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Pembrokeshire

SINGLE INTEGRATED PLAN 2013 - 2018


Pembrokeshire Single Integrated Plan 2013-2018

For a copy of this document in large print, Braille, audio tape or an alternative language please contact Jackie Meskimmon on (01437) 776613. For further information please contact: Marc Forster Partnership and Scrutiny Support Manager Pembrokeshire County Council County Hall Haverfordwest Pembrokeshire SA61 1TP Telephone: (01437) 776300 LSB@pembrokeshire.gov.uk www.pembrokeshirelocalserviceboard.co.uk 5


Contents

1

Frequently Asked Questions

02

Foreword

04

1.

Introduction

05

2.

Vision and framework

06

3.

Children and Families

08

4.

Economy

17

5.

Environment

26

6.

Health, Care and Well-being

36

7.

Safeguarding

45

8.

Safety

51

9.

Monitoring and reviewing this plan

61


Frequently asked questions What is the Single Integrated Plan?

Who has prepared the Single Integrated Plan?

The Single Integrated Plan is the document that will frame public, private and voluntary sector activity in Pembrokeshire over the period 2013-2018. It describes the issues that are important to Pembrokeshire and identifies the approach that a range of organisations will adopt in attempting to tackle them. The Welsh Government requires all Local Authorities to lead the development of a Single Integrated Plan.

This document has been prepared by Pembrokeshire’s Local Service Board (LSB) and its associated partnerships. LSBs have been established in every Local Authority area in Wales with the purpose of providing collaborative leadership and to identify opportunities for service providers to work more closely together. Pembrokeshire’s LSB is made up of senior representatives from Pembrokeshire County Council, Dyfed Powys Police Force, Hywel Dda Health Board, Pembrokeshire Association of Voluntary Services and the Welsh Government. A range of other organisations support the work of the LSB.

Who is the Single Integrated Plan for? The Single Integrated Plan is for everyone who lives in, visits or has an interest in Pembrokeshire. It has been prepared for a range of audiences; for the people of Pembrokeshire, for the organisations that serve Pembrokeshire and as a means of communicating our priorities to external agencies and the Welsh Government.

Pembrokeshire County Council is responsible for supporting the partnerships that have prepared this Plan, but it is important to stress that it is not only a Pembrokeshire County Council Plan. 2


How has the Single Integrated Plan been prepared? In preparing this document we have analysed data from a wide range of sources and brought that information together in a “Single Needs Assessment”. We have also reviewed the other plans and strategies that are important to Pembrokeshire. The final content of the Plan was agreed following consideration of extensive comments received during a three month consultation period on an initial draft Plan. The Plan builds on, and brings together in one document the joint work previously developed through the Community Plan that we published in May 2010, as well as the Community Safety, Children and Young People’s and the Health Social Care and Well-being Partnerships’ plans published in 2011.

How will the Single Integrated Plan be implemented?

How will you know whether or not the Single Integrated Plan has been successful? It is important that we are able to evaluate whether or not this Plan has made a difference. We have set out a range of headline indicators relating to the outcomes identified in this Plan in each of its themed chapters. The LSB will be monitoring these measures on an ongoing basis.

Can I comment on the Single Integrated Plan? Yes, we are always interested to hear your views. It is important that you have your say on the Single Integrated Plan. What do you think of the Plan? Have we identified the right issues? What do you think of our proposals to tackle them? We anticipate being able to publish revisions to the Plan on an ongoing basis. Contact details are provided on page two.

The Single Integrated Plan will only be effectively implemented if the organisations that have contributed to its development choose to reflect its priorities in their own plans, strategies and actions. Indeed many of the organisations concerned have a legal duty to take action in accordance with the Single Integrated Plan. Pembrokeshire LSB’s associated partnerships, which focus on each outcome area, will have a significant role to play in implementing this Plan.

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exist between organisations. However, these relationships are a significant asset. Now, more than ever, we need to work together across traditional organisational and geographical boundaries to ensure that we secure maximum benefit for every pound spent with the aim of improving life in Pembrokeshire.

Foreword I am pleased to introduce the Pembrokeshire Single Integrated Plan for 2013-2018. This Plan replaces the Pembrokeshire Community Plan 2010 - 2025. It reflects the progress that has been made since the Community Planning process started at the beginning of 2000. The relationships that exist between the partner organisations serving Pembrokeshire have always been positive, but it is important that we continue to challenge and hold each other to account. Our Local Service Board – the body that brings together the leaders of the local public and voluntary sectors to take collective action to improve quality of life in Pembrokeshire – was a relatively new development when the last Community Plan was published. Pembrokeshire Local Service Board is focused on being outcome driven. It is able to agree shared priorities and remove potential blockages to progress because it relies on a core group of members. However, it also draws on other organisations with expertise in specific areas as and when this is required.

Cllr. Jamie Adams Chair, Pembrokeshire Local Service Board

We still face significant challenges in Pembrokeshire, all of which are spelt out in detail in this Plan. Our ageing population continues to place significant pressure on our health, social care and voluntary services. Although our economy has continued to perform reasonably well in recent years, the impact of the recession is selfevident in our towns and their surrounding areas. The quality of the local environment and some of the lowest levels of crime and disorder in the country remain significant strengths, but we will need to work hard to ensure this position is sustained.

This combination of issues presents an opportunity to demonstrate the true value of partnership working. By working together we can build on our successes and continue to work towards improving the quality of life for everyone in Pembrokeshire. All of the partners who have supported the development of this Plan are committed to this objective and to embedding the principles of sustainable development into our work.

Although the relationships that exist between organisations are stronger than they have ever been, the challenge we face in seeking to secure a better life for everyone in Pembrokeshire is also greater than ever. Reductions in public spending at a national level are placing considerable pressure on our ability to deliver a shared agenda, and on occasion this will place strain on the relationships that

This plan was finalised by a range of agencies and interested groups following careful consideration of a wide range of comments received during a three month public consultation. On behalf of the partners involved in developing this Plan, I would like to thank all those who took the time to study and comment on the draft plan. 4


Introduction

1.1 The purpose of the Single Integrated Plan is to present a clear picture of how the public, private and voluntary sectors can work together to improve the quality of life for everyone in Pembrokeshire. 1.2 The Single Integrated Plan sets out a long-term vision for the County, based on the shared ambitions of residents, community groups, local leaders and visitors. This vision will drive partnership work over the next 5 years. The Single Integrated Plan is the overarching plan for Pembrokeshire. 1.3 The Plan sets out a series of outcomes, priorities and headline actions. Achieving these outcomes will require partners to work together to identify how best to make a measurable difference to the people of Pembrokeshire. 1.4 It is important to acknowledge the budget pressures that all service providers will face during the period covered by the Single Integrated Plan. This will require innovative thinking and, potentially, tough decisions to be taken regarding resource allocation. 1.5 In developing the Single Integrated Plan we have examined the full breadth of issues facing the County. For example, we have: • analysed information and identified the trends that are important locally, • taken time to understand the concerns of 5

residents, as they are expressed within plans prepared by the community councils and local interest groups, and • reviewed the other plans and strategies that are important in Pembrokeshire. 1.6 Whilst the publication of this Single Integrated Plan is significant, it is important to acknowledge that the true value of community planning lies in the dynamic nature of the process – in keeping the Plan relevant to Pembrokeshire and its people. We hope that the issues identified in this document stimulate further discussion and that we are able to enter into a dialogue with the community regarding the improvements they would like to see implemented. We will be reviewing the content of this Plan regularly and will publish update reports. 1.7 In addition to responding to emerging local needs, partners will also be required to review the content of the Plan to ensure it is able to address changes to National legislation. For example, it will be essential for partners to incorporate the emerging details of the Sustainable Development Bill into their joint action plans during the next few years. 1.8 The priorities and headline actions identified in this Plan will be taken forward by the individual organisations that have supported its development, the LSB and a range of other associated partnerships. It is not our intention to establish additional delivery mechanisms where groups are already in place.


2.1 Our overall aim and vision for Pembrokeshire is, quite simply:

2. Vision and framework

To ensure that Pembrokeshire is prosperous and that it remains vibrant and special 2.2 To achieve this vision, we have developed this Single Integrated Plan as the defining statement of strategic planning intent for Pembrokeshire. This plan replaces the following partnership plans: • The Pembrokeshire Community Plan 2010-2025 • The Children and Young People’s Plan • The Health, Social Care and Well-being Strategy • Safer Pembrokeshire’s Community Safety Strategy 2.3 To develop this plan we have analysed data from a wide range of sources and brought that information together in the form of a Single Needs Assessment1. We have also reviewed the other plans and strategies that are important to Pembrokeshire. 2.4 Our analysis of the data and information in the Needs Assessment has enabled us to identify the following six outcomes that partners have agreed to work towards over the next five years: • Children, young people and families have the opportunity to fulfil their learning potential and to live healthy and happy lives • Pembrokeshire has a competitive, productive and sustainable economy • People in Pembrokeshire enjoy an attractive, sustainable and diverse environment • People in Pembrokeshire are healthier • Children and adults are safeguarded • Communities in Pembrokeshire feel safe Our Single Needs Assessment can be accessed at www.pembrokeshire.gov.uk. For further information please contact us using the details provided on page 2. 1

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2.5 The chapters that follow describe each outcome in turn. They begin by introducing each outcome, summarising the key data and challenges that exist today in order to capture where we are now and identifying the challenges that are likely to become important in Pembrokeshire by 2018. 2.6 Having summarised the challenges that partners will need to address in order to deliver each shared outcome, each chapter then lists the key strategic priorities and headline actions that partners have agreed to focus on over the next five years. The content focuses on high-level, strategic and shared actions. Further detail about what partners are going to do will be developed in joint partnership plans and in individual service plans that will support the delivery of this plan.

“Results Based Accountability�2 principles, we have included a chart for each indicator outlining data over recent years and an indication of what we think will happen in the next few years if we do nothing. The charts also show the difference we will make by delivering this plan.

2.7 While we have identified key priorities for each outcome, it is clear that some actions will contribute to more than one outcome. Cross-cutting issues such as sustainable development, transport, equalities and poverty will require the LSB’s associated partnerships to work together. In recognition of the wider impact that some of our actions will have we have included graphical representations of the extent to which our priorities will contribute to the delivery of each outcome.

2.9 Further details of how we intend to monitor and review the progress of this plan are included at the end of the document.

Results-Based Accountability (RBA) is a disciplined way of planning, delivery and accountability that can be used to improve the quality of life in communities as well as to improve the performance of partnerships and services. RBA is a simple, plain language approach to measurement that puts the focus on the outcomes and impact on communities and service users. 2

2.8 By focusing on an outcomes based approach, partners in Pembrokeshire are demonstrating their commitment to achieving meaningful change. Being able to identify how we know our actions are working is crucial in enabling us to demonstrate success. Each chapter contains a series of headline indicators that will indicate the impact of the joint initiatives. Using

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3. Children & Families

3.1 Introduction 3.1.1 As partners, creating opportunities for children, young people and families to live healthy, happy and fulfilling lives is fundamental to the work we do. Our Single Integrated Plan provides a strategic framework through which partners can shape, target and deliver services designed to ensure that all children, young people and families have their rights protected, their entitlements promoted and the chance to take advantage of all opportunities available to them.

