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Department of Pediatrics 2013 & 2014 Status Report


McMaster University | Department of Pediatrics | 2013 & 2014 Status Report

2013 & 2014 Status Report

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What’s Inside

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30

Content

Excellence in Care

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From the Chair

25 In the Clinic

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From the Dean

30 Helping Kids Live Healthier Lives

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From the President

33 Advocating for Children Around the World 34 McMaster–Niagara Pediatrics Collaboration is Thriving

2013 & 2014 Year in Review

20 In the News

36 Dr. Dent Looks Back 22 Recognition Dinner 37 Building a Pediatric Trauma Team

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48 34

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Excellence in Research

Excellence in Education

39 Remembering the Father of Neonatology

47 It’s a Big Job

40 Improving Care for the Tiniest Patients

48 Endowment Fund Dollars at Work

41 Preemie Voices

49 There’s a Pediatrics App for That!

42 Shaping Young Researchers

50 Specialized Education

43 Supporting Research

51 Celebrating CanChild

44 Improving Life for Children with Epilepsy

52 Behind the Scenes

45 The Benefits of Exercise

54 2013 & 2014 Publications 78 2014 Faculty & Trainees 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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| Department of Pediatrics


From the Chair Dear friends and colleagues, It is my pleasure to present the 2013 & 2014 status report for the Department of Pediatrics. The report captures just a slice of our remarkable activities in healing, teaching and research, and highlights some of the major awards and achievements of our members. Our Department continues to see dramatic growth, now consisting of 214 full- and part-time faculty members. In the past two years, close to 20 new faculty have joined our team, contributing to a 60 percent increase in faculty since 2009. At our heart we are a clinical department, and the care we provide to children and families continues to grow in volume and in quality. On page 25 of the report, you’ll find many examples of clinical innovation as we look for new ways to better serve our patients. The report also highlights some of our pediatric research successes, many of which fall in the key areas of metabolism, exercise and obesity (Page 30), neonatal care (Page 40) transition (Page 33), and knowledge translation. In 2014 alone, our faculty successfully secured more than $2 million in CIHR funding. Our educational impact has never been stronger as we enter into postgraduate and undergraduate accreditation in 2015. The Department has reached a new record with more than 100 postgraduate trainees from around the world in 12 programs. This growth represents a 250 percent increase in subspecialty trainees over the past five years (Page 50). Our Education Endowment Fund has seen early success, bringing together our research and educational missions and promoting innovative educational scholarship. The fund awarded its first grant in 2013 (Page 48), and we look forward to its continued growth in the future. We’ve started to reach beyond the borders of our Children’s Hospital to our regional partners to support the educational mission of the Faculty of Health Sciences, and to help improve the care for children and families across the health care system. The partnership between McMaster and the Niagara Health System is an excellent example of collaboration, and you can read more about it on Page 34.

This report also contains stories of reflection and remembrance, with a tribute to Dr. Jack Sinclair (Page 39), a giant in the world of neonatology and a foundational faculty member for the Department. It also looks at the 25th anniversary celebrations for McMaster Children’s Hospital (Page 36) as well as the CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research (Page 51). This is a bittersweet report for me as it will be my last as Department Chair. I am incredibly proud of the accomplishments of our Department. We have never been stronger or better positioned to address the health of children and youth across our region and the world. We have an incredible group of leaders, faculty and staff, and I am confident that the Department will continue to build on the momentum of the past decade. I feel truly privileged to have called McMaster home at such a formative time of my personal and professional life. I’ve also had the chance to share personal moments of joy and grief for colleagues and staff. Most importantly, I’ve seen how we come together as faculty and staff to support each other in our personal and professional lives. I wish the Department, my lifelong colleagues and friends, continued success in the future—I consider you all a part of my family.

Lennox Huang, MD FAAP Associate Professor Chair, Department of Pediatrics* McMaster University Chief of Pediatrics* McMaster Children’s Hospital at Hamilton Health Sciences & St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton

*ending May 2015

2013 & 2014 Status Report

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From the Dean

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n behalf of the Faculty of Health Sciences, I wish to congratulate the faculty and staff of the Department of Pediatrics on their excellent achievements throughout 2013 and 2014.

The Department of Pediatrics of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine is one of Canada’s leading centres for pediatric health learning, discovery and care. It has a strong academic reputation, built by internationally recognized faculty who conduct high-impact research in a wide range of areas, including diabetes, obesity, cancer, childhood disability, neuromuscular disorders and neonatology, and who train the next generation of leading pediatricians. During the time of this report, the accomplishments in the department have been many. As examples: Professor emeritus Saroj Saigal published the book Preemie Voices, which describes the lives, challenges and achievements of people born very prematurely and cared for at McMaster Children’s Hospital during the past generation. The CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, a pioneer and global leader in childhood disability research, celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2014. The Centre has developed tools and materials that help millions of children around the world. Among many recognitions of the excellence of the Department’s faculty members, professor Ronald Barr was honoured by the Pediatric Chairs of Canada with the 2014 Paediatric Academic Leadership – Clinician Practitioner Award. It is also important to note the growth and strength of the Department’s residency and fellowship programs in recent years. In 2014, there were 50 residents in the program, and 52 fellows in nine fellowship programs – the highest number of fellows the Department has ever seen. These are just a few highlights from the past two years that continue to raise the reputation and profile of the Department of Pediatrics, a department which has held an important role in the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine since its inception. Best wishes for success in the year ahead.

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Dr. John G. Kelton Dean and Vice-President Faculty of Health Sciences Dean of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine


From the President

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cMaster Children’s Hospital has reached a milestone. In September 2013, the hospital celebrated its 25th anniversary. It took a great deal of hard work and visionary thinking by many dedicated people to create a pediatric hospital in Hamilton in 1988. Some of those people still walk our hallways today – people like Dr. Peter Dent and Dr. Peter Rosenbaum who marshalled the direction of the hospital in those early years, then continued to engage in its expansion to ensure the dream of a full pediatric acute care hospital would come true. McMaster Children’s Hospital is now considered one of the fastest growing pediatric hospitals in Canada. In those 25 years, the changes have been nothing short of monumental. Together, we’ve celebrated the expansion of the neonatal intensive care unit, the creation of an inpatient mental health unit, an adolescent treatment unit, and a new pediatric intensive care unit, among many other achievements. Of course, one of the most significant changes was the move to children’s-only emergency care, and building a new, state-of-theart emergency department. McMaster Children’s Hospital began streaming children’s emergency care in 2009, with about 15,000 visits to the emergency department from children and youth. Five years later, that number has nearly tripled, to almost 45,000 visits. As a result, we have hired many more pediatric emergency doctors, ever improving the care of children in this community and region. Changes and growth continue. In 2014, construction began on the new McMaster Children’s Health Centre, a new purpose-built facility for children and youth in the outpatient programs for mental health, autism spectrum disorder and developmental pediatrics, as well as prosthetics and orthotics for children and adults. That building will open in 2015. Growing our hospital means growing our capacity for research and education. The innovative thinking of our pediatrics department has improved care for children far beyond our walls through the development of new research, new methods and best practice. The next generation of learners is benefitting from our specialists at McMaster.

Dr. Peter Fitzgerald President McMaster Children’s Hospital

These are truly exciting times for McMaster Children’s Hospital. I want to say a special thank you to Dr. Lennox Huang, who has led the pediatrics department with dignity, intellect and enthusiasm, and is responsible for recruiting many of the newer physicians. I also want to acknowledge the great work of all of our pediatric physicians, both those who have cared for children for many years, and those new, bringing with them further ideas and innovation. I look forward to seeing what the next 25 years will bring for growth and opportunity. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Year in Review February 2013

January 2013 The Department welcomes Dr. Michelle Batthish to the Division of Rheumatology, and Dr. Muzafar Gani Abdul Wahab to the Division of Neonatology. Michelle Batthish

Muzafar Gani Abdul Wahab

Dr. Jan Willem Gorter is appointed the Scotiabank Chair in Child Health Research. Drs. Peter Rosenbaum and Mark Tarnopolsky are named in McMaster’s 125 People of Impact, celebrating McMaster University’s 125th Anniversary. Drs. Sourabh Dutta and Chris Fusch are awarded a HAHSO Innovation Grant in the amount of $196,880 for the project “Effect of Cohorting Patients by Level of Acuity to Designated Areas within a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.” Dr. Gabriel Ronen is awarded a $179,570 HAHSO Innovation Grant for his project “Enhanced physical activity in children and youth with epilepsy: Exploring evidence of impacts on health, functioning, psychological wellbeing, and quality of life.” Dianne Norman receives a Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator Certificate at the annual International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Grants Drs. Chris Fusch, Stephanie Atkinson, Salhab El Helou, Niels Rochow, and Lehana Thabane are awarded $472,066 for the project “The effect of individualized fortification of breast milk on somatic growth and neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants – The IFO Study.” Their project ranked 1st place. Drs. Brian Timmons, Cheryl Missiuna, Gita Wahi and colleagues are awarded $1,579,006 for the project “Impact of Developmental Coordination Disorder on the physical health of young children.” Drs. Stephanie Atkinson, Katherine Morrison and colleagues are awarded $747,829 for the project: “FAMILY Study (Family Atherosclerosis Monitoring in Early Life).” Drs. Christine Wekerle, Peter Rosenbaum and Harriet MacMillan are awarded $1,398,012 for the “Ontario Child Health Study Sequel.” Medical students Evan Cole (supervised by Dr. Melissa Parker) and Anushka Weeraratne (supervised by Dr. April Kam) both receive CIHR Health Professional Study Research Awards in the amount of $4,251.

Dr. Katherine Morrison and co-PI Dr. Anthony Levinson are awarded a CIHR E-Health Innovation Catalyst Grant to examine “Family Centred E-Health in Pediatric Weight Management: A Pilot Study.” Opened on February 9, 1973, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit celebrates its 40th Anniversary.

Members from the CAAP program

Established in January 1993, the Child Advocacy & Assessment Program (CAAP) marks its 20th year at McMaster Children’s Hospital. 8

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March 2013 Dr. Jan Willem Gorter is appointed Director of CanChild. Dr. Melissa Parker receives an HHS Early Career Award. Dr. Andrea Mucci is awarded a $2,000 Banting Legacy Transition Award to pursue training or education in the field of Transitional Care.

Pediatrics Faculty supervised or co-supervised 208 trainees in the 2013/2014 academic year.

McMaster Children and Youth University, founded by Pediatrics faculty, receives Forward With Integrity Funding.

Drs. Melissa Parker, Jeffrey Pernica, Salhab El Helou, and Sherry Van Blyderveen receive New Investigator Fund awards. Drs. Andrea Hunter and several medical students present three posters at the Consortium of Universities Global Health Conference in Washington, DC.

More than 50 undergraduate and medical students and 27 faculty supervisors take part in the annual Pediatric Undergraduate Research Day. Read the article on page 42. May 2013

April 2013 Drs. Chris Fusch (PI), Anthony Chan, and Les Berry are awarded $545,000 in funding from CIHR and NSERC for the project “Development of a pumpless lung assist device which acts like an artificial placenta for neonates with respiratory failure.” Drs. Julia Frei and Kim Genier are appointed Co-Chief Residents for 2013-2014. Read the article on page 47.

Mark Duffett (PI), supervised by Deborah Cook, is awarded $165,000 in CIHR Fellowship funding for the project “The Evidence in Pediatric Intensive Care (EPIC) Research Program.”

Drs. Jeffrey Pernica (PI), David Goldfarb, and colleagues are awarded a $100,000 Grand Challenges Canada: Stars in Global Health grant for their project “Measuring the impact of novel enteric diagnostics: how many children’s lives can be saved.” Dr. Martha Fulford is appointed Site Chief in the Department of Medicine, McMaster Site. Drs. Julia Frei and Daisy Liu receive a Pediatric Resident Research Award. Dr. Vladimir Belostotsky is awarded a $40,000 HHS New Investigator Fund for his project “Correction of Zinc Deficiency in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant.”

Dr. Harriet MacMillan joins the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences Board of Directors.

Pediatric resident and PAIRO President Dr. Jonathan DellaVedova receives the OMA Resident Achievement Award for Leadership.

CIHR Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarships are awarded to graduate students Michelle Phoenix (supervised by Dr. Peter Rosenbaum) and Tram Nguyen (supervised by Dr. Jan Willem Gorter).

Dr. Brian Timmons and members from CanChild Contribute to the Active Healthy Kids Canada: Annual Report Card.

Dr. Karen Choong becomes Pediatric Director of the Canadian Critical Care Society.

Drs. David Goldfarb (PI), Jeffrey Pernica, and colleagues receive a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, PATH, and CDC Foundation in the amount of $275,000 over 2 years to establish a National Rotavirus Surveillance Program in Botswana.

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2013 & 2014 Year in Review June 2013 Dr. Bill Mahoney is awarded a Member Recognition Award from the Canadian Paediatric Society.

Dr. Anthony Chan and colleagues present 14 abstracts at the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Congress, held in Amsterdam. Dr. Tapas Mondal speaks about “Long term ECG monitoring: current practice and the future” at the Zhejiang Normal University in Jinhua, Zhejiang Province, China.

Dr. Rajesh RamachandranNair becomes a member of the newly created Provincial Epilepsy Implementation Task Force. Dr. Moyez Ladhani becomes Chair of the Royal College Pediatric Exam, OSCE Committee. Dr. Peter Rosenbaum delivers an invited lecture at the 50th Anniversary of the Japanese Association of Rehabilitation Medicine titled “Developmental Rehab in the 21st Century: Is it Time for a New Start?”

Dr. Christine Wekerle presents “Improving the setting and adopting of international standards to drive innovation” at the 2013 World Research Congress. Dr. Peter Rosenbaum gives the invitational Annual Alton Goldbloom Lecture at Montreal Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Rajesh RamachandranNair presents at the International Epilepsy Congress. Dr. Sandesh Shivananda is awarded $160,500 in funding from the Physicians’ Services Incorporated Foundation for his project “Care Bundle to Improve Oxygenation in Newborns (CBION).” Read the article on page 40. Dr. Greg Harvey (supervised by Dr. Melissa Parker) receives a $2,000 PSI Resident Research Prize for his project “Factors Affecting Pediatric Isotonic Fluid Resuscitation Efficiency: A Randomized Nonclinical Trial Evaluating the Impact of Syringe Size.” Drs. Stephanie Atkinson, Katherine Morrison, Gita Wahi, and colleagues receive a CIHR Grant for $2 million over five years for their project “Understanding the impact of maternal and infant nutrition on infant/child health.” Drs. Chris Fusch (CI), Deborah O’Connor (PI), and colleagues from the Hospital for Sick Children receive a CIHR grant for $2 million over five years for the project “Optimizing Mother’s Milk for Preterm Infants.”

There were 41 poster presentations and 6 trainee oral presentation at the annual McMaster Child Health Research Day. July 2013

Dr. Muzafar Gani Abdul Wahab becomes the new Neonatology Subspecialty Program Director. Stacey Marjerrison

7 new faculty joined the Department in 2013 and 8 new faculty joined in 2014 10

| Department of Pediatrics

Enas El Gouhary

Jennifer Twiss

The Department welcomes Dr. Stacey Marjerrison as an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Division of Hematology and Oncology, Dr. Enas El Gouhary as an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Division of Neonatology, and Dr. Jennifer Twiss as an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Division of Neonatology.


Dr. Anne Klassen and colleagues receive a CIHR Open Operating Grant for $602,389 over five years for the project “International Study to Develop a PatientReported Outcome Instrument for Cleft-Lip and/or Palate Patients: The CLEFT-Q.” Drs. Herbert Brill, David Callen, Natasha Johnson, Prashanth Murthy, Sandeep Raha, Katrin Scheinemann, and Sandesh Shivananda are promoted to Associate Professors. Dr. Andrew Latchman is appointed Director of the Pediatric Clerkship Program, and Dr. Vicky Breakey becomes Assistant Pediatric Clerkship Director. Vicky Breakey

Andrew Latchman

August 2013 Dr. Jan Willem Gorter becomes the Associate Editor of the international journal Child: Care, Health and Development. September 2013 Dr. Tanya Solano joins the Department of Pediatrics as an Assistant Professor in the Division of Emergency Medicine.

McMaster Children’s Hospital celebrates its 25th Anniversary on September 16, 2013. Read the article on page 36. Kal Mungovan, a former Master’s student supervised by Dr. Elyanne Ratcliffe, receives the Neurogastroenterology and Motility Prize for her abstract “Influence of Intestinal Microbiota on the Postnatal Development of Dopamenergic Enteric Neurons,” awarded by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. Ten members from the Department present abstracts at the Association for Medical Education in Europe conference in Prague, Czech Republic. Drs. Moyez Ladhani, Heather Bhan, Andrea Hunter and Jon Gilleland participate in the International Conference on Residency Education.

Dr. Melissa Parker and colleagues host a World Sepsis Day Symposium on September 13, 2013. Dr. Christina Grant and Catherine Krasnik’s abstract “Conversion Disorders in Canadian Children and Youth: A National Survey of Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes” is presented at the International Pediatric Congress in Melbourne, Australia. Dr. Stephanie Atkinson and colleagues receive a grant for $636,322 over five years from the Dairy Research Cluster Initiative for the project “Role of high dairy diet on bone health outcomes in pregnant women and their offspring in early life (Bone BHIP): A randomized clinical trial.” Dr. Sheri Findlay and colleagues receive a $190,092 CIHR Knowledge to Action operating grant for their study “Implementing highly specialized and evidence-based pediatric eating disorder treatment in Ontario.”

Dr. Melissa Parker receives a Young Investigator Award for her abstract “Rapid Pediatric Fluid Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Efficiency of Two Provider Endorsed Manual Fluid Resuscitation Techniques.” October 2013 Dr. Edward Pugh joins the Department of Pediatrics as an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Division of Neonatology.

Dr. Harriet MacMillan receives the 2014 Anne and Neil McArthur Research Award from St. Joseph’s Healthcare. Dr. Moyez Ladhani receives the 2013 Donald Richards Wilson Award. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Year in Review Resident Dr. Willa Liao represents McMaster’s Pediatric Residency Program at the Canadian Society of Allergy & Immunology’s 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting. Dr. Robert Issenman and colleagues receive the Best New Technology Poster Award for “Using a tablet screening tool (TickIT) in Adolescent Health Care” at the Canadian Association of Pediatric Health Centres Conference held in Toronto.

Drs. Michelle Butt and Marilyn Ballantyne (Co-PIs), with Lucy Giglia, Susan Jack, Sarah McDonald, and Wendy Sword receive a CIHR Planning Grant in the amount of $18,225 for their project “Addressing Primary Health Care Service Gaps for Late Preterm Infants and their Families.” Dr. Fawaz Alanzi (supervised by Drs. Karen Choong and Cynthia Cupido), Dr. Shazli Shethwala (supervised by Drs. Moyez Ladhani and Madan Roy), and Dr. Allison Rodrigues (supervised by Drs. Lucy Giglia and Moyez Ladhani) receive RMA Scholarship Awards.

Dr. Peter Rosenbaum gives the invited Presidential Guest Lecture at the 67th Annual Meeting of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine.

Anthony Crocco

Jon Gilleland

Dr. Anthony Crocco is appointed Division Head and Medical Director of the Division of Emergency Medicine, and Dr. Jon Gilleland is appointed Acting Division Head and Medical Director of the Pediatric Critical Care Unit.

November 2013 Dr. Daisy Liu, pediatric resident, receives the 2013 Dr. Derek Puddester Canadian Association of Interns and Residents Award for Resident Well-being.

Dr. Robert Issenman presents “Motivational Interviewing in the Office Approach to Overweight” at the OMA Summit on Children’s Nutrition. Dr. Ronnie Barr receives the 2013 Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario Companion Award. Department members celebrate at the Annual Recognition Dinner. December 2013

There were 50 pediatric Residents and 52 Fellows during the 2013/2014 academic year 12

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Dr. Ehud Rosenbloom and his research team are recognized at the International Meeting on Simulation Healthcare (IMSH). Their abstract, “The Mirror Technique: A Novel Use of In-Situ Simulation to Test Flow and Environment of a New Pediatric Emergency Space,” wins the first place award in the Program Innovation Abstract category. Drs. Quang Ngo, Ehud Rosenbloom, Lennox Huang, Kevin Middleton, and colleagues conduct four workshops and present two posters at IMSH.


Dr. Rajesh RamachandranNair receives a $26,728 Jamie Buchanan Memorial Award from the Hospital Foundation to conduct research on “Neuropsychological outcome in encephalopathy associated with electrical status epilepticus of sleep ESES.”

Faculty published 289 journal articles in 2013, and 244 journal articles in 2014

Dr. Arif Somani and collaborators are awarded $239,408 from the National Institutes of Health for work towards Intra-Pulmonary Aerosol Delivery for Intubated Pediatric Patients.

Dr. Brandon Meaney is appointed Chair of the Accreditation Self-Study Task Force for the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine.

Dr. Rajesh RamachandranNair presents “Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy SUDEP: Patient advocacy” at the American Epilepsy Society annual meeting, held in Washington, DC.   January 2014 Dr. Robin Williams is appointed to the Order of Canada in recognition of her contributions as a public health leader promoting effective policies in early childhood development. Dr. Karen Choong secures a $199,655 HAHSO Innovation Grant for her project “Functional Recovery in Critically Ill Children: The ‘Wee-Cover’ Longitudinal Cohort Study.”

Prof. Carol DeMatteo from CanChild (PI) with co-investigators Drs. Lucy Giglia, Lehana Thabane, Brian Timmons, and colleagues receive $591,000 in CIHR funding for the study “Safely Returning Children and Youth to Activity After Concussion.” March 2014 Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Grants Open Operating Grants are awarded to the following Department members:

Dr. Madan Roy becomes a member of the Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health. February 2014 Dr. Anthony Chan is appointed Associate Chair of Research in the Department of Pediatrics.

Ian Hanney (BHSc student mentored by Mark Duffett and Dr. Karen Choong) is awarded best poster for “Consent in Pediatric Critical Care RCTs: A systematic review” at the Canadian Critical Care Forum. Drs. Samah Al-Harbi, Katie Siu, Maria Chacon, and Rachel Walker (supervised by Dr. Karen Choong), along with Evan Cole and Dr. Greg Harvey (supervised by Dr. Melissa Parker) also present at the event. Dr. Herbert Brill is appointed Corporate Chief of Pediatrics and Co-Medical Director, Women’s and Children’s Health Program, with the William Osler Health System.

Dr. Sandy Raha (PI) and colleagues are awarded $432,935 over four years for their project “Maternal obesity contributes to poor neonatal health: The role of the placenta.” Dr. Brian Timmons (PI) and colleagues are awarded $769,424 over five years for their project “The School-age Kids’ health from early Investment in Physical activity (SKIP) study.” Dr. Mark Tarnopolsky (PI) and colleagues are awarded $444,501 over four years for their project “Characterization of Novel Exerkines Mediating Pro-metabolic Effects of Endurance Exercise.” Dr. Katherine Morrison and colleagues are awarded $946,604 over five years for their project “The Baby & Microbiota of the Intestine Project (Baby & Mi).” Dr. Melissa Parker and colleague are awarded a Catalyst Grant in the amount of $100,000 over two years for their project “Exception to consent in pediatric resuscitation research: Exploring the experiences of substitute decision makers.” Dr. Melissa Parker is a CIHR New Investigator Salary Award recipient, as an emerging leader in pediatric critical care and resuscitation research and knowledge translation. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Year in Review Dr. Moyez Ladhani receives the first Pediatrics Education Endowment Fund award in the amount of $2,000 for his project “Competency Based Medical Education, Mini MAS.” Read the article on page 48. Dr. Christina Grant is appointed the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine’s designated representative for the Association of American Medical Colleges’ Group on Women in Medicine and Science. April 2014 Dr. Mark Ferro becomes an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and a joint faculty member in the Department of Pediatrics.

45 students present 27 posters at the annual Pediatrics Undergraduate Research Day. Read the article on page 42. Dr. Mark Ferro and colleagues are awarded a $118,656 CIHR grant for the project “Psychiatric comorbidity in children with chronic physical illness: a pilot study.”

