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Pembroke College Record

1982


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1982


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LIST OF MASTER AND FELLOWS Hilary Term 1983 MASTER SIR GEOFFREY GEORGE ARTHUR, K.C.M.G., M.A. FELLOWS GODFREY WILLIAM BOND, M.A., (B.A. Dublin), (elected 1950), Dean and Lecturer in Classics, Morison Fellow. PIERS GERALD MACKESY, M.A., D.Phil., D.Litt. (elected 1954), Lecturer in Modern History, Damon Wells Fellow. JOHN WILKS, M.A., D.Phil., D.Sc. (elected 1956), Lecturer in Physical Science. ZBIGNIEW ANDRZEJ PELCZYNSKI, M.Phil., M.A., D.Phil. (M.A. St. Andrews) (elected 1961), Lecturer in Politics. ARTHUR DENNIS HAZLEWOOD, B.Phil., M.A. (B.Sc. Econ. London) (elected 1961), Professorial Fellow. PETER JOHN CUFF, M.A., D.Phil. (elected 1961), Vicegerent and Lecturer in Ancient History. EDGAR LIGHTFOOT, M.A., (M.Sc. London; Ph.D. Leeds) (elected 1961), Lecturer in Engineering Science. IAN PHILIP GRANT, M.A., D.Phil. (elected 1964), Lecturer in Mathematics. VERNON SPENCER BUTT, M.A. (B.Sc., Ph.D. Bristol) (elected 1965), Lecturer in Biological Science. JOHN RAYMOND ROOK, M.A. (Ph.D. Manchester) (elected 1965), Lecturer in Mathematical Physics. CHARLES JAMES FRANK DOWSETT, M.A., D.Phil. (M.A., Ph.D. Camb.). F.B.A. (elected 1965), Calouste Gulbenkian Professor of Armenian Studies. GORDON HARLOW WHITHAM, M.A. (Ph.D. Manchester) (elected 1965), Lecturer in Chemistry. JOHN DAVID FLEEMAN, M.A., D.Phil. (M.A. St. Andrews) (elected 1965), Librarian and Lecturer in English Literature and Language. JOHN MICHAEL EEKELAAR, B.C.L., M.A. (LL.B. London) (elected 1965), Lecturer in Jurisprudence, Sheppard Fellow. SAVILE BRADBURY, M.A., D.Phil. (elected 1966), Tutor for Admissions, Nuffield Research Fellow in Medicine and Lecturer in Human Anatomy. SIMON WALTER BLACKBURN, M.A. (M.A., Ph.D. Camb.) (elected 1969), Lecturer in Philosophy. PAUL RAPHAEL HYAMS, M.A., D.Phil. (elected 1969), Lecturer in Modern History.


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RT. REVD. KALLISTOS TIMOTHY WARE, M.A., D.Phil. (elected 1970), Fellow by Special Election. COLIN NICHOLAS JOCELYN MANN, M.A., (M.A., Ph.D. Camb) (elected 1973), Senior Tutor and Lecturer in French Language. DANIEL DAVID PRENTICE, M.A. (LL.B. Belfast, J.D. Chicago) (elected 1973), Dean of Graduate Students and Lecturer in Law. MICHAEL JOHN GORINGE, M.A., D.Phil. (M.A., Ph.D. Camb.) (elected 1975), Fellow by Special Election. JOHN SEBASTIAN KNOWLAND, M.A., D.Phil. (elected 1976), Lecturer in Biochemistry. BRIAN JOHN HOWARD, M.A., (M.A. Camb., Ph.D. Southampton) (elected 1976), Lecturer in Physical Chemistry. KENNETH MAYHEW, M.A. (M.Sc. London) (elected 1976), Lecturer in Economics. ERIC GERALD STANLEY, M.A. (Ph.D. Birmingham) (elected 1976), Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon. JOHN HUGH COLIN LEACH, M.A. (elected 1979), Bursar. COLIN JAMES RICHARD SHEPPARD, M.A., D.Phil. (elected 1979), Lecturer in Engineering Science. ALAN JONES, M.A. (elected 1980), Lecturer in Islamic Studies. MALCOLM KEITH SYKES, M.A. (M.B., B.Chir., M.A. Camb.) (elected 1980), Nuffield Professor of Anaesthetics. PETER JAMES GODMAN, M.A., D.Phil. (M.A., Ph.D. Camb.) (elected 1980), Lecturer in English Language and Literature. GRAHAM GARLAND ROSS, M.A. (B.Sc. Aberdeen, Ph.D. Durham) (elected 1981), Rutherford and Atlas Research Fellow. JOHN RICHARD KREBS, M.A., D.Phil. (elected 1981), E.P. Abraham Fellow in Zoology. NICHOLAS ERNEST CRONK, M.A. (elected 1982), Junior Research Fellow and Junior Dean. JOHN IAN TANNER, C.B.E. (M.A., Ph.D. Nottingham, Hon. D.Litt., City University), (elected 1982), Senior Research Fellow and Archivist. EMERITUS FELLOWS DONALD GEORGE CECIL MACNABB, M.A. JOHN RICHARD PERCIVAL O'BRIEN, B.Sc., M.A. DOUGLAS GRAY, M.A. (M.A. New Zealand). SUPERNUMERARY FELLOWS REVD. COLIN MORRIS, M.A. ALEXANDER CRAMPTON SMITH, M.A. (M.B., Ch.B. Edinburgh). ARTHUR LAURENCE FLEET, M.A.


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HONORARY FELLOWS HON. JAMES WILLIAM FULBRIGHT, M.A., Hon. D.C.L., K.B.E. (Hon.) PHILIP NICHOLAS SETON MANSERGH, M.A., D.Phil., D.Litt. (Litt. D. Camb.), O.B.E., F.B.A. LEWIS ARTHUR LARSON, M.A., D.C.L. CHARLES STEWART ALMON RITCHIE, B.A. ROLAND ALMON RITCHIE, B.A., (Hon. D.C.L., King's College, Halifax, Nova Scotia, LL.D. Dalhousie University). SIR ROBERT REYNOLDS MACINTOSH, M.A., D.M. JAMES McNAUGHTON HESTER, M.A., D.Phil. (Hon. LL.D. Princeton). THE LORD MILES OF BLACKFRIARS, C.B.E. (Hon. D.Litt., City University). MORRIS BERTHOLD ABRAM, M.A. (Hon. LL.D. Yeshiva University and Davidson College). SIR FRANK COOPER, G.C.B., C.M.G., M.A. JOSEPH PHILEMOR JEAN MARIE BEETZ, M.A. GEORGE RICHARD FREDERICK BREDIN, M.A., C.B.E. REGINALD SOLOMON GRAHAM, M.A. EARL MASON McGOWIN. SIR HENRY THOMAS HOPKINSON, M.A., C.B.E. NORMAN STAYNER MARSH, B.C.L., M.A., Q.C., C.B.E. NOR SEWARD RICHARD, M.A., Q.C. ROBERT FRANCIS VERE HEUSTON, M.A., D.C.L. (M.A., LL.B. Dublin). ROBERT CATHCART MARTINDALE. CHAPLAIN REVD. JOHN EMERSON PLATT, M.A., D.Phil. (M.Th. Hull), Editor of The Record. ASSISTANT BURSAR MISS MOIRA McIVER

COLLEGE SECRETARY MRS FIONA GRIFFITHS


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MASTER'S NOTES I confess I look back on 1982 with a sense of personal frustration: temps s'en va et rien n'ai fait — it sounds more urgent in the old French. I was away the greater part of the first four months, working mostly in Arabia for the British Bank of the Middle East (whose parent, the Hong Kong Bank, gave a benefaction in recognition of the loss of my services, such as they are, to the College); but my efforts there, whether for the Bank or for the College, were not very successful this year. I hope that both institutions will receive a more satisfactory reward in 1983. My long absences placed an unusual burden on the Vicegerent, Edgar Lightfoot, whose performance in Oxford was happily more effective than mine abroad. I should like to put my thanks to him on record, and in doing so, I am confident that I speak for the whole of the Governing Body. Since I am leaving for the Middle East again the day after tomorrow, I prophesy an even harder time for Peter Cuff, who took over as Vicegerent during the summer; harder because the College, like all others, faces intractable problems, and will have to take difficult decisions on admissions policies. An attempt is to be made to revise the system, if such a tangle of arrangements can be called a system, by next summer; and though nearly everybody admits that changes are overdue (and indeed inevitable), there is nothing like a consensus on the direction these changes should take. There is the further difficulty that the public is — legitimately — more interested in admissions policy than in any other aspect of Oxford and — perhaps less legitimately — better, but not impartially, informed about the discussions which take place in committees dealing with the matter. If you add to the uncertainty about admissions the fact that Colleges now have a fixed upper limit on their home and E.E.C. undergraduate numbers, you will see that the lives of the Senior Tutor and the Tutor for Admissions are likely to be even more harrassed than they used to be. Gordon Whitham ceased to be Senior Tutor in the summer, when he took over as Chairman of the Physical Sciences Faculty: Ian Grant's last day as Tutor for Admissions is today. I should like to thank them both for their hard work for the College and wish their successors, Nico Mann and Savile Bradbury, a smoother ride than the one I have predicted. After this somewhat melancholy prelude, I can perhaps come to more cheerful news. In 1982 we elected two Honorary Fellows: R.C. (Bob) Martindale (1923) and Robert Heuston. The latter, Regius Professor of Laws at Trinity College, Dublin, since 1970, was already a Supernumerary Fellow and will be well-known to many readers, for he was a Fellow and Tutor of the College from 1947 to 1965. Of the former, more anon, as they say. In the summer Arthur Fleet retired from his University post as Deputy Registrar (Administration) and from his Professiorial Professional Fellowship at the College. We shall miss him on the Governing Body, on which old members of the College are again reduced to one, John Krebs. But we hope we shall continue to see Arthur Fleet from time to time: he is now a Supernumerary Fellow.


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We welcome two new Research Fellows: Nicholas Cronk, elected in the spring to replace Geoffrey Sweet as Junior Research Fellow and Junior Dean, and John Tanner, the distinguished (and unpaid!) Archivist of the College, elected to a Senior Research Fellowship in the autumn. Thanks to the latter's generosity, we have been able to appoint Aidan Lawes, a Keble historian, as Assistant Archivist, to shed some light on the darker corners of the College's historical records, unsorted for a century and more. Mrs Cordy's retirement at the end of Trinity Term 1982 marked the end of a long period (24 years) of devoted and loyal service to the College as Deputy Librarian. For whole generations of undergraduates Mrs Cordy was synonymous with the College Library. Many will recall the time when she presided in the old Library (Broadgates Hall) and remember that her eagle-eyed surveillance was not diminished by her responsibility for the 'Submarine' and 'Hector's Hole' as well as the old Law Library in the upper room now occupied by Mr Mayhew. There was no document, photograph, or rare book which she could not conjure up without apparent effort, and her knowledge of the College archives extended to the dim and dusty recesses of the Hall tower. One grew so accustomed to her facility in dealing with questions about Founders' Kin, group photographs of long ago, or College societies' minute-books, that it is difficult to realize that Mrs Cordy began and continued only as• a part-time assistant. Every moment of her time in the College was devoted to the materials under her charge and no matter what catalogues, lists, or registers we eventually acquire, we are not likely to find anyone who will carry it all in her head. We wish her a long and happy retirement. Otherwise the Fellowship remains unchanged, save for one unique distinction: Dr Timothy (Kallistos) Ware was this year elevated to the Orthodox See of Diocleia, which is part of what Chesterton called "the lands where Christians were" (sc. and are no longer). The Church's loss is our gain, for Kallistos remains with us. One of my predecessors was a Bishop, but I wonder whether a College has ever before boasted a Bishop as a Fellow and member of its Governing Body. The College's performance in Final Honour Schools was not very different from 1981: ten Firsts, ten Thirds and the rest Seconds. What was unusual was that seven of the ten Firsts were in the Sciences (two Mathematics, one Chemistry, one Agriculture, one Engineering and two Physiology). What was unprecedented was that two of them were women: Jane Carter in Agriculture and Maxine Phillips in Mathematics. (In Angela Dalrymple we now have the first woman President of the J.C.R.). Congratulations are due to Spencer Bowman, who was awarded the Junior Mathematics Prize for the top First in the subject; to Geoffrey Willis (Philosophy and Theology), who achieved the best Philosophy marks in the University and took the Henry Wilde Prize; and to Nigel Hope, the winner of the Chancellor's Prize for Latin Prose. No cause for lamentation in all that! Hockey and rowing remain the Pembroke sports. The Hockey XI were First Division Champions for the second time in three years. In Summer Eights, however, the First VIII, despite undiminished enthu-


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siasm and a new boat, could not quite line up to the achievements of the previous lustrum, but they only lost one place. The Ladies' First VIII, on the other hand, rowing in divisions whose records resemble the Hang Seng rather than the F.T. Index, won yet another bump supper. The Seventh Blackstone Lecture was delivered on 13 November by the Master of Balliol on "The Expert in Court". I do not think I have ever heard a more lucid and agreeable lecture on any subject: it is a great pity that these occasions have to be on Saturdays and thus attract few undergraduates, though many persons of distinction. This lecture, like one or two of its predecessors, was particularly welcome to me since it provided a rational basis for what I had previously assumed were simply prejudices. Dr Pelczynski delivered this year's McCallum Memorial Lecture on 29 May on "Poland — the Road from Communism". He was altogether too modest, first calling it a "Special" McCallum lecture, as though it was unworthy to join the series, and secondly, booking a lecture room too small for his large and well-rewarded audience. It is my belief that R.B. McCallum, some of whose correspondence I have lately been privileged to read, would have applauded this lecture more than any since Senator Fulbright's. We had the pleasure of entertaining Mr Fulbright for a few days over the beginning of the Michaelmas Term — his first visit to Oxford since 1975. We hope to see him again in 1983: he is now the Senior Honorary Fellow of the College. We also had the pleasure of the company of our latest (but not youngest!) Honorary Fellow for much of October: Bob Martindale and his wife Margarita came from Arizona and looked after me more than I them. Their visit spanned the commemoration of the tercentenary of the death of Sir Thomas Browne (19 October), and the excellent dinner in Hall that night was provided by the Martindale Benefaction. I had already taken part in the Browne tercentenary celebrations in Norwich in June, as my predecessor Bishop Mitchinson had attended the tercentenary of Browne's birth in 1905. I was received with much kindness and consideration by the people of Norwich, who regard Browne as their most famous (adopted) son. We had another commemoration in November — the 250th anniversary of the dedication of the College Chapel. The Bishop of Oxford preached at a festal Evensong, which was followed by a dinner in Hall. We were very glad to have with us over that period Damon Wells, to whose generosity we owe the restoration of the Chapel and much else. We missed the opportunity to commemorate the bicentenary of the matriculation of James Smithson; but I am not sure what we would have done, for pretty well all we know about him is that he left his property to the United States to found the Smithsonian Institution! And the big anniversary looms: Samuel Johnson died in 1784. The last "event" of the year was the dinner held on 30 November, when my portrait was presented to the College. The artist, Bryan Organ, and his wife were present, but the donor, Reggie Graham, was prevented by illness from attending. I will leave it to others to discuss


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9

the portrait: what I should like to do is to thank Reggie Graham, to whom the College owes far more than he will ever allow me to say — I think that apart from this portrait he has acknowledged only the endowment of the Blackstone Lectures. To him and to all old members I send my best wishes for 1983: though to judge from the Editor's difficulties with some contributors, it may well be nearer to 1984 when they read these lines. 31 December 1982.

THE COLLEGE SOCIETY ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING The Annual General Meeting of the Society took place in Broadgates Hall on Friday, 1 October 1982 where, in the absence of the Master who was ill, the Vicegerent, Dr. P.J. Cuff presided. The minutes of the previous meeting held on 2 October 1981 were read and approved. Treasurer's Report The Treasurer reported that on 31 December 1981 there was a credit balance of ÂŁ1034-17 in the Society's account which would go far towards the cost of printing the next issue of the Record. Elections to the Committee The meeting approved the re-election for three years in each instance of the following members of the committee due for retirement in 1982: Mr. M.T. Cooper Revd. Dr. B.A.C. Kirk-Duncan Mr. K.H. Jeffrey Mr. J.R.P. O'Brien Mr. A.C. Snowden Secretary and Treasurer Revd. Dr. J.E. Platt was re-elected Hon. Secretary and Treasurer for the coming year. Other Business The meeting recorded its thanks to the College for again providing its hospitality on this occasion. THE ANNUAL DINNER By kind permission of the Master and Fellows the Society held its Annual Dinner in Hall on Friday, 1 October 1982. 138 members attended. Mr. Ivor Richard, Honorary Fellow of Pembroke, presided and proposed the toast of "The College", in a witty and most amusing speech. The Vicegerent, Dr. P.J. Cuff, spoke in reply. The formal aspect of the evening concluded with speeches by the President of the Middle Common Room, Miss C. Battaglino, and the President of the Junior Common Room, Mr. J.S. Seitler.