Children, young people and families have the opportunity to fulfil their learning potential and to live healthy and happy lives

3.1.2 A key reference point for us in developing and delivering our priorities is the Welsh Government’s guidance document Children and Young People: Rights to Action, which sets out seven Core Aims designed around entitlements established by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. These Core Aims have been integrated into our delivery plans to ensure we fulfil our commitment to these principles. 3.1.3 Though our aim is to improve outcomes for all children and young people, we will have a particular focus on children and young people living in poverty. In this, we are driven both by the current economic climate, which is making life difficult for many families, and by our statutory responsibilities under the Children and Families (Wales) Measure, Welsh Government’s key piece of legislation designed to tackle issues of child poverty in Wales. In accordance with this legislation, this Single Integrated Plan is also the child poverty strategy for Pembrokeshire. 3.1.4 Our approach is based on the knowledge that it is not possible to effect meaningful change and deliver outcomes which benefit 8


whole populations, such as children and young people, if organisations or agencies work in isolation. No one organisation is responsible for ensuring children, young people and families have the opportunity to fulfil their learning potential and to live healthy and happy lives on their own. Rather, we recognise that we can only work towards realising this outcome if we co-ordinate and deliver services together.

• The proportion of babies who are breast fed at birth has risen from 57% in 2006 to around 60% in 2010. While this is above the Wales figure (53%) it still compares unfavourably with rates in Ceredigion and Carmarthenshire. • Immunisation rates are generally increasing, though second / booster vaccinations remain significantly lower than primary vaccinations. In general, take-up rates are lower in rural areas than urban areas and this might indicate a greater difficulty in accessing services. • The most recent Childcare Sufficiency Assessment found the number of child care places is declining (14.7 per 100 children, an 18% reduction since November 2010). A further area of concern is the uneven distribution of provision, which results in a lack of choice and availability, particularly in the north of the County and some areas in the south. There are also specific gaps around welsh medium provision and availability during holiday periods.

3.2 Where are we now? 3.2.1 The experiences of a child in early years (0-7 years old) are critical to an individual’s overall progress and development. We have given particular significance to the early years health of children and the health of their families. As the evidence suggests, this has a major influence on physical and emotional development, attainment levels, lifestyle choices and future health and well-being. Poor health is also far likelier to be an issue for children and young people living in poverty.

3.2.2 Access to quality learning and training opportunities is vital if children and young people are to reach their full potential. We will strive to deliver services which enable learners from all backgrounds the opportunity to access quality learning opportunities in both formal and non-formal settings.

• The proportion of low birth weight babies (single births under 2.5 kg) provides an indication of general maternal health. The low birth weight of babies is linked to infant mortality and also to a slightly increased risk of developmental complications. Pembrokeshire’s rate was 6.5% in 2010, which was below the Welsh rate of 7%, but higher than rates in our neighbouring areas of Ceredigion (4.9%) and Carmarthenshire (5.5%).

• At present, the Local Authority’s education services for children and young people – as well as its capacity to improve – have been deemed to be unsatisfactory by Estyn. • In 2012, performance in Pembrokeshire’s primary schools did not compare well to similar schools in other authorities. The percentage of learners gaining the Foundation Phase indicator was below the average for Wales. In Key Stage 2, the percentage gaining the core subject indicator was similar to the Wales average, having been above this average in previous years. 9


• Performance in Pembrokeshire’s secondary schools improved at a faster rate in 2012 than the average for Wales. In both Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4, performance compared well in relation to those indicators that included English or Welsh first language and mathematics to schools in other authorities across Wales • In all key stages, more able pupils did not do as well as expected on the higher national curriculum levels and GCSE grades. • When compared to performance levels of similar schools on the free-school-meal benchmarks, performance in Pembrokeshire primary schools was below average in the Foundation Phase and well below average in Key Stage 2. At these Key Stages, too many schools were in the bottom quarter, and performance appears to be deteriorating. • In 2011, the percentage of Pembrokeshire learners leaving school without any recognised qualification was the second worst figure in Wales. Performance had deteriorated on the previous year. • In 2011, though attendance in primary schools was in line with the Wales average when compared to similar schools on the free-schoolmeal benchmarks, about two-thirds of primary schools were in the lower half. • Attendance in secondary schools improved over the last two years and was above the Wales average in 2012. However, in 2011 only one school was in the top quarter, and four were in the lower half when compared with similar schools.

• Pembrokeshire had 10.1% of its population involved in post-16 learning in 2009/10. This was higher than the Wales average of 9.1%, and was the second-best performance among all local authority areas. 3.2.3 We want all children and young people in Pembrokeshire to be safe, to make healthy lifestyle choices and to experience high levels of emotional and physical well-being. We also want to see children and young people who are happy and engaged, eager to make a positive contribution to their communities and actively participating in the issues and decisions and affect them. As partners, we will continue to deliver services which support these aims. • The Welsh Index of Multiple Deprivation Child Index (2011) revealed that Pembrokeshire has areas amongst both the most and least deprived in Wales in the health domain. All of Pembrokeshire’s schools are signed up to the Health Promoting Schools scheme as are many

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population). Participation rates in extra-curricular school and community based sports clubs are around the Wales average.

• •

partners in the pre-school setting. All primary schools menus are compliant with the Appetite for Life initiative. Recorded crime in Pembrokeshire is low compared to Wales as a whole, and incidents of crime with a child victim have remained relatively constant since 2008. Domestic abuse has a major impact on children and young people. National figures suggest that 1 in 4 women will be affected by domestic abuse at some point. As is acknowledged elsewhere in this document, domestic abuse is more of an issue in Pembrokeshire than in the rest of Dyfed Powys Police Force area. The Sandy Bear Bereavement and Loss service supported 197 children and young people experiencing emotional difficulties in 2011-12. In 2011, there were 147 road traffic accidents involving young drivers in Pembrokeshire. In Pembrokeshire’s 0-25 age group, 80% are registered users of Leisure Services, and 18,707 users are in the 0-15 age range. This is the 5th highest participation rate in Wales (per 1,000 11

3.2.4 Living in poverty significantly affects a child’s chances in life, particularly in terms of their aspirations, qualifications, employment prospects and health. The current economic climate is making life even more difficult for many families and the knock-on effects for children and young people’s development are significant at many different levels. We will take action to address the cycle of poverty3. • The Welsh Index of Multiple Deprivation Child Index (2011) revealed that Pembrokeshire has areas amongst both the most and least deprived in Wales in the employment domain and income domain. The percentage of children and young people defined as “living in poverty” is around 20%, slightly below the Wales average. • In 2010, 12.7% of 16-64 year olds in Pembrokeshire had no qualification. • Unemployment rates in Pembrokeshire are broadly in line with figures for Wales as a whole, though the seasonal nature of certain employment sectors means it is subject to significant variation. At the end of 2011, 15.4% of children and young people in Pembrokeshire lived in workless households, compared to a Wales rate of 18.6%. Where children and young people who grow up in poverty are more likely to live in poverty as adults. 3


3.3 Pembrokeshire 2018

3.3.1 In addition to the issues that exist today, this Plan also aims to identify and address challenges that are likely to emerge during its lifetime.

• The Job Seekers Allowance (JSA) claimant rate for 18-24 year olds moves in line with the seasonal variation highlighted above (between 7.5% - 11.5% over the past 12 months) and there has been a substantial upturn in claimants since the start of the recession (though the total number remains below the Wales and UK averages). However, the proportion of families accessing benefits for people in work (e.g. tax credits) is much higher than the Welsh average. • The Pembrokeshire cluster area (which includes the most deprived areas of Haverfordwest, Pembroke and Pembroke Dock) has been awarded funding through the Communities First programme. This initiative supports the most disadvantaged people in our most deprived areas, with the aim of contributing to the alleviation of persistent poverty. In particular, the programme is targeted at narrowing the education / skills, economic and health gaps between our most deprived and more affluent areas.

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3.3.2 For the foreseeable future, our ability to meet the needs of children and young people will be influenced and shaped by the tough economic climate, and the resultant continued pressure on public sector budgets. A further significant factor is the increasing number of elderly people. It is inevitable that increased demand for adult social care provision will have an impact on other services - including those provided to children and young people. 3.3.3 Unless partners develop more collaborative, joinedup and innovative approaches to service delivery in response to these challenging circumstances, the broader damaging effects on children, young people and families as a whole may include: • an increase in the number of families living in poverty, • a heightened risk of children and young people growing up with low levels of general well-being, at greater of risk of poor health, with lower attainment and less aspiration, • the impact of proposed Welfare Reform changes being exacerbated,


3.3.4

A key part of our response to these challenges will be the continued development of integrated services targeted at improving outcomes for the whole family, specifically those that focus on prevention and early intervention.

3.4 What are we going to do?

• children and young people becoming more vulnerable to the impact of crime, both as perpetrators and victims, • an increased risk of family-centred crises e.g. alcohol / substance misuse, domestic abuse / violence, food poverty, fuel poverty, • inequalities in young people’s ability to access service provision being increased, • a reduction in employment opportunities and lowering of income levels, and, • an increasing threat to community cohesion.