Drs. Dustin Jacobson and Karen McAssey present the poster “Comparison of Clerk Duty Hour Schedules in Pediatric Clerkship” at the Council on Medical Education in Pediatrics. Drs. Christine Wekerle, Harriet MacMillan, and colleagues are awarded a $10,000 developmental team grant from CIHR for the project: “Understanding health risks and promoting resilience in male youth with sexual violence experiences.”

Dr. Alim Pardhan receives a 2014 Professional Association of Residents of Ontario Teaching Award. Dr. Mark Ferro and researchers from Sick Kids receive a $697,290 CIHR grant to fund the study “Impact of pediatric epilepsy surgery on healthrelated quality of life.” May 2014 Dr. Madan Roy is appointed Interim Regional Chief of Pediatrics and Regional Academic Lead, Pediatrics, for the Niagara Health System. Read the article on page 34.

Daisy Liu

Anne Moffatt

Joanna Stanisz

Drs. Daisy Liu, Anne Moffatt, and Joanna Stanisz become new Co-Chief Residents for the 2014-2015 academic year. Dr. Brian Timmons and colleagues receive $263,220 in funding from the Heart & Stroke Foundation for the project “Cardiovascular Health in children with chronic inflAMmatory condition: role of physical fItness, and inflammatiON: The CHAMPION Study.”

21 grants were awarded to Pediatrics Faculty in 2014 14

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Dr. Saroj Saigal and her team from the Adults Born Preterm International Collaboration (APIC) conduct a symposium at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting in Vancouver. Dr. Katherine Morrison is an invited speaker at the conference on the topic “Cardio-metabolic health of adults born preterm.” Dr. Olaf Kraus de Camargo presents “Putting the ICF-CY into Practice” at the 30th Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity in Hawaii. Dr. Christina Grant receives a 2014 Certificate of Merit Award from the Canadian Association for Medical Education (CAME).


Pediatrics Faculty were awarded $5,091,847 in research funding in 2014

Dr. Jan Willem Gorter and colleagues receive funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada in the amount of $412,867 for their project “Optimizing life success through residential immersive life skills programs for youth with disabilities.” Dr. Brian Timmons is awarded an NSERC Discovery Grant in the amount of $145,000 for the project “Antiinflammatory mechanisms of exercise during human growth.”

Dr. Christina Grant is selected as McMaster University’s representative on the Canadian Association for Medical Education (CAME) Board of Directors. Drs. Quang Ngo and Andrea Hunter are selected as co-chairs of McMaster’s Pediatrics Residency Program curriculum. Dr. Constantine Samaan is selected to join the Pediatric Endocrine Society Obesity Committee.

Eight members from Pediatrics present seven posters and four oral presentations at the 2014 World Congress of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Medicine, held in Istanbul, Turkey. Dr. Mark Ferro receives a Brain Star Award from the Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction through CIHR. Pediatric resident, Dr. Romy Cho receives a Banting Foundation Legacy Award in the amount of $2,500. Dr. Srinivasa Doreswamy (supervised by Dr. Sandesh Shivananda) receives the award for Best Oral Presentation for “Inadvertent Pressure over Upper Lip during Neonatal Intubation - A mannequin study: A display of new prototype - Neoscope” at the 13th Annual Neonatal Research Day. June 2014

Dr. Rajesh RamachandranNair is appointed as a member of the central council of the Canadian Association of Child Neurologists.

Dr. Robyn Whitney is selected as the HHS Medical Staff Association’s Outstanding Resident 2014 for the Department of Pediatrics.

Dr. Saroj Saigal receives the Medical Staff Association’s Dr. Stephen Garnett Distinction Award. Drs. Mark Ferro, Jan Willem Gorter, and Michael Boyle are awarded a $37,600 HHS New Investigator grant for the study “Depressive symptoms in youth with physical illness during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood.” Stephen Noorduyn

Researchers in the Department showcase 18 posters presented by trainees and research staff at the 6th Annual McMaster Child Health Research Day. There are also five trainee oral presentations, and one featured oral presentation by New Investigator Dr. Jeffrey Pernica. Faculty Development Day Certificates are awarded to Dr. Heather Bhan (University Teaching Program Certificate); Dr. Fawzah Alrwuili (University Teaching Program Certificate); and Dr. Romy Cho (Basic Teaching & Learning Certificate).

New provincial funding has facilitated the development of a Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Program (CPEP) for children and youth with medically refractory epilepsy. Read the article on page 25. Dr. Sheri Findlay is appointed Chair of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada’s Specialty Committee in Adolescent Medicine.

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2013 & 2014 Year in Review

Jeff Pernica

Drs. Jeffrey Pernica, David Goldfarb, and colleagues receive a grant from The Government of Nunavut and Public Health Agency of Canada in the amount of $185,000 over 2 years to establish a project for diarrheal illness surveillance at sentinel sites in Nunavut.

Drs. Melissa Parker (PI), Karen Choong, Lehana Thabane, Jeff Pernica, and colleagues are awarded a $35,000 HHS New Investigator grant for their study “Optimizing Resuscitation Care for Children with Septic Shock through Audit-Feedback: A Pilot Study.”

Drs. Tania Cellucci and Andrea Hunter receive Pediatric Residency Program Faculty Teaching Awards. Dr. Stephanie Atkinson presents at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Society for Obstetrics and Gynecology of Canada in Niagara Falls, ON, on the topic “Does Maternal Nutrition Influence Pregnancy Outcomes and ‘Program’ Future Infant Health?” Faculty and learners from the Department of Pediatrics present at the Canadian Pediatric Society Conference in Montreal, QC. The Bosco Paes Award for excellence in teaching is awarded to Dr. Kim Genier.

Dr. Mark Ferro is awarded a Research Early Career Award from Hamilton Health Sciences. The CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research celebrates its 25th Anniversary. Read the article on page 51.

Pediatric Neurology Residents award Dr. Samantha Marin with a Resident Teaching Award, and Dr. Mark Tarnopolsky with a Staff Teaching Award. Dr. Tapas Mondal is an invited speaker at the Indo-Global Healthcare Summit & Expo in Hyderabad, India. Dr. April Kam presents the poster “Using process mapping in a pediatric emergency to minimize missed urinary tract infections” at the 15th International Conference on Emergency Medicine in Hong Kong, China. Dr. Madan Roy is appointed Associate Chair, Niagara Regional Campus. Drs. Constantine Samaan, Mark Tarnopolsky, and Sonia Anand are awarded $35,000 from the HHS New Investigator Fund for their project “Telmisartan effects on muscle inflammation in the metabolic syndrome.”

July 2014 Faculty Promotions: Dr. Jan Willem Gorter is promoted to Professor; Drs. Salhab el Helou, Jeffrey Pernica and Melissa Parker are promoted to Associate Professors; and Drs. Lucy Giglia, Andrea Hunter, Ramsay MacNay and Linda Pedder become Associate Clinical Professors. Dr. Moyez Ladhani’s abstract “Implementing a competency based curriculum in a paediatric training program” is selected by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada: International Conference on Residency Education planning committee as one of the top five nominees for this year’s “What works” paper session.

Kevin Jones

Nathalie Schindler

Eric Koelink

The Department of Pediatrics welcomes Dr. Kevin Jones as an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neurology, and Drs. Nathalie Schindler and Eric Koelink as Assistant Clinical Professors in the Division of Emergency Medicine. August 2014

Pediatrics Faculty contributed 78,781 teaching hours in 2014 16

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Dr. Stephanie Atkinson is appointed a member of the working group of neonatologists and nutritionists for the project “Evaluating the Evidence to Support Guidelines for the Nutritional Care of Preterm Infants (Pre-B Project),” sponsored by the National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.


Maude Perreault (PhD student supervised by Dr. Stephanie Atkinson) is awarded a four-year doctoral scholarship of $50,000 per year by the Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist Program.

Drs. Anne Klassen, Vicky Breakey, and colleagues receive $149,554 from the C17 research network for the study “Development and Validation of Distress Screening Tools for use by Canadian Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Cancer Patients & Survivors.” Dr. Jonathan Gilleland is successful in becoming a Master Facilitator for the Patient Safety Education Program Canada, in collaboration with Northwestern University and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute.

There are 9 Pediatric Specialty and Sub-Specialty Fellowship Programs Dr. Herbert Brill is selected to join the new Paediatric Levels of Care Work Group for the Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health. Pediatric Endocrinology Fellow Dr. Eman Al-Shehri wins the Best Poster Presentation Prize at the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) conference. Drs. Peter Rosenbaum and Gabriel Ronen participate in a panel discussion on ethics in neurodisabilities at the European Academy of Childhood Disability in Vienna. Dr. Gita Wahi and colleagues receive bridge funding from the Spring 2014 CIHR Open Operating Grant competition in the amount of $100,000 for their study entitled “Aboriginal Birth Cohort (ABC) Project.”

September 2014 Dr. Arif Somani is awarded a $50,000 peer reviewed grant by the Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium and Office of Discovery and Translation towards the development of an aerosol generator for intubated patients.

Dr. Emma Wyatt is named the new Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Medical Director. Neonatal fellows Dr. Aravanan Anbu Chakkarapani and Dr. Niels Rochow present at the American Academy of Pediatrics-Section on Perinatal Pediatrics, Mid-Atlantic Conference in Hershey, PA.

Nikhil Pai

Amit Mukerji

Adam Fleming

New Assistant Professors join the Department of Pediatrics: Dr. Nikhil Pai joins the Division of Gastroenterology; Dr. Amit Mukerji joins the Division of Neonatology; and Dr. Adam Fleming becomes a member of the Division of Hematology-Oncology. Drs. April Kam and Anne Niec present the workshop “Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) in residencies: A tool for making more compassionate doctors,” and Dr. Bojana Babic presents the poster “Evaluation of Pediatric Residents’ Knowledge of Patient Education Resources” at the Association for Medical Education in Europe, 2014 Excellence in Education Conference, held in Milan, Italy. Dr. Christoph Fusch becomes a member of the Editorial Board for the new journal Molecular and Cellular Pediatrics, launched by the German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

Dr. Peter Rosenbaum receives a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine. October 2014 McMaster University medical student Blair Bigham (supervised by Dr. Melissa Parker) is selected to receive a Young Investigator Award at the American Heart Association Resuscitation Science Symposium. Dr. Ronnie Barr receives the Pediatric Chairs of Canada’s 2014 Paediatric Academic Leadership - Clinician Practitioner Award.

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2013 & 2014 Year in Review Dr. Madan Roy is successful in becoming a Master Facilitator for the Patient Safety Education Program Canada with the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Dr. Jackson Wong joins the Department of Pediatrics as an Associate Professor, and also becomes the Head of the Division of Respirology.

Dr. Ronnie Barr is invited to take part in the World Health Organization’s New Cancer Medicines Working Group, to complete a comprehensive review of the cancer chapter of the WHO’s Essential Medicine List. Read the article on page 33. Dr. Christina Grant presents the poster “Conversion Disorders in Canadian Children and Youth: A National Survey of Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes” at the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry meeting, held in San Diego, CA.

Dr. Mark Ferro and colleagues are awarded a $118,656 CIHR grant for the project “Psychiatric comorbidity in children with chronic physical illness: a pilot study.” Dr. Emma Wyatt’s paper “Metered Dose Inhaler Ipratropium Bromide in Moderate Acute Asthma in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial” is selected for oral presentation at the Australian College of Emergency Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting. Dr. Muzafar Gani Abdul Wahab organizes the inaugural Functional Echocardiography in Neonates workshop, held in Hamilton, ON. Drs. Moyez Ladhani, Audrey Lim, Gita Wahi, and Connie Williams present at the International Conference on Residency Education. Dr. Olaf Kraus de Camargo Chairs the 2nd German Conference for the Implementation of the ICF-CY in Hamburg, Germany.

Dr. Madan Roy is elected as Academic Liaison on the Pediatrics Section of the Ontario Medical Association Executive. Dr. Vickie Galea (PI) and co-investigators Drs. Chris Fusch, Salhab el Helou, and Ranil Sonnadara receive a Strategic Initiative Award from NeuroDevNet in the amount of $26,454.98 for the research project “Quantitative modeling of spontaneous movements in infants.” Dr. Olaf Kraus de Camargo presents posters and workshops at the WHO - Family of International Classifications Meeting in Barcelona, Spain. His poster titled “User requirements for a mobile ICF application” wins first prize. Dr. Christine Wekerle presents “Focus on Practical Strategies” at the Canadian Association of Pediatric Health Centres Conference, held in Calgary, AB.

There were 39,500 children’s Emergency Department visits at McMaster Children’s Hospital in 2014 18

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Members in the Department of Pediatrics celebrate at the Annual Recognition Dinner. See more photos on page 22.


Mark Duffett presents “Randomized controlled trials in pediatric critical care: State of the science” at the Critical Care Canada Forum.

Pediatric residents Drs. Jenna Dowhaniuk and Samah Al-Harbi receive awards from the Regional Medical Associates Research Scholarship Fund. November 2014 Dr. Saroj Saigal publishes her book Preemie Voices. A book launch was held on November 17-World Prematurity Day. Read the article on page 41.

The Department of Pediatrics has 214 Faculty Members and 67 Administrative Support Staff Dr. Sandesh Shivananda conducts a workshop on “Quality Improvement – Preventing Healthcare Associated Infections” at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER) in Chandigarh, India. December 2014 Dr. Melissa Parker receives a Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist Program - Career Enhancement Program Award. Dr. Tapas Mondal attends a CPR Educational Training event as a Medical Supervisor at Arizona State University. Dr. Christine Wekerle and colleagues are awarded $1.5 million in grant money over five years, funded by CIHR and PHA, for the project titled “Understanding health risks and promoting resilience in male youth with sexual violence experience.”

Dr. Mark Ferro is awarded a $50,000 HHS New Investigator grant for his project titled “Multimorbidity in Youth Receiving Mental Health Services.” Dr. Christine Wekerle presents at Children’s Mental Health Ontario on Adolescent Dating Violence. Dr. Jan Willem Gorter and colleagues receive a grant from NeuroDevNet in the amount of $29,488 for the project “Making a Difference to families caring for children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD).”

Drs. Jeffrey Pernica, April Kam, David Goldfarb, Lehana Thabane, and colleagues from McMaster and CHEO receive a grant from the PSI Foundation for $169,500 for the project titled “Short-course Antimicrobial Therapy for Pediatric Respiratory Infections (SAFER).”

Dr. Moyez Ladhani is the Keynote Speaker at the PGME Education Day for Program Directors & Program Administrators, held at Dalhousie University. Nora Fayed (PhD postdoctoral research fellow) and Dr. Gabriel Ronen present the paper “Children’s perspective of quality of life in epilepsy” at the Child Neurology Society in Columbus, OH, and the American Epilepsy Society in Seattle, WA. Dr. Stephanie Atkinson is elected as Chair of the Board of Directors for the Maternal Infant Child & Youth Research Network. Dr. David Goldfarb and colleagues are awarded a CIHR Planning Grant in the amount of $11,903 for their proposal titled “Building an Arctic Enteric Infections Research Agenda.”

Drs. Audrey Lim and Ramsay MacNay are elected to the executive of a newly established Complex Care Special Interest Group. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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In the News Dr. Sandy Raha

Members in the Department of Pediatrics are frequently approached by the media to provide expert opinions and commentary. The following headlines are some of our top stories. 2013 Headlines

McMaster Emergency Department Complete -Robert Issenman, CHCH TV, January 29, 2013 Cold weather may explain new born baby’s mistaken death -Lennox Huang, Toronto Star, February 18, 2013 Bullying, on the Matt Holmes Show -Christina Grant, CHML Radio AM900, February 22, 2013 Arthritis also affects children -Tania Cellucci, CHCH TV, March 27, 2013

Grateful parents back doctor’s research -Gabriel Ronen, Hamilton Spectator, April 6, 2013

Innovation grants going to local life-changing researchers -Jeff Pernica, Hamilton Spectator, April 29, 2013

McMaster prof says low grade in kids health report card requires lifestyle changes -Brian Timmons, CBC Hamilton, May 23, 2013 20

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Family speaks out after mall refuses cart for autistic child -Jan Willem Gorter, CBC Nova Scotia, May 24, 2013

In Praise of Pediatrics

-Child Health Research Day, Hamilton Spectator, June 27, 2013 Why young adults with cancer have distinct needs -Ronald Barr, The Globe and Mail, July 10, 2013 Myth of Science 2: The Quest for Perfection -Mark Tarnopolsky, The Nature of Things, CBC Television, October 17, 2013

A helping hand for parents of disabled kids -Peter Rosenbaum, The Hamilton Spectator, October 24, 2013

Food as fuel: what nutrients you need to stay healthy -Stephanie Atkinson, Hamilton Spectator, November 14, 2013 Gillespie: No ordinary girl, no ordinary challenge -Peter Rosenbaum, The London Free Press, November 11, 2013 Some babies born very small do just fine as adults -Saroj Saigal, Reuters, November 19, 2013 Mac MD leads national fitness study -Brian Timmons, The Hamilton Spectator, December 4, 2013


2014 Headlines After two years in hospital, Guelph teen prepares to go home for good -Robert Issenman, The Hamilton Spectator, January 20, 2014 No measles vaccine? You could be at risk -David Goldfarb, The Hamilton Spectator, April 3, 2014

New breast milk freezer at Mac -Christoph Fusch, CHCH Television, April 10, 2014

Younger Skin Through Exercise -Mark Tarnopolsky, New York Times, April 16, 2014 Anti-ageing Secrets: Exercise Could Prevent Wrinkles and Maintain Younger-Looking Skin -Mark Tarnopolsky, Huffington Post, April 16, 2014 A major disparity: First Nations children far more likely to die of cancer than non-natives, study finds -Stacey Marjerrison, National Post, June 8, 2014

Square Off -Jeff Pernica, CHCH, September 19, 2014 100 Ontario children infected with vicious EV-D68 virus -Lennox Huang, The Toronto Star, September 25, 2014

McMaster looking into neurological symptoms -Brandon Meaney, CHCH News, October 2, 2014 Enterovirus D68 connections being investigated at McMaster Children’s Hospital -Brandon Meaney, CBC Hamilton, October 2, 2014

Mac study looks at reasons for childhood obesity Pioneering preemies

McMaster Hospital defends court action to treat aboriginal girl -Vickey Breaky, CBC Hamilton, October 2, 2014 Preventing kids’ colds and flu -Jeff Pernica, CHCH TV, October 2, 2014

Cluster of cases with polio-like symptoms baffles doctors -Brandon Meaney, The Globe and Mail, October 3, 2014

-Katherine Morrison, Hamilton Spectator, July 28, 2014

Hamilton study ties school results to fitness results -Brian Timmons, CHCH TV, August 12, 2014

Hamilton doctors on watch after national alert for children’s respiratory illness -Lennox Huang, The Hamilton Spectator, September 16, 2014

focus of McMaster MD’s book -Saroj Saigal, CBC, November 17, 2014

Preemie Voices: Growing up, going through life as a preemie -Saroj Saigal, Canada AM, November 24, 2014 Use of ‘behaviour-altering’ drugs widespread in foster, group homes -Burke Baird, Toronto Star, December 12, 2014 Hamilton flu cases predicted to climb -Jeff Pernica, CHCH News, December 30, 2014 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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Recognition Dinner 2014

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Excellence in Care 24

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In the Clinic Specialized pediatric clinics are improving patient care “Providing excellence in clinical care is the cornerstone of the Department of Pediatrics,” says Dr. Sheri Findlay, Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Associate Chair, Clinical. “The majority of our faculty spend the bulk of their time caring for infants, children, teens, and their families with a diverse variety of clinical conditions. Medical care changes over time, and our Department is committed to providing the most current and evidence-based care available to all our patients. The programs below are examples of clinical innovation that we are extremely proud of. Not only are these initiatives bringing the most up-to-date clinical care to the community, they are also contributing to the education of the next generation of pediatricians, enriching medical literature and furthering care for children in Ontario and elsewhere.”

The Pediatric & Adolescent Type 2 Diabetes Program besity is on the rise in Canada, currently affecting one in four children and bringing with it the onset of Type 2 diabetes in young people. It is an illness that was previously rarely seen in this population, meaning little is known about its long-term implications for children.

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Different from Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 is more severe in kids and can cause a number of critical health problems. In adults, Type 2 diabetes is known to shorten an individual’s lifespan and greatly reduce their quality of life. “We don’t know if outcomes in children developing Type 2 diabetes will be the same as those who develop diabetes as adults,” says Dr. M. Constantine Samaan, Staff Physician in the Division of Endocrinology and Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, “but we have an obligation to try and prevent adverse outcomes from happening.”

Early effective treatment will be the cornerstone for ensuring the long-term health of these children.

Samaan saw the need for a Type 2 diabetes program and in 2012 formed a multidisciplinary team consisting of a pediatric endocrinologist, a dietician, a diabetes nurse educator, a kinesiologist, a social worker, and a child life specialist. The team comes together to create a treatment plan that is unique to the needs of each patient, working with the family to implement the plan and monitor their progress.

Dr. M. Constantine Samaan

The research component of the program takes patient care “from the bedside to the bench,” which Samaan says allows for knowledge translation, education, and advocacy to improve care and outcomes for these children. With referrals from the hospital and from the community, the clinic has grown to provide care for more than 40 children and youth. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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Drs. Tania Cellucci and Michelle Batthish

“We have seen strong results in the program,” says Samaan. “Early effective treatment will be the cornerstone for ensuring the long-term health of these children, and we hope they will see the benefits across their lifespan.” Joint Injection Program Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis is one of the most common chronic conditions in children, and the Joint Injection Program is providing improved and faster access to one of the most effective treatments. The program began in the fall of 2012 and is run by Drs. Tania Cellucci and Michelle Batthish, Assistant Professors in the Division of Rheumatology.

It has enhanced the quality of care that we provide and it is meaningful to our families and the patients we treat.

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Before the program was introduced, patients would have to see more specialists and wait longer for treatment, sometimes up to three months. The Joint Injection Program streamlines the process: Cellucci and Batthish are able to provide this treatment directly to children and teenagers with arthritis, sometimes in as little as one week. It also offers the opportunity for patients to receive unsedated treatments right in the clinic setting, and reduces the number of hospital visits for the family. “The program is especially great for younger children,” says Batthish. “All of their appointments are with the same familiar faces, and they do not need to go to the operating room, which can be scary and intimidating for some children.” On average, this new program treats around three patients per month, administering injections to provide relief for inflammatory arthritis. “Families who have been through both the old and new systems have provided a lot of positive feedback about the new program,” comments Cellucci. “The process is streamlined, less stressful, and injections happen faster. It may


Dr. Kevin Jones with his patient Morgan

not be a large program, but it has enhanced the quality of care that we provide and it is meaningful to our families and the patients we treat.” Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Clinic Epilepsy is a disorder of brain electrical activity, which presents with symptoms of recurrent unprovoked seizures. For most children with epilepsy, these symptoms or seizures can usually be managed with the first medication prescribed. However, about one-third of patients with epilepsy will continue to have seizures despite trials of more than two medications. These children have medically refractory (or drug resistant) epilepsy, and can be seen in the Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Clinic. “Drug resistant epilepsy places a significant burden on patients’ quality of life,” says Dr. Kevin Jones, Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, and Pediatric Neurologist and Epileptologist at McMaster Children’s Hospital. “Constant seizures can effect development and cognitive ability, and uncontrolled epilepsy can often get worse over time.” Jones was recruited to McMaster to support the epilepsy clinic, working with Dr. Rajesh RamachandranNair and a multidisciplinary team consisting of a nurse practitioner, a social worker, a registered dietician, a

neuropsychologist, a psychometrist, and EEG technologists to determine a comprehensive treatment plan for each patient. The team also identifies patients with drug resistant epilepsy who may be candidates for epilepsy surgery, and refers them to a regional epilepsy center for further treatment. “The goal of the clinic is to reduce the burden of seizures and improve the quality of life for our patients,” says Jones. “For some patients a surgical operation to remove or disconnect the part of the brain causing the seizures may be an option. This can be a very effective solution and may make patients seizure free.”