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The following is a list of the members who attended: FELLOWS P. J. Cuff (Vicegerent) C. N. J. Mann A. Jones G. W. Bond J. R. Krebs (1963) P. G. Mackesy J. R. P. O'Brien I. P. Grant (1924) G. H. Whitham S. Bradbury 1912 B. B. Smyth 1925 R. Fletcher E. Lobb 1926 S. Linton 1927 S. E. Clark W. W. Georgeson 1933 F. Brewer D. E. H. Whiteley 1934 R. B. Crail C. H. R. Hillman M. Silverman 1935 H. C. Allen H. W. S. Horlock S. Lester E. H. A. Stretton R. W. Sykes 1936 B. A. C. Kirk-Duncan H. Y. Larder G. K. Newman C. A. Stone C. B. White 1938 J. S. Lightbody C. E. L. Thomson 1939 J. V. Barnett J. D. Young 1943 F. J. Whitworth 1944 R. N. P. Sutton 1946 G. A. O. Jenlcin D. E. Thompson K. M. Wilkock 1947 L. Bernstein J. G. Drysdale 1948 M. Andrews J. T. Buffin J. P. H. Davy J. J. Deave

G. R. F. Bredin I. S. Richard (1950) (Chairman) J. E. Platt (1956) (Chaplain) R. J. Drysdale G. A. Everett K. G. Garrod H. J. Harris R. F. Lewis G. Thompson P. Ungoed-Thomas E. H. Webster 1949 P. R. Bachelor R. G. Deeble P. C. V. Jagger C. J. V. Roberts P. Wardale 1950 I. H. Hinton W. M. Marshall P. C. H. M. Prichard 1951 D. J. P. Gilmore A. D. Maclennan P. D. Oldrieve W. G. Potter P. J. Stokoe 1952 J. E. Barlow W. R. Howells D. A. Knight J. P. Nolan D. C. M. Prichard R. C. Stopford 1953 0. G. E. Dickson R. H. Side 1954 F. D. Ball R. S. Chivers G. B. Hall P. G. B. Letts J. E. Roberts S. T. Shipley A. F. Stirratt W. R. Timperley J. R. E. Warburton


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1955 M. J. Crispin J. H. Lyon R. D. Vernon 1956 G. T. Crookes D. J. D. McPhail G. F. Matthews R. D. Thompson 1958 F. J. Arrowsmith P. C. Coulson J. P. Richardson C. Seagroatt 1959 J. A. Banks C. B. Craig J. A. O'Brien L. J. Pike J. F. A. Pullinger 1962 N. G. Crispin Chamberlain 1963 P.P.Chamberlain N. T. James 1964 P. M. Bailhache R. A. Cox R. W. K. Crawford G. Gancz A. W. Panton E. Pickard P. J. Wheeler

S. M. Zollner 1965 1965P.P.J.J.N. N.Kendall Kendall R. G. Ware 1967 M. R. D. Johnson L. T. T. Steel 1970 G. J. E. Podger A. P. Russell 1971 M. J. Burr P. J. Gregory , M. J. Kill R. L. Langley D. Ruskin 1972 J. J. Langham-Brown P. H. Tucker P. D. Wilkinson 1973 R. G. ffrench D. G. Roberts P. D. B. West 1975 S. K. Archer H. W. Griffiths J. J. Kellett S. Pitcher Pilcher 1976 H. J. Elton 1980 C. Battaglino J. S. Seitler

OBITUARY The deaths of the following Members have been notified since the last issue of the Record:1919 W. S. Angus 1919 C. F. C. Hoare 1919 L. H. Leslie-Smith 1949 J. D. Cameron 1927 A. P. Corin 1932 F. H. Minoprio 1935 B. Crowther 1919 F. E. Oxtoby 1929 C. B. Edwards 1922 C. W. Thomas 1935 A. J. H. Exton 1919 H. D. Thompson 1920 C. R. Greene 1939 J. E. A. Tyson 1934 F. Wood 1924 P. A. Harwood


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W. S. ANGUS W.S. Angus matriculated from Bradford Grammar School in 1919 with a Boulter and Radcliffe Scholarship, and took his degree in Modern History. In a long academic career he was appointed Registrar of Armstrong College, Newcastle-on-Tyne and finally became Registrar of the University of Durham. J. D. CAMERON The following note has been contributed by his brother: "John Cameron followed his brother Sandy up to Pembroke in 1949 from Trinity College, Glenalmond, having held a commission with the Royal Artillery for an interim period, serving in North Africa. He read Forestry and later worked for the Forestry Commission holding appointments in the Forest of Dean, the Salisbury area, South Wales, and Sussex. He died at the age of 54 at his home in Uckfield in May 1982 having suffered a heart attack two years before which succeeded a previous one some thirteen years earlier. Obituaries in College records tend to accent matters academic. John was no slouch in these and there was little that he did that he did not explore in depth. But he was not one to blind people with science or discomfort them with specialist knowledge which his papers showed him undoubtedly to have had in a variety of fields and in most accomplishments. He was a knowledgeable forester and his wise, perhaps somewhat old-world counsel was respected. He was a self-taught expert on deer, an aspect of forestry only today beginning to receive the attention it deserves. A lifelong interest in the art of venery (his father was a founder member of two packs of hounds which hunted in the Sudan before the last war) found him the sometime amateur huntsman of the Christ Church and New College Beagles and later the Chilmark. He acquired an extensive knowledge of hounds and their historical breeding and latterly this interest led him to France where he became fluent in the language and thoroughly conversant with the traditions of la chasse. His musical appreciation ranged from the pibroch — he was pipemajor of his school corps band — to high opera for which he was a frequent visitor to nearby Glyndebourne. In between he found and gave pleasure with the Spanish guitar, a skill he achieved together with command of the language in consequence of following the bulls as an aficionado. He appreciated and was appreciative of the widening of outlook and interest which his education at Oxford had given him." A.J.C. REV. A. P. CORIN Paul Corin came up to Pembroke from St. Paul's with a Gainer Scholarship in 1927 and took Third Class Honours in both Mods. and Greats. After a year at Westcott House, Cambridge, he was or-


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dained to a curacy at Kings Cross, Halifax whence he moved after four years to become Vicar of St. Thomas, Huddersfield. In 1946 he finally left Yorkshire on becoming Vicar of St. Mary of Eton, Hackney Wick, where he remained until moving to his last parish, Christ the Saviour, Ealing in 1958. On his retirement in 1981 he moved to Burnham on Crouch. The November magazine of his Ealing parish contained the following tribute: "Fr. Corin was a very devoted Priest and much sought after Confessor, and he was much respected by all who knew him. He was, essentially, a shy and private person, who devoted his entire life to the service of his beloved Lord and he had no greater joy than being able to offer the Holy Sacrifice each day of his priesthood. His views of doctrine and worship were conservative, and in the trendy sixties when 'change' was the 'in' word he refused to budge and eventually this refusal had a marked effect in that he became much respected for representing something solid and secure in a chaotic spiritual desert. He loved children and our two schools were a source of great joy to him. He also loved music and our choir and the George Luck choristers provided him with much pleasure. His other great love was the sea, and when eventually he felt the time had come to retire it was quite natural that he should move somewhere near to the sea, so that he could sail his boat. He was a very wise and scholarly person, who could in a very few words sum up arguments perfectly. He didn't suffer fools gladly, but was always the most compassionate and kind-hearted of men. Fr. Corin could have no better epitaph that to say that he was a good and wise Priest, who loved his flock." B. CROWTHER Brian Crowther came up to the College from Kingston Grammar School with a senior classical scholarship in 1935. A member of a successful rowing VIII, the rugby XV, and the swimming team he played his full part in life of the College. Commissioned in the Royal Artillery at the outbreak of war, he ended it as a staff major in the War Office liaising with the American Army. His teaching career began with an appointment at Ashby-de-la-Zouch Grammar School, thence to St. Bee's School in Cumbria, and finally as Headmaster of Shaftesbury School. During his twenty years there he achieved the enlargement and modernisation of the school's laboratories, the creation of day-rooms and studies for boarders and the restoration of the library. He was also responsible for acquiring the redundant St. Rumbold's Church as the school chapel. His early retirement at the age of 60 was forced upon him by increasing kidney trouble, a misfortune which he bore with characteristic courage.


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The academic world is the poorer for the passing of a splendid teacher and administrator and a stalwart Christian, and we in College mourn the loss of a most loyal member whose active interest in Pembroke and its affairs continued throughout his life. A. J. H. EXTON A.J.H. Exton matriculated from Caldy Grange Grammar School (Cheshire) in 1938, and took First Class Honours in Modern History. After holding a teaching post at Birkenhead School he was appointed Headmaster first at Oswestry School and finally at his old school, Caldy Grange. C. R. GREENE Dr. C. Raymond Greene died on 6 December 1982 at the age of 81, having been troubled for some months by illness. In his life, he achieved eminence as an endocrinologist and as a mountaineer. He graduated in 1923, qualified in 1927, supplicated for the D.M. in 1935, gained M.R.C.P. in 1941 and was elected F.R.C.P. in 1954. Some sixty odd years ago, he came up to Pembroke from Berkhamsted as Theodore Williams Scholar in Medicine. He was in residence at the same time as other notables, T.M. Knox, T.P. Creed, R.C. Lee, E.M. McGowin, N.F. McGowin, R. Martindale and H.T. Hopkinson, later distinguished as academics or as benefactors of the College. Pembroke of the twenties was a small happy-go-lucky college with half a dozen dons, who took a casual interest or none at all in a man reading science. The few scientists and medics such as Greene followed their own interests, fixed their tuition and rarely saw the dons except at terminal don rags. Looking back on his student days, Raymond Greene commented that he was shocked by the amount of rubbish he was taught. As is evidenced by his own reminiscences to be found elsewhere in this issue, he was better pleased with the instruction he received from Mr. H.L. Drake; because the latter was his moral tutor he was invited to Drake's room to identify port of different vintages. Greene was an apt pupil of the best known oenologist of the time; he became, so he claimed, infallible in spotting the vintage of a port. Sport, good wines and conversation were seemingly dominant in the twenties. Yet there were, nonetheless, curious ingredients in the life of Pembroke men at the time which nourished the individuality, independence and adventurous spirit so manifest in Raymond Greene. Raymond was the eldest of three sons of the headmaster of Berkhamsted School. His brothers were Graham Greene, the novelist, and Sir Hugh Greene, one time Director General of the B.B.C. The three were, so it is said, alike in physique, attributes and mannerisms. The first glimpse I had of him, he was, as senior, lording it over the scholars' table, adjudicating the challenge of a sconcing. Another Pembroke man of the time recalls Greene, decked in a scholar's gown and smoking his pipe, standing before the fire in the J.C.R. — his right presumably as its President — resolving, as he loved to do, the problems of his contemporaries. Greene was an impressive figure. Only the Master, the Rev. Dr. F. Holmes Dudden, seemed to exceed him in presence and


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dignity. Greene was very tall, 6'4", very good looking, with unruffled self-assurance. He spoke precisely, authoritatively and with remarkable clarity of diction. As one who knew writes "whether giving a lecture or talking to you in the quad, he always spoke as if delivering an elocution lesson. He seemed to be looking down from above — lofty not patronising, always aware of the elevation at which he lived, lived actually (a favourite word of his) not pretended to live". Together his height, speech and mannerisms combined to give him an air of superiority, which disturbed some not well acquainted with him. Raymond Greene studied his preclinical subjects at Oxford and Edinburgh. The academic approach to medicine was one he did not value too highly. Academic work was too flat for him. The hospital ward and the surgery were, he believed, the places where a doctor served his apprenticeship to the art of medicine. Excitement for him was the unusual case, the emergency in the home, street or mountain side — anything that demanded initiative and quick action. From Pembroke he passed to Westminster Hospital and qualified in 1927. After a short time with a group practice in Wiltshire — the first of its kind — he returned to Oxford as partner to Dr. Counsell, a well known character to the city people. Counsell was a sick man and so the whole work of the practice fell upon Greene. In his rooms at 10 Holywell he treated town and gown alike and with characteristic vigour rebuilt a shaky practice. He became as much a character as his partner and a favourite of undergraduates and of his panel patients of St. Ebbe's. These years of private practice (1929-38) gave him a thorough basic training in medicine. It was during them that he was elected to a Schorstein Fellowship in Medicine and, placing his practice in the hands of a locum, escaped to climb in the Himalayas. Raymond Greene had an itch to climb mountains and see what lay on the other side. So he wrote. His love of walking in and climbing mountains came from the encouragement given by his father during the family holidays in the Lake District. He arrived at Pembroke with an arm injured in a climbing accident and was soon involved in the activities of climbing clubs. Together with another Pembroke man, Herbert Carr, and others, he was very much concerned in the reformation of the O.U. Mountaineering Club. He climbed everywhere: Wales, Germany, the Alps, College Chapels, Halls and Towers — almost an obligatory exercise for mountaineers. These activities were, in a sense, preparatory to his later serious climbs. Greene had the makings of a great climber; he was tall, physically very strong (he once lifted a small car) and of great stamina. In 1931 he was persuaded by Mr. Frank Smythe to join an expedition to climb Mt. Kamet (25,000 ft). With four others he reached the summit — the highest reached in those days. Greater honour and pleasure came to him with the invitation to join the 1933 Everest Expedition as a climber and senior medical officer. This expedition has not always been given the importance it deserves for the knowledge it gained of high altitude climbing. Previous ones had failed; in 1924 Irvine and Mallory had disappeared without trace. Greene did not overlook the many physiological and medical problems. He was careful, as he


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was in most matters, to consult Drs. Haldane and Douglas, top authorities on respiratory physiology. He wished especially — besides a successful climb — to understand better the strange process of acclimatization and the efficacy of oxygen in mountain sickness, a condition he knew so well from his Kamet climb. (These studies were later published in the Lancet). In the Everest climb, Greene's strength and endurance came to the fore and even more so his medical knowledge, which ensured that those climbing were in tip-top shape. To Greene's great disappointment, after two attempts, they failed by a thousand feet to make the summit. The weather defeated them. Ferocious winds, snow blizzards and intense cold made the slopes impossibly dangerous. Greene wrote "Everest was the most beautiful and most appalling thing I had ever seen". However, he was rewarded; he was elected Vice-President of the Alpine Club, and it was he who announced over the radio on the morning of the Coronation Day of the Queen, 2 June 1953, the successful ascent of Everest by E.P. Hillary and Sherpd Sherpa Tenzing. Greene never regretted the eight odd years he spent in general practice. Indeed he firmly believed that all consultants should serve before the mast before promotion to higher levels. With the second World War, a medical officer in the Territorial Army, he moved to Aylesbury. Here he taught students evacuated from the London Medical Schools. More to his liking were the times he helped the Armed Services in the training of troops in scaling cliffs, in self-survival and in coping with minor emergencies. In one way his move to Aylesbury was fortunate; it reunited him with his friends in the London Hospitals. Between 1938 and 1945 he served his apprenticeship in endocrinology as a clinical assistant at the Westminster Hospital. So was awakened his interest in the thyroid gland. He established his private practice first in Wimpole Street and later Harley Street. He became honorary consultant to the Metropolitan Hospital, Royal Northern Hospital and the Royal Free but it was at the New End Hospital that he established himself as an authority upon thyroid conditions. As he realised, with new ways of assessing thyroid function, the times were propitious for advances in the study of this organ. He took full advantage of the new technological and other developments. Fortunately too he had able colleagues Sir Geoffrey Keynes and Dr. J. Linnell; together they were a formidable team. It is not surprising that Greene's ever increasing experience of thyroid dysfunction and his extraordinary diagnostic ability led to patients from all over the country and indeed the world being referred to him. His reputation became worldwide and his fame recognised. He was president of the 4th International Goitre Conference (1960 London), vice-president of the 5th Conference (1965 Rome) and vice-president of the European Thyroid Association (1966). Not so well known is Greene's interest in the problem of migraine. It was rather typical of him to dive into a problem which has floored so many. It is easy to appreciate the standard of the work he achieved from the fact that he was invited to give the Sandoz Lecture on this disease to the Institute of Neurology (1972) — an honour he well deserved.


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As one might expect from one so active, Greene published extensively. Among his scientific papers those upon the physiology of man at high altitude stand out as important contributions to our knowledge of respiration and exercise. In his writings he showed a fine regard for the English language; he chose his words carefully; he was a good teller of stories. His serious books included "Practice of Endocrinology" (1948), "Human Hormones" (1970) and "Sick Doctors" (1974). In much lighter vein was "Moments of Being" (1974), which relates in a semiautobiographical manner events in Raymond Greene's life in the 1920s and 1930s. This last reveals the circumstances whereby Greene participated in the protection of General de Gaulle on his official visit to England. For this he was awarded, as a mark of respect, by the General, the Cross of the Legion of Honour. It pleased him greatly. In recent years, he was associated with the publishing firm of Heinemann, first as a director and later as Chairman of the section on medical books. To his credit must be placed the high standard of books which appeared during his chairmanship. Raymond Greene was a fine physician honoured alike by his colleagues and his patients. He was also a fine Pembroke man loyal to college institutions and to its traditions. J.R.P. O'B. P. A. HARWOOD P.A. Harwood came up in 1924 as a Rhodes Scholar from the University of Nevada where he later became Professor of English. L. H. LESLIE-SMITH After winning an M.C. in World War 1 he matriculated from Brighton Grammar School and in 1922 took his degree in Modern History. He then took up journalism and became a member of the staff of The Times. F. E. OXTOBY Francis Oxtoby was killed in a motor accident in July 1982. A graduate of Leeds University he matriculated in 1919, after serving in World War I, and took his degree in English. He taught at Sationers' School from 1925 until 1958 and became Senior English Master there. In collaboration with F. Finn he wrote a series of Test Papers in the English Language for John Murray, and after retirement helped to set up the firm of Dean and Oxtoby Ltd. C. W. THOMAS He matriculated as a Rhodes Scholar from A. and M. College, Texas, and took his degree in English. He became Professor of English first at the University of Wisconsin and then at the University of Iowa. S. J. VAN HYNING He came up as a Rhodes Scholar from Reed College, Oregon, U.S.A., and later served in the Department of State, Washington.