3.4.1 Based on the information that is available to us, we have agreed to focus our work on four key priorities: • Pembrokeshire’s children, young people and families have the opportunity to achieve their full potential • Pembrokeshire’s children, young people and families’ safety and well-being is protected and promoted • Pembrokeshire’s children, young people and families’ rights are protected and supported • Pembrokeshire’s children, young people and families are not disadvantaged by poverty

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Children, young people and families in Pembrokeshire have the opportunity to fulfil their learning potential and to live healthy and happy lives

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

PRIORITY

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: Provide support services appropriate to the needs of families Improve the early years health of children and the health of their families

WĞŵďƌŽŬĞƐŚŝƌĞ͛Ɛ ĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶ͕ young people and families have the opportunity to achieve their full potential

Prepare children for lifelong learning Support children and young people throughout their learning to maximise attainment Support children and young people to access their broad entitlement of provision throughout their learning Ensure co-ordinated multi-agency work with children and young people in specific vulnerable groups Safeguard children and young people from harm Improve physical and emotional health for children and young people

PembrokeshiƌĞ͛Ɛ ĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶ͕ LJŽƵŶŐ ƉĞŽƉůĞ ĂŶĚ ĨĂŵŝůŝĞƐ͛ safety and well-being is protected and promoted

Identify and reduce local health inequities Promote the safety of children and young people in the home Promote the safety of children and young people in the community Protect children and young people from the harm and impact of substance misuse Provide housing opportunities to meet the needs of young people

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Children, young people and families in Pembrokeshire have the opportunity to fulfil their learning potential and to live healthy and happy lives

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

PRIORITY

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: Deliver co-ordinated multi-agency action to ensure the broad aims of the Child Poverty Strategy for Wales are implemented and embraced

PembrokeshŝƌĞ͛Ɛ ĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶ͕ young people and families are not disadvantaged by poverty

Support parents of children and young people in vulnerable groups to take advantage of opportunities to increase and retain household income Support children, young people and their parents to maximise opportunities for paid employment

PembrokeshirĞ͛Ɛ ĐŚŝůĚƌĞn, young ƉĞŽƉůĞ ĂŶĚ ĨĂŵŝůŝĞƐ͛ rights are protected and supported

Ensure that the delivery of our services is based on a shared commitment to respect, value and engage with children and young people Provide information for children, young people and families through a range of media Encourage and support children and young people to be involved in decisions that affect them Provide advocacy services for children and young people Support the development of volunteering opportunities for children and young l Promote sport, play and active lifestyles Increase levels of cultural and social activities for children and young people

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3.5 How will we know if this is working? 3.5.1 We will measure our progress against the range of headline indicators shown below. These indicators have been chosen because, when viewed collectively, they provide a balanced picture of quality of life in Pembrokeshire. By working together our aim is to ‘turn the curve’ and improve Pembrokeshire’s performance. The black dotted line represents the difference we aim to achieve by delivering this Plan. Number of childcare places in Pembrokeshire

Live births w ith low birthweight 3500

9.00% 3250

8.50% 8.00%

3000

7.50% 2750

7.00% 6.50%

2500

6.00% 2250

5.50% 5.00%

2000

4.50% 1750

4.00% 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Wales

2006

2007

2008

Ceredigion

2009

2010

Pembrokeshire

2011

2012

2013

2014 1500

Carmarthenshire

2006

2007

KS4 Level 2 incl English/Welsh & Maths

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

% of new young people NEET

65.00%

7.0% 6.5%

60.00%

6.0% 5.5%

55.00% 5.0%

4.5% 50.00% 4.0% 3.5%

45.00%

3.0% 40.00%

2.5% 2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Pembrokeshire

2011/12

2012/13

2013/13

2006

Wales

2007

2008

2009 Year 11

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Year 13

% Children in Workless Families 19 18 17 16 15

Data Development Agenda: Develop measures to assess the impact of child poverty

14 13 12 11 10

9 Feb-08

Feb-09

Feb-10

Feb-11

Feb-12

Pembrokeshire

Feb-13

Feb-14

Feb-15

Wales

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4. Economy

4.1 Introduction

Pembrokeshire has a competitive, productive and sustainable economy

4.1.1 The Single Integrated Plan has been developed during a time of continuing global economic uncertainty. The UK’s economy is forecast to grow significantly slower than over the last decade. 4.1.2 The changes in the global economy present new challenges. The population is ageing and the age of retirement is rising, changing the characteristics of the labour market. New emerging markets provide opportunities for exports but also present competition. Consumers are expecting faster response times and increased customisation. Traditional industries such as manufacturing and construction have had to evolve new, more efficient, more creative methods, considering the “whole life” impact of manufacture and disposal. 4.1.3 Pembrokeshire’s economy reflects its peripheral geography, which is both an opportunity and a barrier. The County benefits from an outstanding natural environment, comparatively low unemployment rates, comparatively high employment rates (especially self-employment) and good deep water access for shipping, which has attracted the developments in the energy sector. 4.1.4 Much of Pembrokeshire’s success in recent years can be attributed to the developments in the energy sector and the ripple effect in the supply chain. There are likely to be further developments in this sector over the next 10 years, including 17


combined heat and powered generation, wind, wave and tidal development. 4.1.5 The priorities for developing the economy in Pembrokeshire are set in the context of Welsh Government and UK Government policies. Greater productivity, strong employment prospects and a dynamic and highly skilled workforce must be the focus of partners if we are to achieve a better standard of living for the people of Pembrokeshire within this National context.

4.2 Where are we now? 4.2.1 To develop the economy in Pembrokeshire, we will focus on helping people achieve the learning, skills and confidence to improve their employment prospects. The working age population in Pembrokeshire needs support, in the first instance to access employment and then to progress to higher value employment. • Historically, Pembrokeshire has experienced high unemployment rates especially in key settlements like Pembroke Dock and Milford Haven. By June 2007, the rate had fallen to 1.3% in Pembrokeshire, when the Welsh average stood at 2.1% and the UK at 2.2%. Unemployment has increased since this date (to 3.6% in January 2013, compared to 4.2% in Wales and 3.8% in the UK) but has remained below the Welsh average. However, the rate of increase in

Pembrokeshire has been faster than the average. Of those in employment, Pembrokeshire has a higher rate of part time workers, 31.2% compared to a Wales average figure of 27.8% and a UK average of 27.1%. Another labour market concern is the level of youth unemployment. The level in Pembrokeshire is 8.1%, below the Welsh average figure of 8.2% but some way ahead of the UK average at 7.0%. The profile of unemployment reflects peaks in construction and shutdowns at refineries, which are exacerbating local factors. • Skills for employment are not the same as qualifications. Three times more Pembrokeshire businesses have indicated that they found a lack of skills to be more of a challenge to recruitment than a lack of qualifications. The skills of the workforce need to be refreshed and they need to reflect the changing demands of the economy. A recent Pembrokeshire business survey found that four out of five businesses do not have formal processes in place to train and develop their workforce, and very few of these businesses plan to change their approach during the next year.

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• Pembrokeshire’s relatively high rates of selfemployment could lead to conclusions that formal qualifications may be less important than entrepreneurial drive. However, it may also be the case that Pembrokeshire is not exploiting the key growth areas that are dependent on high levels of qualification. 4.2.2 Pembrokeshire relies upon small and medium sized enterprises to drive its economy. We are committed to helping to ensure that successful businesses grow, prosper and employ. • Pembrokeshire has over 12,375 registered businesses. Of these, 11,650 or 94.1% employ less than 10 people. Of the workforce, 12% are self employed. Currently Pembrokeshire has the 3rd highest business density (number of firms per 10,000 working aged population) in Wales (650); the Welsh average is 464. It is also evident that, when it comes to size of business, micro is the norm in Pembrokeshire, as it is for many rural areas. The average business in Pembrokeshire 19

had 3.3 employees in 2011, which was a third smaller than the average Welsh business. • The number of business births gives an indication of the entrepreneurial culture of an area and of its growth potential. It is often cited as an important statistic in assessing the performance of the economy and the likelihood that this performance will be sustained. Business births are often assessed in comparison with the adult population of an area. In 2005, Pembrokeshire had the highest rate of business births per 10,000 working age population (81) of any Local Authority in Wales. In 2010, the figure dropped significantly to 39 per 10,000 working aged population. Over the same period, the business death rate per 10,000 of working age population rose from 66 to 72. • The agricultural, food and tourism sectors are significant employers in the County and have concentrated local supply chains. Tourism alone provides approximately 14,180 full time jobs directly. These industries rely heavily upon the quality of the natural environment to develop their products and services. The jobs in these sectors tend to be lower paid, part time and seasonal. • The Bridge Innovation Centre in Pembroke Dock demonstrates our commitment to developing high skilled knowledge led businesses. The focus and investment on the development of the knowledge economy is predicated on the need to diversify from low value added jobs. Our support for knowledge based business is set against the backdrop of the lack of a significant higher education institution in the County.


• Public sector spending cuts have had an impact on the third sector. In order to combat reductions in income and activity, the third sector and social enterprises need support to diversify their income opportunities. Pembrokeshire has a number of successful social enterprises. 4.2.3 To help the economy access new market opportunities we aim to provide infrastructure and investment to support a dynamic and prosperous economy. • European funding provides vitally important support for economic development efforts in Pembrokeshire. Between 2007 and 2012, investment from the European Regional Development Fund and the European Social Fund amounted to over £76m in the County. In addition, Pembrokeshire benefits from Rural Development Plan for Wales funding and the European Fisheries Fund. These funds are used to part finance projects and initiatives to promote 20

business competitiveness, develop skills, provide services to rural communities and tackle unemployment and poverty. • The County’s retail centres provide an important element of our economic infrastructure, but the outlook for our town centres is mixed. Changing shopping habits, as well as local constraints on the physical layout of our towns, represent significant challenges. Data on vacant commercial property presents a partial picture, as it is the quality of the retail offer that concerns local people and visitors as much as the number of vacant units. Across the County, vacancy rates in town centres average 14.5%, this compares with an average vacancy rate of just under 15% across the UK. Locally, rates vary from less than 4% in Narberth to nearly 20% in Milford Haven. We are working hard to ensure our principle settlements complement each other more effectively. • There has been a period of sustained investment in the energy sector over the last five years. This is likely to continue, with a proposal for a combined heat and power plant at the South Hook LNG site. There is also significant interest in renewable energy projects, including field scale solar power installations, wave and tidal energy and off shore wind turbines. • In recent years, the energy sector has invested over £3 billion in Pembrokeshire. This has resulted in an improvement in average wage levels and employment rates in the County. The sector provides 2500 direct jobs and benefits supply chain and service businesses.


Pembrokeshire’s facilities provide 25% of the UK gas and oil supply and contribute over £2 billion a year in taxes. The importance of this contribution was recognised in April 2012, when the Haven was awarded Enterprise Zone status by the Welsh Government. • Proposed marina and harbour developments in Pembroke Dock, Milford Haven, and Fishguard represent an investment in high value recreation provision. This provides opportunities for higher value tourism, as well as a range of broader supply chain opportunities such as marine engineering, port and rail development and housing. The standard of port infrastructure provides opportunities to support the deployment of energy projects in wave and tidal energy and offshore wind. An additional market for the ports is the growing cruise sector. However, port infrastructure will need to improve further if we are to capitalise on this trend. • Investment in the road network is still seen as a priority for the Pembrokeshire economy. Some

improvements have been made to the A40 at Robeston Wathen, with further improvements planned for Llandewi Velfrey and the A477. Work on the “Southern Strategic Route” and the new Bulford Road is underway. • The Welsh Government and BT have recently agreed an investment programme to deliver ‘Next Generation’4 broadband to 96% of homes and businesses in Wales by 2015. Enterprise Zones will be amongst the first areas to benefit from this investment. Given the rural nature of much of Pembrokeshire, it is likely that many homes and businesses will remain in the 4% that don’t benefit from this project. The Welsh Government Broadband Support Scheme is an attempt to address this by funding local projects, such as the Treleddyd Fawr Community Broadband project. Pembrokeshire County Council is currently delivering community broadband solutions by upgrading ICT infrastructure to address slow and not spots. Next generation broadband is also referred to as ‘super fast’ broadband or ‘high-speed’ broadband. Next generation broadband is able to offer much greater bandwidth, typically up to three times faster than basic broadband, meaning faster website downloads. 4

21


4.3 Pembrokeshire 2018 • comparatively low numbers of people with skills at level 3 and above, • providing skills development in the right format for employers, • using decreasing levels of European funding as a catalyst to strengthen the economy, • supporting citizens with the introduction of the Welfare Reform Act, • the changing role of our town centres, • developing a culture of innovation, enterprise and employment, and • maximising the opportunities of Enterprise Zone status.