When brain surgery is not an option, a vagal nerve stimulator or dietary

The goal of the clinic is to reduce the burden of seizures and improve the quality of life for our patients.

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therapies may be considered, and these too may lead to seizure reduction and improved quality of life. Through the clinic, Jones also cares for patients with infantile spasms, a type of epilepsy that affects young children ages 3 months to two years. “It’s important to treat these symptoms early,” Jones says. “Without proper treatment, patients can experience other seizure types as they get older, and they could have difficulty learning.” Since opening in the fall of 2014, more than 50 patients have been seen at the clinic. Pediatric Complex Care Team “We care for the most medically fragile children,” says Dr. Audrey Lim of the Pediatric Complex Care Team. “The population we serve has different needs from most other children. Our patients are medically fragile and are often technology dependent—meaning they require some form of technology, such as airway support or a feeding tube, to help them survive and function.”

We want our patients to be stable and healthy in their own homes.

A group of four pediatricians, two respiratory therapists, a clinical nurse specialist, and a nurse practitioner form the core group that is the Pediatric Complex Care Team. They provide support for close to 70 patients, each one with unique and varied medical conditions. “We want our patients to be stable and healthy in their own homes, and our education program and close follow-up with parents help make this possible,” says Lim. “Before patients are discharged home, parents, caregivers, and homecare nurses are completely trained on how to care for their children.” Classroom, bedside teaching, and simulation training helps caregivers learn how to safely care for patients who have tracheostomies, use home mechanical ventilation and other respiratory equipment. “Our population is growing,” says Lim, “because better technology and improvements in health care mean that these children with medical fragility and complexity are surviving longer, and one of our goals is to optimize their care and overall health.” Members of McMaster’s Pediatric Complex Care Team are also working with a group 28

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of pediatricians across the country to establish a Complex Care Special Interest Group within the Canadian Pediatric Society. The group will help further develop the complex care strategy in Canada, and set standards to provide the best care possible for these children with medical complexity. Suspected Cardiac Disease Clinic Parents only want the best care for their children, especially when dealing with conditions of the heart. But Dr. Dragos Predescu, Assistant Professor in the Division of Pediatric Cardiology, says that of the nearly 2,000 children referred to McMaster’s Suspected Cardiac Disease Clinic each year, only about 10 percent actually have a cardiac condition. Headed by Predescu, the clinic is working to create a standardized approach to this population of children, with the goal of decreasing wait times and costs, improving care, and increasing the comfort of community doctors when dealing with this problem. These improved care strategies start before the patient even attends the clinic, with a detailed questionnaire that families complete about their child’s health and family medical history. These questionnaires provide more robust data that allow doctors to make more informed decisions. For children that are treated in the clinic, Predescu says another goal is to provide a letter to families by the time they walk out the door, outlining the assessment and a detailed plan of action. “In the majority of cases, this letter will reassure patients, families, and referring doctors of the benign nature of their symptoms,” Predescu says. “For those who need it, the plan will provide all the information necessary, from suggested lifestyle modifications to treatment options and next steps for the investigations.” Along with an improved approach to this patient population, information gathered through a database attached to the clinic will create tremendous opportunity for research and continuous improvement of care. Predescu says this initiative will also provide a highly functional and transferable solution to the community and other hospitals that will improve care and allocation of resources and bridge the gap between families, community practitioners, and the hospital. Pediatric Stone Clinic Kidney stones were once mainly an adult’s disease, but Dr. Vladimir Belostotsky, a Pediatric Nephrologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, says more and more children are suffering from this illness and doctors are trying to understand why. In 2012, Belostotsky launched the Pediatric Stone Clinic to create a standardized approach to treating kidney stones in children.


Dr. Vladimir Belostotsky

There are five main types of kidney stones and many different mixtures and varieties; each requires a different treatment method. Through the clinic, doctors can conduct more effective investigations to determine if a patient has a kidney stone and what specific type it is, allowing them to provide individualized targeted treatments. “We want to learn why each patient is developing kidney stones, how we can help them slow down the stone growth, and what we can do to prevent the patient from developing a stone in the future,” says Belostotsky. The clinic has been developing and introducing into practice new methods to diagnose rare causes of stone disease in children. “Through thorough testing and investigations into these rare causes, we’re able to better diagnose and better manage this illness in kids,” Belostotsky says. “By standardizing our approach to treating kidney stones, we can pick up information we might otherwise miss. Once we know why they’re happening, we can work at preventing them from happening again.” Belostotsky visited and has been collaborating with the Mayo Clinic, the world leader in kidney stone treatment and research. He says this relationship is helping develop improved methods to better diagnose kidney stones and their rare causes, and understand why this illness is affecting a growing population of young people.

Once we know why they’re happening, we can work at preventing them from happening again.

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Helping Kids Live Healthier Lives Clinics and programs in the Children’s Exercise and Nutrition Centre are helping children and families struggling with weight management and the associated health implications

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he Children’s Exercise and Nutrition Centre (CENC) at McMaster Children’s Hospital is working to improve the health of children and their families by helping them lead healthier lifestyles. As a multidisciplinary clinical, research, and educational service, the Centre is home to a number of clinics and programs, all working to provide care for children and their families who are struggling with weight management and the associated health implications. Metabolism, Obesity and Health Program The Metabolism, Obesity and Health program, led by Dr. Katherine Morrison, Medical Director of the Clinic and Pediatric Endocrinologist, is broken down into two specialized areas—the Pediatric Lipid Clinic and the Growing Healthy Weight Management Program—and is closely affiliated with the Type 2 Diabetes Clinic.

It’s wonderful to see the learning that happens there, about how to prepare healthy foods, even on a budget.

The Pediatric Lipid Clinic assists families with genetic disorders impacting cholesterol levels. These families often come to the clinic because multiple family members have had heart attacks at relatively young ages. The Growing Healthy program is the largest of the three and sees several hundred new patients annually. A multidisciplinary, family-centred approach is used by nurses, dietitians, and physicians to counsel families in the program. Given the alarming prevalence of overweight children and teenagers, this clinic is helping families reduce the related health consequences.

prevalent,” says Morrison. “Some of these children stop attending school. They can be really limited in their ability to engage in normal lives.” Funded for many years by McMaster Children’s Hospital, the weight management clinic recently added the expertise of a psychologist and nurse practitioner to its team after receiving additional funding from the Ministry of Health in 2014. “This recognizes the complexity of the patients that we see in this clinic,” Morrison says. To meet the needs of these children, she says the clinic is now fortunate to have two dietitians providing dietary support, an exercise physiologist, an activity counsellor, a general pediatrician, and three pediatric endocrinologists. “The impact is that we are now able to better address the health challenges that these children and families face. This is the number one thing for me.” On the horizon is the opportunity to modify the program with more group sessions while addressing the psychological and cardio-metabolic challenges these children and their families face. A collaboration was introduced last year between the clinic and Oakville chef and restaurateur, Julia Hanna, who founded the HealthyFam Program in partnership with Longo’s. In HealthyFam, children participate in a threeweek session working alongside a chef where they learn to prepare their own healthy meals.

“The health implications for children in this age group are real and present, even in kids as young as 5 or 6 years old,” says Morrison. Clinic staff see a high prevalence of cardio-metabolic problems in the children, including high blood pressure, sleep apnea, glucose problems, and fatty liver disease. “Those are all very common among the children we see.” What is also concerning is that mental health problems are often seen in these children and adolescents. “One-third of patients meet screening criteria for depression and anxiety, and self-esteem problems are also 30

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Dr. Katherine Morrison and Master’s student Sarah Kanji


Dr. Burke Baird with Sonya Thiessen (left) and Glenn Jenkins (right)

“The response from the children and families has been very positive. It’s wonderful to see the learning that happens there, about how to prepare healthy foods, even on a budget,” says Morrison. When they’re finished cooking, children and families eat the meal together with the chef. “It’s lovely to see the joyful learning that happens in that environment.” Exercise Medicine Clinic Chronic medical conditions such as cancer, hemophilia, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic pain, or rheumatoid arthritis sap children of their stamina and fitness, and can place a major burden on their quality of life. Many are ill for too long, unable to ride a bike or play soccer like their friends, and this lack of exercise and physical activity puts them at risk for future health problems.

that have completed chemotherapy are also offered a referral to the clinic as part of their treatment and rehabilitation. Upon admission, Baird does a brief medical review and then determines the child’s fitness level through a baseline fitness test on an exercise bicycle. Arm ergonomics are used for children who are wheelchair-bound, such as those with spina bifida or developmental deficiencies. Weight, height, and BMI are also measured, but Baird says these measurements are not the focus of the clinic. “Our goal is solely on improving a child’s physical activity and health.”

The novel Exercise Medicine Clinic at McMaster Children’s Hospital is another program in the Children’s Exercise and Nutrition Centre. The clinic uses exercise to help children regain the stamina and fitness they’ve lost—or never had—while giving them the confidence and skills they need to live a healthy life.

Baird says the most important meeting patients have is with the activity therapist, Sonya Thiessen. “She provides a personal, practical, usually home-based exercise program, and recommendations on how a child can improve their overall fitness and activity levels,” Baird says. These activity suggestions could be as simple as playing outside for an hour, or going for a 30-minute walk after school. They could also be as complex as a personalized exercise circuit in their house with whatever equipment they have available to them.

“In many cases, the exercise is therapeutic for their condition, easing depression, anxiety, and chronic pain,” says Dr. Burke Baird, Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, and head of the Exercise Medicine Clinic.

Brock, 17, is an example of one of the clinic’s success stories. He developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia when he was only 10 months old, and his mother Lori says “the clinic is giving him the tools he needs to continue with a healthy lifestyle.”

About 80 children a year are referred to this multidisciplinary clinic from within the hospital and from pediatricians in the community. All children

Baird describes some of the changes seen in children as dramatic and spectacular. Children get better and there are heart-warming moments 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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Dr. Brian Timmons and his research students. From left: Nicole Proudfoot, Kim Volterman, Thanh Nguyen, Lisa Chu, Dr. Brian Timmons, Sara King-Dowling, Joyce Obeid, Natascja Di Cristofaro, Boguslaw (Bogdan) Wilk, Yasmeen Mezil, Gabriela Leites, Madeline McDonald. Missing: Linda Gillis

when they admit to staff, “I never thought I would ever do this again,” he says. Exercise as medicine Does banking physical activity as a child put you on a different trajectory for your health as an adult, making you less likely to develop diseases such as osteoporosis and cancer? That’s one of the many questions Dr. Brian Timmons, Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, is asking. His research is using physical activity to improve the health and lives of children, and even as a young researcher in the field, his studies have already generated significant results.

We found that students with higher levels of fitness had higher grades.

A firm believer in getting the message of being physically active out to the broader community, Timmons has built relationships with schools, school boards, the City of Hamilton, and community groups devoted to physical literacy. Working with the group from Start2Finish and schools in the HamiltonWentworth area, Timmons introduced the 20/20 Challenge in the spring of 2014, in which students took part in 20 minutes of physical activity for 20 weeks. There were 500 students from 19 schools involved in the study, and the results were pretty impressive. 32

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“We found that students with higher levels of fitness had higher grades,” says Timmons. “Teachers also told us they saw a positive difference in their students.” His largest project to date is the Health Outcomes and Physical activity in Preschoolers (HOPP) Study, the first longitudinal study of its kind in the world that began in 2010 and followed more than 400 typical 3-, 4and 5-year-olds for three years, who were recruited from kindergartens, day cares, and Ontario Early Years Centres. A snapshot from its first year results suggests children who meet physical activity guidelines have better body composition, less body fat, better cardiovascular health, and better motor skills. In 2014, Timmons received funding for the School-age Kids’ health from early Investment in Physical activity (SKIP) Study, which is the sequel to HOPP, and is set to begin in March 2015. Researchers will follow the same cohort of 400 children from the HOPP study to track their physical activity, fitness, and health. The study will explore whether or not physical activity in the early years matters for children’s health later on in life. Timmons’ research also includes investigating the physical activity and fitness levels of children with chronic conditions—arthritis, cancer, kidney disease, Type 1 diabetes—expanding on the work started by the late Dr. Oded Bar-Or. His most recent study, funded in 2014 by the Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada, will examine the relationship between physical activity, fitness, and inflammation with heart health in various groups of children with an inflammatory-related disease. “We are trying to use exercise as medicine for these kids,” Timmons says.


Advocating for Children Around The World Dr. Ronnie Barr continues to campaign for better children’s medications

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hen Dr. Ronnie Barr began his training in internal medicine—later specializing in hematology—he never dreamed he would one day end up as the first Head of the Hematology/Oncology Division in the Department of Pediatrics at McMaster University (a position he held for 30 years), much less spend a term as Chair of Pediatrics. “McMaster’s medical school had a big Department of Medicine, which had a big Division of Hematology,” Barr recalls of his initial interest in the school more than three decades ago. “That Division was the strongest in Canada, and so the real attraction to McMaster was its strength in hematology. But the job offer came from the Department of Pediatrics—and that provided an opportunity to become part of a bigger group of hematologists.” Barr led this regional program in hematology for more than a decade.

Today, Barr is a Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics, Pathology, and Medicine, and also sits on a drug review committee for the World Health Organization (WHO), which allows him to advocate for children around the world who need life-saving medication. In his 40 years working in international child health, Barr says the lack of available cancer treatments for children in poorer countries is upsetting and the quality of the treatments that are available is also a concern. “It’s a big problem if the drugs being given are ineffective, and the availability of anti-cancer drugs for children is a clear problem in more than 100 countries,” he says, adding that most of the medications on the WHO’s Model List of Essential Medicines are for adults and are not relevant for children.

In 2014, he and his colleagues were able “to make the case for a small number of additional drugs for children” to be added to the List. He remains optimistic that they will be. Outside of his international child health work, Barr is spending an increasing amount of time on a demographic that he believes gets too little attention: adolescents and young adults (AYA). “They fall between the cracks because they’re not kids and they’re not adults, and there’s more of them with cancer than kids with cancer,” Barr says. Fortunately, in 2008, the nationally-funded Canadian Partnership Against Cancer accepted that the AYA age group had been largely excluded. As a result, a national task force was created specifically for young people between the ages of 15 and 29. Barr was selected as a CoChair of the task force, which is headquartered at McMaster. Recently, Barr was recognized with a 2014 Paediatric Academic Leadership-Clinician Practitioner Award from the Pediatric Chairs of Canada for his extensive clinical and research work in pediatrics. Although he says being acknowledged for his work was an honour, it’s the progress he’s made to help children with life-threatening diseases that’s been the real reward. “I’ve been provided the opportunity to engage in cutting edge research on treatments for children with malignant diseases for more than 30 years, and I’ve been able to interact with a wide variety of people. That’s the value of being on a relatively small campus,” he says. “But the real achievement has been the productivity of our research.”

Dr. Ronnie Barr with his patient Harrison

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McMaster-Niagara Pediatrics Collaboration is Thriving

New physicians and improved care processes are among the program’s early successes

This collaboration is the best thing that could have happened to advance pediatric care in the Niagara Region,” says Dr. Madan Roy, McMaster’s Deputy Chief of Pediatrics and the Interim Regional Chair and Chief of Pediatrics for the Niagara campus. “The greatest benefit is not to the Niagara Health System or McMaster, it’s to the children in the region.” When the Niagara Health System (NHS) consolidated its services under one roof at the new St. Catharines site in early 2013, three teams had to merge and work together in one location, bringing with it advantages and limitations. A year later, Roy—who is credited with bringing systems and processes to new levels of performance and effectiveness, along with significant positive changes and growth to the Division of General Pediatrics—was chosen to help facilitate a more streamlined system. There was some “trepidation” on both sides as he stepped into his new role, Roy says. But he has seen significant change and positive growth in terms of staff recruitment and the overall operation of Niagara’s Pediatrics Department, and he’s complimentary of the team that has worked with him to make that happen. “They’re a very nice group, very collaborative,” Roy says. “I really enjoy it… I’m proud of it. We’ve restructured how the place is run and it has dramatically improved the quality of life and the level of care in that department.” Ingredients to the success have been Roy’s ability to create a culture of collaboration, engagement, and innovation, along with the use of a multi-focused approach to challenge the status quo, resulting in improved service delivery and outcomes. The Pediatric Rapid Assessment Clinic (P-RAC) is an example of positive change. This quality improvement project— in collaboration with Brock University and the Interprofessional Education for Quality Improvement 34

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(I-EQUIP) Program—was designed to provide better immediate care for semi-urgent cases. With improved bed utilization, patient flow, and access to care, the clinic has already been very successful in achieving its goals. What Roy was most pleased to see was the recruitment of three new pediatricians in the early months of the collaboration project. For NHS— which at times struggled to attract new doctors—this was “very good” and a sign that Niagara’s reputation was growing.

The greatest benefit is not to the Niagara Health System or McMaster, it’s to the children in the region.

“With the additional staff, scheduling isn’t as tight, physicians aren’t under as much stress, and they are better able to help each other,” says Roy. “With the goal of academic advancements, we started a formal clinical teaching unit to offer layered learning,” he notes. “A lot of trainees want to come for that. These educational opportunities open up the availability to provide more pediatric training. Now learners are seeking us out, and feedback has been overwhelmingly positive.” Over the course of the next three to five years, Roy expects to see an almost seamless “free flow” of pediatric care between McMaster and the NHS-St. Catharines site. That will mean better access to specialized care for children who need it, and faster access for babies who require immediate attention. “Our goal is to actually bring sub-specialists over to Niagara…to bring clinicians to the patients.” He points out that the two facilities are independent, and “the goal is for the two departments to have shared policies and standards” so that they can communicate effectively to ensure the highest quality of patient care. “In terms of patient safety, the policies and procedures we introduced were modified for the Niagara Region, and that automatically improved


From the Niagara Health System, (from left): Laura Farrelly, Director of Women, Babies and Children’s Health; Dr. Rocio Monroy, Pediatrician; Dr. Madan Roy; and Carol Munro, Clinic Manager

services. We all want to improve patient care so people don’t end up in the ER.” Emerging academic strengths in Niagara include Quality Improvement in Healthcare and Interprofessional Education, which improve both patient care and the experience of students and residents across the region. Roy credits Dr. Lennox Huang, the Chair and Chief of Pediatrics at McMaster University, along with Dr. Karl Stobbe, Regional Assistant Dean of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, and Dr. Thomas Stewart, Chief of Staff & Executive Vice President Medical Affairs at NHS, with leading the vision of an academic and regional care collaboration. This successful relationship between Hamilton and Niagara’s pediatric departments now has other pediatric centers in our Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) actively seeking out McMaster’s Department of Pediatrics to establish similar systems. “Ultimately,” says Roy, “it all translates to better care.”

Our goal is to actually bring sub-specialists over to Niagara…to bring clinicians to the patients.

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Dr. Dent Looks Back Celebrating 25 years of McMaster Children’s Hospital

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r. Peter Dent is sitting in his office where, framed on the wall, is a photograph that has become iconic in the life of the hospital: Children sitting on a wall at McMaster in front of a sign reading “Children’s Hospital.” It was taken 25 years ago on the day that the designation of the hospital was made official, a designation that Dent shepherded over the course of a decade until it finally became a reality. “We ended up with a children’s hospital that was never meant to be, and we made it work,” says Dent, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Pediatrics.

Whether or not it was meant to be, the Children’s Hospital has become exactly what Dent hoped it would: the focal point of pediatric care in the region and, in some cases, well beyond it. “That’s the thing about health care,” says Dent. “You provide a service, and people come out of the woodwork. They’ll come. That’s been exciting. Or maybe ‘gratifying’ is more the word.

The recent creation of the pediatric emergency department capped the development of the hospital, providing what is in essence its front door. “Putting it all together, it seems like a long time,” says Dent of the 35 years he’s spent working with the idea of what a hospital is, what it can do, and what it can become. When asked what he is most proud of, his answer is swift and simple: “That it’s here.

“What’s gratifying is being proven that you’re right. Proving that, if you have a children’s-only emergency room, it will be swamped within three years. Which it is. It’s also gratifying to hear people say, ‘Thank God for the Children’s Hospital, because it saved my kid’s life.’”

“It evolved against the odds of funding, in spite of opposition, with individuals sacrificing in order to make it evolve. There was a purpose there, and people put their shoulder to the wheel and pushed ahead. I’m proud that it did break through, that we were on the right track,

No matter what shape or form it has, it’s our Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Peter Dent joined the Department of Pediatrics at McMaster University in 1968 and was Chair of the Department from 1980 to 1990, during which time he founded what is now known as McMaster Children’s Hospital. He is currently Professor Emeritus and continues to be an active physician at the hospital.

Photo from McMaster Children’s Hospital 25th Anniversary

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Building a Pediatric Trauma Team

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Photo from McMaster Children’s Hospital 25th Anniversary

and that the right thing happened. We’ve continued to improve our care, and we’ve taken our place in the sun.” About his work in the early days, Dent says, chuckling, “I was sort of like a rat in a maze looking for which way I could go to find something to eat.” It’s a bit deprecating, but there’s some truth in there, too. The hospital, for the decade leading up to the designation and in the 25 years since, has depended on a patient, observant, cooperative leadership; it depended on being able to acknowledge obstacles and find creative ways of addressing them. “I didn’t threaten anybody. I recruited support for the idea wherever I could,” something that continued after the designation in the creation of Hamilton’s Ronald McDonald House, Dent says. That approach—recruiting support for the idea—has defined the development of the hospital, and is something Dent sees continuing into the next 25 years. “We are starting to take our skills out into the community. There are developments in Niagara, for example, and there is talk of setting up specialty clinics in peripheral hospitals to obviate the need for patients to travel here. So that’s the next wave.”

hen Dr. Krishna Anchala first arrived at McMaster Children’s Hospital (MCH) in 2004, she was the only practicing pediatric emergency physician in Hamilton. As a young pediatrician fresh from her training, she began her career not knowing that one day she would help change the way pediatric trauma care was delivered in the region. “It was a really exciting opportunity for me,” says Anchala, Associate Professor in the Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine. “I found it interesting to think of ways to incorporate emergency room practices that were pediatric specific.” Anchala says patients received good care, but she was looking to establish a pediatric-specific strategy for McMaster’s emergency room, and to improve emergency care for children in the region. She began advocating to the provincial trauma network in order to have MCH recognized as a pediatric trauma centre. She also saw the need for more pediatric emergency physicians. “We didn’t have enough pediatric staff in the ER, but there were many dedicated pediatricians in the hospital who would help where they could,” she says. “We also had many people willing to assist in establishing the trauma team. Without their support, we wouldn’t be where we are now.” In 2011, MCH became home to a fully dedicated children’s-only emergency department, and the team has grown to include close to 20 full- and part-time pediatric emergency physicians.

At the end of the day, however, he finds that the hospital’s greatest strength is simply that it’s here.

Anchala acknowledges there are many people who are responsible for making the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Team what it is today.

“It’s our Children’s Hospital. No matter what shape or form it has, it’s our Children’s Hospital. We have a Children’s Hospital.” It’s something that Dent believes is a very powerful idea. “We have a place where we take our kids when they’re sick.” And he knows, perhaps better than anyone, just what life would be like without it.

“We have had the opportunity to hire great pediatric emergency providers, and have the support of an incredible group of nurses who love working with kids,” she says.“It shows how dedicated people are, and how strongly they feel about supporting and developing our pediatric emergency program.” 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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Excellence in Research 38

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Remembering the Father of Neonatology

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A tribute to the work of Dr. Jack Sinclair pecialized neonatal care for premature and critically ill newborns was in its infancy when Dr. Jack Sinclair arrived at McMaster University in 1970. In just a few years, he created one of the foremost neonatal units in the world and was recognized as a pioneer in the field.