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F. WOOD Entering the College from Manchester Grammar School in 1934, F. Wood took his degree in P.P.E. After a period of service in the Manchester Bank he became a lecturer at Hendon Technical College and finally was appointed Principal of Peel Park Technical College, Salford, in Lancashire. COLLEGE STAFF H. S. HONOUR On 1 September 1961, a fortunate day for Pembroke, Herbert Stanley Honour ("Stan") migrated to the College from Oriel. He was put in charge of No. 9 Staircase, and his trim figure became a familiar feature of the Chapel Quadrangle. He quickly absorbed the Pembroke tradition of pride in the College and in the job, and for over twenty years no major function was complete without his controlling presence. He will be greatly missed by many "generations" of our members when they revisit the College, and his wife Marie (who too has to her credit many years on the College staff) has the very true sympathy of all of us. G.R.F.B. ERRATUM The Editor would like to correct an error in the obituary of B. L. Strange which appeared in the 1981 issue of the Record. His appointment as Senior Lecturer in Management Studies was in 1967, not 1970 and was at the North Gloucestershire College of Technology at Cheltenham. The Editor hopes that Mrs Strange will accept the Record's apologies. ACADEMIC HONOURS 1982 FINAL HONOUR SCHOOLS 1982: FIRST CLASS S. Abbott Chemistry J. S. Bayliss Engineering Science S. B. Bowman Mathematics D. J. Burn Physiological Sciences Miss E. J. Carter Agricultural and Forest Sciences D. W. Fyfe Literae Humaniores A. Hwang Physiological Sciences Miss M. L. Phillips Mathematics N. D. White Jurisprudence G. A. Willis Philosophy and Theology HONOUR MODERATIONS 1982: FIRST CLASS J. Cook Mathematics M. Darville Mathematics


PEMBROKE RECORD

D. R. C. Phillips M. R. B. Taylor D. R. Tincello C. D. Walker

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English Language and Literature Music Engineering Science English Language and Literature

FIRST PUBLIC EXAMINATION 1982: DISTINCTIONS Miss N. S. Clayton Biology J. C. Grassi Law P. F. Kennedy Oriental Studies I. Lewin P.P.E. A. J. Neesom P.P.E. UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 1982 S. B. Bowman (1979) Junior Mathematics Prize J. C. Burns (1977) T.W. Greene Scholarship Miss P. Gaitet (1980) Heath Harrison Junior Scholarship N. R. Hope (1979) Chancellor's Prize for Latin Prose A. Howling (1978) Gordon Francis Prize A. Hwang (1979) Radcliffe Pharmacology Prize G. A. Willis (1978) Henry Wilde Prize in Philosophy ATHLETIC DISTINCTIONS 1982 P. T. Baxter (1980) Rifle Shooting Half Blue D. J. Burn (1979) Athletics Blue M. Darville (1980) Cross Country Blue S. J. L. Foster (1978) Rowing Blue Miss E. A. Gallagher (1980) Table Tennis Half Blue Miss D. Georgiou (1981) Netball Blue J. W. Hall (1980) Pentathalon Half Blue K. Knapp (1981) Cross Country Blue P. D. B. West (1973) Croquet Half Blue PORTRAIT OF THE MASTER In November 1982 R.S. Graham (1935), Honorary Fellow, presented to the College a portrait of the Master by Bryan Organ. Mr Organ's work (which came to the attention of the wider public because of the malicious damage done to his portrait of the Princess of Wales), is already familiar in Oxford: his striking diptych of the Chancellor (and Pembroke's Visitor), Sir Harold Macmillan, hangs in the entrance hall of the University Offices in Wellington Square, and two other Heads of House have been painted by him: Sir Alexander Cairncross (St Peter's) and Sir Rex Richards (Merton). The portrait of the Master (acrylic on canvas, 4'6" square, and predominantly green in tone) is informal, and perhaps less radical in conception than at least two of the above, yet it marks what many will agree is a welcome break with the long tradition of academic portraits which grace the Hall. It is beyond any doubt an excellent likeness (though the Master protests that it makes him look nicer than he is), and at the same time a most distinguished picture which can only enhance Mr Organ's reputation. Custom forbids its hanging in the Hall while the Master is still in office, but it was the


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donor's wish that it should be visible to all members of the College, and it is consequently hung for the time being in a prominent position in the Library. The College is indeed grateful to Mr Graham (and Mr Organ) for this important and interesting addition to its collection. Nicholas Mann

THE LIBRARY The College library has seen quite a number of developments during the last 12 months. After 24 years as Deputy Librarian Mrs. M.W. Cordy retired in July 1982. She has been succeeded by Miss. J.M. Richardson, MLS, ALA, whose appointment began in May. A new library assistant, Mrs. K. Smith, was appointed in April. There have since been some changes in the general running of the library, its routines and processes. A new book-charging system is now in operation, utilising datelabels and stamp. All borrowers can now be aware of exactly when their books are due for return. A box has been installed through which returned books are now posted, thereby ensuring that no book is again borrowed until it has been officially discharged. A book-stand on the ground floor now displays the variety of new library accessions and a list of all these new additions is issued at the end of each term. A printed guide to the library was produced during the summer vacation and copies were issued to all new students on arrival. Introductory tours of the library were also provided for small subject groupings. Detailed guides to the catalogue and shelves were also completed during the summer vacation and should help to ensure efficient use of the catalogue and accurate location of the books on the shelves. To help towards this end, a detailed subject index and a catalogue of the library's serial holdings have now been compiled. Both the Mathematics and Medicine sections have now been reclassified according to a simplified version of the Dewey Decimal Classification Scheme, whilst retaining their traditional initial symbols. This has enabled the sections to be very accurately classified by a logically structured system which allows for future developments and expansion within the subjects. There are plans for further reclassification of some sections during the next long vacation. The following statistics may be of interest: (there are no previous figures with which to compare these) Books borrowed June — December 1982: 4,362 Books added to stock May — December 1982: 406


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There has been a steady trickle of inquiries regarding the rare books and specialist collections, including a request from the Bibliotheque Nationale for copies from one of the rare and valuable items in the Chandler Aristotelian collection. On 19 June 1982 the Johnson Society of Lichfield made its Summer Pilgrimage to Pembroke. The visit proved to be most enjoyable and Miss Helen Forsyth presented the library with an engraving of Dr. Johnson and one of her own poems. The library mounted a modest exhibition of relevant material to coincide with the Sir Thomas Browne Tercentenary Commemorative Dinner held on 18 October 1982. On 30 November, the Master's portrait was ceremonially unveiled and now hangs in a commanding position in the Rare Books Room. J. M. RICHARDSON Deputy Librarian

PEMBROKE COLLEGE LIBRARY — GIFTS, 1982 Donor Donor

Mr. D. D. Prentice

Author

Hartley, T. C.

Title Title

The foundations of European Community Law Prof. A. Woolrich Woolrich, A. Commonwealth to Protectorate Rev. Rev. J. J. E. E.Gethyn-Jones Gethyn-JonesGethyn-Jones, Gethyn-Jones,J.J.E.E. George George Thorpe Thorpe and and the Berkeley Company Mrs. Ward Latham, R. E. Revised medieval latin word-list Mrs. Ward Latham, R. E. Dictionary of medieval latin from British sources Fascicles I & II M. J. Petry Petry, M. J. Wijsbegeerte in Rotterdam in Heden en Verleden I. Stanbrook Stanbrook, I. British nationality — the new law Mr. M. St. J. Parker Preston, A. E. St. Nicholas, Abingdon and other papers Mr. & Mrs. Strubell Trueta, J. Trueta, surgeon in peace and war B. Lyons Lyons, B. The tread is strong Prof. D. Giesen Who's Who in Germany 7th.ed. (2 vols.) Came Canon B. Carne Friends of Lydiard Tregoze Report No. 15 Mr. N. Cronk Voltaire Traitee de metaphysique (1734) Mr. N. Cronk Voltaire Le taureau blanc J. T. Gilmore Gilmore, J. T. John Mitchinson, 1833 — 1918, Bishop and Educator Dr. S. Blackburn Hare, R. M. Moral thinking B. J. Dendle Galdos, B. P. Los articulos politios R. Dingwall & Dingwall, R. & J. M. Eekelaar Eekelaar, J. M. Care proceedings T. Hopkinson Hopkinson, T. Of this our time M. B. Abram Abram, M. B. The day is short (2 copies) Y. Nakano Boswell, J. Life of Samuel Johnson Vol. II (first translation into Japanese by Y. Nakano) J. D. Latham Allen, R. The Arabic novel J. D. Latham Bosworth, C. E. Al-Maqrizi's "Book of contention Al-Magrizi's and strife concerning the relations between the Banu Umayya and the Banu Hashim."


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Mr. D. D. Prentice J. Beer Dr. P. J. Godman Mr. N. Cronk Dr. S. A. CederholmWilliams Dr. P. J. Cuff

Burn, E. H. Beer, J. Lefkowitz, M. R. Regnard

Dr. N. T. James Prof. D. Gray

Weibel, E. R. Gray, D.

Dr. Z. A. Pelczynski Mr. D. D. Prentice Dr. A. Batty-Shaw Dr. A. Batty-Shaw Mr. A. D. Hazlewood

Falk, Z. W. Parker & Mellows Browne 300 Cttee Browne 300 Cttee Hazlewood, A. D.

S. Parry Prof. D. Brewer

Maponya, M. March & Parrinello

Prof. D. Brewer The Master Dr. J. Platt

Aitchison & Hey Platt, J.

Dr. J. D. Fleeman Mr. J. H. C. Leach

Gilson, D. Bernstein, P. L.

Mr. J. H. C. Leach

Hayes, D. A.

Mr. J. H. C. Leach

Mendelson, M.

R. D'Unienville

D'Unienville, R.

Lefkowitz, M. R.

Modern law of real property Who is Jesus? Heroines and hysterics Le joueur joucur Who's Who in the Commonwealth 1982 Women's life in Greece and ancient Rome Stereological methods Vols. 1 & 2 A marriage of Mercury and philology Law and religion Modern law of trusts 4th.ed. Portrait exhibition catalogue Sir Thomas Browne of Norwich Irrigation economics in poor countries The hungry earth: a play Collective effects in solids and liquids Gauge theories in particle physics The Best of Smithsonian Reformed thought and scholasticism Bibliography of Jane Austen Portfolio management and efficient markets Investments: Analysis and management Investment analysis and securities markets Histoire politique de l'isle de France

Other donations have been received from A. G. Rice, J. A. Burney and K. B. Smith. In addition to these, a donation was received which formed part of the library of the late W. S. Johnston, sometime Senior English Master and Second Master at Stockport Grammar School and an alumnus of St. Catherine's. The works comprise a scholarly collection of AngloSaxon and Middle English (several hundred in all) and were presented to the library by R. Higson (1973), to whom they were bequeathed. Mr. R. B. Peat (1946), has provided an extensive list of his personal library, with a promise to leave the entire collection to the College. library. Mrs. M. McCallum, wife of the former Master, presented the library with seven books on law and political science from her husband's collection. On the death of Mrs. M. King, widow of F. J. King (1919), who had been College Archivist for many years, the College was found to be the residuary legatee of her estate. To mark the gratitude of the College to their memory, a copy of the Encyclopaedia Britannica has been purchased for the library.


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THE ARCHIVES An Assistant Archivist, Mr. A. H. Lawes, has been recently appointed by the College Archivist, Dr. John Tanner, to re-order and produce a catalogue of the archives of the College and associated collections of documents. The older college records, and those of intrinsic value, are stored in a strongroom with controlled atmospheric conditions, in the McGowin Library. More modern papers are housed in the Muniment Tower of the Hall, which, with minor structural repairs and internal alterations, ought to provide adequate storage well into the next century, for semi-current records generated by the college administration and for over-size archives, maps, plans and large volumes. Most of the College archives have never been properly catalogued, and many discoveries remain to be made. There are intellectual discoveries, with regard to the development of Pembroke as a college and its role in the life of the University as a whole, themes neglected in Macleane's published history of the College, as outside the historical fashions of the late nineteenth century, when it was written. There are also physical discoveries of neglected, and perhaps forgotten, papers, documents and even objects, relating to the history of the College, both within, and outside, the walls of College. Only recently, a forgotten hoard of photographs of members of College, dating back to the 1920s, was unearthed in the drying cupboards of the kitchen servants' laundry room. These discoveries, gathered in, logically ordered and publicised, re-assert the role of Pembroke College in the future, by strengthening and demonstrating its foundations as firmly rooted in the past. Donations of material relevant to the history of the College and its members will be gratefully received, whether they relate to the building of the chapel or to the admission of women; even the diary of today's undergraduate may provide a basis for tomorrow's doctoral thesis. Donations received in 1982 Mrs R. B. McCallum Papers relating to Pembroke College and the General Strike, 1926 (currently on exhibition in the McGowin Library). Miss C. Battaglino Script of the Pembroke College Revue, 1982. A. H. LAWES Assistant Archivist SIR THOMAS BROWNE at PEMBROKE On 19 October 1982 the College commemorated the three-hundredth anniversary of the death of Sir Thomas Browne. The date is usually held also to have been the date of his birth, but Browne himself told John Aubrey, was born born November November 19, Aubrey, in in aaletter letterof of24 24August August1672, 1672,'Iwas 1605', and Antony Wood adopted that date in his Athenae Oxonienses,


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presumably on Aubrey's authority. Some thirty years after his death his daughter Elizabeth Lyttleton asserted that he was born on 19 October, but she was probably influenced by the anonymous "Life" which was prefixed to Browne's Posthumous Works, published towards the end of 1712. The date 19 October has prevailed as the date of both Browne's birth and death, partly because mankind loves a convenience, and partly because it was accepted by Dr Johnson in his 'Life of Sir Thomas Browne' which was prefixed to his edition of Browne's Christian Morals, 1756, a biography largely founded on the materials in the Posthumous Works. It is certain that Browne died on 19 October 1682, an event provoked, according to William Stukeley, by over-indulgence in a dish of roast venison. Browne lies buried in the church of St. Peter Mancroft, in Norwich. Browne was at Winchester before he entered Broadgates Hall as a commoner on 5 December 1623, aged eighteen, being, as Johnson remarked (quoting Antony Wood), `the 'the first man of eminence graduated from the new college, to which the zeal or gratitude of those that love it most, can wish little better, than that it may long proceed as it began'. Of Browne's college career nothing more is known except that he was at the time when Broadgates Hall was transformed into Pembroke College, the senior undergraduate member. As such he was nominated to make a suitable speech to the King's messengers when they presented the new college with its Letters Patent dated 29 June 1624. The story of this occasion is told by Henry Savage, Master of Balliol, in his history of his own college, Balliofergus, 1668. One section of Savage's book is entitled Natalitia Collegii Pernbrochiani Pembrochiani Oxonii, 1624, and it includes the text of Browne's Latin speech, his first known composition. Savage's interest in this occasion arose from the fact that when Thomas Tesdale of Abingdon bequeathed money to Roysse's Free School there to provide places at Oxford for six scholars and seven fellows, he first fixed upon Balliol as the proper place for them. Balliol thus received his ÂŁ300, but shortly afterwards Richard Wightwick of East Ilsley llsley agreed with the Abingdonians that he would give further money to establish a separate institution at Oxford for the Abingdon scholars, and so Tesdale asked Balliol for his money back. Unluckily Balliol had already spent the money, and a further ÂŁ40, on the purchase of 'Caesar's Lodgings', some tenements which stood where the Martyr's Memorial now stands and which they had designed, in Savage's words, 'for a present receptacle for the said six scholars'. In these financial straits Balliol were helped out by their Visitor, George Abbot, Archbishop of Canterbury, and the money was handed over to the energetic and indefatigable Principal of Broadgates, Thomas Clayton, D.D., D.D., Regius Professor of Medicine. Balliol Banjol were not pleased, and the memory rankled. The drafts of Savage's history, preserved in Balliol library, show that as he successively composed this part of his story, his anger and resentment did not diminish. Whilst these matters were going on Thomas Clayton had not been quiet. He concerted with the Abingdon benefactors to secure his position by enlisting the aid of William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke


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who was Chancellor of the University, as 'God-father of this new Christned Hall', and Herbert brought the support of King James to the foundation of the new college which was therefore named after Pembroke. Against such allies the power of the Archbishop of Canterbury was nothing. From these events we derive our name, our coat of arms, and the fact that the Chancellor of the University is our Visitor. All this was brought to a triumphant conclusion on 5 August 1624 when the King's emissaries arrived to read out the Letters Patent to the assembled aularians who were thereby changed into members of Pembroke College. The transformation was greeted by the new collegians with speeches, first by Browne, then by John Lee, BA, one of the Abingdon scholars, by Matthew Turner, MA, tutor in philosophy, and lastly by Thomas Clayton, erstwhile Principal, and now Master. In the assembly which was held in Broadgates Hall, were the scholars rescued from Balliol, now only five in number, for one of them, Crabtree, had 'dyed of a stab with a knife, given him by the unlucky hand of a Fresh-man of three Weeks standing.' The survivors had good reason to be grateful for the founding of the new college. Browne graduated BA on 31 June 1626, and then, probably influenced by Clayton, took up the practice of medicine. He seems to have remained in Oxford for a short time, but soon began his continental travels in the study of medicine in France and Italy, at Montpelier and Padua, returning home by way of Leyden where he was made MD. In 1637 he removed to Norwich where he remained in medical practice until his death in 1682. His writings reflect the variegated nature of seventeenth-century learning, and something of the variety of Browne's travels. They show a mixture of inextinguishable curiosity and wide reading in several languages, with a mystical credulity and a desire to assimilate all knowledge into a single whole. In Browne this latter motive inhibited the development of any mode of thought which was not subservient to Christian belief, and it left his budding scientific curiosity immethodical and confused. The central assertion of his Christian faith in Religio Medici, 1642, is couched in language resonant and stately, which is further dignified by Browne's habit of naturalizing Greek and Latinate words into English. This stylistic habit is itself a metaphor for his desire to universalise both his language and his faith. JJ.D.F. .D.F . FURTHER PRE-WAR PEMBROKE MEMORIES The articles by Eversley Belfield and Colin Leach in the 1981 Record prompted a number of members to add their own memories. The first of these must now sadly also serve as a memorial to its author, Dr. Raymond Greene: Mr. Belfield's remark, in the Pembroke College Record of 1981, that Drake "was an expert on wines and I believe a connoisseur of port" was something of an understatement. I came up to Pembroke in 1920 as Theodore Williams Scholar in Medicine. In those days there was no tutor in physiology in the college and I had to find a tutor elsewhere. Drake was what was called my