4.3.1 In addition to the issues that exist today, this Plan also aims to identify and address challenges that are likely to emerge during its lifetime. 4.3.2 For the foreseeable future, our ability to ensure Pembrokeshire has a competitive, productive and sustainable economy will be influenced by the tough economic climate, and the resultant pressure applied to public sector budgets. We must ensure that we plan for the long term, whilst reacting to the challenges of the current economic climate. 4.3.3 The key additional challenges to address over the next few years include:

4.4 What are we going to do?

• low rates of GVA/GDP growth and jobless growth, • dependency on a limited number of sectors to generate jobs and a relatively limited choice of jobs or opportunities to progress, • a comparatively large proportion of households where people are low paid and in part time work, • fewer skilled jobs in the professional / associate professional categories,

4.4.1 Based on the information that is available to us, we have agreed to focus our work on three key priorities: • People with the learning, skills and confidence to improve their employment prospects • Successful businesses which grow, prosper and employ • Infrastructure and investment to support a dynamic and prosperous economy 22


Pembrokeshire has a competitive, productive and sustainable economy

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

PRIORITY

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: Develop and deliver employment initiatives Develop initiatives to support labour market intelligence and future skills

People with the learning, skills and confidence to improve their employment prospects

Reduce barriers to work Support key sector skills development Target development of Science Technology Engineering and Maths initiatives Deliver leadership and management skills Promote and support start up, small and medium sized enterprises Promote entrepreneurial activity in schools and college Develop the use of community benefit clauses in public sector contracts

Successful business which grow, prosper and employ

Promote Pembrokeshire as the energy capital of the UK Provide support to the food, tourism and agricultural sectors Increase the quality and variety of the tourism offer through the Destination Partnership Support new and existing social enterprises

23


Pembrokeshire has a competitive, productive and sustainable economy

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

PRIORITY

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: Improve access, speed and connectivity to mobile and broadband Promote the development of our town and village centres

Infrastructure and investment to support a dynamic and prosperous economy

Support port, marina and cruise developments Develop the Bridge Innovation Centre as a hub for innovation in business Support the delivery of the Enterprise Zone Pursue development of our strategic employment sites

24


4.5 How will we know if this is working? 4.5.1 We will measure our progress against the range of headline indicators shown below. These indicators have been chosen because, when viewed collectively, they provide a balanced picture of quality of life in Pembrokeshire. By working together our aim is to ‘turn the curve’ and improve Pembrokeshire’s performance. The black dotted line represents the difference we aim to achieve by delivering this Plan. Number of active businesses

Employment in Pembrokeshire

6500 80 6000 70 5500 60 5000 50 4500

40

4000

30

3500

20

3000

10 0

Mar 2006 Jun 2006 Sep 2006 Dec 2006 Mar 2007 Jun 2007 Sep 2007 Dec 2007 Mar 2008 Jun 2008 Sep 2008 Dec 2008 Mar 2009 Jun 2009 Sep 2009 Dec 2009 Mar 2010 Jun 2010 Sep 2010 Dec 2010 Mar 2011 Jun 2011 Sep 2011 Dec 2011 Mar 2012 Sep 2012 Mar 2013 Sep 2013 Mar 2014 Sep 2014 Mar 2015 Sep 2015 Mar 2016 Sep 2016 Mar 2017 Sep 2017

2500 2000 2008

2009

2010

2011

Ceredigion

2012

Pembrokeshire

2013

2014

2015

2016

Carmarthenshire

% aged 16-64 in Employment

5

Headline GVA per head at current basic prices

% aged 16-64 who are employees

% aged 16-64 self-employed

JSA claimant count as a % 16-64 population 7.0

25 000

6.0 20 000

5.0 4.0

15 000 3.0 2.0

10 000

1.0 5 000 0.0

0 1997

1998

1999

South West Wales

5

2000

2001

2002

2003

West Wales and The Valleys

2004

2005

Wales

2006

2007

2008

2009

Carmarthenshire

UNITED KINGDOM

There is no Pembrokeshire data available at present.

25

Ceredigion

Pembrokeshire

Wales


5. Environment

5.1 Introduction

People in Pembrokeshire enjoy an attractive, sustainable and diverse environment

5.1.1 Learning to live sustainably and protecting our environment is critical to the future health and prosperity of Pembrokeshire and its people. It is widely recognised that a healthy and diverse natural environment is an important contribution to quality of life and is also a key factor in sustaining economic growth. 5.1.2 While the importance of our environment is recognised, it is clear that the way we are currently exploiting the natural world and using its resources is not sustainable. We cannot continue to consume materials at the present rate, otherwise future generations will face serious problems and a lack of natural resources. Instead, we must learn to respect and live within our environmental limits. 5.1.3 The Welsh Government is currently consulting on its proposed Sustainable Development Bill, which is intended to place sustainable development at the heart of all public service decision making and delivery. We will work within this emerging framework to ensure our work supports the environmental well-being of our citizens. Proposals for a Planning Bill, an Environment Bill and a Heritage Bill are all likely to come to fruition during the lifespan of this Plan and all have the potential to contribute to its outcomes.

26


• In future, there will need to be a holistic ecosystem approach to land management which balances the use of natural resources with conservation needs. This approach will need to take into account issues such as climate change, by maintaining a connected system of open spaces to give habitats and species every opportunity to adapt to its impact. • The Environment Agency Wales (EAW), Countryside Council for Wales (CCW), Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority (PCNPA) and Pembrokeshire County Council have each consistently met the targets set by Welsh Government to reduce CO2. Each organisation is committed to meeting or exceeding all future targets. • CCW and PCNPA have each attained Green Dragon accreditation for effective environmental management and are considering options to pursue ISO 14001 and BS 8555 respectively. EAW has attained EMAS accreditation. Each organisation has implemented a number of sustainability initiatives including upgrading building insulation, installing energy efficiency controls, making greater use of renewable energy, reducing car travel, switching to bio-fuels and local purchasing. • The number of solar panels installed on private dwellings and the appearance of wind turbines across the County is a clear indication that individuals and the private sector are investing in renewable energy initiatives. Onshore and offshore renewable energy installations will increasingly feature in the Pembrokeshire landscape. • Organisations in Pembrokeshire have worked together to ensure Welsh Government targets for recycling have been met by providing kerbside collection services and by creating safe and attractive recycling points. Currently, 54% of waste is diverted for reuse, recycling or composting.

5.2 Where are we now? 5.2.1 Climate change cannot be tackled effectively by working in isolation - it impacts on all of us, and across geographical and organisational boundaries. We must work together to devise strategies that will help mitigate its impact. Our response will continue to include improving waste and recycling facilities, reducing carbon emissions and promoting innovative solutions to the challenges we face. • Met Office statistics show a general warming of the UK climate since 1960 and climate modelling predicts this trend will continue. The UK Government has stated that climate change is one of the most serious threats facing the world, and anticipates that average global temperatures may rise between 1.1°C and 6.4°C above 1990 levels by the end of this century. • The Welsh Government consultation document ‘A Living Wales: Natural Environment Framework’ sets out proposals to ensure that Wales has increasingly resilient and diverse ecosystems that deliver economic, environmental and social benefits. They include viewing the environment as a whole system and implementing a single risk-based spatial planning process.

27


• Local organisations reuse or recycle large quantities of furniture, clothes and other items. For example in 2011/12 Pembrokeshire FRAME Ltd reused and recycled 430 tonnes of furniture, clothes and other household items, which represented 2.43% of the total recycling recorded by the County Council. Charity shops also make a significant contribution, although this information is not recorded. Based on national statistics, it is estimated that charity shops could be contributing a further 4.3% ‘hidden’ recycling. • The National Park Authority and the County Council have both recognised the need for the development of good quality affordable housing and have supported appropriate sustainable building design standards. • Partners work to raise awareness on a range of environmental issues with the private sector and the public. Engagement methods used include tailored educational programmes aimed at all age groups, the provision of advice to businesses on resource use and low carbon initiatives, or arranging events focussing on the natural or historical environment. • A partnership including Welsh Government, the County Council, CCW, EAW, Network Rail, National Trust, the Country Land Business Association and PCNPA has developed a Shoreline Management Plan which identifies risks to communities, business, infrastructure and habitats resulting from climate change and rising sea levels. The plan also proposes actions to mitigate the threats through effective partnership working.

5.2.2 The outstanding natural environment of Pembrokeshire is one of our greatest assets. One third of the County is protected by National Park status and the number and size of nature conservation designations is a clear recognition of its importance in terms of biodiversity and geology. • Pembrokeshire’s natural assets make it an important holiday destination. Tourism is a key industry estimated to contribute nearly £570 million to the local economy and supporting more than 16,000 jobs directly and indirectly. • A wide range of organisations and individuals contribute to the management of the natural environment through partnership working. This includes agri-environment schemes, managing designated sites, working on large land management projects, managing national nature reserves, working with landowners, river management, and working in partnership with industry (e.g. Milford Haven Waterway Environmental Surveillance group).

28


• As planning authorities, Pembrokeshire County Council and Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority have each produced a Local Development Plan (LDP) which establishes the strategies and policies to guide the use and development of land in Pembrokeshire up to 2021. Each plan specifically recognises the importance of the natural and historical environment and includes clear policies intended to protect and maintain the distinctive character of the County. • We recognise the value of our historic environment and its importance in helping to understand our past and preserve our unique cultural heritage. Equally, we recognise that the quality of the built environment has a direct impact on the quality of people’s lives. A wide range of organisations and individuals work together to interpret and preserve the special qualities and distinctive character of Pembrokeshire, and to make it accessible to a wider audience. 29

• PLANED, a community-led partnership, works throughout Pembrokeshire to deliver projects that have cultural, social, economic and environmental benefits for local people and which have a particular focus on sustainability. • The Pembrokeshire Biodiversity Partnership is responsible for delivering the Local Biodiversity Action Plan (LBAP). The plan sets out strategies to deal with a range of environmental challenges, including the improvement of freshwater, coastal and inland environments, habitat restoration and recreation and species protection. • We take pride in the quality of our environment. An independent assessment of Pembrokeshire has judged that 98.8% percentage of highways and relevant land are maintained to a high or acceptable standard of cleanliness. Pembrokeshire has 12 Blue Flag beaches (more than any other part of the UK), 1 Green Flag country park, and more than 50 Coast and Seaside Awards – the most in Wales. 5.2.3

Reliable access to infrastructure assets such as roads, electricity, ICT, water and sewerage is a necessity for modern society. As Pembrokeshire is a rural county, we need to continue maintaining and enhancing the necessary communication infrastructure and capacity which enables people to access local services. In doing so, we will also support the long term vibrancy of our communities by creating local employment opportunities. Transport is a particularly important issue for people and our challenge is to try and reduce reliance on single occupancy car travel.