Throughout a distinguished career, Sinclair became a respected scholar, skilled researcher, and mentor to aspiring students like Dr. Saroj Saigal, who had the good fortune to work with him—first as a fellow during the early years of neonatal intensive care, and subsequently as a colleague for more than 25 years. “Jack had a brilliant mind and moved the field of evidence-based medicine forward to an international level,” says Saigal, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Pediatrics. “Jack’s interest in methodology influenced the quality of my long-term follow-up studies,” following extremely low birth-weight babies from infancy to adulthood. Sinclair was internationally renowned for his book Effective Care of the Newborn. A young physician in Berne, Switzerland, who was just embarking on his career in neonatal medicine read Sinclair’s book and still remembers the impact it had on him and his future. That doctor is Dr. Christoph Fusch, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, and inaugural holder of the Jack Sinclair Chair in Neonatology. “He was a pioneer,” says Fusch, who hopes to follow in Sinclair’s footsteps. As a gesture of fondness for Sinclair’s genius, Fusch often references Sinclair’s work in his own presentations. McMaster University recruited Sinclair in 1970 from Columbia University in New York City. In Hamilton, he worked with newborns and preemies at the former Henderson Hospital until McMaster University Medical Centre, now McMaster Children’s Hospital, opened in 1973. He retired in 1999 and became professor emeritus. He pioneered research and implemented changes that were substantial to the field of neonatology. His research improved the chances of survival for newborns, and made McMaster renowned for its Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). He is recognized for his research on evidencebased neonatal care, and for enhancing the understanding of temperature regulation for premature babies. He also helped establish the practice of bringing mothers to the NICU at McMaster when they were at risk of delivering prematurely. Sinclair received numerous accolades and awards throughout his career, and in 2002 McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation each contributed $1 million to create a research chair in Sinclair’s name to fund further innovations and research in neonatology. Sinclair passed away on May 2, 2014, at the age of 80, though his legacy will live on and his influence on McMaster and the field of neonatology will forever be remembered. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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Improving Care for the Tiniest Patients

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McMaster neonatologists don’t settle for ‘good enough’ when caring for tiny infants

lobally, premature births account for more than one million deaths a year. It’s a problem that Dr. Christoph Fusch, Professor of Neonatology and holder of the Jack Sinclair Chair in Neonatology, is trying to address in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), where premature babies make up half of the NICU workload. To discover better ways of giving these infants their best chance at life, Fusch is conducting a blinded randomized controlled study to determine if individual fortification of breast milk improves a pre-term baby’s growth and development. While breast milk is recognized as the ideal food for babies, it varies in protein, fat, and carbohydrates, and isn’t always sufficient to meet a pre-term baby’s nutritional needs. The study will include 100 babies, half receiving individual fortification and half standard clinical fortification for a minimum of three weeks in the NICU. Various growth and body composition measures will be taken at the same time and repeated during appointments in the NICU follow-up clinic. “We’re also assessing neurodevelopment to see whether babies’ brains do better with this new cutting edge concept,” says Fusch. Small changes lead to big improvements Several years ago, Fusch started to explore the idea that there was a more efficient way of organizing the NICU. To address this challenge, he developed a “microsystems” study in May 2014. Preliminary findings suggest that, compared to the mixed acuity model, the NICU runs more efficiently under the microsystems model where sicker babies are grouped together. In many cases, it also reduces the length of their stay in the unit. Together with his other neonatal colleagues, Fusch has also implemented

neonatologist-guided bedside diagnostics, which brings ultrasound and echocardiograms to an infant’s bedside. These tools help provide an immediate diagnosis and avoid the lengthy wait for the reports on a baby’s condition. “For babies who are sick with additional fluid in their belly or bleeding in their brain, you can’t wait hours or a day to get a diagnosis,” he says. “It’s an approach that helps a lot with decision making and care.”

We were able to give a good start to every baby born in our hospital. It’s now the standard of care.

Because of underdeveloped lungs, premature babies have difficulty breathing and a growing body of evidence shows invasive ventilation can lead to problems with clotting and sepsis. Taking a “personalized medicine” approach, Fusch is introducing a more individual and gentle approach to ventilation and because of it, sepsis rates are going down. The Golden Hour An innovative quality improvement program designed to improve the care of premature infants during their “Golden Hour” (the first hour of life) showed clear benefits to infants during their first four days. Led by Dr. Sandesh Shivananda, Associate Professor in Neonatology, the RESIN (Resuscitation and Early Stabilization Improvement in Newborns) Study introduced a care bundle that implemented seven major interventions in the delivery room and neonatal unit. By implementing interventions such as introducing standard clinical practice guidelines, team training to improve performances, and controlling oxygen and pressure administration, the team was able to improve patient quality of care. Evaluations of the RESIN program, completed in June 2013, were positive. The study showed a reduction in invasive ventilation, central vascular catheter use, and a significant reduction in the severity of illness. It has lowered the cost of care and improved caregiver satisfaction, Shivananda says. “We were able to give a good start to every baby born in our hospital. It’s now the standard of care.”

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Following the success of the RESIN study, he embarked on improving baby’s well being on every single day during hospital stay. His new quality improvement program is called CBIOME (Care Bundle To Improve Oxygenation and Minimize desaturation Events), a care bundle that includes five practice changes. The CBIOME program will facilitate caregivers’ use of evidence-based practices and new oxygen monitoring technology to maintain safe oxygen levels. Tailored training using simulation and coaching support will be used to help NICU caregivers learn and apply the new practices.

The study began in May 2014 and is set to end in December 2015. Initial results have shown that neonatal events like bradycardia and desaturation events can be accurately measured, and such measurements can be used to assess baby’s well being and the impact of bedside interventions. “We hypothesize that adoption of new proven practices, when combined with effective execution at the bedside, will lead to fewer events, better oxygen control, and therefore lower instances of chronic lung and severe eye disease,” Shivananda says.

Preemie Voices

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ritten by Dr. Saroj Saigal, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Pediatrics, the book Preemie Voices includes a collection of stories written by 41 men and woman—now in their 30s—who were born extremely prematurely and weighing less than 1,000 grams. “My intention for soliciting these letters about their life, challenges, and experiences was to provide newer parents of preemies with hope and encouragement, and in some ways, to give back to the community for their participation in our studies for over three decades,” says Saigal. “These letters were so candid and powerful that, with the permission of the preemie authors and the support by the Department of Pediatrics, I decided to publish them.”

Preemie Voices was published in the fall of 2014, accompanied by a 25-minute documentary featuring some of the participants. A book launch was held at McMaster University on November 17 to celebrate World Prematurity Day.

Dr. Saroj Saigal with cover baby Owen (at 4 months) and his mom, Jessica

“The response to this book has been overwhelming, by both the medical community and parents,” says Saigal. “It provides a remarkably positive story of resilience and recovery of these vulnerable infants born shortly after the introduction of neonatal intensive care.” Preemie authors at the book launch, holding photos of themselves as preemies

Photos by Bridget Greer

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Shaping Young Researchers Pediatric research days give young researchers an opportunity to showcase their work

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he spirit of mentorship within the Department of Pediatrics towards training the next generation of child health clinician scientists is showcased every year during Undergraduate Research Day and Child Health Research Day. Held in the spring, these two events honour the contributions to child health research by trainees, new investigators, and research staff. Both Research Days provide an opportunity for trainees from various programs, faculty members, and staff to learn more about their colleagues’ current work and areas of interest, and also provides opportunities for networking. Both days are a celebration of the year’s culmination of hard work by trainees and mentors. By providing engaging research opportunities, the intent is to ignite in students an interest in pursuing a career in child health research. Almost 40 posters were presented during the most recent Undergraduate Research Day, offering students—often for the first time—a chance to display and discuss their research findings with peers, faculty, and special guests. Participation is open to all undergraduate students, including medical students who are working on research under the supervision of a Department of Pediatrics faculty member. Project topics are wide-ranging, from sound levels in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to the effect

of intestinal microbiota on the development of the gastrointestinal tract of mice. “The day not only creates an environment that encourages research, but it also encourages students to enter research at a very early stage in their career,” says Dr. Anthony Chan, Professor and Associate Chair, Research, in the Department of Pediatrics. “For many students, exposure to research in their early years is a precursor to later graduate or medical studies in which child health research remains a focus.”

The day not only creates an environment that encourages research, but it also encourages students to enter research at a very early stage in their career.

The contributions from all learners are valued. Chan says an undergraduate student’s research project may generate data which has immediate implications or that may contribute toward answering an important question that researchers are currently working on. Another major research event is Child Health Research Day. Participation is open to all postgraduate trainees, including graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, clinical fellows, and medical students working on research under the supervision of a faculty member. The work of research staff and new investigators fewer than five years from their first academic appointment is also featured. Trainees have the opportunity to compete for awards, including best poster and best oral presentations. “The day is an opportunity for faculty and learners to showcase how they have been involved in research,” says Chan. “A significant amount of time and effort goes into mentoring trainees at every level. We really try to highlight them and their efforts.” Photo from Child Health Research Day, 2014

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Supporting Research

R Lindsay Akrong

esearch makes possible new discoveries and developments in clinical care that improve the health of children. Developing questions into successful research studies is a process that takes teamwork and know-how!

Recognizing the need to support investigators in this process, the Department of Pediatrics invested in a core platform of research services for faculty members and learners. In addition to a part-time biostatistician and data analyst who provide guidance on research methodology and statistical approaches, a full-time Research Services Specialist was hired who offers guidance in activities such as identification of and application for research grants, ethics applications, budget development and management, research staff hiring, project management, electronic data capture, and knowledge translation. Lindsay Akrong holds an Honours undergraduate degree in Biology & Psychology, as well as a Master’s degree in Medical Sciences from McMaster University. Over the past 12 years, she has been involved both academically and professionally in the management of pediatric research, including management of a program of research in knowledge translation and implementation science. In addition to the direct service she provides, Akrong also coordinates bi-weekly Research Roundtable training sessions for faculty and learners, as well as the Department’s involvement in provincial and national research initiatives. With such support and training available to Department members, implementation of research protocols and success in research output is enhanced for our faculty members and, ultimately, the field of child health. Photos from Undergraduate Research Day, 2014

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Improving Life for Children with Epilepsy Dr. Gabriel Ronen uses research to help children live better lives Dr. Gabriel Ronen

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pilepsy is one of the most common neurological health conditions in children, and yet in the early 1990s, when Dr. Gabriel Ronen joined the Department of Pediatrics at McMaster University, there was no dedicated program to help children with the condition living in the Golden Horseshoe. Though well trained and backed by years of experience as a Pediatric Neurologist, Ronen—now a Professor in the Department of Pediatrics— wanted to do more than just treat children; he wanted to improve their quality of life. For that reason, Ronen has undertaken years of research into quality of life for children with epilepsy—and continues to do so. He feels fortunate to see that his work has raised the profile of issues that weren’t considered important just two decades ago. In the mid-1990s, Ronen began his first research project: a study to understand what children with epilepsy and their families consider important in terms of quality of life and self-perception. That study was followed by another—this time funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research—that has been looking into the psychosocial and biomedical factors that affect children with epilepsy. His most recent study looks at the impact of enhanced physical activity in children with epilepsy. “I have devoted my research to these children and their families,” he says. “When I came to McMaster in 1991, there was a need to look after children with epilepsy in the region. I thought, ‘How can I best improve their life?’ Well, it turns out that you never know unless you ask them.” 44

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In addition to his extensive research work, Ronen is currently collaborating on a book on ethics in developmental disabilities with developmental pediatrician and fellow McMaster researcher Dr. Peter Rosenbaum, who collaborated with Ronen on their earlier book, Life Quality Outcomes in Children and Young People with Neurological and Developmental Conditions: Concepts, Evidence and Practice, which was published in 2013. “That was very gratifying, very satisfying,” Ronen says of the publication. “It deals with quality of life and how to measure issues that are important for patients, and to recognize opportunities to help these people.” Ronen’s dedication to his patients and to research that helps children with epilepsy everywhere has not gone unnoticed. In the last two years, a local family who has directly benefitted from Ronen’s work, “organized a fundraising event with proceeds going to support Dr. Ronen’s research program, as well as clinical care for children with epilepsy at our hospital,” notes Dr. Brandon Meaney, Division Head of Neurology in the Department of Pediatrics. “They raised over $50,000. A third fundraiser is being planned for 2015, and the family expects an even bigger turnout this year.” While Ronen considers the gesture “quite amazing,” Meaney says it just illustrates how appreciative people are of Ronen’s commitment and dedication to helping children. “He has improved the lives of countless children with epilepsy and their families,” Meaney says. “Rather than simply focusing on treating their seizures, he has wanted to understand the relationship between having— and being treated for—epilepsy, and one’s quality of life.”


The Benefits of Exercise Dr. Mark Tarnopolsky’s research is finding more and more benefits of exercise

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n ardent, lifelong runner and exercise enthusiast, Dr. Mark Tarnopolsky, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, remembers how he was laughed at when, as a young kinesiology and biology student at McMaster University, he talked about pursuing a scientific career focused on exercise. “Exercise isn’t a real science,” he was told. In the intervening decades, he proved otherwise. A year ago, Tarnopolsky drew worldwide attention with his research showing that exercise not only appears to keep skin younger, it may also reverse skin aging in people who start exercising late in life. He says it’s “astonishing to consider all the intricate ways in which exercise changes our bodies.” In animal studies, Tarnopolsky found endurance exercise plays an important role in preventing mitochondria disease, which affects one in 5,000 Canadians and leads to other degenerative diseases of the heart, muscles, and kidneys. “We found almost 100 percent protection,” he says. “Essentially, the animals were cured of this genetic condition. Everything was better with exercise.”

Canada). Their project is using a revolutionary new technology called Next Generation Sequencing, which allows all 22,000 genes in a person’s genetic code to be analyzed rapidly. “With this technology, we were able to discover the specific genetic cause for approximately 70 per cent of our patients,” which is significant for families, says Tarnopolsky. By knowing the specific genetic cause for a child’s disability, it puts an end to continual muscle biopsies, spinal taps, and blood samples, while offering families accurate genetic counselling. Tarnopolsky says there are also potential therapeutic implications. For example, doctors can avoid X-rays if a child is shown to be susceptible to cancer. Tarnopolsky says he is at the “absolute pinnacle” of where he wanted to be 30 years ago when he was an undergraduate student. He continues to run every day, a time when many of his ideas for research are born. “I ran into work this morning when it was pitch black,” he says. “Ideas flow when you’re running on your own for two hours. I’ve had a lot of interesting hypotheses and ideas during a run that formulated the direction of research.”

This led Tarnopolsky and his research team to ask the question: How can multiple tissues benefit from muscles contracting? They discovered muscles release various proteins and play an important role in exercise. “The spin-off of that observation was the creation of our company, in partnership with McMaster University, called Exerkine Corp., whose mandate is to identify protein and nucleic acids which mediate the systemic benefits of exercise,” Tarnopolsky says. Ultimately, it may mean a therapy could be developed which could benefit someone in a wheelchair who can’t exercise, or possibly reverse the effects of aging and other genetic diseases.

“ ” Everything was better with exercise.

From a clinical care perspective, a highlight for Tarnopolsky is his research team’s involvement in Care for Rare, a collaboration of clinicians, informaticians, and scientists, building upon the infrastructure and discoveries of FORGE Canada (Finding of Rare Disease Genes in

Dr. Mark Tarnopolsky

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It’s a Big Job

Drs. Julia Frei and Kim Genier

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Co-Chief Residents get an extra dose of administrative responsibilities

hen Dr. Julia Frei was selected to serve as Co-Chief Resident in McMaster University’s Department of Pediatrics, she expected to take on a substantial workload. After all, the job demands a considerable amount of time, planning, and organizing in order to keep the Pediatric Residency Training Program running smoothly. Her expectations of the role weren’t too far off the mark. “It’s a challenging role,” she says of the many responsibilities she was charged with. “Much of the job is administrative… Creating call schedules, planning and organizing activities, welcoming candidates who apply to the Residency Program, and advocating for resident-led change in the program insofar as possible.” In fact, there is an extensive list of duties that Frei and fellow Co-Chief Resident Dr. Kim Genier shared. Despite carrying such a heavy workload, both women agree it was a rewarding year and an excellent experience to start their medical careers. “It was a fantastic leadership experience to take on during the senior years of our residency,” says Genier. “Developing administrative and advocacy skills translates to becoming a well-rounded pediatrician.” Both say their biggest accomplishment was transitioning the Department

to a float model that reduced the number of continuous hours residents were expected to work. “No resident, including off-service residents, completes 24-hour shifts anymore,” Frei explains. “Pediatric residents work 16-hour shifts every other night during a two week stretch. This has improved resident worklife balance, resident learning, patient continuity of care, and patient safety.” “We’re one of the first programs to transition all its learners to a floatbased system,” adds Genier. “It’s been well received by residents—and the patients benefit from that as well.” Serving as Co-Chief Resident wasn’t without its challenges, though, she adds. “Trying to balance a new role in an already busy schedule, meeting the needs of residents, and leading them through program changes was tough. But it was good preparation for the types of practices we hope to lead.” Since completing their turn as Co-Chief Residents, Frei has moved on to a two-year fellowship in developmental pediatrics, while Genier is completing her fourth year of residency in general pediatrics, both at McMaster. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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From left: Smitha Giridhar, Dr. Joanna Stanisz, Dr. Moyez Ladhani, Dr. Shazli Shethwala, and Beth Hawke

Endowment Fund Dollars at Work Developing the Mini Milestone Assessment Tool

It’s rewarding to be able to give back and support our own faculty and students,” says Dr. Christina Grant, Associate Chair of Education. “Through our Endowment Fund grants, we’re able to promote innovative education scholarship and encourage excellence in research and investigative studies on a global stage.” In 2014, the Department of Pediatrics established Research and Education Endowment Funds to foster educational scholarship among faculty and students. The funds are intended for applicants who want to conduct educational research, gain skills in education scholarship or leadership, or present at a conference on educational scholarship. The Education Fund awarded its first grant in 2014 to Dr. Moyez Ladhani, Associate Professor and Program Director for the Pediatric Residency Program. Ladhani used the funding to evaluate a McMaster-designed tool for the Royal College’s competency-based education program. 48

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He developed a competency assessment tool—the Mini Milestone Assessment Tool (Mini-MAS)—and evaluated it in a pilot study beginning in March 2014. This new “learner-centred approach,” in which students complete a series of milestones at their own pace, will replace the century-old tradition of medical students moving through four-week rotations, writing Royal College exams, then going into practice. The tool is a booklet that faculty use to observe residents in six areas, scoring them on a scale from Novice to Expert, and providing constructive feedback to help them improve their skills. “Basically, what we want faculty to do is give residents some areas to improve on,” says Ladhani. Every six months, Ladhani reviews the booklet to ensure the learner has made gains the next time they performed the


It lets us tailor their program to meet their needs.

same task. “Over the year, we want to know if they are actually moving along this progression from Novice to Expert and whether they are using the feedback to improve.” Under the previous system, students received an In Training Evaluation Report (ITER), rarely falling below expectations because the report was retrospective and few faculty filled it out. “Now we know that during the four weeks, someone has observed the resident four times and has given them feedback,” he says. An evaluation of the tool found that it offered good educational value. The number of observations increased, residents’ competencies improved, and they appreciated receiving constructive feedback. Ladhani says the only concern from residents was that it was difficult at times to get faculty to observe them, or they felt uncomfortable asking them to do so. The tool, he says, picked up areas where students were struggling. “It lets us tailor their program to meet their needs, rather than the generic program that we have right now, where everyone does the same thing for four years.”

Your Support Matters Education & Research Endowment Funds The Department of Pediatrics’ Education and Research Endowment Funds were established to promote innovative education scholarship; develop educational leaders amongst our faculty and trainees; and pursue excellence in research and investigative studies on the global stage. If you are interested in giving to the Department of Pediatrics’ Education or Research Endowment Funds to support these vital initiatives, please contact: Ann Brodie Director of Development Faculty of Health Sciences Phone: 905.525.9140 x22236 E-mail: brodiea@mcmaster.ca

There’s a Pediatrics App for That!

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ith the touch of a screen, the McMaster Pediatrics Clerkship App is bringing important educational resources to the fingertips of teachers and students in the Pediatric Clerkship Program. With McMaster clerkship locations scattered around the city and across the province, the app is making it easier for clerkship teachers to educate students based on the Canadian Undergraduate Curriculum in Paediatrics, an established national medical school curriculum. The app is a useful tool for faculty and learners, providing instant access to vast amounts of literature, resources, and information on pediatric care. “There are tons of apps to teach medical knowledge,” says Dr. Andrew Latchman, Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, and Pediatric Clerkship Director for the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, “but there are not many apps for sharing the objectives that form the foundation for learners in medical education.” First introduced as a beta model in 2014, Latchman says the new app is playing a valuable role in the classroom, where students are finding it’s a springboard for more focused group discussions. The app is also helping students master the requisite skills and knowledge during their rotation through different ambulatory and inpatient pediatric services. Latchman says the idea and development of the app was a team effort that benefitted significantly from the technological expertise of Dr. Anthony Levinson, Director of the Division of e-Learning Innovation for the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine. The Web-based app will be formally evaluated and turned into a phone-based app in 2015. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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Specialized Education Training the next generation of pediatricians

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he Department of Pediatrics has tripled its number of specialty and sub-specialty fellows since 2013, a vision brought to fruition by Drs. Christina Grant, Associate Chair of Education in the Department of Pediatrics, and Lennox Huang, Chair and Chief of Pediatrics, along with a team of dedicated program directors.

Over the past two years, the fellowship programs have seen tremendous growth, and now boast more than 50 fellows. Together with the Pediatric Residency Program, Grant says we have more than 100 postgraduate medical trainees; that ranks us as one of the largest pediatric training programs in Canada.

“We have a growing department,” says Grant. “We have more divisions and a hospital that is also growing. It makes sense.”

“We are growing as a faculty,” she says, “and it is one of the inevitable things to strive for. These types of learners are highly educated and are practically pediatricians themselves. They bring a lot of skills to the Department—skills they can teach to learners on other levels.” They also improve the Department’s research pursuits, “bringing research questions to advance the clinical care for children and youth.”

Having these expert learners in the hospital has a huge impact on the clinical care we provide.

The Department of Pediatrics offers seven accredited fellowship programs in Allergy, Developmental Pediatrics, Critical Care, Gastroenterology, Hematology/Oncology, Neonatology, and Neurology, with two more non-accredited fellowships in Endocrinology and General Pediatrics.

One of the impressive aspects of the program is the diversity of its learners. Students come from around the world to further their education at McMaster. “We have learners from across Canada, and many from the Gulf States who are taking part in our fellowship programs,” Grant says. “Accepting learners from around the world is a great way for our department to be recognized internationally for providing specialized education. Having these expert learners in the hospital has a huge impact on the clinical care we provide for young children and adolescents.”

Pediatric Fellows, from left: Khaldun Rozi, Smita Roychoudhury, Hamood Al Shueili, Ruma Jain, and Ahmed Al-Nahari

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Years at McMaster

1989

Celebrating CanChild

O

ne of the things that makes CanChild remarkable is simply that it’s remarkable.

“What is really unique about CanChild is the emphasis we’ve placed on putting knowledge into practice and doing that in a way that is understandable,” says Dr. Mary Law, CoFounder of CanChild and former Dean of the School for Rehabilitation Science. In June 2014, the CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research celebrated its 25th Anniversary: 25 years of improving the lives of children and youth with disabilities, and their families. When you look at what have become the hallmarks of the organization, it really is: working as a team, capitalizing on a range of disciplines, generating useable knowledge, encouraging and rewarding input. “We have had a very flat organizational structure,” says Dr. Peter Rosenbaum, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, and Co-Founder of CanChild. “Many of our research staff are named authors on our work not as a perk, but because they make intellectual contributions.” In the CanChild environment, students as young

2014

CanChild’s 25th Anniversary

25 years of thinking differently

as 19 are collaborating with and learning from seasoned researchers like Rosenbaum. At the same time, they’re also providing valuable input and sharing information about new technologies and ways to incorporate them into their work. “Openness, sharing, respect, and collaboration have always been for us an obvious approach,” says Rosenbaum. For 25 years, CanChild has also recognized the importance of family engagement, thus inviting youth and families to make meaningful contributions in their studies—a concept that many other researchers are now beginning to adopt in their own studies. To anyone who has worked with or within CanChild, all of this can perhaps begin to feel obvious, which is why the celebrations around its 25th Anniversary were so valuable. It was an opportunity to think a bit about what CanChild has become, and really consider the unique opportunities it offers. The next 25 years What’s next for CanChild? Dr. Jan Willem Gorter, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and the Director of CanChild, says the focus will

continue to be on generating knowledge and transforming lives. “We are a research and education centre,” says Gorter. “We are building the next generation of researchers and allowing young people to grow in this field.” Gorter also emphasizes the important role collaboration plays in CanChild’s success. “The core focus of CanChild is helping children with disabilities, but there is value in looking beyond the disability,” he says. “We learn from other disciplines, which is why our connection with the Department of Pediatrics is so important.” The team has invested in strong collaborative research partnerships and has developed strong links with leading researchers in childhood disability, parent networks, rehabilitation and health networks, professional societies, and child health agencies. These partnerships with organizations in Ontario, across Canada, and around the world are vital to CanChild’s future growth and success. “We have come a long way in 25 years,” says Gorter. “CanChild has grown up, and now we’re ready for the future!” 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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Behind the Scenes

Supporting the day-to-day operations in the Department of Pediatrics

I don’t know what we would do without them!