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"moral tutor" but he naturally knew nothing of my subject. At Collections, so dreaded by many because a bad report by one's tutor to the assembled fellows could mean at best a severe warning and at worst expulsion, Drake would report "Greene is a physiologian. To say more would be superfluous". Dudden would ask "Getting on all right, Greene?" I would reply "Yes, Master, I think so" and Dudden would say "Well, enjoy your vacation" and I would depart. But if he knew nothing of physiology he knew all that was to be known about wine. He was the best-known oenologist of his day. Several years later, when I had become a research fellow, we were both dining in Exeter. The Rector, a very learned man but no gourmet, turned to Drake and said "Oh, Drake, what would you like to drink? There's some red wine or white wine or beer or cider if you would prefer that". Drake became visibly pale. Wolfenden, the steward of the Common Room, took pity on him. "I know you would prefer red, Drake, and this is rather good. It's so and so of such and such a year". Drake accepted it but he could not so quickly overcome the shock. Dinner over we retired to the Common Room and Wolfenden was careful to sit next to him. "Do tell me", he said, "what you think of our port". Drake sniffed his glass, took a very small sip and delivered judgement. "An excellent Taylor '96" he said, "but I bought Cockburn's of that year. I think it has matured just a little better". From that moment the clouds were dispersed. He had a strong sense of duty to the young men committed to his care. Twice a term I was invited to his room after Hall. He would lay out three glasses of port, representatives of the three vintages then available in the Senior Common Room, and I would be asked to identify them. By the time I went down I could do it infallibly. His habit was to buy twice as much of the young wine of his choice as his colleagues could consume and later to sell the remainder at so large a profit that he would lay down a fresh supply at no cost. Pembroke was famous for having the best wine in the University. I hope it still is. C. T. Quinn-Young writes: My undergraduate days of 1922 to 1926 saw some much needed innovations in College. First, in 1923, came electricity to replace the oil lamps previously used, and then in 1925 came baths. Before this we used tin baths in our rooms or if we were feeling rich went along to the Clarendon Hotel (where Woolworths was) and for the expenditure of one shilling bathed in luxury. I moved into digs in my last year so never enjoyed the College baths which were on the site now occupied by the McGowin Library. Which reminds me that I knew the two elder McGowins and was sorry to hear of the recent death of Floyd. Other Americans of my time were E. K. Lindley, also recently deceased, whom I well remember as a very active President of the J.C.R. Then there was Senator Fulbright, now both an Honorary Fellow and an Honorary K.B.E. Later I found our brief acquaintance helpful when I became involved in the Fulbright Exchange of teachers between the U.S.A. and African


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countries. But I must not be led into mentioning too many of my contemporaries who have become well-known personalities, though Belfield's remarks about Pembroke's academic record remind me that on the very first time that the Degree examination of P.P.E. was introduced John Coatman achieved First Class Honours. He was a very remarkable man, having come up in his forties with a pre-first war degree, from Manchester I think and then some years in India. He later reached high rank in the ICS and later still was well known in academic circles, once again I think largely at Manchester University. Incidentally in spite of his age he was in the College Rugger XV. Of the Dons mentioned by Belfield, Homes-Dudden, Drake and Salt were all there in my time but I suppose that the Dean of my days had gone. He was the Reverend A. B. Burrows, who I felt would like to have been pompous which would scarcely have suited such a small man. Drake I met some years later on the platform at Paddington and he greeted me with "I remember you as never having achieved a degree". When I told him that I was on my way to Oxford to receive my M.A. he apologised and later that day I was given the treat of sampling his vintage port in the S.C.R. As regards College staff, Ponsford took over from Millen, himself quite a character, in 1924 I think. Ponsford had been a wireless operator at sea for some years, his last ship having been, I believe the old Mauritania. The butler in my time was named Mountstephen who like Duke was aloof, dignified and portly. The Manciple I knew was generally referred to as "old Billy Gribble". I don't think he can be the one that Belfield knew as though he was a bit pompous I don't remember him as having been in any way unpopular. A word about "sconces" which in the middle twenties were more often three pints than two. The victim had the right to protest, in writing and in Latin to the Don presiding at High Table to whom the petition was handed by the butler. This was a mere formality as even if the petitioner was a Classical scholar the reply was invariably the same "Latine scribendum est". Amongst some memories of his own undergraduate days, A.H. Bray (1929), includes the following note about a Pembroke man of much earlier vintage: A remarkable and renowned 19th century Oxford character with a close connection with Pembroke was Robert Stephen Hawker, Hawker of Morwenstow, who lived from 1803 to 1885. Hawker entered Pembroke in 1823. In 1824, after his marriage to Charlotte I'ans, senior to him in age by 20 years, he was forced as a married man to transfer to Magdalen Hall. He won the Newdigate Poetry Prize and became a close friend of Francis Jeune, Master of Pembroke from 1843-64. His subsequent life became a legend told in biographies from that of the Reverend S. Baring-Gould ("Onward Christian soldiers") soon after Hawker's death, to that of Piers Brendon in 1975 (Cape). Margaret F. Burrows wrote a study of Hawker's "Thoughts and Poetry" (Blackwell 1926) which is of much interest. Hawker's first marriage gave 40 years of constant companionship, much of it while he was Vicar of Morwenstow in North Cornwall. When Charlotte died in February 1863 he was grief-stricken. In December 1864 Hawker was married


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a second time, to Pauline Kuczinski, who was 40 years his junior: they had three daughters. His poetry has a place in "The Oxford Book of English Verse" which, however, does not include the lines: "And have they fixed the where and when? And shall Trelawny die? Here's twenty thousand Cornish men Will know the reason why!" nor "The Quest of the Sangraal", which Piers Brendon calls "his great blank-verse epic". John Fowles in his Foreword to Piers Brendon's book links Hawker in that "long national chain of literary characters whose summit and cynosure is Dr. Johnson". That alone makes Hawker of interest to Pembroke men and women. As with Johnson and so many other Pembroke characters, tales about Hawker are innumerable. BOOKS Of This Our Time: by Tom Hopkinson (Hutchinson [1982] , pp.317, £8.95) Always difficult, when reviewing a book with a valid local interest, to avoid the charge of parochialism: as though a specialist critic of the recent (1982) biography of Lord Alanbrooke should concentrate on the treatment of the Field-Marshal's interest in ornithology. Sir Tom Hopkinson was (and is) a Pembroke man, but we must remember that his years here numbered no more than four out of the 76 (happily not out) which he has scored as of this writing; and that it was his creation and editorship of Picture Post which brought him to the notice — even into the limelight — of the wider world. Picture Post! Hard, perhaps, to realise that a quarter of a century has passed since the demise of the once famous, even indispensable, weekly magazine, costing — if memory serves — four old pence; so few under the age of forty-five or even fifty are likely to remember it with any clarity. Tom Hopkinson disputes that Picture Post was killed by television, but social historians, looking at parallel events in the U.S.A., may well believe that the actuante of TV was bound to sound the death-knell of any journal which attempted, in a sense, to match what television does — but a week later. As Charles Peguy put it in Les Cahiers de la Quinzaine (1914): 'Homer is new this morning; and perhaps nothing is as old as today's newspaper'. Hopkinson's vigorous exposition, excellent memory and enjoyment of life lived to the full all come through clearly in this pleasantly written first instalment of his memoirs. Son of a University teacher suddenly turned clergyman, he early knew the turn of the wheel of fortune: there is a delightful account of how his father actually asked his children — one of them an infant of some four summers — if they would permit him to change his vocation. After St. Edward's School, Oxford, Hopkinson came up to Pembroke in 1923, with a scholarship won largely on the strength of Collingwood's emphatic approval of his English Essay. He read Greats, which he took in 1927: a distinguished year, when the list of those taking Firsts included Oliver Franks, Ronald Syme, and T.B.L. Webster. Sir Tom would be the first to


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agree that his own interests were not primarily academic; and, indeed, the Pembroke of that distant period exudes a raffish charm which comes through clearly not only in this autobiography but also in that of the late Patrick Campbell (Lord Glenavy). Other familiar Pembroke figures who come vigorously to life in these pages are Robert Martindale (whose bounty we so regularly enjoy at the Martindale Dinner), and (Senator) William Fulbright. Bernard Miles — with whom Hopkinson was later to share a flat — makes a brief appearance, as do Rex Warner and Cecil Day-Lewis (from Wadham), but there is no evidence that Hopkinson's path ever crossed that of Evelyn Waugh, who, albeit at Hertford, must have been another contemporary. Rigours of the time include long walks to wash (there seem to have been no baths at all except for tubs in one's rooms), and, dare I say it, some compulsory chapel at a time when most (if not all) other Colleges had relinquished the practice. An agreeable frankness about his life at Oxford shines through the pages describing his time here, and I should, I think, have enjoyed being a member of the Jawbone Society (one donkey's jawbone, courtesy of Selfridges, £3 £3.3s.). 3s.). Sir Tom's early career after Oxford had its up and downs. Marriage to Antonia White ("Frost in May") was not without its problems, though life with someone who could assert with veracity "I've been married three times and have a certificate of virginity signed by the Pope" can never have been dull. Journalism in the 1930s, like everything else, was affected by the depression, and the Hopkinsons were often poor: it was not until the encounter with Stefan Lorant and the creation of the Hulton-financed Picture Post that his career really took off. This book has been widely, and favourably, noticed: rightly, for its author was one of the real innovators in the journalism of the time. It is valuable to have an account of life at Picture Post, and it could have come from no better hand. The somewhat portentous note struck by the title of this engaging book is wholly belied by its contents. Colin Leach John Henry Newman: and Work, Work, By By Brian Martin (Chatto Newman: His His Life life and and Windus [1982] , pp.160, £8.95) A brief notice of this elegantly-produced, well-written, and pleasantly illustrated book is called for on at least three counts: first, interest in Cardinal Newman and the Oxford Movement, never worse than dormant, has revived in a most marked fashion over the last decade; secondly, Brian Martin has long been a Lecturer in English at Pembroke; and the third reason lies in "the Rev. Walter Mayers, of Pembroke College, Oxford". Mayers, says Martin, was the schoolboy Newman's "most influential teacher"; and "inspired him with conversation and sermons". Mayers, indeed, Newman later wrote, was "the human means of this beginning of divine faith in me". Mayers — who once asked Newman to go to an Oxford tailor "and request him to make me a pair of mixture pantaloons by Monday" — subsequently had an Oxfordshire parish where, at least once, Newman stood in for him and preached — somewhat unsatisfactorily — on the subject of the starving silk-weavers of Spitalfields; and it was Newman who was to preach Mayers' funeral


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sermon in 1828, to the considerable gratification of his widow. Brian Martin's book has been widely noticed elsewhere; but we may pardonably feel it to be a matter of more than parochial interest that the early career of one of England's greatest men of the Church (controversy apart) was so influentially guided by a former member of this College. To read Brian Martin's account of Newman, that remarkable but not always appealing figure, is to have recreated for one the times when a future prime minister of England would wait agog to hear whether an Oxford clergyman intended to take the path to Rome. Colin Leach BOOKS ON OXFORD In the summer of 1982, a member of the SCR visiting Oxford from California asked the Bursar for a list of some books on Oxford. Since it is possible that what was then produced may have a wider interest for Oxford men and women, we are publishing here the letter which Colin Leach wrote in reply. Any queries, please, to go to him rather than to the Editor! Dear Rolf, I wonder if you realised just how severe a task you were setting me when you asked for a bibliography on Oxford — or, rather, on its University? The standard Bibliography of E.H. Cordeaux and D.H. Merry (Oxford 1968) includes nearly 9,000 items and is itself the essential start for any researcher, however languid and desultory his approach. For our purposes, we had better limit ourselves to a selection from the 300 or so books relating to the University and the Colleges that are on my own shelves — and thus are more or less available, even if a lot of them are the result of fairly diligent searching in second-hand bookshops and catalogues. For the University itself, Sir Charles Mallet's three-volume History (London, 1924-1927, reprinted 1968) remains the standard work — though it will in due course be supplanted by work, of agonising slowness, now in progress. V.H.H. Green's much shorter History (Batsford 1974) is still available, and is useful despite a habit of generalising from the author's own College (Lincoln) to the University. Far more popular books are Jan (formerly James) Morris's Oxford (Faber, 1965), excoriated in a review by A.J.P. Taylor, Felix Markham's Oxford (Weidenfeld, 1967), which can only be recommended for the coffee-table, and David Piper's The Treasures of Oxford (Paddington Press, 1977), which splendidly illustrates an aspect of Oxford of which undergraduates, in particular, are often surprisingly unaware. More specialised University history can be found in A.D. Godley's Oxford in the Eighteenth Century (Methuen, 1908) or W.R. Ward's Victorian Oxford (Cass, 1968), which emphasizes the political aspects of University life. For earlier times, H.C. Maxwell Lyte's History.. from the Earliest Times to the year 1530 (Macmillan, 1886) provides solid but occasionally indigestible fare. Loyalties are far more often directed to Colleges than to the more abstract idea presented by the University, and this has left its mark


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on the literature. Nineteen of the 'old' Colleges had their histories published in a series issued by F.E. Robinson near the turn of the century; inevitably variable, they include John Buchan's first work — Brasenose (1898). The history of Pembroke (1900), by D. Macleane, is a shortened version of his very thorough Pembroke, published for the Oxford Historical Society in 1897. Of many other College histories, two are outstandingly good: R.H. Hodgkin's Six Centuries of an Oxford College (Blackwell, 1949), which has Queen's as its subject, and V.H.H. Green's The Commonwealth of Lincoln College 1427-1977 (Oxford, 1979). New College and Balliol have also been fortunate in their historians (I know of no fewer than four histories of New College); by contrast, Keble — so far as I am aware — has no published history at all, except for a few pages in A. Clark's The Colleges of Oxford (Methuen 1891). Of even greater fascination, perhaps, are the lives of the great men who have peopled the Colleges. If Anthony Wood's A thenae Oxonienses (second edition, 1721) is fundamental, it is also scarce and expensive; his Life and Times (1632-1965), superbly edited in five volumes by Andrew Clark for the Oxford Historical Society (1891-1900), is equally important and is still in print; the abridgement edited by Llewelyn Powys (Wishart, 1932) provides a doubtless easier access, but it is a long time since I have seen any copy but my own. The Remarks and Collections of Thomas Hearne (Oxford Historical Society, 1884-1918), edited in eleven volumes by various hands, cover the period from 1705 to 1735, but are confessedly for the aficionado. You will perhaps be more interested in the last century or so; and the wealth of biographies is enormous. I shall, for the moment, pass over Newman, Keble, Pusey and the Oxford Movement; with a passing glance at G.V. Cox's Recollections of Oxford (1870) and W. Tuckwell's readable Reminiscences (1900) let us turn immediately to Mark Pattison's remarkable Memoirs (Macmillan, 1885; reprint, Centaur Press 1969) — to which I was introduced as an undergraduate, by Robert Shackleton — which are excellently commented upon by John Sparrow's Pattison and the Idea of a University (Cambridge, 1967). Pattison's Rectorship of Lincoln substantially overlapped Jowett's Mastership of Balliol, and the contrast between the two men has often been drawn to telling effect, even if it has led to exaggeration of the difference in their approaches to a University education. For Jowett himself, the somewhat pious biography of E. Abbott and L. Campbell (Murray, 1897; two volumes, or three including the Letters, 1899) has happily been replaced by Geoffrey Faber's Jowett: A Portrait with Background (Faber, 1957). At this point, mere numeration must briefly take over; my shelves have — inter alios — biographies (or autobiographies) of such Oxford notabilities as Maurice Bowra; Gilbert Murray; C.S. Lewis; Lord Cherwell; A.L. Rowse (four volumes so far); "Sligger" Urquhart; J.C. Masterman; Enid Starkie; Walter Pater; John Ruskin; Lewis Carroll (several are available; I particularly recommended his Letters, edited by Morton N. Cohen in two volumes, (Macmillan, 1979); Pembroke's R.G. Collingwood (Autography, Oxford 1939); and Warden Spooner of New College (by William Hayter, published by W.H. Allen, 1977). But the list could be greatly, and


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perhaps wearisomely, extended and I shall only add for you, as a scientist, A.E. Gunther's biography of Robert T. Gunther (Oxford, 1967), the man who was chiefly responsible for establishing Oxford's Museum of the History of Science. If I passed over the Oxford Movement, it was assuredly not for any lack of books upon that controversial subject. Interest in, or knowledge of, religious history or theological doctrines is a help — but not essential — for following events at Oxford between 1833 and 1845; read R.W. Church's classic The Oxford Movement: Twelve Years: 18331845 (first published by Macmillan in 1891, but reissued by the University of Chicago in 1970), or Tom Mozley's lively Reminiscences: Chiefly of Oriel College and the Oxford Movement (Longmans Green, 1882; republished by Gregg, 1969), which were not regarded as accurate by his brother-in-law — Cardinal Newman: of many books on Newman himself, Brian Martin's admirable study (Chatto, 1982) is the latest. G. Faber's Oxford Apostles (1933) gives character studies of all the Movement's leading figures: a recent paperback reprint is still available from Faber's. Oxford has always attracted the sociological, or pseudo-sociological, survey, and I own more of them than I care nowadays to admit. Dacre Balsdon's Oxford Now and Then (Duckworth, 1970) is a good example; N. Longmate's Oxford Triumphant (Phoenix, 1954) has a photograph of your correspondent diligently waiting to enter the Radcliffe Camera, while wearing a raincoat and a resigned expression. Christopher Hollis's Oxford in the Twenties (Heinemann, 1976) is of particular interest to me, since my father was up at that time. The same author's The Oxford Union (Evans, 1965) is obviously of more specialised interest. J.C. Masterman's To Teach the Senators Wisdom (Hodder, 1952) is not only great fun but quite instructive — and, I think, the first book on Oxford that I ever read. First editions of John Betjeman's An Oxford University Chest (London 1938) are distinctly expensive; but Oxford have brought out a cheap paperback reprint. Two final subjects as diverse as they could well be: architecture and fiction. For architecture — and much else — go, of course, to N. Pevsner and J. Sherwood's indispensable Oxfordshire in the Buildings of England series (Penguin 1974, reprinted 1979), superlative value, or the Royal Commission of Historical Monuments' monumental and well-illustrated City of Oxford (HMSO, 1939); incredibly, this was still in print at £5.25 until a year or so ago. The Victoria Counties History of Oxford (Oxford, 1954) is well considered, but I have only recently been able to buy a somewhat expensive copy, and the book is scarce. It is tempting but would be unfair to include Jan Morris's The Oxford Book of Oxford (O.U.P., 1978) among the works of fiction, but a number of mistakes which I, among others, pointed out in the first edition, have been corrected in the second; an enjoyable bedside book, which naturally plunders a number of the other works already referred to. Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited (1945) is only one of the best-known of the enormous number of novels to include a section on Oxford, and to list even a selection would be tedious. Of novels wholly devoted to Oxford, Dorothy Sayers's Gaudy Night (Gollancz,


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Portrait of the Master by Bryan Organ

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The Master and Fellows, Trinity Term 1982