• The LDPs that cover Pembrokeshire have identified sustainability as a key priority. The strategy for future development is strongly influenced by the availability of existing services, employment opportunities and the capacity of the existing transport infrastructure. • Local authorities use a variety of methods to publicise and advise on access to the paths and bridleways in their care, and maintain numerous sites and car parks that give access to popular walks and beaches. In addition to providing opportunities for sustainable transport on foot and bicycle, our network of public rights of way has an economic significance for the tourism industry. Public rights of way also provide opportunities for recreation and healthy exercise. • The LDPs support walking and cycling as sustainable alternative forms of travel within Pembrokeshire, both as leisure activities and as convenient and environmentally friendly methods of travel for shorter journeys. Since 2001, £5,306,000 has been invested in 26 improvement 30

schemes across the County to provide safe routes in communities, particularly to schools. Road safety training to national standards is available to all primary school children (and to adults on request). • Transport provision in a rural county like Pembrokeshire is a complex cross-cutting issue influencing all the outcomes of the Single Integrated Plan but particularly those relating to Economy and Health. The accessibility and affordability of public, private and community transport profoundly affects the options available to many residents in terms of access to services, employment opportunities and leisure. Low population density and resource constraints make innovation and flexibility in transport provision a necessity, particularly for those with low incomes seeking employment, or for those with health and mobility issues needing to access services. • Public transport use is widely promoted and both the National Park Authority and County Council support the Coastal Bus Service, which provides access to all parts of the coast using a fleet of wheelchair accessible vehicles. • The three railway lines in Pembrokeshire provide links to the national rail network and provide some local commuting opportunities. However, buses are the principal form of public transport used, although regular frequent services are limited to the principal road network. The use of public transport for travel to work is limited (3.01% for buses and 0.38% for rail) compared with 65% of people who travel to work by car.


Private vehicles remain the principal form of transport and highway infrastructure is the single most important factor affecting travel to work. • The use of voluntary community transport services helps those who do not have access to their own transport and who do not have, or cannot use, conventional public transport services. In addition, a range of mobile provision offers valued services to people in their own homes, helping to support independent living and combating rural isolation. • Since 2010, the Hywel Dda Health Board and the County Council has employed a full-time transport officer to develop non-emergency transport options for patients. In Pembrokeshire, during the 2011/12 financial year 1,584 patient journeys were made in County Council minibuses, at an average cost of £26.68. The average cost of these journeys by ambulance would have been £41.99. During the same period, 674 patient journeys were made in community transport

vehicles, at an average cost of £6.00 per journey. Together, these initiatives saved more than £51,000. • Pembrokeshire is remote from the main urban conurbations of South Wales and road links to and within Pembrokeshire are limited, with no motorway or dual carriageways despite being one of the main transport routes to the Republic of Ireland. Nevertheless, the highway infrastructure is extensive, consisting of 175 miles of A-rated trunk and principal roads and more than 1,400 miles of other roads covering the sparsely populated countryside. The condition of highways in Pembrokeshire is comparable with other authorities, with 6.3% of A-roads assessed as being in poor condition, which is close to the Welsh average of 6%.

31


5.3.4 Energy, fuel and food prices will increase which will: • have a disproportionately negative effect on a remote rural area like Pembrokeshire, • put greater financial strain on households and cause hardship to those on low or fixed incomes, • make it harder for rural businesses to compete, and • make more bus services unsustainable.

5.3 Pembrokeshire 2018 5.3.1 In addition to the issues that exist today, this Plan also aims to identify and address challenges that are likely to emerge during its lifetime. 5.3.2 The Department of Energy and Climate Change has identified a number of probable impacts resulting from climate change including: • more frequent extreme weather events resulting in floods and droughts, • damaging effects to human and animal health, • the increasing scarcity of food and water, • the long-term irreversible rise of sea levels, and • increased threat to infrastructure which could: o displace people and disrupt services and communication, and o damage or destroy assets such as roads, railways, electricity supplies.

5.4 What are we going to do? 5.4.1 Based on the information that is available to us we have agreed to focus our work on three key priorities: • Pembrokeshire will address the challenge of climate change • The quality of Pembrokeshire’s environment will be protected and improved • Pembrokeshire will have good communication links to and within the County

5.3.3 Meeting the requirements of EU, UK and Welsh Government legislation will mean: • increasing the amount of waste that must be recycled and composted, and • reducing the carbon footprint of organisations and activities.

32


People in Pembrokeshire enjoy an attractive, sustainable and diverse environment

PRIORITY

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: Meet Welsh Government recycling /composting targets Meet Welsh Government carbon reduction targets

Pembrokeshire will address the challenge of climate change

Promote sustainability through a comprehensive education programme Create resilient communities able to cope with climate change Use the LDP to promote sustainable development Promote low impact economic activity in local communities Enhance ƚŚĞ ƋƵĂůŝƚLJ ŽĨ WĞŵďƌŽŬĞƐŚŝƌĞ͛Ɛ ďĞĂĐŚĞƐ and bathing water Safeguard the biodiversity of Pembrokeshire

dŚĞ ƋƵĂůŝƚLJ ŽĨ WĞŵďƌŽŬĞƐŚŝƌĞ͛Ɛ environment will be protected and improved

Work to eradicate non-native invasive weeds Improve air quality and ensure the good ecological status of water bodies WƌŽƚĞĐƚ WĞŵďƌŽŬĞƐŚŝƌĞ͛Ɛ ŚŝƐƚŽƌŝĐĂů ĂŶĚ ŶĂƚƵƌĂů ĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚ

33


People in Pembrokeshire enjoy an attractive, sustainable and diverse environment

PRIORITY

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: Lobby for and promote the use of improved ICT systems Maintain footpaths and bridleways to a good standard

Pembrokeshire will have good communication links to and within the County

Promote walking and cycling as sustainable forms of travel Integrate bus, rail, cycling and walking services and infrastructure Promote and support affordable and accessible public transport Promote and support community transport initiatives Maintain roads to a good standard

34


5.5 How will we know if this is working? 5.5.1 We will measure our progress against the range of headline indicators shown below. These indicators have been chosen because, when viewed collectively, they provide a balanced picture of quality of life in Pembrokeshire. By working together our aim is to ‘turn the curve’ and improve Pembrokeshire’s performance. The black dotted line represents the difference we aim to achieve by delivering this Plan. Percentage CO2 reduction

Public Rights of Way that are easy to use

45.00% 100%

40.00%

90%

35.00%

80%

30.00% Axis Title

70%

25.00% 60%

20.00% 50%

15.00%

40%

10.00%

30%

5.00%

20%

0.00%

10%

Actual Reduction

Pembrokeshire

Target Reduction

A-Roads in poor condition

Carmarthenshire

Ceredigion

Wales

Streets cleaned to a high or acceptable standard 100.00%

9.50%

99.00%

8.50%

98.00% 7.50% 97.00% 6.50% 96.00% 5.50% 95.00% 4.50% 94.00% 3.50% 93.00%

2.50% 2007-08

2008-09

Wales

2009-10

Pembrokeshire

Carmarthenshire

2010-11

92.00%

2011-12

2005/06

Ceredigion

2006/07

2007/08 Pembrokeshire

2008/09 Carmarthenshire

2009/10

2010/11

Ceredigion

Waste Disposal 60,000

50,000

40,000

Data Development Agenda: Develop measures to assess the state of biodiversity in Pembrokeshire

30,000

20,000

10,000

0

Landfill

Recycled

Composted

Landfill Allowance

35


6. Health, Care & Well-being

6.1 Introduction

6.1.1 It is widely recognised that health is affected by many factors. At an individual level there are fixed biological factors, such as age, sex and genetic make-up, and potentially modifiable lifestyle factors such as smoking, diet and exercise. At a higher level are the wider determinants that influence health, directly or indirectly, including environmental, social and economic factors.

People in Pembrokeshire are healthier

6.1.2 It has long been acknowledged that improving health and well-being is not something any one organisation can do alone. Organisations working in partnership can deliver better outcomes than when they work separately. That is why Pembrokeshire County Council and Hywel Dda Health Board have worked together with partners in the voluntary sector, Public Health Wales and the wider community to focus on this outcome. We have a responsibility to work together to address the range of components of good health and ensure that everybody is as healthy as they can be. 6.1.3 We also have a role to play as individuals; we must take a greater responsibility for our own health. This sense of responsibility needs to be encouraged in the wider community – however, encouraging individuals to adopt healthier lifestyles could prove to be a significant challenge.

36


relevance to the provision of health and social care services, as these services are more likely to be needed by this age group.

6.2 Where are we now?

• In 2001, just under 9% of the population were aged 75 and over. In 2011, this rose to 10% and by 2021 it is projected to be 13%. This equates to over 50% increase in the number of people aged 75 and over between 2001 and 2021. • The number of people in Pembrokeshire receiving adult social services has increased significantly (by around 30%) since 2007. Most of this increase has been amongst those aged 65 and over. This increase in demand on limited resources will necessitate a review of what services we provide, how we provide them and to whom we can provide them. • The number of 18+ customers in receipt of services has increased by 36% since 2009/10. Customers are also choosing to receive care at home with domiciliary care increasingly seen as an alternative to care home provision. • The increase in the number of older people is likely to be associated with a rise in age-related chronic conditions, such as circulatory and respiratory diseases and cancers. In 2010, the highest causes of death in Wales were diseases of the circulatory system (33%), cancer (28%) and diseases of the respiratory system (14%). • The health needs of people have changed since existing community services were designed some 10 to 15 years ago. The challenge now is to develop responsive 24 hour health and social care services that support vulnerable groups and keep people out of inappropriate institutional settings. Through the development of targeted interventions, services are now being provided to support people in the community for longer. Figures show that, currently, 94.8% of social care customers aged 18+ and 90.45% of customers aged 65+ are supported in the community.