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I don’t know what we would do without them,” says Tammy Troy-Hempey, Director of Administration in the Department of Pediatrics. “They play a major role in how we operate, and we depend on them in so many ways.” She is talking, of course, about the 67 individuals that make up the pediatric administrative support team. “We’re a high-spirited bunch,” Troy-Hempey says with a smile. “We have a unique culture here in Pediatrics, and our support staff reflect and contribute to that positive environment. We really are a team, and it’s nice to know that whatever we need, whether it’s help with a last minute-emergency or just a good laugh, there’s always someone you can count on.”

Troy-Hempey admits, though, that their jobs aren’t easy. “There is always a new system that needs to be learned, or one more report that needs to be done.” But every time something is added to their already long list of responsibilities, she says they never fail to deliver. “They’re a highly skilled and professional group, and I am always impressed by the efforts they put in to further developing their skills. Everyone is willing to go the extra mile, and I think that says something about our team in Pediatrics. We have great people working with us who are dedicated to what we do. “They’re the gears that keep the wheels turning, or whatever cliché way you want to say it. The truth is their impact is beyond measure, and we couldn’t do it without them.”


Administrative Support Team Photo above, from left: Front row: Nora Sherry, Louise Chalupka, Danielle Dobberstein, Nancy Murphy, Kim Harris, Shirley Ferguson 2nd row: Elizabeth Merz, Kristine Rogerson, Karen Murray, Patti Bochek-Peters, Heather Vey, Carmela Jeffrey 3rd row: Sandy Murray, Claudia Bizzarro, Andrea Brydges, Lisa Villeneuve, Brianne Robertson 4th row: Priya Matthews, Kim Fitzhenry, Michelle Skrobek, Shirley Lampman, Jen Stanley, Beth Harris 5th Row: Rachelle Hall, Denise Wedge, Skye Levely, Sarah Mitchell, Elizabeth Fonseca, Karen Weir, Karen Auld, Jessica Okis, Carrie Burjaw, Katherine Floresco Operations Team Photo on left, from left: Front row: Elise Gallant, Tammy Troy-Hempey, Jennifer Bailey Back row: Antonietta Petrella, Sarah-Kai Antanaitis, Lindsay Akrong, Jennifer Jenkins, Giulia Spadafora

2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications Muzafar Gani Abdul Wahab Wani VB, Uboweja AK, Gani M, Al-Kandari J, Kazem M,l-Naqeeb N, et al. Type I retinopathy of prematurity in infants with birth weight less than 1251 g: incidence and risk factors for its development in a nursery in Kuwait. Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol. 2013;20(1):66-71. Zainab Abdurrahman Abdurrahman Z, Kastner M, Wurman C, Harada L, Bantock L, Waserman S. Experiencing a first food allergic reaction: a survey of parent and caregiver perspectives. AACI. 2013;9:18. Steven Arora Samuel S, Morgan CJ, Bitzan M, Mammen C, Dart AB, Manns BJ, et al. Substantial practice variation exists in the management of childhood nephrotic syndrome. Pediatr Nephrol. 2013;28(12):2289-2298. Arora S, Belostotsky V. Chronic Kidney Disease and Thrombosis. Curr Pediatr Rev. 2013;9(3):200-204. Phan V, Blydt-Hansen T, Feber J, Alos N, Arora S, Atkinson S, et al. Skeletal findings in the first 12 months following initiation of glucocorticoid therapy for pediatric nephrotic syndrome. Osteoporos Int. 2014;25(2):627-637. Lau K, Obeid J, Breithaupt P, Belostotsky V, Arora S, Timmons BW, et al. Effects of acute exercise on markers of inflammation in pediatric chronic kidney disease: a pilot study. Pediatr Nephrol. 2014. Uma Athale Lipshultz SE, Lipsitz SR, Kutok LJ, Miller TL, Colan SD, Neuberg DS, et al. Impact of hemochromatosis gene mutations on cardiac status in doxorubicin-treated survivors of childhood high-risk leukemia. Cancer. 2013;119(19):35553562. 54

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Athale U. Thrombosis in pediatric cancer: identifying the risk factors to improve care. Expert Rev. Hematol. 2013;6 (5):599-609. Vrooman LM, Stevenson KE, Supko JG, O’Brien J, Dahlberg SE, Asselin BL, et al. Postinduction dexamethasone and individualized dosing of escherichia coli l-asparaginase each improve outcome of children and adolescents with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Results from a randomized study-Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocol 0001. J Clin Oncol. 2013:31(9):1202-1210. Klassen AF, Grant C, Barr R, Brill H, Krause de Camargo O, Ronen GM, et al. Development and validation of a generic scale for use in transition programmes to measure self-management skills in adolescents with chronic health conditions: the TRANSITION-Q. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Oct 28. [Epub ahead of print]. Stephanie Atkinson Shiff NJ, Brant R, Guzman J, Cabral DA, Huber AM, Miettunen PM, Scuccimarri R, et al. Canadian Steroid-Associated Osteoporosis in the Pediatric Population (STOPP) Consortium. Glucocorticoid-related changes in body mass index among children and Adolescents with rheumatic disease. Arthritis Care Res. 2013;65(1):113-21. Morrison KM, Anand SS, Yusuf S, Atkinson SA, Schulze KM, et al. Maternal and pregnancy related predictors of cardiometabolic traits in newborns. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(2). Pritchard JM, Papaioannou A, Tomowich C, Giangregorio LM, Atkinson SA, Beattie KA, et al. Bone mineralization is elevated and less heterogeneous in adults with type 2 diabetes and osteoarthritis compared to controls with osteoarthritis alone. Bone. 2013;54:76-82. Pritchard JM, Giangregorio LM, Atkinson SA,

Beattie KA, Inglis D, Ioannidis G, et al. Changes in trabecular bone microarchitecture in postmenopausal women with and without type 2 diabetes: A two year longitudinal study. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013 Mar 27;14:114. Walji R, Wahoush O, Atkinson SA. Feasibility and Acceptance of a Novel Nutrition and Exercise Intervention to Manage Excess Gestational Weight Gain: Focus group study in Ontario, Canada. Primary Health Care. 2013;3:134. Mandel K, Atkinson SA, Barr RD, Pencharz P. Skeletal morbidity in acute lymphoblasticleukemia of childhood: Effects on bone metabolism. J Hematol Malig. 2013, Vol. 3, No 1. Rodrigopulle DJ, Atkinson SA. Validation of surrogate limb analysis for body composition in children by DXA. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014;44:1-5. Lupton JR, Atkinson SA, Chang N, Fraga CG, Levy J, Messina M, et al. Exploring the benefits and challenges of establishing a DRI- like process for bioactives. Eur J Nutr. 2014;53 Suppl 1:1-9. Adamo K, Shen G, Mottola M, Nascimento S, Jean-Philippe S, Zachary M, et al. Obesity Prevention from Conception: a Workshop to Guide the Development of a Pan-Canadian Trial targeting the gestational period. Nutr Metab Insights. 2014;7:7–18. Ronald Barr Barr RD. Essential medicines for children with cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013;60(5):888. Tsimicalis A, Stevens B, Ungar WJ, McKeever P, Greenberg M, Agha M, et al. A mixed method approach to describe the out-of-pocket expenses incurred by families of children with cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013:60(3):438445.


Barr RD. Measurement of bone mineral density in children with cancer. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2013;35(6):492. Yee S, Buckett W, Campbell S, Yanofsky RA, Barr RD. A national study of the provision of oncology sperm banking services among Canadian fertility clinics. Eur J Cancer Care. 2013;22(4):440-449. Rae C, Furlong W, Horsman J, Pullenayegum E, Demers C, Barr RD. Bleeding disorders, menorrhagia and iron deficiency: impacts on health-related quality of life. Haemophilia. 2013;19(3):385-391. Tsimicalis A, Stevens B, Ungar WJ, Greenberg M, McKeever P, Agha M, et al. Determining the costs of families’ support networks following a child’s cancer diagnosis. Cancer Nurs. 2013;36(2):E8-E19. Mehta PS, Wiernikowski JT, Petrilli JAS, Barr RD, et al. Essential medicines for pediatric oncology in developing countries. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013;60(5):889-891. Pai M, Chan A, Barr RD. How I manage heavy menstrual bleeding. Br J Haematol. 2013;162(6):721-729. Bradley NME, Robinson PD, Greenberg ML, Barr RD, Klassen AF, Chan YL, et al. Measuring the quality of a childhood cancer care delivery system: Assessing stakeholder agreement. Value Health. 2013;16(4):639-646. Bradley NME, Robinson PD, Greenberg ML, Barr RD, Klassen AF, Chan YL, et al. Measuring the quality of a childhood cancer care delivery system: Quality indicator development. Value Health. 2013;16(4):647-654. Sullivan R, Kowalczyk JR, Agarwa Bl, Ladenstein R, Fitzgerald E, Barr RD, et al. New policies to address the global burden of childhood cancers. Lancet Oncol. 2013;14(3):E125-E135. Fusch G, Raja P, Dung NQ, Karaolis-Danckert N, Barr RD, Fusch C. Nutritional status in sick children and adolescents is not accu-

rately reflected by BMI-SDS. J Am Coll Nutr. 2013;32(6):407-416. Antillon F, Rossi E, Molina AL, Sala A, Pencharz P, Valsecchi MG, et al. Nutritional status of children during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Guatemala. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013;60(6):911-915. Rayar M, Webber CE, Nayiager T, Sala A, Barr RD. Sarcopenia in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2013;35(2):98-102. Fonseca A, Gordon CL, Barr RD. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (PQCT) to assess bone health in children, adolescents, and young adults: a review of normative data. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2013;35(8):581-589. Teall T, Barrera M, Barr RD, Silva M, Greenberg M. Psychological resilience in adolescent and young adult survivors of lower extremity bone tumors. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013;60(7):12231230. Webber C, Halton J, Walker S, Young A, Barr RD. The prediction of lean body mass and fat mass from arm anthropometry at diagnosis in children with cancer. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2013;35(7):530-533. Rogers PC, DePauw S, Schacter B, Barr RD. A process for change in the care of adolescents and young adults with cancer in Canada. “Moving to Action”: The second Canadian international workshop. International Perspectives on AYAO. Part 1. J Adolesc Young Adult Oncol. 2013;2:72-76.

Barr RD, Feeny D, Furlong W, Horsman J. Letter to the Editor: Concerning Paltzer, Jason, Emily Barker, Whitney P. Witt: Measuring the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of young children in resource-limited settings: a review of existing measures, Quality of Life Research. Qual Life Res. 2014;23(4):1047-1048. Barr RD. Reply to comment: Asociación de Hemato-Oncología Pediátrica de Centro América (AHOPCA): a model for sustainable development in pediatric oncology. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2014;61(11):2122. Wilkins KL, D’Agostino N, Penney AM, Barr RD, Nathan PC. Supporting adolescents and young adults with cancer through transitions: position statement from the Canadian Task Force on Adolescents and Young Adults with cancer. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2014;36(7):545-51. Barr RD, Klussmann FA, Baez F, Bonilla M, Moreno B, Navarrete M, et al. Asociación de Hemato-Oncología Pediátrica de Centro América (AHOPCA): A Model for Sustainable Development in Pediatric Oncology. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2014;61(2):345-354. Denburg AE, Knaul FM, Atun R, Frazier LA, Barr RD. Beyond the Bench and the Bedside: Economic and Health Systems Dimensions of Global Childhood Cancer Outcomes. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2014;61(3):572-576. Martiniuk A, Silva M, Amylon M, Barr RD. Camp Programs for Children With Cancer and Their Families: Review of Research Progress Over the Past Decade. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2014;61(5):778-787.

Rosenberg-Yunger ZRS, Klassen AF, Amin L, Granek L, D’Agostino NM, Boydell KM, et al. Barriers and facilitators of transition from pediatric to adult long-term follow-up care in childhood cancer survivors. J Adolesc Young Adult Oncol. 2013;2:104-111.

Tsangaris E, Johnson J, Taylor R, Fern L, Barr RD, Klassen A, et al. Identifying the supportive care needs of adolescent and young adult survivors of cancer: a qualitative analysis and systematic literature review. Support Care Cancer. 2014;22(4):947-959.

Mandel K, Atkinson SA, Barr RD, Pencharz P. Skeletal morbidity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of childhood:  Effects on bone metabolism. J Hematol Malig. 2013;3:35-40.

Fonseca A, Scheinemann K, Jansen J, Barr RD. Testicular Myeloid Sarcoma: An unusual presentation of infant acute myeloid leukemia. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2014;36(3):E155-E157. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications Robbins AS, Lerro CC, Barr RD. Insurance status and distant-stage disease at diagnosis among adolescent and young adult patients with cancer aged 15 to 39 years: National Cancer Data Base, 2004 through 2010. Cancer. 2014;120(8):1212-1219.

Michelle Batthish Batthish M, Bassilious E, Schneider R, Feldman BM, Hyman A, Tse SML. A unique, interactive and web-based pediatric rheumatology teaching module: residents’ perceptions. Pediatric Rheumatology. 2013;11(1): 22.

Samaan MC, Scheinemann K, Burrow S, Dillenburg RF, Barr RD, Wang KW, et al. Recruitment feasibility to a cohort study of endocrine and metabolic health among survivors of childhood brain tumours: a report from the Canadian study of Determinants of Endometabolic Health in ChIlDrEn (CanDECIDE). BMJ Open. 2014;4(6).

Batthish M, Tse SM, Feldman BM, Baker GR, Laxer RM. Trying to Improve Care: The Morbidity and Mortality Conference in a Division of Rheumatology. J Rheumatol. 2014 Dec;41(12):2452-2458.

Barr RD. Risk of premature menopause after treatment for Hodgkin’s lymphoma. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014;106(9). Navarrete M, Rossi E, Brivio E, Carrillo JM, Bonilla M, Vasquez R, et al. Treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Central America: A lower-middle income countries experience. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2014;61(5):803-809. Barr RD. “Delays” in diagnosis: a misleading concept, yet providing opportunities for advancing clinical care. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2014;36(3):169-72. Rae C, Furlong W, Jankovic M, Moghrabi A, Naqvi A, Barr R. Economic evaluation of two treatment strategies for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood. Eur J Cancer Care. 2014;23:779-885. Klassen AF, Grant C, Barr R, Brill H, Krause de Camargo O, Ronen GM, et al. Development and validation of a generic scale for use in transition programmes to measure self-management skills in adolescents with chronic health conditions: the TRANSITION-Q. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Oct 28. [Epub ahead of print]. Ereny Bassilious Batthish M, Bassilious E, Schneider R, Feldman BM, Hyman A, Tse SML. A unique, interactive and web-based pediatric rheumatology teaching module: residents’ perceptions. Pediatr Rheumatol. 2013;11(1): 22. 56

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Vladimir Belostotsky Arora S, Belostotsky V. Chronic kidney disease and thrombosis. Curr Pediatr Rev. 2013;9(3):200-204. Guo P, Belostotsky V. Cracking Haematuria in Adolescent with Negative Work Up. BMJ Case Rep. 2013. de Macedo AN, Irfan Yasin Jiwa M, Macri J, Belostotsky V, Hill S, Britz-McKibbin P. Strong anion determination in biological fluids by capillary electrophoresis for clinical diagnostics. Anal Chem. 2013;85(22):11112-20. Vicky Breakey Breakey VR, Warias A, Ignas DM, Blanchette VS, Stinson JS. The Importance of Usability Testing for Internet-based Patient Self-Management Interventions. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2013;13:113. Sterling L, Nyhof-Young J, Blanchette VS, Breakey VR. Growing Up with Hemophilia: An assessment of teens’ experiences and perceived transition need. Univ Toronto Med J. 2013;90(4):146-151.

ITP through narratives of children with ITP, their parents, and health care professionals. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2014 Oct;36(7):559-65. Odame JE, Chan AK, Wu JK, Breakey VR. Factor XIII Deficiency Management: A review of the literature. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2014;25(3):199-205. Herbert Brill Edwards C, Kapoor V, Samuel C, Issenman R, Brill H. General anesthetic versus light sedation: Effect on pediatric endoscopy wait times. Can J Gastroenterol. 2013;27(7):519-522. Wingate KE, Jacobson K, Issenman R, Brill H, Barker C, Israel D, et al. The effect of two doses of vitamin D3 (400 IU vs. 2000 IU/d) on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in children with Crohn’s disease. FASEB J. 2013;27. Bollegala N, Brill H, Marshall JK. Resource utilization during pediatric to adult transfer of care in IBD. J Crohns Colitis. 2013;7(2):e55-60. Wingate KE, Jacobson K, Issenman R, Carroll M, Barker C, Israel D, et al. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations in Children with Crohn’s Disease Supplemented with Either 2000 or 400 IU Daily for 6 Months: A randomized controlled study. J Pediatr. 2014;164(4):860-865. Klassen AF, Grant C, Barr R, Brill H, Kraus de Camargo O, Ronen GM, et al. Development and validation of a generic scale for use in transition programmes to measure self-management skills in adolescents with chronic health conditions: the TRANSITION-Q. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Oct 28. [Epub ahead of print].

Breakey VR, Ignas DM, Warias AV, White M, Blanchette VS, et al. A pilot randomized control trial to evaluate the feasibility of an Internetbased self-management and transitional care program for youth with haemophilia. Haemophilia. 2014;20:784–793.

David Callen Marin SE, Callen DJA. The Magnetic Resonance Imaging Appearance of Monophasic Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: An Update Post Application of the 2007 Consensus Criteria. Neuroimaging Clin N Am. 2013;23(2):245-266.

Beck CE, Boydell K, Breakey VR, Birken CS, Stasiulis E, Blanchette VS, Llewellyn-Thomas H, Parkin PC. Exploring the experience of acute

Whitney R, Callen DJA. Micturition-induced seizures: a rare form of reflex epilepsy. Pediatr Neurol. 2013;49(1):61-63.


Whitney R, Borys O, Callen DJ, Latchman A. The McMaster Pediatric Migraine Questionnaire: A prospective validation study. Pediatr Neurol. 2014;52(2):214-17. Brian Cameron Hutchings K, Vasquez A, Price D, Cameron BH, Awan S, Miller GG. Outcomes following neonatal patent ductus arteriosus ligation done by pediatric surgeons: a retrospective cohort analysis. J Pediatr Surg. 2013;48(5):915-8. Wong C, Cameron BH, Mak M, Yang J, Shah P, Shivananda S, et al. Do the rates and outcomes of neonatal pda ligation differ in Canadian neonatal units without pediatric cardiac surgery programs? A Canadian neonatal network study. J Pediatr Surg. 2013;48(5):909-14. Kittmer T, Hoogenes J, Pemberton J, Cameron BH. Exploring the hidden curriculum: a qualitative analysis of clerks’ reflections on professionalism in surgical clerkship. Am J Surg. 2013;205(4):426-33. Pemberton J, Rambaran M, Cameron BH. Evaluating the long term impact of the Trauma Team Training™ Course in Guyana: an explanatory mixed methods approach. Am J Surg. 2013;205(2):119-24. Abdur-Rahman L, Shawyer A, Vizcarra R, Bailey K, Cameron BH. Do geography and resources influence the need for colostomy in hirschprung’s disease and anorectal malformations? A Canadian Association of Paediatric Surgeons: Association of Paediatric Surgeons of Nigeria Survey. Afr J Paediatr Surg. 2014;11(2):150-7. Tania Cellucci Cellucci T, Tyrrell PN, Twilt M, Sheikh S, Benseler SM. Distinct phenotype clusters in childhood inflammatory brain diseases. Arthritis Rheumatol. 2014;66(3):750-756. Petit-Pedrol M, Armangue T, Peng XY, Bataller L, Cellucci T, Meaney BF, et al. Encephalitis with refractory seizures, status epilepticus, and antibodies to the GABA(A) receptor: a case series, characterisation of the antigen, and

analysis of the effects of antibodies. Lancet Neurol. 2014;13(3):276-286. Titulaer MJ, Hoftberger R, Iizuka T, Leypoldt F, McCracken L, Cellucci T, et al. Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti-N-methylD-aspartate receptor encephalitis. Ann Neurol. 2014;75(3):411-428. Anthony Chan Berry LR, van Walderveen MC, Atkinson HM, Chan AKC. Comparison of N-linked glycosylation of protein C in newborns and adults. Carbohydr Res. 2013;365(1):32-37. Chander A, Atkinson HM, Stevic I, Berry LR, Kim PY, Chan AKC. Interactions of heparin and a covalently-linked antithrombin-heparin complex with components of the fibrinolytic system. Thromb Haemost. 2013;110(6):11801188. Chander A, Nagel K, Wiernikowski J, Bosco P, Chan A, and the Thrombosis and Hemostasis in Newborns (THiN) Group. Evaluation of the use of low molecular weight heparin in neonates: A retrospective, single-center study. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2013;19(5):488-493. Hilliard P, Zourikian N, Blanchette V, Chan A, Elliot B, Israels SJ, et al. Musculoskeletal health of subjects with hemophilia A treated with tailored prophylaxis: Canadian Hemophilia Primary Prophylaxis (CHPS) Study. J Thromb Haemost. 2013;11(3):460-466. Lane S, Arnold E, Webert K, Chan A, Walker I, Heddle N. What should men living with severe hemophilia need to know? The perspectives of Canadian hemophilia healthcare providers. Haemophilia. 2013;19(4):503-510. Nagel K, Pai MK, Paes BA, Chan AK. Diagnosis and treatment of intracranial hemorrhage in children with hemophilia. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2013;24(1):23-27. Pai M, Chan A, Barr R. How I manage heavy menstrual bleeding. Br J Haematol. 2013;162(6):721-729.