Mrs. Cordy, Assistant Librarian 1958 — 1982


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James Smithson, matriculated 1782

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The Launching of the "Sir Thomas Browne"

Pembroke's Croquet Cuppers Champions, 1982


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1935) has probably enjoyed the largest readership. An earlier generation enjoyed "Cuthbert Bede" 's The Adventures of Mr. Verdant Green (London 1900) and Sandford of Merton by "Belinda Blinders" (D.F.T. Coke) (Oxford, 1903), an agreeable spoof. Tom Brown at Oxford (1881) is a disappointing sequel to its famous predecessor. But Max Beerhohm's Zuleika Dobson (1911) remains, for many, the Oxford novel, a position from which J.I.M. Stewart's enjoyable, if rather mannered and ponderous, five-volume sequence A Staircase in Surrey (Gollancz, 1975-1978) is unlikely to displace it. And there is a plethora of detective novels set in Oxford Colleges. Enough is enough. There are books on Oxford's stone, pictures, gardens, libraries, cricketers, women, actors, oarsmen, townplanning, The Rhodes Trust and goodness knows what else. Guidebooks abound. There is even an Oxford University Handbook. If you want more — and I scarcely think it likely — you have only to ask. Colin Leach THE MIDDLE COMMON ROOM President: Clair Battaglino/Ian McComas Secretary: Nick Hudson Treasurer: John Slatter/Julian Olszowka Bar Steward: Dennis Washburn/Bill Clement The election of a new committee brought new life to the MCR at the end of Hilary Term 1982. Organized social events began during Easter vacation highlighted by a pre-Boat Race Brunch. Trinity Term began in a novel fashion, with an all-night party in the MCR featuring Bucks Fizz and lots of good food. Two videos were shown in the early hours in an attempt to keep members awake long enough to enjoy Oxford's May Morning celebration and the breakfast which followed in the MCR. Trinity Term social events included a brunch with members of the SCR, a number of MCR-SCR teas, and a joint disco with Wadham College MCR. Sport was the focus of much MCR energy in Summer Term. The traditional MCR-SCR cricket match and barbecue was perhaps the biggest single event of the term. The SCR team (padded out by a few excellent JCR players and Dan Prentice's son) managed to defeat the MCR despite the last minute batting of then President, Clair Battaglino (who'd never even seen the game played before). For many, it seemed that the high quality of the food and beer, and the glorious sunshine were much more of a draw than the quality of cricket, but the combination made it a thoroughly enjoyable day for all. This event was followed one week later by the MCR-SCR croquet match. Again under the pressure of "tradition" Ms. Battaglino joined in, teaming up with ace player Peter West, to face the SCR duo of Nico Mann and Bob Hargrave. With the disadvantage of a self-imposed handicap the MCR players lost by one stroke but our spirits were lifted when a group of Morris Dancers led (?) by MCR member Mike Hitchiner took to the lawn. The highlight of the garden party which


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followed was undoubtedly the culinary expertise shown by Ms. Battaglino and the MCR's "Chef in residence", Pascale Gaitet. Perhaps the most consistent sporting concern of the MCR over the last year has been rowing. Coxed for the first time by a female member of the MCR, our graduate crews put in a good showing in both Torpids and Eights (four bumps in all). During Torpids the "Pembroke Pirates" gained a certain notoriety if only for their vigorous ramming tactics. The current President, Ian McComas and the former President Clair "Kamikazi" Battaglino sat face to face as stroke and cox and more often than not it was he yelling commands at her. By Eights Week we managed to raise our standard of rowing and qualified 14th highest in the rowing on divisions. After suffering an initial defeat in the Christ Church Regatta, this year's MCR crew, coxed by Sari Horwitz and under the watchful eye of Coach McComas, will undoubtedly make a fine showing in Torpids and Eights of 1983. What the MCR crews lack in power they make up for in spirit and style — well, a style all our own! This year the MCR has again been treated to a wide range of social events including a wine and cheese party, a Sunday brunch, teas, a fancy dress party and a termly dinner. The biggest event of Michaelmas Term was the annual College Revue. Written by a team of writers from the MCR and JCR, the Revue was produced by two MCR members and directed by the MCR's Steve Abbott. Performers from the MCR and JCR got on stage to send up ourselves, the SCR and everything that is Pembroke/Oxford. Some graduates remarked that it felt strange to take part in a "school play" after so many years but MCR President, Ian McComas seemed undaunted by this in his stage debut as the Bursar. Hard work by all involved proved that good comic timing and academic excellence are not mutually exclusive, or so we assume from the positive response of our audience. The post-Revue party marked the end of the undergraduate Michaelmas Term, but during the vacation Pembroke is kept alive by the presence of its graduate students. Clair Battaglino

THE JUNIOR COMMON ROOM President: Jonathan Seitler Secretary: Jane Knaggs Treasurer: Tony Allen NUS Rep: Deborah Georgiou OUSU Rep: Mark Fidler 1982 was a particularly turbulent year for the JCR. In May we received notice that because of the shortage of housing in Oxford, the City Council might evict 'multi-occupants', i.e. students. As Pembroke is the college with the largest proportion of students living out, this meant that over one-third of the college was faced with the prospect of having nowhere to live. After a complicated JCR-SCR-City Council wrangle, a temporary settlement was reached by which students were guaranteed against eviction during term time. However, if there is one thing that 1982 will be remembered for, it will be the lesson that


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no longer can the college rely on its finalists being able to secure rented accommodation in Oxford and that rooms for all its undergraduates is of the utmost priority and urgency. Fortunately though, 1982 will not be remembered solely for this disturbing feature. The JCR, after eight years of 'isolationism' rejoined the Oxford University Students Union in June, and was subsequently at the forefront of the campaign for a Central Students Union in Oxford. We also took a keener interest in the "JCR Overseas Scholarship Fund" and sought to finalise the details of a plan whereby the JCR provides a grant of a sizable sum, already saved over nine years, to give a student from the Third World the opportunity to take a degree course at Pembroke. Hopefully, other colleges will follow our example in this area, as many have already done in feverishly copying our 'Brown Rice week'. During April, for those interested, the only food available in Hall for an entire week was, at the JCR's request, Brown Rice. Although, as the Manager of 'The Blenheim' will testify, this did not succeed in alerting everybody's mind and stomach to the reality of undernourishment, it did raise a considerable sum of money which was duly sent to Oxfam. Finally, 1982 may be remembered as the year in which the JCR modernised itself. Apart from a refurbishment we also hired a video recorder, photocopier and milk machine. The age of the microchip also meant that our procurement of a computer gave JCR members a valuable opportunity to master 'basic' computer language, and in the process to construct programmes for addictive little games. Although some members felt it a sad development to see the once gay, energetic and predatory undergraduate reduced to a button-pushing fanatic, 'plus ga change, plus c'est la meme chose' we are all, in one way or another, 'tools of our fools'. Jonathan Seitler

OVERSEAS SCHOLARSHIP Since the 1950s a system has existed in Oxford to finance students from the developing world to study at this University. Nineteen colleges have viable schemes, while there are twelve overseas scholarships at the moment. Since the early 1970s when there was an overseas scholar at Pembroke, a voluntary levy has continued to be made on the JCR, and it has now been decided to resuscitate the scheme at Pembroke. The scholarships are open to students from developing countries who would otherwise be unable to obtain an equivalent education in their native country, either through poverty, lack of comparable facilities or because the person is a refugee. Applicants are judged on their academic record, their financial need, and their intentions for future work, particularly with regard to their native community. The selection procedure has been the only serious criticism in the past. Initial screening of candidates lies with the national co-ordinator of schemes of this sort, the World University Service. At Oxford itself


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it has been administered by a central co-ordinating committee of junior members since 1973, while selection itself runs upon general University lines. The final decision lies in consultation between senior and junior members of the college. The main costs of the scholarship system are University fees, college fees, maintenance, and air fare. The University fees are £3600 p.a. for a science course, £2700 p.a. for an arts course (the cost of a medical course at £6000 usually precludes it from this system). College fees are themselves around £1700 p.a. The maintenance is expected to be £3000-3500, the figure based on the graduate grant, which also takes into account that the scholar is staying in Britain throughout the course. Air fare is £600, which includes £100 as a settling-in allowance for essentials. All colleges waive all of their fees as does the University for 60% of tuition fees, for up to 25 students — the remaining 40% will equal £1080 for an arts course and £1440 for a science course. The remaining costs of a scholar on a three year course though would be in the region of £12700. But the scholarships are financed primarily by the junior members of the colleges offering the scholarship. If the JCR levy were raised to the intended £3.00 per term then the scheme could be run without further assistance, but this assumes a total commitment from all junior members, and does not take into account current inflationary trends. The opting out rate of undergraduates will depend on how high the levy becomes in time — if enough withdraw it would jeopardize the whole scheme. The long term viability of the scholarship depends therefore not only on the JCR and various intended fund-raising events, but on further contributions from the SCR and Old College Members. The Third World Scholarship is a valuable charitable scheme run by students not just to appease their social conscience, but as a realistic attempt to improve the conditions of life, or rather existence, in many developing countries. Donations to famine funds and refugee camps are very important, but without the help of education it will take more than donations to overcome the root of such problems. If each member of the College, past and present, is prepared to donate a small sum to the Fund then we will be doing the very least for the third world in providing a scholar with an otherwise inaccessible university education. Many of us have taken our university education for granted; in the third world not even life is taken for granted. This scheme might be a way, however small, of changing that. Please contribute generously. Doug Taylor, Pembroke College Representative for the OUSU JCR Scholarship Committee


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JOHNSON LITERARY SOCIETY President: L. Lucas Secretary: R. Barrett Treasurer: A. Offen A successful term of office has just been completed, proving that the Johnson Literary Society retains its attraction within the College. As one of the College's oldest societies, it enjoys an unrivalled sense of tradition, while attaining contemporary interest with guest speakers from the more 'modern' world of the media. (Though this is not to trivialise the latter's importance, which Dr. Johnson himself recognised: writing of the "barbarous" mass of the Ancient Greeks and Romans who lacked means of printing and, "consequently", knowledge, he concluded that "knowledge is diffused among our people by the newspapers"). Guest speakers this year have ranged over a wide spectrum. In Hilary Term Piers Williams addressed a nostalgic audience on the subject of Biggles, on which she has co-written two books, while in Trinity delighted careerists heard Ian Cotton, a prosperous freelance journalist, relate a rambling and exotic account of his career since going down from New College in the '60s with a Third in English. However, the year's biggest coup was Melvyn Bragg in November — three days before he addressed an audience a third of the size at the Union, Mr. Bragg and a copious supply of port (one of the more timeless traditions of the society) conspired to create a lively and informative meeting. The committee only regrets that the novelist had to beat such a hasty retreat in order to catch an early train back to London, and would like to relay his own concern at having to leave as the audience was "hotting up". Thanks are due to all who helped make this such a successful and pleasant term of office, and I would like to wish the incoming committee an equally fruitful year. L. Lucas

BLACKSTONE SOCIETY Officers: 1981/82 Officers: 1982/83 President: V. Clarke S. Howard Treasurer: C. Pocock M. Vincent Secretary: P. Sykes Z. Webb A striking feature of the Blackstone Society is the reputation it seems to have acquired about the College with the non-legal fraternity. Most laymen appear to conclude that this society is merely a nebulous conceptual extension of a nebulous conceptual science epitomised by dusty tomes of legal jargon! We hope that the Blackstone Society will continue by its functions to dispel this image. In Trinity Term we held several events of a social


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nature and Michaelmas Term has seen us venturing down to Lincoln's Inn to quiz the Chancery judiciary. We arranged a visit to the College by the legal assistant to "Justice". Plans are well on the way for the Hilary mock trial which will try an imaginative case of S.C.R. feuds. .. calls have already been heard to bring back hanging. S. Howard CAMDEN SOCIETY President: G.P. Bristowe Secretary: O.C. Elliott Treasurer: C.D. Rolles Under new management, the Camden Society has tried to cater for all tastes and spread the word of the historian throughout the College. Robert Hardy, the actor, came to speak on the longbow, a subject on which he is a recognized expert. Dr. Blair, a fellow of Queen's College, acted as guide on a trip to the medieval village of Cogges and Mr. Benjamin spoke with great eloquence on the Victorian Poor Law. All these guest speakers attracted considerable audiences — even the odd scientist has been seen to have bridged the gap between the arts and sciences; Dr. Krebs's talk on the selfish gene was, in this respect, a minor historical milestone. The highlight of the year, however, was the after-dinner speech by Dr. Mayr-Harting who spoke on nineteenthcentury murder trials. Fortunately, this was far more amusing for the audience than the victims. Peter Bristowe PEMBROKE COLLEGE CHRISTIAN UNION "I am leaving you with a gift — peace of mind and heart. And the peace I give isn't fragile like the peace the world gives. So don't be troubled or afraid." John xiv,27 The Christian Union has had a very busy and eventful year. It has continued to meet together as a group of people who love God and enjoy His blessings. Each week there has been a Communion, prayer meeting, meal and Bible Study. But we also look forward to stepping out confidently to tell others of the importance of the Christian message, as we have done over the last year. Since the last 'Record' there has been a University Mission, led by David Watson with the Riding Lights theatre group (in Hilary Term 1982). The assistant missioner for our College was John Irvine, who led discussions, went to coffee parties and out visiting during the week. There has also been a Mini Mission (in Michaelmas Term 1982) led by Michael Green, which stirred up a lot of interest. We have continued to finance a 'Tear Fund' student and there is still an active interest in overseas student work. So the next year will be just as busy and happy with the Chaplains' Mission coming up and with the deepening commitment of Christians in Pembroke. Helen Hindley Matthew Evans


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THE CHAPEL CHOIR The Chapel Choir has once again completed a year of singing in Pembroke Chapel on Sundays in term time punctuated by various "away matches". Third week of Hilary term saw what seems to have become an annual pilgrimage to Royal Holloway College to savour the comfortable acoustic and impressive organ of its Chapel. Everyone enjoyed giving their all in Haydn's "Insanae et Vanae Curae" and the most was made of the opportunity of doing justice to the music. At the end of July we went to sing for five days at Peterborough Cathedral, another old haunt, and as always, found the experience of singing in such an inspiring edifice of medieval architecture coupled with practising and performing every day an effective tonic to the already fairly high standard of singing. It was with this in mind that we came back to Oxford to record some of the music we had sung this time in Keble College Chapel. Unfortunately various factors such as tiredness and slight technical hitches conspired to compromise the envisaged excellence but nevertheless the exercise proceeded and tapes are now available at ÂŁ3.75 including postage and packing from The Organ Scholar, Pembroke College, Oxford OX1 1DW. It was during sixth week of Michaelmas term that the 250th anniversary of the consecration of the Chapel was celebrated with a Festal Evensong. We sang a suitably inspiring programme of Brahms and Purcell and delivered quite a competent performance as befitted such an occasion. On Saturday of seventh week we took part in a concert of popular choir music at Wesley Memorial Church in aid of the Church project. This proved an enjoyable enterprise which also gave us a chance, somewhat prematurely, to air some of the carols we were to sing the next day in Pembroke Chapel. The Carol Service duly took place with its mĂŠlange of mostly traditional Yuletide music for choir and congregation; it is always the best attended service in Chapel and this year was no exception. Finally on the first day after full term we went down to London to sing Evensong at Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Street, another venue of suitably indulgent acoustics with a four manual organ to match. We look forward to another year of varied activities, including another improved recording. Christopher Landor, Organ Scholar

MUSIC SOCIETY President: C.T. Landor Secretary: B. Maytum The Music Society maintained a steady routine of Weatherley Room concerts towards the end of each term punctuated by the Annual Dinner in Hilary and Garden Party in Trinity. On occasion,


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the summer weather provided an extra venue with extra audience in the Chapel Quad where various members entertained the sunbathing crowds. Michaelmas saw an impressive influx of instrumentalists whose talents have duly been spread out amongst the existing activities. C.T. Landor

PEMBROKE WOMEN'S GROUP Many of us had felt the need for a women's group within Pembroke, but the group did not form until we became more aware of the incidents of violence against women in both the College and the University. After our initial direct response to this violence, the group has broadened its concerns to cover other aspects of sexism in society. Guest speakers agreed upon communally by the women have been invited, and the result has been to raise our awareness of women's issues, such as our special needs within the health system, sexism in language and employment, and the reconciliation of Christian beliefs with feminist ideology. We have been meeting now for two terms, and the non-hierarchical nature of the group allows all women to make an equal contribution, and bring to it those issues which most concern them. Our aims are multi-purpose in trying to link wider questions to the pressures faced by women in a male-dominated University, and to provide a forum for the discussion of political as well as personal concerns. Pembroke Women's Group

THE BALL As you will know, after initial difficulties, arrangements for the Ball finally got under way last year in the Michaelmas Term, thanks mainly to the willingness of junior members to guarantee our enterprise against loss, and to the enthusiasm and support of Old Members of College, for both of which we are most grateful. Thanks are due in particular to Mr Paddy Nolan, whose active support throughout the run-up to the Ball was invaluable. For those who came to the Ball, it is him you have to thank for your after-dinner mints! Our major administrative headache was the hiring of a headlining band. With certain of our number somewhat "dubitantes" we finally settled on a gentleman known as Wilko Johnson. As it was, on the night he went down magnificently, calls for "encores" almost wrecking our timetable on that particular stage, and all those I spoke to said that they had enjoyed his music immensely. Apart from Mr. Johnson, we attempted to cater for as many different tastes as possible, with other acts including Pete Allen's Jazz Band, Instant Sunshine, the Imperfect Fifths and many others. The "minirevue" also went down very well indeed.