6.2.1 Life expectancy within the County is increasing. The life expectancy for men in Pembrokeshire is close to the Wales average and has steadily increased in line with the all-Wales figure (an increase of 4% for life expectancy at birth over a decade). Life expectancy for women is slightly above the Wales average and has increased in line with the Wales average (2.9% over a decade). As life expectancy continues to increase, it is important to note that a number of these additional years of life could be spent in less favourable health or in prolonged periods of poor health and dependence. 6.2.2 With the increase in life expectancy there has been a population shift, with older people now making up a larger proportion of the population. The most significant demographic changes seen to date, and projected to continue, relate to an increase in the numbers of older people in the County. In 2001, about 19% of the population was aged 65 and over. By 2011, this had increased to 22%. The proportion of the oldest people within the 65 and over age group is also increasing, which has particular

37


• According to the results of the Welsh Health Survey 2010/11, 9% of the adult population is currently being treated for a mental illness. It is estimated that 1,846 people age 65+ have early onset dementia. • We recognise that people will require access to different types of services at different points in their lives. These services will differ in nature and will need to respond to changes in need, from critical and substantial through to moderate or low. The provider of the services will also change accordingly. 6.2.3

People’s health behaviours are widely known to affect their health and risk of mortality, with a healthy, balanced diet and regular physical activity being essential components of healthy living. Smoking, poor diet and excessive consumption of alcohol all have a major impact on health and often lead to people suffering from long term illness and premature death. Evidence suggests that individuals are increasingly participating in these negative behaviours, resulting in poor health outcomes.

limit on at least one day in the past week, including 22% who reported binge drinking. The all-Wales figures were 44% and 27% respectively. • Obesity rates are escalating, with an increase of around 20% in a decade, with rates for the County being close or above the Wales average. Recent Welsh Health Survey figures suggest around 22% of adults in Pembrokeshire are obese. Obesity increases the risk of developing a wide range of chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases including stroke. It can also impair a person’s well-being and quality of life. • Levels of physical activity have remained relatively stable, with around 3 in 10 adults reporting 5 or more active days a week in 2011. However, around 3 in 10 adults reported they had not participated in any physical activity during the previous week.

• Overall smoking rates amongst adults in Pembrokeshire declined from 26% in 2003/04 to 24% (slightly higher than the all-Wales figure of 23%). However, smoking remains the greatest single cause of avoidable mortality in Wales. • The 2011 Welsh Health Survey data confirms that 39% of Pembrokeshire adults reported consuming alcohol above the recommended daily 38


6.2.4

Inequities in health are more than a technical or academic issue; they are differences that can greatly affect a person’s life. Inequities are the result of many factors such as poverty, geographic location, culture and lifestyle. Although some of these are things we cannot change, much of the difference in health between different parts of our society is avoidable. • The association between socioeconomic deprivation and poor health outcomes is wellestablished. This has the potential to have a negative impact on community cohesion. It is evident from the Welsh Index of Multiple Deprivation (WIMD) summary report that deprivation in Pembrokeshire is not as prevalent compared to the rest of Wales, and that the pockets that do exist are almost exclusively concentrated in the urban parts of the County. Pembrokeshire has comparatively few deprived 39

areas. Fewer than 5% of the residents live in communities that fall within the 10% most deprived areas of Wales. • It has long been recognised that carers (unpaid relatives, friends and neighbours) are increasingly providing a significant proportion of care, helping people to remain living at home. It is also recognised that caring for others can have a detrimental impact on health and well-being. According to the 2011 Census, there were a total of 15,195 carers in Pembrokeshire, which represented 12% of the population. • Our communities are often vulnerable to prohibitive transport costs and availability. The provision of a well-coordinated transport network with options to meet the needs of people in rural areas is crucial. People without transport remain geographically isolated, unable to access services, activities and job opportunities. Eleven percent of households in rural Wales do not own or have the use of a motor vehicle. People on low incomes and people over the age of 65 years make up a high proportion of this category. • In addition to facing difficulties accessing health services, individuals who cannot readily access transport often miss out on attending social and recreational activities. This isolates the individual and can adversely impact on their health and well-being. • There is growing awareness of how health and housing interlink and the importance of how good housing can influence the physical, mental and social well-being of individuals and communities.


It is also recognised that a stable home environment can lead to improved educational and employment opportunities. It is important to provide appropriate, affordable housing to meet the housing needs of vulnerable people and provide the choice and support to allow them to live within their local community wherever possible. • There is a lack of affordable housing in Pembrokeshire. Increases in house prices since 2001 mean that buying a house is beyond the reach of most households that don’t currently own a home. In 2011, the median house price in Pembrokeshire was £152,500, and the lower quartile house price £117,000. During the same year, the median household income was £23,430 - a housing affordability ratio of 5:1.

40

6.3

Pembrokeshire 2018

6.3.1

In addition to the issues that exist today, this Plan also aims to identify and address challenges that are likely to emerge during its lifetime.

6.3.2

Pembrokeshire will experience a significant increase in its older population during the next 10 years. The gap in life expectancy between the least and most deprived areas in Pembrokeshire is significant and needs to be addressed to avoid greater inequity. We already experience far greater inward migration of elderly people than most counties, as Pembrokeshire is seen as an attractive place to live, especially in later life. We are already seeing a significant demand for our health and social care services and this will continue. It is clear we cannot sustain our current services in their existing format and we will need to work with communities and individuals to promote healthy lifestyles and encourage individuals to remain as healthy and independent as possible with minimal support.

6.3.3

Over the coming years, partners will continue to experience severe pressures on financial budgets. The projected increase in demand on limited resources will necessitate a review of the services we provide, how we provide them and who should be eligible to receive them. The challenge now is to think about a major reconfiguration of service delivery to meet the expected increase in demand.


6.3.4

The significant challenges facing Pembrokeshire are:

6.4

What are we going to do?

6.4.1

Based on the information that is available to us, we have agreed to focus our work on three key priorities. • Help and support people to take responsibility to improve their health and well-being throughout their lives • Reduce inequities through cross-sectoral working • Provide the people of Pembrokeshire with appropriate and sustainable health and social care services

• the challenging financial climate we will face coupled with increasing demand for services, which is predicted to double by 2033, • an increase in the support required by customers with increasingly complex needs to enable them to remain at home; • a predicted growth in the County’s resident population, (estimated to increase to 124,587 residents by 2021) with people aged 65+ predicted to increase from 21.1% to 26.6% of the population, and • a predicted rise in the number of individuals who participate in health damaging behaviours. 6.3.5

To address these challenges we will need to develop multi-agency responses to improve outcomes for the whole population, with a particular focus on health promotion and early intervention. 41


People in Pembrokeshire are Healthier

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

PRIORITY

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: tŽƌŬ ƚŽǁĂƌĚƐ ƚŚĞ ŝŵƉůĞŵĞŶƚĂƚŝŽŶ ŽĨ ͚KƵƌ ,ĞĂůƚŚLJ &ƵƚƵƌĞ͛ ƐƚƌĂƚĞŐŝĐ ĨƌĂŵĞǁŽƌŬ for Public Health document, to improve quality and length of life and provide fairer outcomes for all

People will be helped and supported to take responsibility to improve their health and well-being throughout their lives

Support people to achieve good mental health and challenge stigma and discrimination. Develop services that shift the focus towards prevention and early intervention, reduce isolation and exclusion and promote independence Reduce levels of obesity by promoting healthy and active living across all ages Increase levels of physical activity and reduce the amount of sedentary behaviour Provide affordable and appropriate housing

We will reduce inequities through cross-sectoral working

Provide support and advice for carers to improve their well-being and the wellbeing of the people they care for

Provide community transport services that meet a wide range of needs to enable appropriate access to health and social activities (shopping, library, etc.)

42


People in Pembrokeshire are Healthier

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

PRIORITY

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: Provide appropriate primary, community and social care services that will enable the right person to access the right service at the right time in the right place

People in Pembrokeshire will be provided with appropriate and sustainable health and social care services

Work in partnership with the voluntary sector to deliver health and social care services which improve the health and well-being of the people of Pembrokeshire

43


6.5 How will we know if this is working? 6.5.1 We will measure our progress against the range of headline indicators shown below. These indicators have been chosen because, when viewed collectively, they provide a balanced picture of quality of life in Pembrokeshire. By working together our aim is to ‘turn the curve’ and improve Pembrokeshire’s performance. The black dotted line represents the difference we aim to achieve by delivering this Plan. Life Expectancy

% Adult obesity and physical activity 70%

79

60%

78 50%

77 40%

76 30%

75 20%

74

10%

0%

73 2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2004

2016

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

% Adult Obesity

% of Adults w ho smoke

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

% Adult Physical Activity

Delayed transfers of care from hospital to appropriate care setting 4.5

30% 4

3.5 3

20%

2.5 2 1.5

10%

1 0.5 0

0% 2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2007/08

2017

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

No. per 1000 population aged 75+

% of carers offered assessment or review 60%

50%

Data Development Agenda : Develop measures to assess the incidence of unplanned admissions to hospital and also mental health

40%

30%

20%

10%

0% 2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

44


7. Safeguarding

7.1 Introduction

Children and adults are safeguarded 7.1.1 Safeguarding adults and children is everybody’s business. The Pembrokeshire Safeguarding Children Board (PSCB) and the Adult Protection Committee lead our work in this area. 7.1.2 The Children Act 2004 required each local authority in Wales to establish a Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) to coordinate what is done by key local organisations to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. 7.1.3 The PSCB’s vision is that every child in Pembrokeshire is able to grow up in a loving and secure environment, which is free from abuse, neglect and crime, and which enables them to enjoy good health and fulfil their potential. 7.1.4 In 2000, strategic guidance was issued to authorities in Wales called ‘In Safe Hands’. It established the national framework for the development of local policies, procedures and guidance for the protection of vulnerable adults. 7.1.5 Adult Safeguarding matters are handled in accordance with the Interim All Wales Policies and Procedures (2010). The Adult Protection Committee in Pembrokeshire works closely with the Dyfed Powys Adult Protection Forum to raise awareness of Adult Protection responsibilities and ensure each of their respective organisations adheres to the Interim All Wales Policies and Procedures 2010. 45


7.2 Where are we now? 7.2.1 Pembrokeshire has undergone significant scrutiny and challenge in respect of safeguarding children over the previous 18 months. This level of scrutiny has been conducted through several key inspections and has led to a level of external challenge and support being made available to Pembrokeshire County Council. Inspection reports by Estyn and the Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales (CSSIW) have identified clear shortfalls in practice standards. • Some of the key areas for improvement identified during the inspections included: o the need for clear and accurate record keeping, o the need for a cultural change in Education and schools, o improving practice in Human Resources, o the development of effective quality assurance systems for safeguarding processes and procedures, o formalising reporting mechanisms with Members, o professional challenge and holding agencies to account, o the use of restraint and behaviour management techniques, o senior Members and officers exercising leadership through the establishment of effective monitoring and accountability arrangements, o the relationships between education and social service professionals, and o improving professional abuse practice.