Rochow N, Chan E, Wu WI, Selvaganapathy PR, Fusch G, Berry L, et al. Artificial placenta - Lung assist devices for term and preterm newborns with respiratory failure. Int J Artif Organs. 2013;36(6):377-391. Stevic I, Chan HHW, Berry LR, Chan AKC. Inhibition of the prothrombinase complex on red blood cells by heparin and covalent antithrombin-heparin complex. J Biochem. 2013;153(1):103-110. Stevic I, Chan HHW, Chander A, Berry LR, Chan AKC. Covalently linking heparin to antithrombin enhances prothrombinase inhibition on activated platelets. Thromb Haemost. 2013;109(6):1016-1024. Yang JYK, Williams S, Brandão LR, Chan AKC, Mondal T. Neonatal and childhood right atrial thrombosis: Critical clot size. (Letter) Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2013;24(4):458. Arnold E, Lane S, Webert KE, Chan A, Walker I, Tufts J, et al. What should men living with haemophilia need to know? The perspectives of Canadian men with haemophilia. Haemophilia. 2014;20(2):219-225. Bernard TJ, Rivkin MJ, Scholz K, deVeber G, Kirton A, Gill JC, et al. Emergence of the primary pediatric stroke center: Impact of the Thrombolysis in Pediatric Stroke (TIPS) trial. Stroke. 2014;45(7):2018-2023. Graf L, Moffat KA, Carlino SA, Chan AKC, Iorio A, Giulivi A, et al. Evaluation of an automated method for measuring von Willebrand factor activity in clinical samples without ristocetin. Int J Lab Hematol. 2014;36(3):341-351. Kumar R, Chan AKC, Dawson JE, Forman-Kay JD, Kahr WHA, Williams S. Clinical presentation and molecular basis of congenital antithrombin deficiency in children: A cohort study. Br J Haematol. 2014;166(1):130-139. McCrindle BW, Li JS, Manlhiot C, Tweddell JS, Giglia TM, Massicotte MP, et al. Challenges and priorities for research: A report from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications (NHLBI)/National Institutes of Health (NIH) Working Group on Thrombosis in Pediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease. Circulation. 2014;130(14):1192-1203. Leung JM, Berry LR, Chan AKC, Brash JL. Surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane with a covalent antithrombin-heparin complex to prevent thrombosis. J Biomater Sci Polym Ed. 2014;25(8):786-801. Nguyen GC, Bernstein CN, Bitton A, Chan AK, Griffiths AM, Leontiadis G, et al. Consensus statements on the risk, prevention, and treatment of venous thromboembolism in inflammatory bowel disease: Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. Gastroenterology. 2014;146(3):835-848. Park CK, Paes BA, Nagel K, Chan AK, Murthy P, and the Thrombosis and Hemostasis in Newborns (THiN) Group. Neonatal central venous catheter thrombosis: diagnosis, management and outcome. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2014;25(2):97-106. Steele MR, Chan AKC, Nagel K. Pharmacokinetics of recombinant and plasma-derived factor VIII products in pediatric patients with severe hemophilia A. (Letter). Haemophilia. 2014;20(1):e100-e101. Stevic I, Kozenko M, LoStracco R, Chan AKC, Chan HHW. Phenotype presentation for a novel mutation affecting a conserved cysteine residue in exon-63 of fibrillin-1 (Cys2633Arg). Biochemical Genetics. 2014;52(5-6):225-232. Taneja R, Berry L, Pappu U, Stitt L, Sayal P, Allen P, et al. Protamine requirements in cardiac surgery: Effect of changes in the heparin reference standard. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2014;28(5):1227-1232. Traore AN, Chan AKC, Webert KE, Heddle N, Ritchie B, St-Louis J, et al. First analysis of 10-year trends in national factor concentrates usage in Hemophilia: Data from CHARMS, the Canadian Hemophilia Assessment and Resource Management System. Haemophilia. 2014;20(4):e251-e259. 58

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Kumar R, Dawson JE, Chan AKC, Forman-Kay JD, Kahr WHA, Williams S. c.1058C>T variant in the SERPINC1 gene is pathogenic for type II antithrombin deficiency. Br J Haematol. 2014 Dec 19. [Epub ahead of print]. Walker RG, Obeid J, Nguyen T, Ploeger H, Proudfood NA, Bos C, et al. Sedentary time and screen-based sedentary behaviours of children with a chronic disease. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2014 Nov 10. [Epub ahead of print]. Karen Choong Abdulsatar F, Walker R, Timmons B, Choong K. “Wii-Hab” in Critically Ill Children: A Pilot Trial. J Pediatr Rehabil Med. 2013;6:193-204. Duffett M, Choong K, Hartling L, Menon K, Thabane L, Cook DJ. Randomized controlled trials in pediatric critical care: a scoping review. Critical Care. 2013;17(R256). Gupta S, Joshi V, Joshi P, Monkman S, Vaillancourt K, Choong K. Airway pressure release ventilation: A neonatal case series and review of current practice. Can Respir J. 2013;20(5):86e91. Menon K, McNally JD, Choong K, Ward RE, Lawson ML, Ramsay T, et al. A Survey of Stated Physician Practices and Beliefs on the Use of Steroids in Pediatric Fluid and/or Vasoactive Infusion Dependent Shock. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2013;14(5):462-466. Gunz A, Choong K, Potter M, Miller E. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates with urea-cycle defects. Int Med Case Rep J. 2013;6:41-48. Menon K, McNally D, Choong K, Sampson M. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the effect of steroids in pediatric shock. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2013;14(5):474-480. Zorko DJ, Choong K, Gilleland J, Agar B, Baker S, Brennan C, et al. Urgent ultrasound guided hemodynamic assessments by a pediatric medical emergency team: a pilot study. PLoS One. 2013;8(6):1-6.

Choong K, Koo KY, Clark H, Chu R, Thabane L, Burns KEA, et al. Early Mobilization in Critically Ill Children: A Survey of Canadian Practice. Crit Care Med. 2013;41(7):1-9. Lamontagne F, Quiroz Martinez H, Adhikari NK, Cook DJ, Koo KK, Lauzier F, et al. Corticosteroid use in the intensive care unit: a survey of intensivists. Can J Anaesth. 2013;60(7): 652-59. Beck CE, Choong K, Friedman J, Hartfield D, Holland J, Lacroix J, et al. Avoiding hypotonic solutions in paediatrics: keeping our patients safe. Paediatr Child Health. 2013:18(2):94-95. Beck CE, Choong K, Friedman J, Hartfield D, Holland J, Lacroix J, et al. Intravenous fluidrelated symptomatic acute hyponatremia. Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program. 2013;18(2):94-95. McNab S, Ware R, Neville K, Choong K, Coulthard M, Duke T, et al. Isotonic versus hypotonic solutions for maintenance intravenous fluid administration in children (Review). The Cochrane Library. 2014;(12):1-60. Hanney I, Duffett M, Choong K, Menon K, Cook D. Consent in Pediatric Critical Care Randomized Control Trials. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2014;15(Suppl 1):204. Choong K. Hypotonic IV fluid administration is associated with hyponatremia. J Pediatr. 2014;164:1239-1242. Choong K, Duffett M, Hanney I, Cook D, Randolph A. Impact of Randomized Controlled Trials Conducted by Pediatric Critical Care Research Networks. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2014;15:suppl:198-199. Choong K. Facilitating Acute Rehabilitation in Critically Ill Children. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. 2014;15(9):917. Cynthia Cupido Brazil K, Cupido C, Taniguchi A, Howard M, Akhtar-Danesh N, Frolic A. Assessing Family Members’ Satisfaction with Information Sharing and Communication during Hospital Care at


the End of Life. J Palliat Med. 2013;16(1):82-86. Peter Dent Ardelean DS, Dent PB, Ferguson PJ, Laxer RM. Chronic Nonbacterial Osteomyelitis in a Child with Previous Juvenile Dermatomyositis. J Rheumatol. 2013;40(3):339-341. Shiff NJ, Brant R, Guzman J, Cabral DA, Huber AM, Miettunen P, et al. Glucocorticoid-related changes in body mass index among children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases. Arthritis Care Res. 2013;65(1):113-121. Rejane Dillenburg Thabane L, Mbuagbaw L, Zhang SY, Samaan Z, Marcucci M, Chengli Ye, et al. A tutorial on sensitivity analyses in clinical trials: the what, why, when and how. BMC Med Res Methodol. 2013;13:92. Samaan MC, Thabane L, Burrow S, Dillenburg RF, Scheinemann K. Canadian Study of Determinants of Endometabolic Health in ChIlDrEn (CanDECIDE study): a cohort study protocol examining the mechanisms of obesity in survivors of childhood brain tumours. BMJ Open. 2013;3(6). Dillenburg R, Nathan P, Mertens L. Educational Paper: Decreasing the burden of cardiovascular disease in childhood cancer survivors: An update for the pediatrician. Eur J Pediatr. 2013;172(9):1149-1160. Kantor PF, Lougheed J, Dancea A, McGillion M, Barbosa N, Dillenburg R, et al. Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines. Can J Cardiol. 2013;29(12):1535-1552. Millar PJ, Proudfoot NA, Dillenburg RF, MacDonald MJ. Reduced heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity in normotensive children with repaired coarctation of the aorta. Int J Cardiol. 2013;168(1):587-588. Samaan Z, Mbuagbaw L, Kosa D, Borg Debono V, Dillenburg R, Zhang S, et al. A systematic scoping review of adherence to reporting

guidelines in health care literature. J Multidiscip Healthc. 2013;6:169-88. Samaan MC, Scheinemann K, Burrow S, Dillenburg RF, Barr RD, Wang KW, et al. Recruitment feasibility to a cohort study of endocrine and metabolic health among survivors of childhood brain tumours: a report from the Canadian study of Determinants of Endometabolic Health in ChIlDrEn (CanDECIDE). BMJ Open. 2014;4(6). Mark Duffett Duffett M, Choong K, Hartling L, Menon K, Thabane L, Cook DJ. Randomized controlled trials in pediatric critical care: a scoping review. Crit Care. 2013;17(5):R256.

Ferro MA. Risk factors for health-related quality of life in children with epilepsy: a metaanalysis. Epilepsia. 2014;55(11):1722-31. Ferro MA. Missing data in longitudinal studies: cross-sectional multiple imputation provides similar estimates to full-information maximum likelihood. Ann Epidemiol. 2014;24(1):75-77. Ferro MA, Boyle MH, Dingle K, Scott J. The Child Behavior Checklist and youth self-report in adolescents with epilepsy: testing measurement invariance of the Attention and Thought Problems subscales. Epilepsy Behav. 2014;31:34-42.

Duffett M, Choong K, Foster J, Menon K, Meade MO, Cook DJ. Adjunctive clonidine in the sedation of mechanically ventilated children: A pilot randomized trial. Intensive Care Med. 2013;39 Suppl 1:S150.

Tan M, Dyck BA, Gabriele J, Daya R, Thomas N, Sookram C, et al. Synapsin II gene expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of brain specimens from patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Pharmacogenomics J. 2014;14(1):63-69.

Duffett M, Choong K, Foster J, Cheng J, Meade MO, Menon K, et al. Clonidine in the sedation of mechanically ventilated children: a pilot randomized trial. J Crit Care. 2014;29(5):758–63.

Ferro MA. Adolescents and young adults with physical illness: a comparative study of psychological distress. Acta Paediatr. 2014;103(1):e32e37.

Li AH-T, Thomas SM, Farag A, Duffett M, Garg AX, Naylor KL. Quality of survey reporting in nephrology journals: a methodologic review. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2014;9(12):2089-94.

Sheri Findlay Couturier J, Sy A, Johnson N, Findlay S. Bone mineral density in adolescents with eating disorders exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Eat Disord. 2013;21(3):238-248.

Cook D, Duffett M, Lauzier F, Ye C, Dodek P, Paunovic B, et al. Barriers and facilitators of thromboprophylaxis for medical-surgical intensive care unit patients: a multicenter survey. J Crit Care. 2014;29(3):471.e1–9. Mark Ferro Ferro MA, Boyle MH, Alati R, Scott J, Dingle K. Maternal psychological distress partially mediates physician visits in a population-based sample of adolescents with asthma. J Asthma. 2014; Aug 28:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]. Ferro MA, Chin R, Camfield CS, Wiebe S, Levin SD, Speechley KN. Convulsive status epilepticus and health-related quality of life in children with epilepsy. Neurology. 2014;83(8):752-57.

Christoph Fusch Choi A, Fusch G, Rochow N, Sheikh N, Fusch C. Establishment of micro-methods for macronutrient contents analysis in breast milk. Matern Child Nutr. 2013 Jun 18. [Epub ahead of print]. Fusch G, Raja P, Dung NQ, Karaolis-Danckert N, Barr R, Fusch C. Nutritional status in sick children and adolescents is not accurately reflected by BMI-SDS. J Am Coll Nutr. 2013;32(6):407-416. Lutsiv O, Giglia L, Pullenayegum E, Foster G, Vera C, Chapman B, et al. A population-based cohort study of breastfeeding according to gestational age at term delivery. J Pediatr. 2013 Nov;163(5):1283-1288. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications Lutsiv O, Pullenayegum E, Foster G, Vera C, Giglia L, Chapman B, et al. Women’s intentions to breastfeed: a population-based cohort study. BJOG. 2013;120(12):1490-1498. Rochow N, Chan EC, Wu WI, Selvaganapathy PR, Fusch G, Berry L, et al. Artificial placenta-lung assist devices for term and preterm newborns with respiratory failure. Int J Artif Organs. 2013;36(6):377-391. Rochow N, Fusch G, Choi A, Chessell L, Elliott L, McDonald K, et al. Target fortification of breast milk with fat, protein, and carbohydrates for preterm infants. J Pediatr. 2013;163(4):1001-1007. Wang L, Sievenpiper JL, de Souza RJ, Thomaz M, Blatz S, Grey V, et al. Hematocrit correction does not improve glucose monitor accuracy in the assessment of neonatal hypoglycemia. Clin Chem Lab Med. 2013;51(8):1627-1635. Wu WI, Rochow N, Chan E, Fusch G, Manan A, Nagpal D, et al. Lung assist device: development of microfluidic oxygenators for preterm infants with respiratory failure. Lab on a Chip. 2013;13(13):2641-2650. Lange A, Fusch C, Merk H, Thyrian R, Hoffman W. Inzidenz und Therapiedauer pathologischer Hüftbefunde im Rahmen der U2-und U3Untersuchung (SNiP Studie). Orthopade. 2014 Feb;43(2):129-35. Fusch C, Samiee-Zafarghandy S. Promoting healthy growth and nutrition in preterm infants: A challenge for clinicians and researchers. Clin Biochem. 2014;47(9):711-713. Fusch C, Jochum F. Water, sodium, potassium and chloride. Nutritional care of preterm infants: scientific basis and practical guidelines. World Rev Nutr Diet. 2014;110. Fusch G, Choi A, Rochow N, Fusch S, Poeschl S, Fusch C, et al. Rapid measurement of macronutrients in breast milk: How reliable are infrared milk analyzers? Clin Nutr. 2014. [Epub ahead of print]. 60

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Fusch C. Reply-body fat% is also a potentially poor individual measure for health in children. J Am Coll Nutr. 2014;33(2). Kersten I, Lange AE, Haas JP, Fusch C, Lode H, Hoffmann W, et al. Chronic diseases in pregnant women: prevalence and birth outcomes based on the SNiP-study. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;75. Rochow N, Manan A, Wu WI, Fusch G, Monkman S, Leung J, et al. An integrated array of microfluidic oxygenators as a neonatal lung assist device: inVitro characterization and inVivo demonstration. Artificial Organs. 2014;38(10). Vasanthan T, Rochow N, Mian F, Codini T, DeFrance B, Fusch G, et al. LPS from bovine serum albumin drives TNFalpha release during ex-vivo placenta perfusion experiments, contaminates the perfusion system but can be effectively removed by oxidative cleaning. Placenta. 2014;35(12). Lucy Giglia Lutsiv O, Giglia L, Pullenayegum E, Foster G, Vera C, Chapman B, et al. A population-based cohort study of breastfeeding according to gestational age at term delivery. J Pediatr. 2013;163(5):1283-88. Lutsiv O, Pullenayegum E, Foster G, Vera C, Giglia L, Chapman B, et al. Women’s intentions to breastfeed: a population-based cohort study. BJOG. 2013;120(12):1490-99. Morais M, Mehta C, Murphy K, Shah P, Giglia L, Smith P, et al. How often are late preterm births the result of non-evidence based practices: analysis from a retrospective cohort study at two tertiary referral centres in a nationalized healthcare system. BJOG. 2013;120(12):15081515. Johnston BC, Donen R, Pooni A, Pond J, Xie F, Giglia L, et al. Conceptual framework for health-related quality of life assessment in acute gastroenteritis. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2013;56(3):280-89.

Jonathan Gilleland Zorko DJ, Choong K, Gilleland J, Agar B, Baker S, Brennan C, et al. Urgent ultrasound guided hemodynamic assessments by a pediatric medical emergency team: a pilot study. PLoS One. 2013 Jun 25;8(6)1-6. Jacobson D, Gilleland J, Cameron B, Rosenbloom E. Perinephric abscesses in the pediatric population: case presentation and review of the literature. Pediatr Nephrol. 2014;29(5):919925. Gilleland J, McGugan J, Brooks S, Dobbins M, Ploeg J. Caring for critically ill children in the community: a needs assessment. BMJ Qual Saf. 2014;23(6):490-498. David Goldfarb Audcent T, MacDonnell H, Moreau K, Hawkes M, Sauve L, Crockett M, et al. Development and evaluations of global child health educational modules. Pediatrics. 2013 Dec;132(6). El-Sayed MF, Goldfarb DM, Fulford M, Pernica JM. Severe late-onset multisystem cytomegalovirus infection in a premature neonate previously treated for congenital infection. BMC Pediatr. 2013;13:142. Chandra A, Caruso N, Haas M, Goldfarb DM, Kestler A. CT before lumbar puncture in suspected meningitis in Botswana: How established guidelines may not apply. Afr J Emerg Med. 2013;4(2)76-82. Puryear S, Seropola G, Ho-Foster A, ArscottMills T, Mazhani L, Firth J, et al. Yield of contact tracing from pediatric tuberculosis index cases in Gaborone, Botswana. Int J of TB and Lung Disease. 2013;(8);1049-1055. Welch H, Steenhoff AP, Chakalisa U, ArscottMills T, Tiwarenge S, Mokomane M. et al. Hospital-based surveillance for rotavirus gastroenteritis using molecular testing and immunoassay during the 2011 season in Botswana. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(5):570-572. Goldfarb DM, Dixon B, Moldovan I, Barrowman N, Mattison K, Zentron C, et al. Real-time


pcr detection of bacterial, parasitic and viral agents from patients with diarrhea in Nunavut, Canada. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2013:72;19903. Renuart AJ, Steenhoff AP, Goldfarb DM, Mokomane M, Tawanana EO, Mohan N, et al. Microbiology of urinary tract infections in Gaborone, Botswana. PLoS ONE 2013;8(3):e57776. Goldfarb DM, Steenhoff AP, Pernica JM, Chong S, Luinstra K, Mokomane M, et al. Evaluation of anatomically-designed flocked rectal swabs for the molecular detection of enteric pathogens in children admitted to hospital with severe gastroenteritis in Botswana. J Clin Microbiol. 2014 Nov;52(11):3922-7. MacIntyre J, McTaggart J, Guerrant RL, Goldfarb DM. Early Childhood Diarrheal Disease and Cognition: Are we missing the rest of the iceberg? Paediatr Int Child Health. 2014 Nov;34(4):295-307. Jan Willem Gorter McCauley D, Gorter JW, Russell DJ, Rosenbaum P, Law M, Kertoy M. Assessment of environmental factors in disabled children 2-12 years: development and reliability of the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF) for Children Parent Version. Child Care Health Dev. 2013;39(3):337-344. Di Rezze B, Law M, Eva K, Pollock N, Gorter JW. Development of a generic fidelity measure for rehabilitation intervention research for children with physical disabilities. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2013;44(8):737-744. Kertoy MK, Russell DJ, Rosenbaum P, Jaffer S, Law M, McCauley D, et al. Development of an outcome measurement system for service planning for children and youth with special needs. Child Care Health Dev. 2013;39(5):750-759. van Schie PEM, Siebes RC, Dallmeijer AJ, Schuengel C, Smits DW, Gorter JW, et al. Development of social functioning and communication in school-aged (5-9 years) children with cerebral palsy. Res Dev Disabil. 2013;34(12):4485-4494.

Shimmell LJ, Gorter JW, Jackson D, Wright M, Galuppi B. It’s the participation that motivates him: physical activity experiences of youth with cerebral palsy and their parents. Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2013;33(4):405-420.

identified goals in young children with cerebral palsy receiving a context-focused intervention: associations with child, goal and intervention factors. Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2014;34(1):6274.

Smits DS, Gorter JW, Hanna SE, Dallmeijer AJ, Van Eck M, Roebroeck ME, et al. Longitudinal development of gross motor function among Dutch children and young adults with cerebral palsy: an investigation of motor growth curves. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2013;55(5):378-384.

Ketelaar M, Gorter JW, Westers P, Hanna S, Verhoef M. Developmental trajectories of mobility and self-care capabilities in young children with cerebral palsy. J Pediatr. 2014;164(4):769-774.

Vos RC, Becher JG, Ketelaar M, Smits DW, Voorman JM, Tan SS, et al. Developmental trajectories of daily activities in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. Pediatrics. 2013 Oct;132(4):e915-23. Cross A, Rosenbaum P, Gorter JW. Exploring the aquatic environment for children with disabilities: how we can conceptualize and advance interventions with the ICF. Crit Rev Phys Rehabil Med. 2013;25(1-2):59-76. Stewart D, Gorter JW, Freeman M. Transitions to adulthood for youth with disabilities: Emerging themes for practice and research. Prev Res. April 2013. Online http://www.nxtbook.com/ nxtbooks/integratedresearchsrvcs/pr_201304/ Klein B, Gorter JW, Rosenbaum P. Diagnostic shortfalls in early childhood chronic stress: a review of the issues. Child Care Health Dev. 2013;39(6):765-771. Alsem MQ, Siebes RC, Gorter JW, Jongmans MJ, Nijhuis BGJ, Ketelaar M, et al. Assessment of family needs in children with physical disabilities: development of a family needs inventory. Child Care Health Dev. 2014;40(4):498506. Mesterman R, Gorter JW, Harvey A, Lockhart J, McEwen-Hill J, Margallo K, et al. Botulinum Toxin Type A in children and adolescents with severe cerebral palsy: a retrospective chart review. J Child Neurol. 2014;29(2):210-213. Pollock N, Sharma N, Christenson C, Law M, Gorter JW, Darrah J. Change in parent-

Darrah J, Wiart L, Gorter JW, Law M. Stability of serial range-of-motion measurements of the lower extremities in children with cerebral palsy: can we do better? Phys Ther. 2014;94(7):987-995. Smits DW, Gorter JW, van Schie PE, Dallmeijer AJ, Ketelaar M, PS Grp. How do changes in motor capacity, motor capability, and motor performance relate in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy? Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014;95(8):1577-1584. Obeid J, Balemans ACJ, Noorduyn SG, Gorter JW, Timmons BW. Objectively measured sedentary time in youth with cerebral palsy compared with age-, sex-, and season-matched youth who are developing typically: an explorative study. Phys Ther. 2014;94(8):1163-1167. Di Rezze B, Law M, Eva K, Pollock N, Gorter JW. Therapy behaviours in paediatric rehabilitation: essential attributes for intervention with children with physical disabilities. Disabil Rehabil. 2014;36(1):16-22. Ferro MA, Gorter JW, Boyle MH. Trajectories of depressive symptoms during the transition to young adulthood: The role of chronic illness. J Affect Disord. 2014;174C:594-601. Klassen AF, Grant C, Barr R, Brill H, Kraus de Camargo O, Ronen GM, et al. Development and validation of a generic scale for use in transition programmes to measure self-management skills in adolescents with chronic health conditions: the TRANSITION-Q. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Oct 28. [Epub ahead of print]. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications Claridge EA, McPhee PG, Timmons BW, Ginis KA, MacDonald MJ, Gorter JW. Quantification of physical activity and sedentary time in adults with cerebral palsy. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014 Nov 21. [Epub ahead of print]. King G, McPherson A, Kingsnorth S, Stewart D, Glencross-Eimantas T, Gorter JW, et al. Residential immersive life skills programs for youth with disabilities: service providers’ perceptions of experiential benefits and key program features. Disabil Rehabil. 2014 Aug 19:1-10. Kruijsen-Terpstra AJ, Ketelaar M, Verschuren O, Smits DW, Jongmans MJ, Gorter JW. Determinants of developmental gain in daily activities in young children with cerebral palsy. Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2014 Sep 18. [Epub ahead of print]. Tan SS, van Meeteren J, Ketelaar M, Schuengel C, Reinders-Messelink HA, PERRIN+ study group. Long-term trajectories of health-related quality of life in individuals with cerebral palsy: a multicenter longitudinal study. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014;95(11):2029-2039. Vos RC, Dallmeijer AJ, Verhoef M, Van Schie PE, Voorman JM, PERRIN+ Study Group. Developmental trajectories of receptive and expressive communication in children and young adults with cerebral palsy. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2014;56(10):951-959. Tan SS, Wiegerink DJ, Vos RC, Smits DW, Voorman JM, PERRIN+ study group. Developmental trajectories of social participation in individuals with cerebral palsy: a multicentre longitudinal study. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2014;56(4):370-377. Gorter JW, Timmons BW. Measurement of habitual physical activity and sedentary behaviour of youth with cerebral palsy: work in progress. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2014;56(6):911. Nguyen T, Gorter JW. Use of the international classification of functioning, disability and health as a framework for transition from paediatric to adult healthcare. Child Care Health Dev. 2014;40(6):759-761. 62

| Department of Pediatrics

Kruijsen-Terpstra AJ, Ketelaar M, Boeije H, Jongmans MJ, Gorter JW, Verheijden J, et al. Parents’ experiences with physical and occupational therapy for their young child with cerebral palsy: a mixed studies review. Child Care Health Dev. 2014;40(6):787-796. Christina Grant Klassen AF, Grant C, Barr R, Brill H, Krause de Camargo O, Ronen GM, et al. Development and validation of a generic scale for use in transition programmes to measure self-management skills in adolescents with chronic health conditions: the TRANSITION-Q. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Oct 28. [Epub ahead of print]. Lennox Huang Daneman D, Kellner J, Bernstein M, Dow K, Dugas MA, Duffy C, et al. Social paediatrics: From ‘lip service’ to the health and well-being of Canada’s children and youth. Paediatr Child Health. 2013;18(7):351-352. Andrea Hunter Audcent T, MacDonnell H, Moreau K, Hawkes M, Sauve L, Crockett M, et al. Development and evaluation of global child health educational modules. Pediatrics. 2013;132(6):e1570-76. Banerji A, Hunter A. Malnutrition – Iron deficiency, Vitamin B12 deficiency, Vitamin A deficiency, Vitamin D deficiency, Iodine deficiency, Zinc deficiency, Folic acid deficiency. In: Caring for Kids New to Canada: A guide for health professionals working with immigrant and refugee children and youth [Internet]. Barozzino T and Hui C, editors. Ottawa: Canadian Paediatric Society; 2013 April. Available from: http://www.kidsnewtocanada.ca/conditions/ malnutrition English, French. Hunter A, Banerji A. Hereditary Anemias – Sickle Cell Disease, Thalassemia and G6PD deficiency. In: Caring for Kids New to Canada: A guide for health professionals working with immigrant and refugee children and youth [Internet]. Barozzino T and Hui C, editors. Ottawa: Canadian Paediatric Society; 2013 April. Available from: http://www.kidsnewtocanada. ca/conditions/anemias English, French.