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As the sun came up on the closing festivities, I spoke to as many revellers as I could, and from all accounts the first Pembroke College Ball for several years was a success. Again I must thank all those, both within College and without, who helped in making it possible, particularly Dr. Rook, and Mr. Leach and Dr. Bradbury, and all the College porters, who stayed up all night to help with the smooth running of the event itself. Although there are no immediate plans for another Ball this year, I hope that our efforts, and the financial "head-start" of about £300 which we should be able, after everything is finally tied up, to leave for them, will encourage the formation of a new Ball Committee in the near future, and I am sure I speak for the whole of our committee when I wish them the very best of luck. Chris Pocock

SPORTING ACTIVITIES RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB Captain: Peter Robson Secretary: Nick Lyon 1982 has proved to be again a year of might-have-beens. We started with the three league matches which were outstanding from last year and although we won one of them versus Queen's, it was not enough to stop us being relegated to the 3rd Division. In the first round of Cuppers, we faced Lincoln who sported a number of University players. Thanks to a fine effort from our pack we secured a large measure of the ball; however the skill of their backs was too much and we lost a close game. Michaelmas Term began with a considerable number of freshers attending practice. Unfortunately only a few had the necessary skill to aid us in our bid for promotion. We had a couple of good wins versus New College and Brasenose in the League; in the match versus New College a deficit of nine points at half time was pulled back to win. We failed to be promoted when we lost to St. John's, after a good game, owing to a debatable decision from the referee! The forwards, again this year, proved to be our strength with the majority of scrummage balls coming back on our side — the line-outs were however a little less secure. The backs were never at any point at full complement because of injuries and other commitments and so never became,what could have been an effective unit. All was not lost however — a record was achieved: the bar bill! A consistent and creditable performance was produced by all members. Thanks go to Nick Lyon for all his hard work. Peter Robson


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BOAT CLUB Captain: M.P. Evans Secretary: G.P. Stevens 1982 began with the exciting news that Pembroke was to have five University oarsmen; Steve Foster in the Blue boat, James Stewart and Simon Oldfield in Isis and Geraint Davies and Keith Pailthorpe in the Lightweights. Not surprisingly this left the first Torpid rather short of experienced oarsmen. But yet again we were very much indebted to David Fell for giving up so much of his time and energy to coaching what on paper looked a weak crew. Despite press comments which varied from cautious praise to simple abuse, they trained hard under the guidance of David and Jon Lovatt. When Torpids arrived they were rowing with a substitute stroke and succeeded in going up three and down one place, to finish ninth in the first division. The second Torpid, with the third division's hardest catch went up three to finish as the fourth highest placed second Torpid on the river. An MCR Torpid rowed on and surprised everyone by getting bumps. That term's training was pleasantly interrupted for men's first and second Torpids and the ladies' crew by a trip out to Reading for the Southern Universities Regatta. Though no trophies were won everyone won at least one race. The first eight in Trinity term looked very strong; and despite the initial disappointment that we would be without our blue, the crew had four university oarsmen in it. Spirits were lifted halfway through the training period as the crew got a new boat courtesy of the "Friends" with the help of the Master, to whom we all extend many thanks. Spurred on by this the crew hoped for two or three first division scalps in Eights Week. However, on two days boats ahead bumped out, on a third we missed St. Edmund Hall by a canvas and on the Friday we were bumped in less than a minute after a jammed seat effectively prevented our Isis men from rowing. A useful looking second eight maintained their high place on the river; the third eight was far too quick for the sixth division and succeeded in winning their blades. The term finished with Mike Packer scoring a rare Pembroke sculling success in Oriel Regatta, a four from the first eight winning at Reading Town Regatta and Julian Cook rowing for Cherwell. Michaelmas term saw both the first and second crews lose in University fours by hitting the bank; there is no truth in the rumour that the latter crew is forming a "Jack before Haystacks" club. In Christ Church Regatta the men's novices deserved more than a first knockout after all the hard training they had put in. As I write we still have a number of people in University trial boats including Geraint Davies who is this year's captain of the Lightweights. My thanks are due to coaches Jon Lovatt, Steve Francis and of course David Fell, to Greg Stevens, this year's secretary, to the Bursar Mr. Leach for his help and efficiency, and to Gill Stredwick who made an excellent job of the food in the Eights Week bar. Finally a "thank you" to all those who help to create the distinctive friendly atmosphere of the Pembroke Boat Club. Matthew Evans


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WOMEN'S ROWING Captain: Tracy Brogan The 1st Torpids Boat after a hard term's training survived the trauma of the stroke and captain, Tricia Kidd, missing the first day of Bumps through illness. With a new stroke (Hattie Jordan) and reserve (Claire Roscoe) they gained the first of their five bumps. In the summer, early problems meant that a second crew did not surface until late in the term, despite this, only just failing to qualify. The 1st VIII ably coached by Isis oarsman James Stewart had a very successful term's training both on land and in the boat which resulted in four bumps and a Bump Supper for the second year running. Special mention must go to the coxing ability of Jean Collier, a driving force in the boat. We were also lucky enough to be sponsored by Mr. R. Kidd of Farnell Parnell Instruments Ltd. for £100. Michaelmas term produced a good and very keen novice crew, most of them going on to row in the Torpids team and some evidently capable of going straight into the first boat to complete what should be a very strong crew, highly motivated by their Captain, Claire Holditch, and set on moving into the First Division. Many thanks to all those involved in this very successful year. Tracy Brogan

CRICKET CLUB Captain: Charles McAndrew Secretary: John Squire Played 9 Won 3 Drawn 3 Lost 3 After playing some encouragingly good cricket in 1981, and reaching the quarter-finals of Cuppers, this season was a disappointing one in many ways. Drawn against eventual finalists New College in the first round, we were rudely defeated by 10 wickets in a rain-affected match limited to 30 overs each. The game was typical of our season: missing key players, we stumbled to 123 for 6 — or rather, all of us stumbled except for Paul Johnston, the team's star player and an Authentic, who made 74 not out. The bowling was accurate enough but lacking in penetration; the fielding enthusiastic but undisciplined. As for the other matches, our record is inconsistent, for we seemed either to win easily or lose heavily, and even the drawn matches (with the notable exception of that against the Invalids) were usually onesided. Thus we annihilated St. Peter's, but lost badly to Jesus — two sides with not a great deal between them. Much of the problem lay in the non-availability of players — we had to call on no less than 24 people in our 9 games, and this writer can testify to the frustration of spending whole mornings trying to find eleven players who were all free of tutorials, essay crises or general apathy on the same afternoon. One of the few pleasures of the New College game was playing on a wicket worthy of the name. New College have one of the best squares


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in the University, and we undoubtedly have the worst. The reports of the last two years have been derogatory: "consistency of college pudding" (1980) and "ploughed field" (1981). Even as far back as 1975 we fmd find the epithet "disgraceful". The Amalgamated Clubs have made repeated efforts to bring this situation to the attention of those concerned, but seemingly to no avail. Perhaps a serious injury will shake the apathy. °Enough 'Enough grumbling: grumbling: itit was was an an enjoyable enjoyable season, distinguished by fine performances from Paul Johnston (whose final average was 118.5) and off-spinner Chris Anderson. Pete Bristowe (also an Authentic), Ian Lewin and Jerry Wray all made useful runs, while Pete's wicket-keeping was superb. The opening bowlers, Tony Allen and Andy Roberts, were accurate and occasionally dangerous, and John Squire's inimitable leg-spin was alternately a joy and an agony to watch. The captain had an atrocious season, and is hiding behind the excuse of "pressure of the job" — to the general derision of everybody. Finally, thanks to all those unsung heroes who turned out at the last moment and greatly added to the local colour. C.G. McAndrew FOOTBALL CLUB Captain: Nick Bowers The Cuppers run in January was not as successful as the previous league competition had promised. Andy Jowett captained the team well, instilling a sense of pride and the will to win. Fitness and skills training became a part of the Pembroke soccer team's weekly life. Our most memorable win of that cup season was a battling 3-2 over Exeter, a team who reached the quarter finals; the foundations upon which the new season was based had been firmly laid. Sandy Storrie, who was elected captain, unfortunately had to hand over the position to Nick Bowers because of commitments to University Hockey; he had time, however, to put the team through rigorous fitness training and bring into action one of our best assets, physical stamina. The new season opened with the crushing 7-0 defeat of Corpus Christi, Pembroke's goal scoring abilities were immediately shown and the scene was set for success. The back four were one of the keys to this success in the league. Gary McGregor, a tough wiry Scot, was rarely, if ever, troubled by his winger, and made good penetrating runs down the right to link with the forwards and midfield; Paul Campbell always showed a cool head, covering well and turning attack into defence. Mike Jervis matured greatly as a player over the season, a strong tackler and header of the ball. Leon Robins, next year's captain, had a great season. Like a terrier he hustles and bustles, and was quite remarkable in the air. In the Teddy Hall cuppers match, which we eventually lost 3-0, he had the better of their Blues player by the end of the game. In midfield James Russell-Stracey, a new player to the team, played well, he has the ability to put the ball at a player's feet, his style is direct and fluent, and he is promising as a defender. Sandy Storrie often supplied a spark of imagination to lift us out of a difficult situation; he has a


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good footballing brain and possesses bite in the tackle; he has scored some crucial goals and made some equally crucial saves in his capacity as reserve keeper. Andy Jowett has been a fine example to the team all season, he is tenacious and hungry to attack and win the ball; on his day he can beat anyone in the air and he has set up many goals with accurate through balls. Up front Tony Mellor has created so many of our chances (in league, cup, and friendlies we scored well over 60 goals this season), he chases and harries and is so quick on the turn. He needs little space to conjure up a cross, shot or pass. Dave Anderson has been a useful striker and the scourge of many a defence,; as well as his obvious physical strength he is fleet of foot and powerful in the air. He has scored some quite outstanding goals. Nick Bowers has had a good season popping in some important goals, his speed on the left, as well as Tony Mellor's on the right, has often made us look very menacing up front. John Dickie is a skilful player who needs to thump in a couple of goals to give him confidence in his own obvious ability. Sporadic selection has not helped but hopefully he will come alight next season. Steve Gosztony and Charlie Phillips have been excellent stand-ins and put in good performances. Doug Taylor, who battled well during our cuppers run, is another 'young hope' for next season; he has adapted well from being an obvious star in the second team to fulfilling a more responsible role in the first team's midfield. Thanks must be given to our impressive array of keepers. Paul Johnson, Tim Thorley, Jerry Wray and Pete Bristowe have all performed admirably. Well, hopefully none have been left out. Pembroke marches on as a first division force and with the determination to stay there. We have the ability to be utterly devastating (as in our 7-0 win over Exeter), if this can be achieved consistently there can be no reason why Pembroke F.C. cannot attain further glory. We have been a very closely-knit and generally sociable side, inviting other teams back to our bar, more often than not, to drown their sorrows. Unfortunately the invitation has rarely been reciprocated. On and off the pitch Pembroke should pride itself as an example to other University sides. Nick Bowers

HOCKEY Secretary: Peter Bristowe Captain: Giles Fraser Although the January snows delayed the resumption of our league programme, the team eventually emerged as the hard, cohesive fighting unit it had always promised to be. The introduction of such skilled freshmen as Paul Johnston, Peter Bristowe and Tim Thorley turned the team into a powerful combination, with the old lags up front providing firepower and determination. We were unbeaten in Hilary


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term and a 1-1 draw with St. John's, our main rivals, secured the First Division Championship for the second time in three years. The celebrations lasted long into the next morning and it was then that we paid tribute to the stalwarts of the team who were leaving us: Charles Wrench (Captain), Nigel Grundy (ex-Captain), Simon Small (ex-Secretary), Jonathan Burney, and Andrew West. Their spirit and enthusiasm will be remembered by the shins of Oxford for a long time to come. Michaelmas Term has seen an influx of new talent into the team, especially in the forward line where the captain was the sole survivor. The team has only lost once, in Cuppers to Exeter, and everything bodes well for the League next term, although unfortunately a League reshuffle has robbed us of the chance to retain the Championship. The girls have not played another match to date, although Debbie Georgiou, Tracy Brogan, Monita Hughes, Judith Mountford and Jenny integral part part of of the the mixed mixed team. team. II hope that Williamson have been an integral the New Year will see the girls team playing regularly, for clearly the talent and potential are there. Giles Fraser

ATHLETICS Captain: R. Williams The College now has 12 members of the O.U.A.C. compared to a meagre 3 in 1979/80. Out of these Marcus Darville and Dave Burn were selected to run for the Blues in the Varsity Match. Dave attained full blue standards in both the 100m and 200m. After the victory by C.U.A.C. in the Varsity Match the College played host for the Achilles Club Dinner. The only intercollege fixtures for track and field are the Cuppers finals which take place during Trinity Term. Pembroke heats and fmals reached the final and fielded a virtually complete team which dominated many of the track events, achieving a commendable fourth position. This compares favourably to the seventh position that we held in the Athletics League a few years back. Cuppers Finals 1982 S.E.H. 318 pts. Wadham 260 Univ. 249 Pembroke 189 Oriel 168 Worcester 164 Pembroke competed in the heats of the Ladies' Cuppers but was unable to make the final. Hopefully in the future there will be more opportunity for athletes


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at College level to compete when more intercollege matches are held. Two were held in Michaelmas 1982 but enthusiasm seemed dampened by the weather. Finally, thanks are due to last year's Captain, Dave Burn, for his work in the formation and motivation of the College team. Richard Williams

CROSS COUNTRY Captain: Marcus Darville Michaelmas started on a high note with a second place to Worcester in the first college league race, with M. Darville, K. Knapp, A. Jowett and J. Hall scoring for the college. However, the lack of any Pembroke runners in freshers' trials was disappointing and made the loss of J. Morrissey all the more critical. Cuppers highlighted our lack of an established fifth man and that combined with the marked increase in overall standard this term in University cross country, put Pembroke in sixth position. We still have ambitions in the league for next term and are well placed to beat our rivals from last year, Brasenose. At University level M. Darville and K. Knapp on coming fourth and fifth respectively in the Varsity match were reawarded full blues. Oxford lost to Cambridge by the narrowest of margins, 40 to 39 points, in a fine race, but look forward to gaining revenge at the British University championship next term. So at College and University level Pembroke's future is bright. M. Darville

BADMINTON Captain: Barry Maytum The freshers Richard Cottingham, Jackie Simpson and Jenny Williamson have proved valuable additions to the club and we have been further reinforced by confirmed college members such as Paul Sykes and Matthew Evans. After last year's generally poor results, we have shown this term an ability to discipline ourselves to winning, and the women's team has done particularly well. Both teams stand a fair chance of improving our showing in Cuppers last year. Barry Maytum


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WOMEN'S SQUASH CLUB Captain: M. A. Hughes 1981-82 was the first year that a women's squash Cuppers and league competition was held. Pembroke entered a team which was unfortunately knocked out in the first round of cuppers by a strong St. Johns' St. Anne's team. Although we won only one league match and went down a division it gave a lot of people experience and enjoyment. A team is entered for this year and we hope to improve our performance. M. A. Hughes

TENNIS CLUB 1981-82 Captain: Giles Fraser 1982-83 Captain: Stephen Gosztony Last season tennis proved to be a rather disastrous affair. Despite an inspired captaincy on and off the courts, from Giles Fraser, and some good performances from Tony Mellor, Jeremy Wray, and Paul Goodhead we only managed to win one league game, and were rather unceremoniously knocked out of Cuppers in the first round. The poor quality of the Pembroke courts I suppose offers us no excuse since, as the home team, we ought to have been more accustomed to their complete unpredictability; yet it did effectively kill any incentive to do any practice on them. Things can only get better this coming season. Stephen Gosztony

TABLE TENNIS CLUB Captain: Jeremy Wray Secretary: Stephen Gosztony Table tennis is a flourishing and successful sport at the College. Last season saw the first team promoted to Division I and the second team to Division III, while the third team consolidated its position in Division VII. It is the first time for a long time that Pembroke have played in Division I, and the first team have made their bid for the league championship with a lot of enthusiasm and considerable success — we are as yet unbeaten after five matches, though some of our toughest opposition is yet to come. The team relies for its success on the solid superiority of its number one player, Liz Gallagher, and the matchwinning and uncompromising leadership of its captain, Jeremy Wray. A mention should also be made here of our new fold-away `Styga Elite Roller', which was sorely needed to supplement the rather moribund 'Jean Jacques' at the bottom of the Alms Houses, and whose performance this term has been of the highest grade. Second and third team performances this term have been varied


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but spirited for the most part, and the latter in particular looks well set on its way to gaining promotion. Finally, I'd like to take this opportunity to thank Liz Gallagher — now playing her last season for us — for her enthusiasm and dedication (often infectious) during the last three years: her record of 30 consecutive victories (and all the other unconsecutive ones) during the last two seasons have been primarily responsible for the rise of the first team from Division III — where it was in her first year — to one of the commanding positions of Division I. ,Cuppers next term should hopefully prove to be an interesting contest. S. Gosztony

DARTS CLUB Captain: Paul Johnston Pembroke darts club is now emerging as a formidable force within the University structure. Having only formed three years ago, the first team has now been promoted to the first division by a wide margin, and has a reasonable chance of doing well next year. The newly formed second team has just been promoted to the first division of the second team league, so the sport as a whole is in a healthy condition. The home of Pembroke darts is the cosy "Happy" Bar, where the board is in constant use. This makes darts one of the most popular sports in the College, so the success of the teams is not unexpected. The image of the darts player as a beer-swilling, pot-bellied hearty is far from the Pembroke truth, where the first team is drawn from people who play in the College rugby, football and hockey teams, but fortunately no rowers. Finally it transcends all sexual barriers, as men and women compete from the same oche! Paul Johnston NETBALL Captain: Deborah Georgiou It would be to deceive if I said that we had a netball team fit and ready to take on the might of the netballing world. We haven't, as yet, and as well as my disorganisation one of the major reasons is that the tiny percentage of women who have a desire to run around outside on a freezing afternoon, want to do so with a hockey stick in their hands, and not a netball. When the fierce competitiveness of mixed hockey cuppers has abated, enthusiasm for netballing glory will soar, at least I hope so, as we are entered in cuppers next term, and one or two practices may be necessary. Perhaps if we had a court it might help, but I am sure that commitment will override these minor difficulties, and then of course there is always the North Quad.. .. Deborah Georgiou