• The number of children on the Child Protection Register has been increasing steadily. The increase has been more dramatic recently, and in the second quarter of 2012/13 there were 130 children on the Register (in 2007/08 this figure stood at 46). It is likely that heightened awareness of safeguarding issues has led to an increase in the volume of referrals and an improvement in the identification of children at risk. • Of those children on the Child Protection Register at the end of September 2012, over 41% were registered under the category of emotional harm. In the majority of cases this is where domestic abuse was identified as a risk factor. Other significant risk factors are parental substance misuse and mental ill health. • During 2011/12, 126 children and young people from specific vulnerable groups in Pembrokeshire received advocacy support from an independent service jointly commissioned with partners in Ceredigion. Further actions are planned to

46


ensure the implementation of the recommendations from “Missing Voices”, a review of independent professional advocacy services in Wales by the Children’s Commissioner. 7.2.2

Referrals for safeguarding adults have also increased in line with raised awareness in recent years. However, there has been an overall reduction in people who are managed by the adult protection team. This reflects the focus on training and development undertaken throughout the year, not only with officers but also with Members and vulnerable groups. • Between 2009/10 and 2011/12, the number of referrals made increased from 669 to 825. However, the number of individuals who met the threshold for being dealt with under the procedures rose from 139 to 142 over the same period. This was the result of improved screening 47

of reported concerns that did not meet the threshold for investigation. • Over time across Wales, the trends with regard to the types of abuse, victim profile, who abuses, how and where have remained consistent. Physical abuse and neglect remain the most common forms of abuse, although victims often suffer more than one form. People are as likely to be abused in their own homes as in a care setting, and the abuser is as likely to be a member of staff as they are a member of the victim’s family or an acquaintance. Abuse by strangers does not come under the remit of the adult protection process, which focuses upon situations where there has been a breach of trust in an existing relationship. • In terms of how allegations of abuse on vulnerable adults are investigated, 12% of reported cases are investigated under the noncriminal investigation process, set out in the Wales Interim Policy and Procedures. Such investigations, which often involve an analysis of care settings, are lengthy and complex pieces of work. During 2011/12, nine investigations were jointly conducted with CSSIW. Investigations by providers into the conduct of their own staff, using internal disciplinary processes, are also undertaken in some circumstances. These accounted for 17% of reported cases during 2011/12. • There has been a sharp increase in the percentage of cases of alleged abuse occurring in a person’s own home. This may be as a result of


increased awareness but could also be attributable to the increased number of people with complex conditions and needs being supported to remain at home. There has also been a significant increase in the number of cases where it is alleged a relative is responsible for the abuse. • A range of statutory and non-statutory advocacy services are able to offer support to vulnerable adults in Pembrokeshire. In 2011/12, the use of advocacy services was reported as being lower than expected. • Professionals have a duty to consider referral to the statutory Independent Mental Capacity Advocate (IMCA) service to support and represent vulnerable adults through adult protection procedures. During 2011/12, the IMCA service received three formal referrals and three queries that did not progress to a formal instruction. While this was similar to Carmarthenshire and Ceredigion, it was a much lower number than might be anticipated when compared with figures received from other IMCA providers in other parts of Wales. 48

7.3

Pembrokeshire 2018

7.3.1

In addition to known issues that exist today, this Plan also aims to identify and address challenges that are likely to emerge during its lifetime.

7.3.2

Our ability to ensure children and adults are safeguarded will be influenced by the tough economic climate and the resultant continued pressure on public sector budgets. Demographic changes such as people living longer, a higher incidence of illnesses such as dementia and a higher diagnosis of children with a disability are also likely to increase pressure on services. How services collaborate to safeguard children and adults will also be influenced by new legislation concerning protecting and safeguarding both children and adults, and also by proposals to coordinate support on a regional basis.

7.3.3

The key additional challenges that are likely to emerge over the next five years include: • a rise in the number of children on the child protection register, • an increase in the number of Looked After Children and Children in Need, • an increase in the number of adult protection referrals, • greater pressure on multi-agency services, and • children and adults who are at risk of abuse not being identified if services are reduced or lost due to budget restraints.


7.4

What are we going to do?

7.4.1

Based on the information that is available to us, we have agreed to focus our work on one key priority:

5.2

• Pembrokeshire will ensure the safeguarding of children, young people and vulnerable adults Where are we now?

Children and adults are safeguarded

PRIORITY

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: ZĞǀŝĞǁ ĂĚǀŽĐĂĐLJ ĂŶĚ ƉĂƌƚŝĐŝƉĂƚŝŽŶ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ ŝŶ WĞŵďƌŽŬĞƐŚŝƌĞ ƚŽ ĞŶƐƵƌĞ ĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶ͛Ɛ ĂŶĚ ǀƵůŶĞƌĂďůĞ ĂĚƵůƚƐ͛ ǀŽŝĐĞƐ ĂƌĞ ŚĞĂƌĚ ƚŚƌŽƵŐŚŽƵƚ ƚŚĞ ŽƵŶƚLJ͘

Pembrokeshire will ensure the safeguarding of children, young people and vulnerable adults

Work to ensure the culture in education promotes safeguarding in all its settings. Ensure there is sufficient capacity to meet demand in frontline work. Ensure safe Human Resource practice is embedded in all settings.

49


7.5 How will we know if this is working? 7.5.1 We will measure our progress against the range of headline indicators shown below. These indicators have been chosen because, when viewed collectively, they provide a balanced picture of quality of life in Pembrokeshire. By working together our aim is to improve Pembrokeshire’s performance. It is not appropriate to include future performance predictions with these particular indicators. No. of Looked After Children

No. of children on the Child Protection Register

300

140

250

120

200

100

80

150 60

100 40

50 20

0 2009/10

2010/11

0

2011/12

2007/08

Pembs

2008/09

Wales Average

2009/10

Pembs

Matters of concern reported to the Pembrokeshire Adult Protection Team

2010/11

2011/12

Wales Average

% Adult Referrals w here risk managed 100%

900 98%

800 700

96%

600

94%

500

92%

400 90% 300 88% 200 86%

100

84%

0 2006/07

2007/08

2008/09

No. of referrals

2009/10

2010/11

2010/11

2011/12

No. meeting threshold

Data Development Agenda: Develop a balanced scorecard to assess the safeguarding of children and young people and vulnerable adults

50

2011/12


8. Safety

8.1 Introduction

Communities in Pembrokeshire feel safe 8.1.1 Pembrokeshire is one of the safest places to live in England and Wales, with very low levels of crime and disorder when compared to other areas. However, we are acutely aware that local problems do exist and we remain committed to doing all that we can to make Pembrokeshire even safer. We also acknowledge that despite the very low levels of crime and disorder, fear of crime is still a significant concern for many of our residents and therefore public reassurance is an important aspect of our work. Crime, and the fear of crime, has a negative impact on community cohesion. 8.1.2 While we face significant challenges in the current financial and economic climate, by working together in new and more effective ways we will continue to successfully reduce crime and disorder and its associated problems in Pembrokeshire. 8.1.3 We can only achieve real improvements by working with the wider community. Our aim is to ensure that the public are involved in these plans and projects.

8.2 Where are we now? 8.2.1 Anti social behaviour (ASB) is currently a high profile issue. The majority of incidents reported in Pembrokeshire are rowdy and nuisance behaviour, often from neighbours. This behaviour can have a significant impact on the quality of life and cohesiveness of our communities. 51


8.2.2

We work hard to tackle ASB on a multi agency basis, providing an effective and coordinated response based on prevention and early intervention. The general perception of young people in particular can be very negative. Education and prevention work helps to address these perceptions. • Anti social behaviour is the highest priority emerging from the latest local Partners And Communities Together (PACT) meetings, representing 66% of emerging priorities. The most recent Citizens’ Panel survey revealed that ASB was the second highest priority for Pembrokeshire residents, with accessibility / visibility of police being the highest priority. • During 2012, anti social behaviour incidents decreased by 9.6% compared with the same period in 2011. Criminal damage also decreased, with current levels down by 23.8% on the previous year. • Pembrokeshire has seen a consistent reduction over recent years in the number of children and young people entering the criminal justice system for the first time. The number more than halved from 255 in 2007/8, to 121 in 2011/12. In 2009/10 and 2010/11, Pembrokeshire achieved a greater reduction than was achieved either regionally or nationally. • The use of Acceptable Behaviour Contracts with young people is an effective intervention, with the majority of young people completing them successfully and parents choosing to continue promoting the behaviour set out within the agreements.

• Wild Camp has been run successfully for three years. This is a multi-agency diversionary scheme for young people at risk of offending. Activities are intended to educate and challenge the young people, helping them to become more aware of how their behaviour affects others and deter them from crime and anti-social behaviour. • Neighbourhoods In Action week continues to be a very positive week of community focussed action, enabling local residents and agencies to work together to find solutions to local problems in order to improve quality of life in the community and reduce the risk of crime and disorder. 8.2.3

Reducing the harmful effects of substance misuse is vital; the effects are far reaching and impact on children, young people, adults, families and entire communities. Although drug offences account for only 9.4% of recorded crime across Pembrokeshire, we know that drug users commit a

52


networks of heroin misuse within the County and achieved some very positive outcomes. A significant number of heroin users are also now engaging with substance misuse treatment services as a result of the operation. • In the Hywel Dda area, there are 6,300 hospital admissions each year caused by alcohol related issues and around 200 patients each year are admitted to hospital because of drug misuse. The most recent annual statistics for the Dyfed Powys Police area show that there were 2,690 individuals referred to alcohol treatment services and 1,492 individuals referred into drug treatment services. Twelve percent of alcohol referrals and 4.8% of drug referrals reported having at least one child living at home. • Police, licensing and trading standards teams work together to undertake a number of test purchasing operations throughout the year, ensuring that local businesses are not selling alcohol to underage customers. • SUDDS (the Specialist Under 18 Drink and Drugs Service) provides ongoing advice to young people, parents and professionals working with young people to raise awareness of the dangers of substance misuse.

large proportion of acquisitive crime (theft) in order to meet their drug needs. The harm caused by alcohol misuse is widespread; violent crime across the County continues to be linked to the night time economy with alcohol being a significant factor. • A recent Home Office arrestee survey showed that 55% of persons arrested for acquisitive crime reported having taken heroin, crack or cocaine in the previous 12 months. Fifty eight percent of violent crime offences in Pembrokeshire have an offender or victim under the influence of alcohol. • Current figures for total drug offences in Pembrokeshire show an increase of 6.6% on the previous year. This is reflective of police activity, having been particularly proactive in this area with a number of recent operations resulting in high-profile convictions. This clearly impacts on recorded crime levels. • Operation Poker focussed on disrupting the 53

8.2.4

Domestic abuse is a very high priority for all partner agencies who work to support victims and deal with perpetrators. Domestic abuse occurs across society regardless of age, gender, race, sexuality, economic status and geography. We are also committed to working together to


improve road safety and reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on Welsh roads. In recognition of the above issues, we aim to protect every individual’s “Right to be Safe”. • As many as 1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men will be affected by domestic abuse at some point in their lives. The most recent figures show the detection rate for domestic abuse crimes in Dyfed Powys Police area was 51.6%. • Pembrokeshire experiences the second highest volume of domestic related crimes in the Dyfed Powys Force area, with current figures showing an increase of 7.5% compared to the previous year. However, targeted enforcement activity has been focussed on this area and, together with campaigns to raise awareness and encourage the reporting of such incidents, this will impact upon the levels of crime being recorded. • Pembrokeshire has the lowest number of recorded repeat victims of domestic related crime within the Dyfed Powys Police area (9.5%), but has the highest number of repeat incidents (19.4%). 54

• In 2012, 167 families were discussed at Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conferences. There were a total of 238 children within these households. A snapshot of children on the child protection register shows that domestic abuse was identified in 43.6% of cases. • Concerns about abuse in teenage relationships have increased in recent years and Pembrokeshire has responded to this by piloting a teenage relationship toolkit in a number of schools. Staff working with young people are being trained so the toolkit can be rolled out across the County. • The role of Independent Domestic Violence Advisor is crucial in increasing the safety of victims of domestic abuse; we continue to ensure the provision of this service across the more rural areas of the County. • Young people are disproportionately at risk of being killed or seriously injured on the road and are the most at-risk age group, making up only 11% of driving licence holders but 23% of casualties nationally in 2011. • Educational interventions are currently provided in all eight secondary schools in Pembrokeshire, including a drama presentation and multi-agency workshops. • Child road fatalities on Pembrokeshire roads are thankfully rare, with an average rate of 1.1 per year between 1995 and 2005. The Road Safety Forum implements a balanced programme of child safety education, environmental improvements, vehicle speed reduction and in car safety to address child casualties.