Bozinoff N, Dorman K, Kerr D, Roebbelen E, Rogers E, Hunter A, et al. Toward reciprocity: host supervisor perspectives on international medical electives. Med Educ. 2014;48(4):397404. Hunter A. Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting. In: Caring for Kids New to Canada: A guide for health professionals working with immigrant and refugee children and youth [Internet]. Barozzino T and Hui C, editors. Ottawa: Canadian Paediatric Society; 2014 April. Available from: http://www.kidsnewtocanada.ca/screening/ fgm English, French. Hunter A. Oral Health Screening. In: Caring for Kids New to Canada: A guide for health professionals working with immigrant and refugee children and youth [Internet]. Barozzino T and Hui C, editors. Ottawa: Canadian Paediatric Society; 2014 May. Available from: http://www. kidsnewtocanada.ca/screening/oral-health English, French. Robert Issenman Edwards C, Kapoor V, Samuel C, Issenman R, Brill H. General anesthetic versus light sedation: Effect on pediatric endoscopy wait times. Can J Gastroenterol. 2013;27(7):519-522. Nguyen R, Ploeger HE, Obeid J, Issenman RM, Baker JM, Timmons BW, et al. Reduced Fat Oxidation Rates During Submaximal Exercise in Adolescents with Crohn’s Disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2013;19(12):2659-2665. Whitehouse S, Penn D, McLellan S, Deevska M, Issenman R, Lam PY, et al. Co-Creation with TickiT: Designing and evaluation of a clinical e-health platform for youth. JMIR Res Protoc. 2013;2(2). Wingate KE, Jacobson K, Issenman R, Carroll M, Barker C, Brill H, et al. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in children with crohn’s disease supplemented with either 2000 or 400 IU daily for 6 months: a randomized controlled study. J Pediatr. 2014;164(4):860-865. Walker RG, Obeid J, Nguyen T, Ploeger H, Proudfoot NA, Bos C, et al. Sedentary time and


screen-based sedentary behaviours of children with a chronic disease. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2014 Nov 10. [Epub ahead of print].

Cano SJ, Klassen AF, Scott AM, Pusic AL. A Closer Look at the BREAST-Q (c). Clin Plast Surg. 2013;40(2):287.

Natasha Johnson Couturier J, Sy A, Johnson N, Findlay S. Bone mineral density in adolescents with eating disorders exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Eat Disord. 2013;21(3):238-248.

Panchapakesan V, Klassen AF, Cano SJ, Scott AM, Pusic AL. Development and psychometric evaluation of the FACE-Q aging appraisal scale and patient-perceived age visual analog scale. Aesthet Surg J. 2013;33(8):1099-1109.

Chesney T, Matsos L, Couturier J, Johnson N. Cannabis withdrawal syndrome: an important diagnostic consideration in adolescents presenting with disordered eating. Int J Eat Disord. 2014 Mar;47(2):219-223.

Pusic AL, Klassen AF, Scott AM, Cano SJ. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the FACE-Q Satisfaction with appearance scale a new patient-reported outcome instrument for facial aesthetics patients. Clin Plast Surg. 2013;40(2):249.

April Kam Johnston BC, Donen R, Pooni A, Pond J, Xie F, Giglia L, et al. Conceptual framework for health-related quality of life assessment in acute gastroenteritis. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2013 Mar;56(3):280-289. Pernica JM, Mah JK, Kam AJ. Canadian Pediatricians’ Prescribing Practices for Community-Acquired Pneumonia. Clin Pediatr. 2014;53(5):493-496. Anne Klassen Cano SJ, Klassen AF, Scott A, Cordeiro PG, Pusic AL. Reply: The Rasch Model: “Litmus Test” de rigueur for rating scales? Plast Reconstr Surg. 2013;131(2):286E-288E. Lee EH, Klassen AF, Nehal KS, Cano SJ, Waters J, Pusic AL. A systematic review of patientreported outcome instruments of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the dermatologic population. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013;69(2). Wildgoose P, Scott A, Pusic AL, Cano S, Klassen AF. Psychological screening measures for cosmetic plastic surgery patients: A systematic review. Aesthet Surg J. 2013;33(1):152-159. Zwicker JG, Harris SR, Klassen AF. Quality of life domains affected in children with developmental coordination disorder: a systematic review. NLM Title Abbreviation: Child Care Health Dev. 2013;39(4):562-580.

Watt L, Dix D, Gulati S, Sung L, Klassen RJ, Shaw NT, et al. Family-centred care: a qualitative study of Chinese and South Asian immigrant parents’ experiences of care in paediatric oncology. Child Care Health Dev. 2013;39(2):185-193. Albornoz CR, Pusic AL, Reavey P, Scott AM, Klassen AF, Cano SJ et al. Measuring healthrelated quality of life outcomes in head and neck reconstruction. Clin Plast Surg. 2013;40(2):341.

measurement theory analysis. Health Expect. 2013 Nov 28. [Epub ahead of print]. Ho AL, Klassen AF, Cano S, Scott AM, Pusic AL. Optimizing patient-centered care in breast reconstruction: the importance of preoperative information and patient-physician communication. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2013;132(2):212E220E. Rosenberg-Yunger ZRS, Granek L, Sung LL, Klaassen R, Dix D, Klassen AF, et al. Singleparent caregivers of children with cancer: factors assisting with caregiving strains. J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2013;30(1):45-55. Ahuja B, Klassen AF, Satz R, Malhotra N, Tsangaris E, Ventresca M, et al. A review of patientreported outcomes for children and adolescents with obesity. Qual Life Res. 2014;23(3):759-770. Schiariti V, Klassen AF, Cieza A, Sauve K, O’Donnell M, Armstrong R, et al. Comparing contents of outcome measures in cerebral palsy using the international classification of functioning (ICF-CY): A systematic review. Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2014;18(1).

Wong KWY, Forrest CR, Goodacre TEE, Klassen AF. Measuring outcomes in craniofacial and pediatric plastic surgery. Clin Plast Surg. 2013;40(2):305.

Anthony SJ, Selkirk E, Sung L, Klaassen RJ, Dix D, Scheinemann K, et al. Considering quality of life for children with cancer: a systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures and the development of a conceptual model. Qual Life Res. 2014;23(3):771-789.

Bradley NME, Robinson PD, Greenberg ML, Barr RD, Klassen AF, Chan YL, et al. Measuring the quality of a childhood cancer care delivery system: Assessing stakeholder agreement. Value Health. 2013;16(4):639-646.

Granek L, Rosenberg-Yunger ZRS, Dix D, Klaassen RJ, Sung L, Cairney J, et al. Caregiving, single parents and cumulative stresses when caring for a child with cancer. Child Care Health Dev. 2014;40(2):184-194.

Bradley NME, Robinson PD, Greenberg ML, Barr RD, Klassen AF, Chan YL, et al. Measuring the quality of a childhood cancer care delivery system: Quality indicator development. Value Health. 2013;16(4):647-654.

McCarthy CM, Mehrara BJ, Long T, Garcia P, Kropf N, Klassen AF, et al. Chest and upper body morbidity following immediate postmastectomy breast reconstruction. Ann Surg Oncol. 2014;21(1):107-112.

Klassen AF, Cano SJ, Sinha R, Shahbaz A, Klaassen R, Dix D. Is the Give Youth a Voice questionnaire an appropriate measure of teencentred care in paediatric oncology: a Rasch

Klassen AF, Cano SJ, Scott A, Tsangaris E, Pusic AL. Assessing outcomes in body contouring. Clin Plast Surg. 2014;41(4):645-54. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications Tsangaris E, Johson J, Taylor R, Fern L, Bryant-Lukosius D, Barr R, Fraser G, Klassen A. Identifying the health and supportive care needs of adolescent and young adult survivors diagnosed with cancer: a qualitative analysis and systematic review. Support Care Cancer. 2014;22(4):947-59. Schiariti V, Sauve K, Klassen AF, O’Donnell M, Cieza A, Masse LC. ‘He does not see himself as being different’: the perspectives of children and caregivers on relevant areas of functioning in cerebral palsy. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2014;56(9):853-861. Cano SJ, Klassen AF, Scott A, Alderman A, Pusic AL. Interpreting clinical differences in BREAST-Q Scores: Minimal important difference. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2014;1134(1):73E175E. Klassen AF, Cano SJ,Scott AM, Pusic AL. Measuring outcomes that matter to face-lift patients: development and validation of FACEQ Appearance Appraisal Scales and Adverse Effects Checklist for the lower face and neck. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2014;133(1):21-30. Schiariti V, Masse LC, Cieza A, Klassen AF, Sauve K, Armstrong R, et al. Toward the development of the international classification of functioning core sets for children with cerebral palsy a global expert survey. J Child Neurol. 2014;29(5):582-591. Klassen AF, Grant C, Barr R, Brill H, Krause de Camargo O, Ronen GM, et al. Development and validation of a generic scale for use in transition programmes to measure self-management skills in adolescents with chronic health conditions: the TRANSITION-Q. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Oct 28. [Epub ahead of print]. Farjou G, Sinha R, Dix D, Shahbaz A, Klaassen RK, Klassen AF. Understanding the healthcare experiences of teenaged cancer patients and survivors. Child Care Health Dev. 2014;40(5):723-730. Klassen AF, Rosenberg-Yunger ZR, D’Agostino NM, Cano SJ, Barr R, Syed I, et al. The devel64

| Department of Pediatrics

opment of scales to measure childhood cancer survivors’ readiness for transition to longterm follow-up care as adults. Health Expect. 2014;29(1):26. Pusic A, Klassen A, Panchapakesan V, Cano S. Response to “The FACE-Q”:The importance of full disclosure and south methodology in outcomes studies”. Aesthet Surg J. 2014;34(4):628-31. Albornoz CR, Matros E, McCarthy CM, Klassen A, Cano SJ, Alderman AK, et al. Implant breast reconstruction and radiation: a multicenter analysis of long-term health-related quality of life and satisfaction. Ann Surg Oncol. 2014 Jul;21(7):2159-64. Tsangaris E, Johnson J, Taylor R, Fern L, Bryant-Lukosius D, Barr R, et al. Identifying the supportive care needs of adolescent and young adult survivors of cancer: a qualitative analysis and systematic literature review. Support Care Cancer. 2014;22(4):947-959. Mariya Kozenko Ng BG, Buckingham JK, Raymond K, Kircher M, Kozenko M, Li CM, et al. Mosaicism of the UDP-galactose transporter SLC35A2 causes a congenital disorder of glycosylation. Am J Hum Genet. 2013;92(4):632-636. Stevic I, Kozenko M, LoStracco R, Chan AKC, Chan HHW. Phenotype presentation for a novel mutation affecting a conserved cysteine residue in exon 63 of fibrillin-1 (Cys2633Arg). Biochem Genet. 2014;52:225-232. Olaf Kraus de Camargo Kraus de Camargo, O. Transiton programs. The North-American experience [Transitionsprogramme - Erfahrungen aus Nordamerka]. Paediatrische Praxis. 2013;80:115-124. Kraus de Camargo, O. Chronische Erkrankungen im Kindesalter: Diagnose - Behinderung - Identitat. [Chronic illnesses in childhood: diagnosis - disability - identity]. Kinderkrankenschwester. 2013;32(6):221-6. Fayed N, Kraus de Camargo O, Elahi I,

Fernandes RM, Houtrow A, Cohen E. Patientimportant activity and participation outcomes in clinical trials involving children with chronic conditions. Qual Life Res. 2014 Apr;23(3):751757. Klassen AF, Grant C, Barr R, Brill H, Kraus de Camargo O, Ronen GM, et al. Development and validation of a generic scale for use in transition programmes to measure self-management skills in adolescents with chronic health conditions: the TRANSITION-Q. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Oct 28. [Epub ahead of print]. Andrew Latchman Paes BA, Craig C, Pigott W, Latchman A. Seasonal respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis based on predetermined dates versus regional surveillance data. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(9):E360-E364. Rice GI, del Toro Duany Y, Jenkinson EM, Forte GM, Anderson BH, Ariaudo G, et al. Gain-offunction mutations in IFIH1 cause a spectrum of human disease phenotypes associated with upregulated type I interferon signaling. Nat Genet. 2014;46(5):503-509. Whitney R, Borys O, Callen DJ, Latchman A. The McMaster Pediatric Migraine Questionnaire: a prospective validation study. Pediatr Neurol. 2014;52(2):214-217. Keith Lau Fernandez y Garcia E, Lau KK. A lack of living donor renal transplantation for Asian children represents an opportunity to improve pediatric healthcare. J Natl Med Assoc. 2013;105(2):196-200. Lau K, Butani L. Increasing organ donors: We can do better! Journal of Transplantation Technologies and Research. 2013, S2: e001 doi:10.4172/2161- 0991.S2-e001. Chan H, Chan A, Blatny J, Lau K. Current Guidelines and Strategies in Management of Renal Vein Thrombosis. Curr Pediatr Rev. 2013;9(3):239-248. Chan HW, Li X, Lau K and Chan AKC. A system-


atic review to evaluate thromboelastography for characterization of bleeding patients with advanced liver diseases. J Thromb Haemost. 2013;11:229.

rFVIIa, Prothrombin Complex Concentrate and Activated Prothrombin Complex Concentrate: a Review of Animal and Human Studies. Thromb Res. 2014;133(5):705-713.

Chan H, Chan A, Alexopoulou I, Lau K. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura. Curr Pediatr Rev. 2013;9(3):204-216.

Samaan MC, Valencia M, Cheung C, Wilk B, Lau K, Thabane L. The design, implementation and evaluation of pediatric & adolescent type 2 diabetes management program in a tertiary pediatric center. J Multidisciplinary Healthcare. 2014;7:321-331.

Ouahed J, Gunz A, Lau K. Current Reviews on Renal Vein Thrombosis in Neonates. Curr Pediatr Rev. 2013;9(3):194-198. Chan HW, Lee FMH, Stevic I, Berry L, Lau K, Chan AK. An in vitro model studying the effects of rivaroxaban and dabigatran on clot formation in factor VIII-depleted plasma mimicking the plasma of hemophilia A patients. J Thromb Haemost. 2013;11:196. Chan HW, Li C, Chan N, Lau K, Chan AK. Heterogeneity of bleeding classification among randomized studies in hemophilic patients. J Thromb Haemost. 2013;11:667-668. Chan HW, Ning S, Chan AK, Rebello R, Lau K. Over-representation of thoracic outlet obstruction in patients with unprovoked upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. J Thromb Haemost. 2013;11:1124-1125. Chan HW, Gantioqui J, Stevic I, Kim PY, Lau K, Chan AK. The effect of rivaroxaban and dabigatran on the surface architecture of clots formed from plasma enriched with different levels of autologous platelets. J Thromb Haemost. 2013;11:468-469. Chan HW, Li N, Lau K, Chan AK. The rate of reduction in D-dimer level for patients with venous thromboembolism responding to antithrombotic therapy. J Thromb Haemost. 2013;11:703-704.

Li N, Chan FCF, Lau KK, Chan AKC, Chan HH. Patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with inhibitors to adamts13 responded slower to plasma exchange than those without inhibitor: a systematic review of the literature. Am J Hematol. 2014;89(6):819820. Chumei Li Li CM, Mahajan V, Wang JC, Paes B. Monosomy 3pter-p25.3 and trisomy 1q42.13-qter in a boy with profound growth and developmental restriction, multiple congenital anomalies, and early death. Pediatr Neonatol. 2013;54(3):202206. Ng BG, Buckingham JK, Raymond K, Kircher M, Turner EH, He M, et al. Mosaicism of the UDP-galactose transporter SLC35A2 causes a congenital disorder of glycosylation. Am J Hum Genet. 2013;92(4):632-636. Lalani SR, Shaw C, Wang QX, Patel A, Patterson LW, Kolodziejska K, et al. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities. Eur J Hum Genet. 2013;21(2):173-181.

Lau K, Chan H, Massicotte P, Chan A. Thrombotic complications of infants with congenital nephrotic syndrome. Curr Pediatr Rev. 2014;10(3):169-176.

Curry CJ, Rosenfeld JA, Grant E, Gripp KW, Anderson C, Aylsworth AS, et al. The duplication 17p13.3 phenotype: Analysis of 21 Families delineates developmental, behavioral and families dellineates developmental, behavioral and brain abnormalities, and rare variant phenotypes. Am J Med Genet A. 2013;161(8):18331852.

Lee FMH, Lau K, Chan AKC, Chan H. Reversal of New, Factor-specific Oral Anticoagulants by

Abdelgadir D, Nowaczyk MJM, Li CM. Trisomy 22 mosaicism and normal develop-

mental outcome: report of two patients and review of the literature. Am J Med Genet A. 2013;161A(5):1126-1131. Li CM, van de Kamp J, Marles SL, Chodirker BN, Greenberg CR, Chudley AE. Manitoba Oculotrichoanal Syndrome: Report of 8 new cases. Am J Med Genet A. 2013;2143. Li CM. Response to Restrictive Dermopathy and ZMPSTE24 Mutations in Mennonites: Evidence for Allelic Heterogeneity. Am J Med Genet A. 2013;152A:2143. Li CM. Homozygosity for the common mutation c.1085dupT in the ZMPSTE24 gene in a Mennonite baby with restrictive dermopathy and abruptio placenta. Am J Med Genet A. 2013;152A:262-263. Rice GI, del Toro Duany Y, Jenkinson EM, Forte GM, Anderson BH, Ariaudo G, et al. Gain-offunction mutations in IFIH1 cause a spectrum of human disease phenotypes associated with upregulated type I interferon signaling. Nat Genet. 2014;46(5):503-9. Mullegama SV, Rosenfeld JA, Orellana C, van Bon BMW, Halbach S, Repnikova EA, et al. Reciprocal deletion and duplication at 2q23.1 indicates a role for MBD5 in autism spectrum disorder. Eur J Hum Genet. 2014;22(1):57-63. Harriet MacMillan Ion A, Greene S, MacMillan HL, Smieja M. HSV-2/HIV co-infection and health-related quality life and identity in women. Can J Hum Sex. 2013;22(3);123-33. MacMillan HL, Tanaka M, Vaillancourt T, Duku E, Boyle MH. Child physical and sexual abuse in a community sample of young adults: Results from the Ontario Child Health Study. Child Abuse Negl. 2013;37:14-21. Wathen CN, MacGregor JCD, Sibbald SL, MacMillan HL. Exploring the uptake and framing of research evidence on universal screening for intimate partner violence against women: A knowledge translation case study. Health Res Policy Syst. 2013;11:13. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications Scribano PV, Stevens J, Kaizar E; NFP-IPV Research Team. The effects of intimate partner violence before, during, and after pregnancy in nurse visited first time mothers. Matern Child Health J. 2013;17:307-18. Catallo C, Jack S, Ciliska D, MacMillan HL. Mixing a grounded theory approach with a randomized controlled trial related to intimate partner violence: what challenges arise for mixed methods research? Nurs Res Pract. 2013;2013:798213. Stewart DE, MacMillan HL, Wathen N. Canadian Psychiatric Association Position Paper. Intimate partner violence. Can J Psychiatry. 2013:58(6):Insert 1-15, Encart 1-17. MacMillan HL, Wathen CN, Varcoe CM. Intimate partner violence in the family: considerations for children’s safety. Child Abuse Negl. 2013;37:1186-1191. Afifi TO, Mota N, MacMillan HL, Sareen J. Harsh physical punishment in childhood and adult physical health. Pediatrics. 2013;132:e333-40. Jenny C, Crawford-Jakubiak JE, and the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect. Clinical Report: The evaluation of children in primary care setting when sexual abuse is suspected. Pediatrics. 2013;1:132:2:e558-67. Feder G, Wathen CN, MacMillan HL. An evidence-based response to intimate partner violence WHO guidelines. JAMA 2013;310:479-80. Flaherty EG, MacMillan HL and the Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect. Caregiver-fabricated illness in a child: a manifestation of child maltreatment. Pediatrics. 2013;132:590-97. Barlow J, MacMillan HL, Macdonald G, Bennett C, Larkin S. Psychological interventions to prevent recurrence of emotional abuse of children by their parents. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013:9. 66

| Department of Pediatrics

Olds DL, Donelan-McCall N, O’Brien R, MacMillan HL, Jack SM, Jenkins T, et al. Improving the Nurse-Family Partnership in community practice. Pediatrics. 2013;132 Suppl2:S110-17. Nemeroff CB, Weinberger D, Rutter M, MacMillan HL, Bryant RA, Wessely S, et al. DSM-5: a collection of psychiatrist views on the changes, controversies, and future directions. BioMed Central. 2013;11:202. Wathen CN, MacMillan HL. Children’s exposure to intimate partner violence: impacts and interventions. Paediatr Child Health. 2013;18:41922. MacMillan HL. Protecting children from maltreatment: a Canadian call to action. Paediatr Child Health. 2013;18(8):409-10. Tanaka M, Afifi TO, Wathen N, Boyle M, MacMillan, HL. Young adult sequelae of exposure to child maltreatment: Results from the Ontario Child Health Survey. Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. June 2014. O’Doherty LJ, MacMillan HL, Feder G, Taft A, Taket A, Hegarty K. Selecting outcomes for intimate partner violence intervention trials: overview and recommendations: Aggress Violent Behav. 2014;19(6):663-72. Davidov DM, Jack SM for the NFP IPV Research Team. Nurse home visitors’ perceived awareness of mandatory reporting requirements: pregnant women’s and children’s exposure to intimate partner violence. J Adv Nurs. 2014;70(8):1770-79. Flaherty EG, Perez-Rossello JM, Levine MA, Hennrikus WL; American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect; Section on Radiology, et al. Evaluating children with fractures for child physical abuse. Pediatrics. 2014;133:e477-89. Oliffe JL, Han CSE, Maria ES, Lohan M, Howard T, Stewart DE, MacMillan HL. Gay men and intimate partner violence: A gender analysis. Sociol Health Illn. 2014;36:564-579.