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rillAa 8T043 notaMat lusq whOzpv,1 4115_453 aolautat fttw.d fatalalfbetatial soislatoo won* wan tiffi* 4 dub stIslr*icridstilt mods ittlitiV8 Aldttganol saa>kas,gaitasass &al Mil *di wit ,ogs .ogsmolt vastmil Nash bourtol bearrol tine /lap galtoll WW1 .otiatainle .flidassite taktaratlit** LAlum akalsto4b4w _31)lw a4 d Is* la* s41sift at bolootoi nesit-w00 y#aotaivib nOirdY113 9.1 Isktossm mat *an gip* Sal. booriol qtaeon „toy Ser tztollaw dial xiirba tztollow8rd6b,o1441,Idinotipit Bibb' 'mania siding* it skit II aid IWO bum* a sill at bigoakag b0000a silt 'to aohOrtb aolaivtb *dI're Osts of baiefrioist nab testa tir 3boo* _ -notaihnom whisked el sioliw gnitaci at &xi* who:* .ttalaiotinnIO „...4iltdiosoli ott) wrxtii_otia*4-xqqatt" yloa sib wt., al at iamb dub agnalnaoli il‘tilin4•10 io NSW ems' eXrigitiw taco m inoono -roluttoq itoni oar:: adtto 6:13 To grab attsb edam loggia SUIT MT ,esoi;014 -buthitOtilttliWWI PIM • ..b• attocpOrto Olooglanto Ian. aid arasot imamortl silt 'to anti=suit attoOt o* b as . d 1(hits yin:5d tl twolliOd-tact,gatiliw000d baillati404,40111wOoid.:t * 1taltaki ta *ski ' Via 0116 laitiderPr —. Oviali21 at- illigit ollist•ina sib ad: nadW isle*ististat sitoidern atolbtO otatie)aril ashuiyft/4,-004k: -al - VAC „slits*/. _`ids?bed _Va.* bnii bnif thiditot tladlath ettottitid bitocsa his. elf mtsitOtOe Arsitsbri U. _ ' fsdso sow sth Woo-woo oditman mon Ootaatiot aobuukitWag • .LIA.11311 • mime° aolgsos0*moduli datodoUudistqa0 misigst) -el boa matWalton Itadiana aball bad aotidi tubbits 1 II *Ws** Wit bat inillmai 5W 48 as lasted ?tifftsd OW-.11htio giuftadtan wiatadiao ads Sift t -44/A 15..410-0000 ti..tOttaalolotstrt lotatit_adt sdf- ,o lo ono ono =401i-Att battnautil /5/13015 501 ofof sitiob sitob ova ofiw t wail odwmown zoom* stn of kik dohatobati •vtoboti a a Obi Of) as ob al *now at lova it *rift laeltovitilOw000 iacitoin tOSIOn mann miffihRhetleft* * 104 30 albads taifW loOUN look~toiol gattlaftenanaismitta iol iM**orittlit so? toasteutbko*Jots tinalnit ffi 641,09 boa JimanowOgq2,0 boa .anal Ix=sieqtruottia/ beriffise WI es/11$ is ►jr:‘1,114 4141 it JUNDO moo ss bid bail OW sw If agatesagathaff .tliossoes ed 11 .visamoildi Oftxam vim Oft inandintoto lottbr; Ionianmitt suediciao WI-ism 1fro I *we ,fils doom No E4800 th'Wki Nilvavtlitekitedi roods u swabOnebOlatair esiatisia-00/ •

U041000 uoigioe0 &natio('

ft


PEMBROKE RECORD

55

NEWS OF OUR MEMBERS The Editor of the Record wishes to thank those Members who have been kind enough to supply him with the items which are given below. He would GREATLY WELCOME OTHERS FOR INCLUSION IN THE NEXT ISSUE, and hopes that Members will send them in, using the slip inserted in these pages. M.B. ABRAM (1946), an Honorary Fellow of the College, is Chairman of the President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and in Biomedical and Behavioural Research. His book The Day is Short has been published by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. R.W.J. BAMPTON (1962) who took his degree in Agriculture, is in charge of the Oxford University Field Station on the University estate at Wytham. G.J. BEEVER (1964), a Chartered Accountant, has been a partner in Cresswell, Crabtree and Sons since 1973 and is a Borough Councillor of the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees. H.N. BERRAGAN (1978) has received the Gray's Inn Band Trust Award. C.L. BOOTH (1943), after four years as Ambassador in Burma, has been appointed High Commissioner in Malta. R.S. BOUMPHREY (1934) has retired after a career spent firstly in the Colonial Audit Service and secondly in University Administration. In the former capacity he served for some twenty years in Nigeria, the Falkland Islands, Malaysia and Singapore. In 1963, after three years as Finance Officer at Durban University, he was appointed to a similar post at the newly founded University of Lancaster where, having controlled its finances during the initial period of very rapid expansion, he subsequently became the establishment officer. Amongst his many extra-professional activities, the study of heraldry has ranked high and he has contributed many papers on this subject as well as producing armorials of a number of counties. On 6 September 1982 George and Dots BREDIN (1950) celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their wedding day. D.R. BURTON (1966), after taking degrees in Greats and Theology, spent five years teaching English in schools and universities in Thailand, after which he returned to take a Certificate of Education at Bangor University. Since then he has worked in the Middle East, first in Saudia Arabia and then (1980) in Oman where he teaches English to Arab R.A.F. recruits at a Technical Training School. He finds that his background of Classics and Theology is very useful in appreciating the mentality of the Buddhists and Moslems with whom he has worked. A.C. BUSHELL (1979) has been awarded a Duke of Edinburgh entrance scholarship at the Inner Temple. J.D. CHARMLEY (1974) was appointed Lecturer in Modern History at the University of East Anglia in 1979. In the following year he became the father of twin sons, an event which he describes as a notable


56

PEMBROKE RECORD

example of academic productivity. In a more literary sense he is working on a book dealing with Harold Macmillan's career in the First World War. S. COFFIN (1971), a Church of England clergyman from Cornwall, is now in Birmingham on a preparatory course before undertaking missionary work in Burundi in East Africa under the auspices of the Ruanda Mission of the Church Missionary Society. V.J. COLLAS (1941) has retired after twenty-three years as Rector of St. Andrews, Guernsey. W.M. COWAN (1961) has been elected to Fellowship of the Royal Society. B.B. DAY (1952) joined MAT International Group Limited in 1975 and, after a period as Director of Marketing at the Head Office in London, has recently been appointed Managing Director of Anglia Export Packing Limited and of MATPAK Limited. From Glasgow University D.R. DIAMOND (1952) joined the London School of Economics and Political Science as Reader in Regional Planning. In October he was appointed there as Professor of Geography with special reference to urban and regional planning. On graduating in 1980, R.R. EASTHAM (1977) went to Hong Kong where he is currently working at the Outward Bound School instructing in canoeing, rock-climbing and sailing. He serves as Third mate on a square-rigged sail training ship which is also operated by the school. M.C.W. EVANS (1967) is a Housemaster at Marlborough College where he teaches History and English. After fourteen years as Senior Chaplain at Tonbridge School, M.R. FRANCIS (1957) is moving to St. John's, Leatherhead, his old school, as Second Master. A.C.L. FRASER (1963) has been Senior Anaesthetic Registrar to United Oxford Hospitals for the past three years, and has recently been appointed Consultant Anaesthetist to the Royal Surrey County Hospital, Brighton. J.D. GELLING (1941) is Rector of Ballaugh and Canon of St. German's Cathedral in the Diocese of Sodor and Man. After three and a half years as an official in the Home Office, M.J. GILLESPIE (1973) has been appointed Private Secretary to the Minister of State, the Rt. Hon. Timothy Raison. P. GOLDSMITH (1954) has been appointed Director of the Meteorological Office responsible for Research, and is also President of the Royal Meteorological Society and President of the International Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution. N.J. GRUNDY (1979) has been awarded a Harmsworth (minor) entrance exhibition at the Middle Temple. G.B. HALL (1954) is a housemaster at King's School, Taunton.


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57

G.M. HARBRIDGE (1955) is Head of the English Department at St. George's School, Harpenden. P.T. HASSE (1976) is one of the youngest men to be appointed as a White House Fellow in Washington. D.M. HERBERT-SMITH (1972) is spending the 1982-3 academic year teaching at Northfield Mount Herman School, Massachusetts and would be very pleased to renew contact with any American friends from Pembroke. R. HIGSON (1973) is teaching mathematics at Winchester College. On 23 October 1982 he was married, in the Chapel of the College, to Miss Helen Elizabeth Kettle, the eldest daughter of a former member of the Modern Languages staff. C.P. HILL (1933) has been elected to an Honorary Research Fellowship in the Department of History and Archaeology in the University of Exeter. W. F.M. HORSLEY (1967) is now the BBC's Tokyo correspondent and will spend at least two years in the post. A.V. HUGHES (1957) has lived and worked in the Western Pacific almost continuously since leaving Oxford in 1961. Initially his particular field was land law, tenure systems, and land use planning. He shifted to economic planning in 1970, and then to government finance. After six years as head of Solomon Islands Ministry of Finance, spanning the attainment of independence in 1978, he became head of the Solomon Islands Monetary Authority at the end of 1981. "If" he concludes "this all sounds a bit po-faced, let me say that it has been extraordinarily enjoyable, at times hilarious and — given the economic outlook for small developing countries — seems set to continue challenging." T.D. JENKINS (1970) is training for the ordained ministry at Ridley Hall, Cambridge. N.H. KEEBLE (1965), who is a Lecturer in English at the University of Stirling, has just published his contribution to the Oxford English Monographs (Clarendon Press) with his portrait of Richard Baxter, Puritan Man of Letters. He has in preparation an Oxford paperback edition of The Pilgrim's Progress, and a study of The Literary Culture of Non-Conformity 1660-1702 for the Leicester University Press. P.E. KEMP (1975) is a Junior Research Fellow in Arabic at the College de France in Paris. J.R. KREBS (1963) has been awarded the Zoological Society's Scientific Medal. After twenty years — ten of them as Headmaster — in one of the pioneering schools for maladjusted boys, J.C. LAMPEN (1958) is taking a year off for writing, research and travel. He hopes then to take up work with young people in Northern Ireland. R.P. LEEKS (1935) has been appointed Chaplain and Warden to the Jesus Hospital in Canterbury. I.S. LEVY (1959) is Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon at the London and Moorfields Eye Hospitals.


58

PEMBROKE RECORD

J.D. LOVELOCK (1930), (1930), who who retired retired recently after serving for J.D. LOVELOCK nearly thirty years as Senior County Music Adviser to Hampshire, is now engaged in research for the Open University. His subject is "Greek Drama and its influence on Opera". He is working in the Bodleian Library andat atthe theOxford Oxford Music Music Faculty Faculty with with Dr. Dr. Sternfeld of Exeter library and College. R.G. LUGAR (1954) has been re-elected as Senator for Indiana for a second term of office. D.B.K. LYONS (1962) is a Senior Vice President and Partner of Spencer Stuart and Associates and is stationed in their New York office. C. MACKONOCHIE (1931) is shortly retiring from the living of Holy Trinity, Weston near Hitchin. P.N.S. MANSERGH (1929), an Honorary Fellow of the College, has now retired from the Mastership of St. John's College, Cambridge. With the forthcoming publication (1983) of the twelfth and last volume of selected documents from the British records on The Transfer of Power in India 1942-47, his appointment, announced by the then Prime Minister (Harold Wilson) as Editor-in-Chief of the Series, comes to its natural end. With an opening volume on the Cripps Mission (1942), the last three on the Mountbatten Viceroyalty (March-August 1947) and, between, the "Quit India" movement (1942), the years of Wavell's Viceroyalty, and the Cabinet Mission (1946) there was no lack of sustaining interest in assembling a documentary narrative which The Times described as "the greatest definitive reference work on the subject this side of Nirvana". R.C. MASON (1970) is Head of Modern Languages at Manningtree School, Essex. G.D. MOORE (1957) is serving on a 2-3 year assignment to the Ministry of Health of Kenya as Adviser on Primary Health Care Projects. M.M.H. MOORE (1956), now a Canon, has moved from his post at Lambeth Palace and has been appointed Chaplain Royal at Hampton Court. M.T. MOULSDALE (1967) is a Consultant Pathologist and Director of the Public Health Laboratory at Watford. D.G. NASMYTH (1970) has moved from Leicester and is working in the Department of Surgery at the General Infirmary in Leeds, where he is a Research Fellow in the employ of the University rather than of the National Health Service. J.D. NIXON (1968) is lecturing in a B.Ed. course at Middlesex Polytechnic. After four years working in a parish in Haarlem, M.F.G. PARMENTIER (1971) has been appointed as Lecturer in ancient church history, patristics and the history of dogma at the Catholic School of Theology in Amsterdam. M.B. PHOENIX (1976) is an Oil Products Trader for Shell Inter-


PEMBROKE RECORD

59

national, and his sphere includes the Mediterranean and Black Sea Government Companies. On Easter Monday he married Miss J.F.A. Simmonds, and they now live in the former Sun Inn (dated 1556) in Witley, Surrey, each pursuing respective careers in Shell and BP International. T.W. PIERCE (1975), who incidentally completed a notable term of office as President of our Middle Common Room during his time in residence, is now a Management Consultant in the American firm of Hayes/Hill in South Africa. He and his wife (Judy) have just moved into what he describes as their "first very own house" on the outskirts of Johannesburg. George BREDIN (1950) informs the Record that, while on a visit to his daughter and her family in South Africa, he attended the Annual Oxford and Cambridge dinner in Johannesburg of which Bill PIERCE was the organising secretary. On this highly successful occasion, attended by a record number of 185 guests, he was delighted to find himself sitting alongside TONY SANER (1973) who, having completed his medical qualifications, is now a member of the staff at Baragwanath Hospital. D.C.M. PRICHARD (1952), Headmaster of Port Regis School near Shaftesbury is now a member of the Borstal Board of Visitors. He is a Director of an Import-Export firm and a Council Member of the Smallpeice Trust for Industrial Design. P.C.H.M. PRICHARD (1950) is in charge of the Trust Department of London Life Association in their new offices in Bristol. K. de M. PRICE (1967) is a Senior Vice President in charge of Citicorp/Citibank activities in Hong Kong. He is Chairman of Citicorp Commercial Finance and Citicorp Insurance Agency Ltd. and also holds directorship on the boards of FNCB Financial Ltd., Citicorp International Ltd., Asia Pacific Capital Corp., Ltd., Citicorp Hongkong Ltd. and Citibank Nominees. In addition to his Hong Kong responsibilities, he is responsible for Citicorp's activities in PRC and Macau. T.H. REDFERN (1965) has, for the past twelve years, been working for I.B.M. (Marketing) in London, Scotland, and Hampshire. He is now a Marketing Manager and is living at Western Patrick near Basingstoke. H.M. REID (1979) is training for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church at Edinburgh Theological College. F.M. ROADS (1961) has recently been appointed Senior Recorder Teacher for the schools in the London Borough of Redbridge. Much of his work is with handicapped children but he also runs an Early Music Group for advanced pupils and teaches the piano-accordion. By way of a side-line in March 1982 he acted as non-playing team captain for the European team at the World Amateur Go Championship in Tokyo. C.J.V. ROBERTS (1949) became President of the Royal Photographic Society in May 1982. D.G. ROBERTS (1973) is in the Diplomatic Service and holds the appointment of Second Secretary in the British Embassy in Havana, having spent the previous three and a half years in Jakarta.


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A.P.T. SIMPSON (1963), after taking a degree in Oriental Languages, worked for three years in the Marketing Department of Cadburys in Bournville and then decided to enter the teaching profession. He took a degree in English, with first class honours, at London University and is now teaching English, as well as being Senior Careers Master, at Kelly College, an independent H.M.C. School in Tavistock, Devon. L.S. SMITH (1956) is the Director of the Curriculum Centre in York. P.M. SMYTH (1960) is Chairman of a group of public Australian exploration companies based in Perth. P.J. STEVENSON (1963) entered the office of Thornton Baker in Oxford as an articled clerk, qualified A.C.A. in 1972, became a local partner in 1975 and achieved his F.C.A. in 1977. He then joined the Anchor Housing Association which provides sheltered housing for the elderly nationwide, with nearly 15,000 flats under its management. He is now its Finance Director. He is married with one daughter, aged ten. C.N.M. SWITHINBANK (1946) is Head of the Earth Sciences Division of the British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge. M.J. TAYLOR (1970) has been awarded the Junior Whitehead Prize of the London Mathematical Society. Following a period as Headmaster of the Headlands School, Swindon, D.J. TERRY (1956) has been appointed the first Principal of The Halesowen College, a newly founded tertiary college. A. TILLYRIDES (1972), having taught at the Theological Seminary in Cyprus from 1977 to 1979 and having then spent two years doing further research at Louvain University in Belgium, is now Head of the Orhtodox Patriarchal Seminary, Makarios III, Archbishop of Cyprus, in Nairobi. P.H. TUCKER (1972) was married in 1980 to Jocelyn, whom he met during his first year at Pembroke. Since September 1982 he has been teaching French at Quainton House School, Harrow, and would be glad to meet any old friends from Pembroke who may be in that neighbourhood. P.R. WALKER (1975) is Priest-in-Charge at St. George's Anglican Church at Pickering Village in Ontario, Canada. M.C. WHITWELL (1952), who is Vicar of Lower Whitley and Little Leigh, has been elected a Member of the Chester Diocesan Synod and is also Youth Chaplain of the Deanery of Great Budworth. He is enjoying playing diocesan cricket, having represented Gloucester diocese when they reached the semi-finals of the "Church Times" Cup, he now turns out for Chester. R. WILLIAMS (1971) has for the past four years been teaching R.E., English and Latin to "0" level, and 'Civilisation' to "A" level at Purley High School for Boys. Following the success of his first book of memoirs, "Eggshells and Tea-Leaves", which included reminiscences of his undergraduate days,


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61

D.O. WILLIS (1935) has, despite his continuing disability, resumed the story in "A Song on a Bugle Blown" which recounts his experiences as a Master at Abingdon School. This may be obtained direct from the author at Kenton House, 1 a Abingdon Road, Cumnor, Oxford at £4.75 including postage and packing. After eighteen years as Rector of Up Holland, M.M. WOLFE (1946) has moved to become Ecumenical Officer for the Churches on Merseyside and Canon Residentiary of Liverpool Cathedral. A.G.B. WOOLLARD (1961) is an Assistant Secretary Secretary in in the the DepartDepart. ment of Education and Science and is responsible for maintaining links between Further Education and Training as well as working for the Manpower Service Commission. D. YATES (1964) has been appointed Consultant Neurologist to the United Birmingham Hospitals. J.D. YOUNG (1939) has recently retired from the North Gloucestershire College of Technology where he had been a Lecturer in the Business and Management Studies Department since 1966.