8.2.5

In 2010, Community Safety Partnerships were made responsible for reducing reoffending within their areas. By reducing reoffending levels we aim to protect the public, minimise the harm caused to victims and reduce the impact of reoffending within our communities. • Total recorded crime has shown a steady reduction, with current figures down by 9.1% compared with the previous year. Detection rates have increased with the current rate standing at 48.6%, an increase of 4.5% on the same period for last year. • Recent figures show a reduction in offending of 41% compared to the previous year for Pembrokeshire’s Prolific and Priority Offenders; this was higher than the national reduction of 29%. • Project Cleddau has recently been implemented in the County; this aims to reduce the number of offences committed in Pembrokeshire by targeting those offenders who are most prolific and cause most nuisance within our communities. Since the start of 2012, eight individuals have exited Project Cleddau; Six of these were successful exits following a sustained period of stability and a significant reduction in offending. Two were exited as a result of moving out of the area. • Housing remains a significant issue for offenders, with 58% of the Project Cleddau cohort currently in the community without suitable accommodation. Project Cleddau works to ensure that offenders with an identified substance misuse need are offered appropriate treatment; 60% of those with an identified need are currently engaged with treatment services.

• The Bobby Van scheme provides free security advice and equipment for repeat victims of burglary and for the vulnerable and most at risk within the community. 8.2.6

In 2006, the Government published CONTEST6, the long term strategy for countering terrorism. This has four strands: Prevent Pursue Protect Prepare

8.2.7

to stop people becoming terrorists or supporting violent extremism to stop terrorist attacks to strengthen our overall protection against terrorist attacks, and where we cannot stop an attack, to mitigate its impact

Although such occurrences are rare, partner agencies in Pembrokeshire are focussed on ensuring that the CONTEST functions become mainstreamed into everyday business. The identification of individuals who may be vulnerable to exploitation from any number of extremist groups should be core business in the same way as we identify those vulnerable to violence or those with health-related issues. Community cohesion helps communities to build and maintain resilience to terrorism.

CONTEST is the United Kingdom’s counter-terrorism strategy. The strategy reflects the changing terrorist threat and aims to reduce the risk to the UK and its interests overseas from terrorism, so that people can go about their lives freely and with confidence. 6

55


• Operational activity and intelligence within Pembrokeshire shows that the threat from any form of extremism remains low. • Ten training sessions were delivered in 2011/12 to raise the awareness of the Prevent strand of the CONTEST agenda. Attendees included school staff and governors, neighbourhood watch coordinators and key professionals working with vulnerable individuals in the County. • Partners work very closely with educational establishments within the County to ensure that appropriate reporting and referral mechanisms are in place to address any Preventrelated concerns. • An ongoing schedule of multi-agency emergency planning exercises in partnership with our main industrial providers is followed to ensure that plans are in place to provide the most effective response to any incidents that do occur.

8.3

Pembrokeshire 2018

8.3.1

In addition to the issues that exist today, this Plan also aims to identify and address challenges that are likely to emerge during its lifetime.

8.3.2

Delivery of Community Safety within Pembrokeshire will face a number of challenges over the coming years. We will do all that we can to mitigate these, but we acknowledge that they are very real and significant concerns, they include: • an ability to provide consistent and improved services with decreasing resources and finances, • an increase in the ageing population which may result in increased fear of crime and a larger section of the community that are vulnerable to crimes such as distraction burglary, • a reduction in household disposable income which may encourage higher levels of home drinking leading to increased domestic and neighbour disputes, substance misuse and family problems, • ongoing emergence of new legal highs, • the current economic climate which may result in severe financial problems and therefore an increase in acquisitive crime, • providing accessible and equitable services within rural communities that are not well served by public transport links, • the availability of suitable accommodation and related support for communities, including victims and offenders, and • balancing the perception and reality of a very low crime, safe County against a disproportionately high fear of crime.

56


8.4

What are we going to do?

8.4.1

Based on the information that is available to us, we have agreed to focus our work on five key priorities:

• Provide an effective and coordinated response to antisocial behaviour, focussing on prevention and early intervention • Reduce the harm caused by substance misuse • Protect every individual’s right to be safe • Reduce the impact of reoffending within our communities • Prevent violent extremism

Communities in Pembrokeshire feel safe

PRIORITY

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: Address anti-social behaviour at an early stage

Provide an effective and coordinated response to anti-social behaviour, focusing on prevention and early intervention

Provide early intervention for young people to minimise the likelihood of them entering the criminal justice system Ensure vulnerable and repeat victims of ASB are identified and protected Monitor activity relating to community engagement with agencies Ensure partner agencies are aware of and effectively utilise the full range of tools and powers available to tackle ASB Disrupt existing and emerging drug networks through enforcement and treatment Undertake prevention and early intervention work with young people including a focus on new and emerging drugs

Reduce the harm caused by substance misuse

Reduce the harm caused to young people by parental substance misuse Provide a comprehensive treatment system which addresses all problem substances Address the needs of families and carers of those misusing drugs and alcohol Promote a safer night time economy, including reducing the impact of alcohol related violent crime

57


Communities in Pembrokeshire feel safe

PRIORITY

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: Continue to raise awareness of domestic abuse and promote services

WƌŽƚĞĐƚ ĞǀĞƌLJ ŝŶĚŝǀŝĚƵĂů͛Ɛ ƌŝŐŚƚ ƚŽ ďĞ safe

Ensure young people are aware of healthy and unhealthy relationships and are able to recognise abusive behaviour Continue to develop services to provide effective advice and support to those affected by domestic abuse Work with criminal justice partners to improve the response to domestic abuse Effectively manage perpetrators to reduce risk Work with partners to improve road safety and target high-risk road users through education and enforcement Provide an effective integrated offender management framework, including transition services for young offenders Reduce levels of reoffending amongst integrated offender management cohort

Reduce the impact of reoffending within our communities

Ensure victims of prolific offenders are provided with appropriate support Further improve multi-agency working to ensure a full range of wraparound services are available to reintegrate offenders into our communities Work with partners via multi-agency frameworks to minimise the impact of reoffending on local communities

58


Communities in Pembrokeshire feel safe

PRIORITY

Safety

Safeguarding

Health

Environment

Economy

Children & Families

Contribution to Outcome

What we want to achieve:

HEADLINE ACTION

We will: Identify individuals who may be vulnerable to exploitation by extremist groups

Prevent violent extremism

Continue to provide training and awareness to key partners who have regular contact with potentially vulnerable groups Monitor multi-agency emergency planning arrangements of strengthen our overall protection against terrorist attacks

59


8.5

How will we know if this is working?

8.5.1 We will measure our progress against the range of headline indicators shown below. These indicators have been chosen because, when viewed collectively, they provide a balanced picture of quality of life in Pembrokeshire. By working together our aim is to ‘turn the curve’ and improve Pembrokeshire’s performance. The black dotted line represents the difference we aim to achieve by delivering this Plan. Crimes per 1000 Population

First time entrants to the Youth Justice System 60

300 50

250 40

200 30

150 20

100

10

50

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Domestic Abuse Related Crimes Detection Rate

Anti-Social Behaviour incidents per 1000 Population 100

75

90

70 80 70

65

60

60

50 40

55 30 20

50

10

45

0 2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

Total No. killed or seriously injured in road traffic collisions 70 68 66 64 62 60 58 56

54 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

60

2013/14

2013/14

2012/13

2011/12

2011/12

2010/11

2010/11

2009/10

2009/10

2008/09

2007/08

2007/08

2008/09

0

0


9.1

Progress relating to this Plan will be monitored at a strategic level by Pembrokeshire’s LSB and its associated partnerships as shown in the structure chart on the next page. Hywel Dda’s Integrated Governance Committees and elected Members on Pembrokeshire County Council’s Overview and Scrutiny Committees will also review and challenge partners’ progress in delivering the outcomes identified in this Plan.

9.2

The partnership groups will rely on performance management support provided by Pembrokeshire County Council. The Council uses an electronic system known as Ffynnon to track its progress in a range of service areas. The system can be tailored to monitor whether or not projects and programmes are being implemented effectively and can be used to relate this information to the relevant headline indicators.

9. Monitoring and reviewing this Plan

9.3

While it is important that we are able to show that projects are being delivered, it is more important that we know what impact these projects are actually having. For this reason we have identified a series of headline 61

indicators which, taken together (and viewed alongside the information we collect regarding project delivery), provide an overall picture of quality of life in Pembrokeshire. These indicators are not perfect – it is sometimes difficult to make precise connections between such indicators and the projects that have been implemented – but they do provide us with a more sophisticated level of insight the benefit of which we would not have were we to rely on project information alone. 9.4

The LSB and its associated partnerships will also be monitoring a wide range of other indicators in order to gain a comprehensive understating of the progress we are making in achieving our shared outcomes.

9.5

It is good practice to review needs, actions and indicators periodically and the LSB will conduct regular reviews of the Plan. Members of the public and community groups will be engaged in these reviews – indeed, one of the benefits of the integrated planning process will be the development of a more consistent dialogue between service providers and their customers.


LSB

Single Integrated Plan

Children and Families

Economy

Environment

Health, Care & Well-being

Safety

Safeguarding

CYPP Executive Group

Economy Group

Pembrokeshire Environment Forum

Health, Social Care & Wellbeing Board

Community Safety Partnership

Local Safeguarding Children Board Adult Protection Committee

62



Pembrokeshire Single Integrated Plan