UNKNOWN ADDRESSES — CAN YOU HELP? Any information about those whose names appear below would be most gratefully received by the Hon. Secretary. The year given is that of matriculation. 1963 1959 1914 1961 1954 1961 1977 1951 1968 1965

ADER, S.A. AGATE, S.J.G. AINSCOUGH, J.P. AKAH, K.N. ALLAN, T.G. ALLUM, P.A. AL NAIMI, A.R. ANDLAW, L.G. ANGERSON, W.J. AZAR, R.F.

1958 1952 1969 1970 1970 1955 1962 1962 1963 1930 1977 1973 1968 1968 1963 1939 1969 1959 1977

BAILEY, M.J. BAILEY, M.S. BAILEY, S.J.W. BAKER, C.F.L. BAKER, J.J. BALL, C.J. BAMPTON, R.J.C. BAMPTON, R.W.J. BARCLAY, K.C. BARNES, R.C. BARNETT, A.J. BARNETT, A.H. BARRACLOUGH, D. BARTHOLOMEW, J.G. BAUGH, B.L. BAYLEY, W.A. BAYLIFF, R.J. BENTLEY, G.S. BENTLEY, P.K.

195 3 1953 1971 1975 1961 1963 1963 1969 1965 1963 1966 1970 1956 1966 1968 1934 1957 1957 1944 1970 1957 1939 1970 1967 1921 1969 1961 1954

BEVAN, P.B. BINHAM, P.P. BIRTCHER, B.L. BIRTWHISTLE, R.J. BISSENDEN, J.G. BLAINE, P.A. BLAKEMORE, S.N. BLOOM, M.F. BOAM, C.T. BOLWELL, G.P. BOWEN, K.D. BOWMAN, M.R. BOXAN. D. BRADFIELD, R.E.N. BRENNER, J.J. BRERETON, C. BRIGHT, D.M.S. BROOK, M.F.C. BROWN, A.S. BROWN, R.J.T. BRYCE, J.M. BUNYAN, D.C. BURGE, D.M. BURGESS, F.G. BURGOINE, K.T. BYDE, J.R.E. BYRNE, M.F.


62

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1966 1967 1964 1957 1958 1970 1973 1948 1971 1937 1965 1978 1963 1932 1971 1949 1967 1970 1960 1971 1957 1960 1955 1976 1923 1962 1931 1961 1969 1952 1964 1971 1968 1977 1957 1958 1973 1967 1972 1975 1957 1956 1957

CALDWELL, I.S. CAMPBELL, I. CAMPION, P.D. CARDEN, J. CARELESS, H.J. CARNEY, D. CARPENTER, M. CAZES, C.B. CHABRIA, S.J. CHALLENOR, B. CHANTRY, P.E. CHAPMAN, M.C.G. CHAPMAN, T.H. CHARSLEY-THOMAS, D. CHERRY, G.W. CLARK, R.C. CLARKE, R.O. CLAUGHTON, S.L. CLAYTON, G.H. COASE, J.G. COCKING, J.B. COHEN, N. COLLIN, P.H. CONNELLY, S.N.W. CONSTABLE, M.C. COOK, G.F. COOKE, L.K.J. COOKE, Dr. M. COOKE, T.M. COOKE-WILKINS, P.E.H. COOMBS, A. COOMBS, G.D.C. COSMOS, S.J. COWTON, S.D. COX, P.R.W. COX, R.A. COX, R.C. CRIDLAN, R.J. CROFF, D. CROOK, W.S. CROSS, A.N. CULHANE, S. CUTHILL, I.A.C.

1959 1953 1953 1973 1924 1964 1969 1946 1964 1936 1932 1965 1963 1962 1970 1972 1969 1967 1976 1913

DALE, G.R. DAND, REV. R.W.S. DAVIES, REV. P.B. DAVIES, P.G. DAWN, R.R. DAY, Dr. M.J.I. DAYKIN, A.P. DEES, G.R.I. DE LARA, B.M. DELARUE, C.A. DENT, G.W. DICKENS, A. DODD, D.S. DONALD, J.M. DOUBELL, J.R. DOUBLEDAY, M.R. DOWNIE, P.W. DREW, J.N.C.M. DRYSDALE, W.J. DUNCAN, G.W.

1965 1964 1965 1952 1965 1968 1942 1973 1959 1946 195 3 1966 1972

DURRANS, P.J. DYAS, T.J.G. EDWARDS, C.R. EDWARDS, F.L. EDWARDS, M.W. EDWARDS, R.C. ELFORD, W.J.D. ELLEN, M.H. ELLIS, J.R. EMERY, C.A. ERSKINE-HILL, C.R. EVANS, A.E. EVANS, M.

1933 1919 1966 1967 1960 1977 1949 1962 1965 1965 1963 1970 1952 1963 1950 1975 1971

FANSHAW, DR. D.B. FARRELL, J. FELL, D.J. FELL, R.H. FERNEYHOUGH, R.E. FIRTH, J.D. FIRTH, J.W. FIRTH, I.J.W. FLITMAN, H.P. FORD, C.C. FORDHAM, A.D. FORREST, T.J.A. FOULSTONE, M.S. FOWELL, FRASER, R.S. FRIED, I.A. FRIEND, P.A.G.

195 3 1974 1965 1961 1970 1928 1967 1965 1957 1966 1964 195 3 1957 1960 1950 1920 1973 1961 1926 1963 1968 1949 1950 1968 1966 1955 1962 1963 1960 1954 1960 1964

GABAY, J.J. GARDNER, G.S. GARDNER, M. GARTON, B.M. GATES, P.J. GAUNT, G.R.L. GEBREAB, N. GEORGE, A.D.G. GEORGE, P.T. GIBSON, K. GIBSON, N.E. GILLIBRAND, P. GILLIES, I.B. GILSENAN, M.D.C. GINEVER, D.A. GINEVER, REV. A.H. GOLITZIN, A.G. GOODRICH, T.C. GOOLD, A.N. GORDON, B. GOTEL, J. GOUGH, D.W. GOVETT, P.K. GOYMER, R.W. GRANGER, J.M. GRANT, A.C. GRAY, D. GRAY, G.R. GRAYSON, D.R. GREENFIELD, R.H. GRIFFITHS, K.R. GRIGORIAN, M.


PEMBROKE RECORD' 1972 GRIGORIAN, V. 1972 GROSS, J.J. 1949 GUILOR, J.K. 1971 1964 1968 1957 1961 1951 1962 1962 1922 1968 1957 1969 1965 1972 1973 1970 1960 1925 1973 1947 1946 1965 1954 1967 1957 1959 1973 1954 1936 1954 1975 1974 1966 1951 1912 1930 1921 1921 1948 1950 1963 1946 1965 1966 1956 1946 1973 1967

HAJALY, R.S. HALL, D.I. HALL, J.T. HAMER, W.S. HANAU, R. HANCOCK, S.P. HANEMANN, W.M. HANFORD, F. HARDING, J. HARDING, D.M. HARKER, N. HARRIS, P.R. HARRIS, R.F.F. HARRISON, J. HARRISON, R.G. HART, T.G. HAWARI, R. HAWKE-GENN, R.T. HAYAKI, I. HEDGER, M. HEDGER, R. HEMSTEDT, G. HENRY, M.B.S. HENTALL, I.D. HERBERT, M.J. HERRIOT, P. HILL, B.F. HILL, G.W. HILL, J.C.G. HINDLE, J.P. HISA, H. HOBHOUSE, M.J.H. HODSON, C.C. HOLBROUGH, D.W. HOLFORD, W.F. HOLLAND, MAJOR S.G. HOMSY, EDMOND HOMSY, ERNEST HORSELL, R.I. HOUGHTON, J.L. HOWARD-HILL, DR. J. HOWELL-JONES, H.G. HUFF, A. HUGGINS, F.E. HUMPHRIES, G.B.M. HURST, CAPT. R.W. HUTCHINS, C.D. HUTCHINSON, W.T.

1965 ILES, WING COMM. H.B. 1966 IRELAND, J.D. 1975 1939 1970 1966 1969 1965 1977 1972

JACKSON, A.N. JACKSON, C.A.S. JACKSON, D.K.F.H. JACOBS, A.J. JAMESON, H.T. JARVIS, G.J. JEBB, M.H.P. TEENS, C.

1977 1968 1919 1961 1967 1971

JENKINS, P.S. JERE, A.J.H. JOHNSON, T.E. JOHNSTON, R.G.M. JONES, I.L. JUBB, H.

1969 1970 1924 1964 1956 1967 1975 1970 1957 1956 1959 1937 1971 1971 1965

KANU, J.S.A. KARPINSKI, C.J. KATZENBACH, W.E. KAWASE, M. KEEN, B.E. KEITH, H.A. KENT, A.G. ICERSH, C.M. KHAN, CAPT. M.A. KIDNER, P.H. KIRBY, I.J. KITOVITZ, N. KNOTT, A. KNOWLES, D.J. KRISHAMURTHI, C.R.

1958 1916 1976 1972 1961 1950 1951 1975 1963 1961 1955 1953 1971 1963 1977 1948 1960 1969 1961 1919 1967

LANCASTER, C. LANE, C.R. LAZARUS, G. LEAVEY, C.R. LE BRETON, R.J.G. LECKY-THOMPSON, C.W. LESLIE-SMITH, G.C. LEWIS, A.S. LEWIS, N.J.A. LIEB, R.J.B. LILLEY, D.W. LIMBRICK, R.G. LINDUP, N. LINTON, J.M. LLOYD, C.W. LO, K. LOFTHOUSE, K.F.R. LOUDON, A.S. LOUGHRIDGE, F.B. LOWRY, S.M. LUETCHFORD, R.J.

1965 1957 1959 1964 1961 1958 1968 1971 1952 1975 1966 1956 1959 1964 1958 1969 1966 1971 1931

MACRO, I.R. MARY, R.J. MALTZ, H.P. MANLOVE, C.N. MANTLE, E.D.H. MARSON, A.T.S. MARTINDILL, C.J. MASHASHA, F.J. MATE, C.F. MAX, D.J.L. MAY, K.L. MEAKIN, D. MEDANI, A.I. MEHEUX, G.L. MELLAND, J.F. MELLOR, R.J.M. MEYNELL, P.J. MICHEL, V.J.M. MILLER, D.C.

63


64 1955 1976 1966 1966 1977 1958 1961 1972 1954 1956

PEMBROKE RECORD MORGAN, F.W. MORGAN, G.P. MORGAN, L. MORGAN, N.H. MORTIMER, J.L. MORTON, J.F. MULLINGER, R.N. MULLINS, S.P. MUNTZ, C.G.A. MURPHY, M.

1953 McCONNELL, P. McKENZIE, PROF. D.F. 1967 1969 1924 1965 1969 1967 1974 1933 1974 1966 1938 1974 1946

NEATH, P.A. NEATH, S.C. NEWSON-SMITH, C.L. NICHOLL, S.M. NICHOLSON, R.H. NICOLL, P. NIVEN, A.C. NOBLE, A.P. NOBLE, R.C. NOBLE-JAMIESON, C.M. NOOR, M. NORMAN, P.B. NOWSON, S.J.P.

1959 1970 1907 1966 1972 1965 1925 1972 1968 1927

OAKLEY, D.V. O'DRISCOLL, J.P. O'FEELY, REV. T.G. O'KEEFE, M.J.C. OLDREY, B.W. OLLIER, K. ORD, R. O'ROURKE, M.J. O'SULLIVAN, J.N. OWEN, T.F.

1977 1950 1978 1921 1968 1960 1976 1952 1959 1964 1975 1974 1958 1966 1964 1934 1977 1965 1969 1962 1958 1968 1975 1972 1963

PAALBORG, A.M. PAGE, G.T. PAGE, J.R. PARFIT, C.T. PARHAM, DR. A.L.S. PARKHOUSE, J. PARRY, D.G. PEARCE, E.P. PEERS, D.W. PEREZ, S.M. PETRAKAKIS, J.T.S. PIACENTINI, P.M. PICARDIE, M.G. PICKFORD, J.G. PICKVANCE, R.E. PIKE, G.J.R. PITTMAN, E.D.B. PITTS, A.B. PLEDGER, D.W. POLEHAMPTON, H.E. PONSFORD, J.C. POOLE, N.C. POPE, S.E. POPOFF, T. PORTER, G.L.

1932 1926 1924 1941 1972

POWELL, C.L.P. POWELL, PROF. G.F. PRESTON, L.H.W. PRICE, J.H. PRYOR, J.B.

1967 QUARMBY, J.D. 1977 QUIN, S.W. 1968 1972 1947 1977 1961 1970 1971 1954 1952 1956 1949 1971 1978 1974 1956 1963 1966 1919 1964 1965 1925 1963 1962 19533 195 1968 1963 1909 1963 1956 1967 1963

RACHWAL, T.G. RADLEY, G.P. RAE, J.P.H.M. RAMSAY-BROWN, J.A. RANFT, P.R. RAPPS, M.J. RASHID, S.P. RAU, S. RAYMOND, R.J. REVILL, P.J. RHODES, H.D.W. RHYS, J.C. RICHARDS, M. RICHARDS, N.H. RICHARDS, W.E. RICHARDSON, D.J. RICHARDSON, H.A. RICHMOND, A.S. RIDLEY, G.N.S. RIST, C.L. RITTNER, T.H. ROACH, J.M. ROBERTS, R.E. ROBERTSON, W.G. ROBINSON, R. ROGERS, C.J.T. ROGERS, G.L. ROMNEY, P.M. ROUND, N.G. RUSSELL, I.D.A. RYCROFT, D.W.

1976 1965 1938 1968 195 3 1934 1967 1925 1959 1958 1967 1946 1975 1963 1973 1962 1958 1951 1970 1938 1960 1967 1909

SABAN, M. SAIGAL, S.N. ST. CLAIR, A.D. ST. CLAIR, D.M. SALKELD, J. SAMUEL, M.P.K. SANDROW, G.M. SARKIES, M.R. SAVAGE, D.J.O. SAWBRIDGE, R.L. SAYERS, A.B. SCHOOLING, A.J.M. SCHULER, C.J. SCHWARTZ, M. SEALEY, N.D.W. SEEKINGS, M.R. SELVADURAI, S. SENANAYAKI, A.W.F. SHAW, T.W. SHAW, W.I.E. SHEARD, J.A. SHEMILT, J.F. SHEPHERD, G.H.G.


PEMBROKE RECORD

1919 1966 1935 1972 1973 1961 1959 1964 1963 1950 1966 1977 1924 1971 1962 1958 1967 1928 1964 1951 1962 1973 1928 1957 1927 1965 1967 1966 1959 1954 1963 1946 1969 1956 1967 1976 1965 1956 1968 1926 1926 1976 1950

SHEPPARD, REV. E.B.M. SHEPPARD, R.W. SICE, W.F. SIEGELMAN, D. SIHM, P.A. SILBER, D.O. SIMPSON, B.R. SIMPSON, C.K. SINCLAIR, A.R.E. SINKINSON, T.C. SITCH, J.E. J.E. SKAR, H.O. SLADDEN, A. SMERILLO, G.L.J. SMITH, ALAN SMITH, ANTHONY SMITH, A.E. SMITH, A.J.K. SMITH, C.N. SMITH, G.F. SMITH, H.I. SMITH, M.J. SMITH, R.A.G. SMITH, R.G. SMYTHE, H.A. SOER, J.E. J.E. SOLEM, K.E. SQUIRE, G.R. STAFFORD, C.V. STANFORD, AJ.R. AJ.R. STEINFELD, M.R. STEPHENS, E.A. STEPHENSON, G. STEVENS, W.N.R. STEWART, H.E. STOCKWELL, R.W.T. STOVOLD, G.D. STUBBS, G.M. G.M. SUTTON, V.H. SWAN, L. SWANN, SWANN, F.G. F.G. SYKES, J.N. SYLVESTER, M.

1908 1931 1947 1945 1960 1967 1964 1964 1975

TAYLOR, E.G. TAYLOR, F.H.G. TAYLOR, S. THACKER, P.W. THOMPSON, A.G. THOMPSON, M.H. THOMSON, A.H. TORDAY, P.L. TOWNSHEND, TOWNSHEND, J.R. J.R.

1965 1966 1981 1980 1975 1974 1969 1961 1961 1963

TRENGROVE, C.H. TROUT, A.H. TUKAN, MRS. L. TUKAN, U.S. TULLETT, D.J. TURNER, D.G.D. TURNER, J.L. TWEEDALE, D.W. TWIGGE-MOLECEY, D.J.

1971 UNSWORTH, P.W. 1965 1961 1973

VAUGHTON, K.C. VAUGHTON, N.D. VIVAR, VIVAR,A.L. Al.

1944 1967 1958 1970 1933 1957 1967 1946 1975 1958 1960 1927 1970 1970 1966 1932 1973 1959 1935 1973 1977 1961 1969 1959 1972 1968 1949 1934 1958 1959 1951 1966

WADE, M.J. M.J. WALKER, R.G. WALKER, R.J. WALL, A.D. WALSH, REV. W.E. WANDLESS, M.E. WANT, M.P. WARNER, CAPT. P.C.R. WATERFALL, M.R.D. WEAVER, R.E. WEBB, R.E.A. WEIGHTMAN, D.M. WEINSTEIN, D.P. WEIR, J.R. WHELAN, S.C. WHITE, MAJOR, A.D.F. W1LLETTS, WILLETTS, J.M. WILLIAMS, B.J. WILLIAMS, G.R. WILLIAMS, M.P. WILLIAMS, S.C. WILLIS, J.G. WILSON, WILSON, J. J. WISE, W.E. WOLFE, S.F. WONG, C.K. WOOD, G.S. WOODGATE, W.D. WOODWARD, A.H. WOODWARD, A.S. WOOLF, M.D. WORKMAN, R.S.

1965 YATES, D.A. 1962 ZAPRUDER, H.G.

65


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Profile for Pembroke College, Oxford

Pembroke College Record (Oxford), 1982  

Pembroke College Record (Oxford), 1982  

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