MacMillan HL, Wathen CN. Children’s exposure to intimate partner violence. Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 2014;2:295-308. Afifi TO, MacMillan HL, Boyle M, Taillieu T, Cheung K, Sareen J. Child abuse and mental disorders in Canada. Can Med Assoc J. 2014;186:E324-E332. Mikton C, MacMillan HL, Dua T, Betancourt T. Integrating the prevention of violence against children and early child development: an opportunity for action. Lancet Glob Health. 2014;2:e442-e443. Gonzalez A, Boyle M, Georgiades K, Atkinson L, MacMillan HL. Childhood and family, and neighbourhood influences on body mass index in early adulthood. Childhood Obesity: Prevalence, Pathophysiology and Management. 2014. Tanaka M, Afifi TO, Wathen CN, Boyle MH, MacMillan HL. Evaluation of sex differences in health-related quality of life outcomes associated with child abuse: Results from the Ontario Child Health Study. Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2014;May 1:1-11. [Epub ahead of print]. Ramsay MacNay Jacobson D, Smriti N, MacNay R, Maclean J. Intra-thyroidal hemangioma—A rare congenital anomaly: Case presentation and literature review. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2014;78(10):1779–83. Stacey Marjerrison Marjerrison S, Pole JD, and L Sung. Inferior survival among aboriginal children with cancer in Ontario. Cancer. 2014;120(17):2751-2759. Karen McAssey Rios LP, Khan A, Sultan M, McAssey K, Fouda MA, Armstrong D. Approach to diagnosing celiac disease in patients with low bone mineral density or fragility fractures Multidisciplinary task force report. Can Fam Physician. 2013;59(10):1055-1061. Lawson ML, Bradley B, McAssey K, Clarson C, Kirsch SE, Mahmud FH, et al. The JDRF CCTN


CGM TIME Trial: Timing of Initiation of continuous glucose Monitoring in Established pediatric type 1 diabetes: study protocol, recruitment and baseline characteristics. BMC Pediatr. 2014;14.

Tapas Mondal Firdouse M, Garwal A, Almeida CL, Mondal T. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy-like phenotype in a boy. J Pediatr Intensive Care. 2013;2(4):187192.

Walker RG, Obeid J, Nguyen T, Ploeger H, Proudfoot NA, Bos C, et al. Sedentary time and screen-based sedentary behaviours of children with a chronic disease. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2014 Nov 10. [Epub ahead of print].

Kaicker J, Kwong J, Dillenburg R, Mondal T. Left pulmonary artery sling: Difference in monochorionic monoamniotic twin presentation. J Neonatal Perinatal Med. 2013;6(3).

Brandon Meaney RamachandranNair R, Jack SM, Meaney BF, Ronen GM. SUDEP: What do parents want to know? Epilepsy Behav. 2013;29(3):560-564. Tarnopolsky M, Meaney B, Robinson B, Sheidon K, Boles RG. Severe infantile leigh syndrome associated with a rare mitochondrial ND6 mutation, m.14487T > C. Am J Med Genet A. 2013;161(8):2020-2023. Petit-Pedrol M, Armangue T, Peng XY, Bataller L, Cellucci T, Davis R, et al. Encephalitis with refractory seizures, status epilepticus, and antibodies to the GABA(A) receptor: a case series, characterisation of the antigen, and analysis of the effects of antibodies. Lancet Neurol. 2014;13(3):276-286. Ronit Mesterman Marin SE, Mesterman R, Robinson B, Rodenburg RJ, Smeitink J, Tarnopolsky M. Leigh syndrome associated with mitochondrial complex I deficiency due to novel mutations In NDUFV1 and NDUFS2. Gene. 2013;156(1):162-167. Mesterman R, Gorter JW, Harvey A, Lockhart J, McEwen-Hill J, Margallo K, et al. Botulinum Toxin Type A in children and adolescents with severe cerebral palsy: a retrospective chart review. J Child Neurol. 2014;29(2):210-213. Wright FV, Rosenbaum P, Fehlings D, Mesterman R, Breuer U, Kim M. The Quality Function Measure: reliability and discriminant validity of a new measure of quality of gross motor movement in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2014;56(8):770778.

Mondal T, Taheera R, Ashkan J. A case of cardiac tamponade with a “small” pericardial effusion and superior vena cava syndrome. J Pediatr Intensive Care. 2013;2(2):71-75. Chawla K, Tofighi T, Agarwal A, Thomas J, Mondal T. A global comparison between brandname and generic drugs. Ind J Pharm Pract. 2013;7(3):23-28. Yang JY, Williams S, Brandão LR, Chan AK, Mondal T. Neonatal and childhood right atrial thrombosis: critical clot size. Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis. 2013; 24:458–459. Parashara R, Lysecki P, Mondal T. Diffuse coronary artery dilatation in a neonate: A case report. J Neonatal Perinatal Med. 2013; [Epub ahead of print]. Kaicker J, Kwong J, Mondal T. Left pulmonary artery sling in twins. J Neonatal Perinatal Med. 2013;6:273-77. Firdouse M, Agarwal A, Dragos P, Gilleland J, Mondal T. Distinctive mediastinal appearance in chest radiograph of a patient with total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Health Care Current Reviews. 2013;1:102. Mondal T, Chen K, Jansen J. Anomalous vessel to the lung with hypoplastic left heart syndrome in a fetus. Pediatric and Developmental Pathology. 2013;16(3):214-216. Jefferson T, Mondal T, Nowaczyk M. Prenatal and pathologic features of aorto-left ventricular tunnel causing fetal hydrops and intrauterine demise. Pediatr Dev Pathol. March/April 2013;16(2):97-101.

Fung A, Manlhiot C, Naik S, Rosenberg H, Smythe J, Lougheed J, Mondal T, Chitayat D, McCrindle BW, Mital S. Impact of prenatal risk factors on congenital heart disease in the current era. Journal of the American Heart Association. J Am Heart Assoc. 2013 May 31;2(3). Chen K, Williams S, Chan AK, Mondal TK. Thrombosis and embolism in pediatric cardiomyopathy. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. April 2013;24(3):221-230. Mondal T, Chaudhuri D, Li B, Shivananda S, Dutta S. Prophylactic indomethacin worsens short-term respiratory outcomes in extremely low-birth-weight infants. Am J Perinatol. 2013 Mar. Agarwal A, Tofighi T, Chawla K, Mondal T. Indian versus Canadian health care systems and policy: A policy review based on Barr’s model of health care governance. Health Care Current Reviews. 2013;1:103. Butt M, Symington A, Janes M, Steele S, Elliott L, Chant-Gambacort C, et al. Respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis in children with cardiac disease: a retrospective single-centre study. Cardiol Young. 2014 Apr;24(2):337-43. Berndl A, Pearce K, Mondal T. Contemporary fetal echocardiography facilitates optimal delivery site. J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2014;36(3):210–215. Mondal T, Slorach C, Manlhiot C, Hui W, Kantor P, McCrindle B, et al. Prognostic implications of the systolic to diastolic duration ratio in children with idiopathic or familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 Sep;7(5):773-80. Firdouse M, Agarwal A, Grosse-Wortmann L, Mondal T. Acquired unilateral pulmonary vein atresia in a 3-year-old boy. J Ultrasound. 2014 Oct 14;18(1):73-8. Agarwal A, Firdouse M, Almeida CL, Mondal T. Distinctive neck swelling in a patient with a vein of Galen arteriovenous malformation. J Ultrasound. 2014. [Epub ahead of print]. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications Firdouse M, Agarwal A, Pindiprolu B, Mondal T. Two ductus venosus: a previously unreported anomaly. J Ultrasound. 2014;17(4):293-6. Firdouse M, Agarwal A, Chan AC, Mondal T. Thrombosis and thromboembolic complications in Fontan patients: a literature review. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2014 Jul;20(5):484-92. Firdouse M, Agarwal A, Mondal T. Vein of Galen arteriovenous malformation mimicking coarctation of the aorta. J Ultrasound. 2014;17(4):297-301. Jacobson D, Predescu D, Mondal T. Case 1: An infant with a low heart rate. Paediatr Child Health. 2014;19(3):1205-7088. Katherine Morrison Korczak DJ, Lipman E, Morrison K, Szatmari P. Are children and adolescents with psychiatric illness at risk for increased future body weight? A systematic review. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2013 Nov;55(11):980-987. Oliviera AP, Kalra S, Wahi G, McDonald S, Desai D, Wilson J, et al. Maternal and newborn health profile in First Nations community in Canada. J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013;35(10):905-913. Wahi G, Wilson J, Miller R, Anglin R, McDonald S, Morrison K, et al. Aboriginal birth cohort (ABC): a prospective cohort study of early life determinants of adiposity and associated risk factors among Aboriginal people in Canada. BMC Public Health. 2013;13. De Long N, Hyslop JR, Nicholson CJ, Morrison KM, Gerstein HC, Holloway AC. Postnatal metabolic and reproductive consequences of fetal and neonatal exposure to the smoking cessation drug Bupropion. Reprod Sci. 2013;20(10):1156-1161. Kusters DM, Hutten BA, McCrindle BA, Cassiman D, Francis GA, Gagne C, et al. Design and baseline data of a pediatric study with rosuvastatin in familial hypercholesterolemia. J Clin Lipidol. 2013;7(5):408-413. 68

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Morrison KM, Anand SS, Yusuf S, Atkinson SA, Schulze KM, Rao-Melacini P, et al. Maternal and pregnancy related predictors of cardiometabolic traits in newborns. PLoS One. 2013;8(2). Taylor VH, Forhan M, Vigod SN, McIntyre RS, Morrison KM. The impact of obesity on quality of life. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013;27(2):139-146. Anand SS, Vasudevan A, Gupta M, Morrison K, Kurpad A, Teo KK, et al. Rationale and design of South Asian Birth Cohort (START): a CanadaIndia collaborative study. MBMC Public Health. 2013;13:608. Morrison KM, Shin S, Tarnopolsky M, Taylor VH. Association of depression and health related quality of life with body composition in children and youth with obesity. J Affect Disord. 2014 Sep 23;172C:18-23. Morrison KM, Damanhoury S, Buchholz A, Chanoine JP, Lambert M, Tremblay MS, et al. The CANadian Pediatric Weight Management Registry (CANPWR): Study protocol. BMC Pediatr. 2014;14. Crane JD, Mottillo EP, Farncombe TH, Morrison KM, Steinberg GR. A standardized infrared imaging technique that specifically detects UCP1-mediated thermogenesis in vivo. Mol Metab. 2014;3(4):490-494. Korczak D, Lipman E, Szatmari P, Morrison KM, Duku E. Child and adolescent psychopathology predicts increased adult BMI: Results from a prospective community sample. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2014;35(2):108-117. Wahi G, Boyle MH, Morrison KM, Georgiades K. Body mass index among immigrant and nonimmigrant youth: evidence from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Can J Public Health. 2014;105(4):e239-44. Avis JLS, Bridger T, Buchholz A, Chanoine JP, Hadjiyannakis S, Hamilton J, et al. It’s like rocket science…only more complex: challenges and experiences related to managing pediatric obesity in Canada. Expert Rev Endocrinol

Metab. 2014;9(3):223-229. Quang Ngo Ngo QN, Matsui DM, Singh RN, Zelcer S, Kornecki A. Anemia among pediatric critical care survivors: prevalence and resolution. Crit Care Res Pract. 2013;2013:684361. Anne Niec Jacobson D, Niec A, Wekerle C. Case 2: An 11-week-old female infant with multiple bruises. Paediatr Child Health. 2013;18(5). Pietrantonio AM, Wright E, Gibson KN, Alldred T, Jacobson D, Niec A. Mandatory reporting of child abuse and neglect: Crafting a positive process for health professionals and caregivers. Child Abuse Negl. 2013;37:102-109. Ward MGK, Ornstein A, Niec A, Murray CL. The medical assessment of bruising in suspected child maltreatment cases: a clinical perspective. Canadian Paediatric Society, Child and Youth Maltreatment Section Paediatr Child Health. 2013;18(8). Bosco Paes Paes BA, Craig C, Pigott W, Latchman A. Seasonal respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis based on predetermined dates versus regional surveillance data. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(9):E360-E364. Li CM, Mahajan V, Wang JC, Paes B. Monosomy 3pter-p25.3 and trisomy 1q42.13-qter in a boy with profound growth and developmental restriction, multiple congenital anomalies, and early death. Pediatr Neonatol. 2013;54(3):202206. Melissa Parker Boutis K, Groodendorst P, Plint A, Babyn P, Brison R, Brison RJ, et al. Effect of the low risk ankle rule on the frequency of radiography in children with ankle injuries. CMAJ. 2013;185(15):E731-E738. Parker M, Parshuram C. Sodium bicarbonate use in shock and cardiac arrest: attitudes of pediatric acute care physicians. Crit Care Med. 2013;41(9):2188-2195.


Harvey G, Manan A, Foster G, Thabane L, Parker M. Factors affecting pediatric isotonic fluid resuscitation efficiency: a randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of syringe size. BMC Emerg Med. 2013;13:14. Cole E, Harvey G, Foster G, Thabane L, Parker M. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial comparing the efficiency of two providerendorsed manual pediatric fluid resuscitation techniques. BMJ Open. 2013 Mar 21;3(3). pii: e002754. Parker M, Manan A. Translating resuscitation guidelines into practice: health care provider attitudes, preferences and beliefs regarding pediatric fluid resuscitation performance. PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e58282. Parker M, Lee F, Mbuagbaw L, Thabane L. Evaluating the Test re-test reliability and intersubject variability of health care provider manual fluid resuscitation performance. BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:724. Cole E, Harvey G, Urbanski S, Foster G, Thabane L, Parker M. Rapid paediatric fluid resuscitation: a randomised controlled trial comparing the efficiency of two providerendorsed Manual paediatric fluid resuscitation techniques in a simulated setting. BMJ Open. 2014 Jul 3;4(7):e005028. Gunz A, Dhannani S, Whyte H, Menon K, Foster J, Parker M, et al. Identifying significant and relevant events during pediatric transport: A modified-Delphi methodology. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2014 Sep;15(7):653-9. Jeffrey Pernica Abouanaser SF, Srigley JA, Nguyen T, Dale SE, Johnstone J, Wilcox L, et al. Bordetella holmesii, an emerging cause of septic arthritis. J Clin Microbiol. 2013;51(4):1313-1315. Audcent TA, MacDonnell HM, Moreau KA, Hawkes M, Goldfarb DM, Crockett M, et al. Development and evaluation of global child health educational modules. Pediatr. 2013;132(6):E1570-E1576.

Welch H, Steenhoff AP, Chakalisa U, ArscottMills T, Pernica JM, Goldfarb, DM, et al. Hospital-based surveillance for rotavirus gastroenteritis using molecular testing and immunoassay during the 2011 season in Botswana. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(5):570-572.

Price V, Portwine C, Zelcer S, Ethier MC, Gillmeister B, Silva M, et al. Clostridium difficile Infection in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From The Canadian Infections in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research Group. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(6):610-613.

El-Sayed MF, Goldfarb DM, Fulford M, Pernica JM. Severe late-onset multisystem cytomegalovirus infection in a premature neonate previously treated for congenital infection. BMC Pediatr. 2013;13.

Stinson JN, Jibb LA, Nguyen C, Nathan PC, Maloney AM, Portwine C, et al. Development and testing of a multidimensional iphone pain assessment application for adolescents with cancer. J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(3):137151.

Pernica JM, Mah JK, Kam AJ. Canadian Pediatricians’ Prescribing practices for community-acquired pneumonia. Clin Pediatr. 2014;53(5):493-496. Slinger R, Hyde L, Moldovan I, Chan F, Pernica JM. Direct Streptococcus pneumoniae realtime PCR serotyping from pediatric parapneumonic effusions. BMC Pediatr. 2014;14(189). Pernica JM, Moldovan I, Chan F, Slinger R. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for microbiological diagnosis of parapneumonic effusions in Canadian children. Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol. 2014;25(3):151-154. Goldfarb DM, Steenhoff AP, Pernica JM, Chong S, Luinstra K, Mokomane M, et al. Evaluation of anatomically designed flocked rectal swabs for molecular detection of enteric pathogens in children admitted to hospital with severe gastroenteritis in Botswana. J Clin Microbiol. 2014;52(11):3922-3927. Sarah Patterson So S, Rogers A, Patterson C, Drew W, Mawell J, Patterson S, et al. Parental experiences of a developmentally focused care program for infants and children during prolonged hospitalization. J Child Health Care. 2013;18(2):156-67. Carol Portwine Pole JD, Alibhai SMH, Ethier MC, Teuffel O, Portwine C, Zelcer S, et al. Adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated at pediatric versus adult hospitals. Ann Oncol. 2013;24(3):801-806.

Dupuis LL, Boodhan S, Holdsworth M, Robinson PD, Hain R ,Portwine C, et al. Guideline for the prevention of acute nausea and vomiting due to antineoplastic medication in pediatric cancer patients. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013;60(7):1073-1082. Tran TH, Mitchell D, Dix D, Cellot S, Ethier MC, Gillmeister B, et al. Infections in children with down syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the Canadian infections in AML research group. Infect Agent Cancer. 2013;47(8). Portwine C, Mitchell D, Johnston D, Gillmeister B, Ethier MC, Yanofsky R, et al. Infectious Events Prior to Chemotherapy Initiation in Children with Acute Myeloid Leukemia. PLoS One. 2013;8(4). Johnston DL, Lewis V, Yanofsky R, Gillmeister B, Ethier MC, Mitchell D, et al. Invasive fungal infections in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia. Mycoses. 2013;56(4):482-487. Cellot S, Johnston D, Dix D, Ethier MC, Gillmeister B, Mitchell D, et al. Infections in pediatric acute promyelocytic leukemia: from the Canadian infections in acute myeloid leukemia research group. BMC Cancer. 2013;13(1):276. Tran TH, Lee M, Alexander S, Gibson P, Bartels U, Johnston DL, et al. Lack of treatment-related mortality definitions in clinical trials of children, adolescents and young adults with lymphomas, solid tumors and brain tumors: a systematic review. BMC Cancer. 2014;14. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications Dupuis LL, Robinson PD, Boodhan S, Holdsworth M, Portwine C, Gibson P, et al. Guideline for the prevention and treatment of anticipatory nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy in pediatric cancer patients. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2014;61(8):1506-1512. Tomlinson D, Dupuis LL, Gibson P, Johnston DL, Portwine C, Baggott C, et al. Initial development of the Symptom Screening in Pediatrics Tool (SSPedi). Support Care Cancer. 2014;22(1):71-75. Lewis V, Yanofsky R, Mitchell D, Dix D, Ethier MC, Gillmeister B, et al. Predictors and outcomes of viridans group streptococcal infections in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: from the Canadian infections in AML Research Group. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014;33(2):126-129. Dragos Predescu Rochow N, Manan A, Wu WI, Fusch G, Monkman S, Leung J, et al. An integrated array of microfluidic oxygenators as a neonatal lung assist device: in vitro characterization and in vivo demonstration. Artif Organs. 2014;38(10):85666. Jacobson D, Predescu D, Mondal T. Case 1: An infant with a low heart rate. Paediatr Child Health. 2014;19(3):1205-7088. Sandeep Raha Samjoo IA, Safdar A, Hamadeh MJ, Glover AW, Mocellin NJ, Santana J, et al. Markers of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and lipid accumulation are moderately associated with the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance in obese men. PLoS One. 2013;8(6):e66322. Devries MC, Samjoo IA, Hamadeh MJ, McCready C, Raha S, Watt MJ, et al. Endurance training modulates intramyocellular lipid compartmentalization and morphology in skeletal muscle of lean and obese women. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013;98(12):4852-4862. Samjoo IA, Safdar A, Hamadeh MJ, Raha S, Tarnopolsky M. The effect of endurance exercise on both skeletal muscle and systemic 70

| Department of Pediatrics

oxidative stress in previously sedentary obese men. Nutr Diabetes. 2013;3. Holloway AC, Salomon A, Soares MJ, Garnier V, Raha S, Sergent F, et al. Characterization of the adverse effects of nicotine on placental development: in vivo and in vitro studies. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2014;306(4):E443E456. De Long NE, Hyslop JR, Raha S, Hardy DB, Holloway AC. Fluoxetine-induced pancreatic beta cell dysfunction: New insight into the benefits of folic acid in the treatment of depression. J Affect Disord. 2014;166:6-13. Hayes EK, Tessier DR, Percival ME, Holloway AC, Petrik JJ, Gruslin A, et al. Trophoblast invasion and blood vessel remodeling are altered in a rat model of lifelong maternal obesity. Reprod Sci. 2014;21(5):648-657. Nguyen T, Baker JM, Obeid J, Raha S, Parise G, Pedder L, et al. The effects of resting and exercise serum from children with cystic fibrosis on C2C12 myoblast proliferation in vitro. Physiol Rep. 2014 Jun 18;2(6). pii: e12042. Barra NG, Palanivel R, Denou E, Chew MV, Gillgrass A, Walker T, et al. Interleukin-15 modulates adipose tissue by altering mitochondrial mass and activity. PLoS One. 2014;9(12):e114799. Rajesh RamachandranNair RamachandranNair R, Jack SM, Meaney BF, Ronen GM. SUDEP: What do parents want to know? Epilepsy Behav. 2013;29(3):560-564. Elyanne Ratcliffe Goldberg D, Borojevic R, Anderson M, Chen JJ, Gershon MD, Ratcliffe EM. Slit/Robo-mediated chemorepulsion of vagal sensory axons in the fetal gut. Dev Dyn. 2013;242(1):9-15. Collins J, Borojevic R, Verdu EF, Huizinga JD, Ratcliffe EM. Intestinal microbiota influence the early postnatal development of the enteric nervous system. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2014;26(1):98-107.

Gabriel Ronen Ronen GM. Quality of life in childhood epilepsies: concepts, evidence and measurements. J Ped Epilepsy. 2013;2:173-181. RamachandranNair R, Jack SM, Meaney BF, Ronen GM. SUDEP: What do parents want to know? Epilepsy Behav. 2013;29(3):560-564. Lempke JR, Lal D, Reinthaler EM, Steiner I, Nothnagel M, Alber M, et al. Mutations in GRIN2A cause idiopathic focal epilepsy with rolandic spikes. Nature Genetics. 2013;45(9):1067-1072. Ronen GM. Identifying early markers for future school achievements in children with early onset epilepsy. DMCN. 2013;55(7):591-592. Whitney R, Bhan H, Persadie N, Streiner D, Bray S, Timmons B, Ronen GM. Feasibility of Pedometer Use to Assess Physical Activity and its Relationship with Quality Of Life in Children with Epilepsy: A pilot study. Pediatric Neurology. 2013;49(5):370-373. Manor L, Streiner D, Yam W, Rosenbaum P, Verhey L, Lach L, Ronen GM. Age-Related Variables in Childhood Epilepsy: How Do They Relate to Each Other and to Quality of Life? Epilepsy Behav. 2013;26:71-74. Ronen GM, Rosenbaum PL. Health outcomes measurement: concepts, guidelines and opportunities. Handb Clin Neurol. 2013;111:35-41. Thomson L, Fayed N, Sedarous F, Ronen GM. Adolescents and emerging adults with epilepsy: life quality and health status during the years of transitions. A scoping review. Dev Med Child Neurol 2014;56(5):421-433. Klassen AF, Grant C, Barr R, Brill H, Krause de Camargo O, Ronen GM, et al. Development and validation of a generic scale for use in transition programmes to measure self-management skills in adolescents with chronic health conditions: the TRANSITION-Q. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Oct 28. [Epub ahead of print]. Sadeghi S, Fayed N, Ronen GM. Patient-


reported outcomes (PRO) measures in pediatric epilepsy: A content analysis using World Health Organization definitions. Epilepsia. 2014;55(9):1431-1437. Ronen GM, Streiner DL, Boyle MH, Cunningham CE, Lach L, Rosenbaum P, et al. Outcomes trajectories in children with epilepsy: hypotheses and methodology of a Canadian longitudinal observational study. Pediatr Neurol. 2014;50(1):38-48. Peter Rosenbaum Manor L, Streiner D, Yam W, Rosenbaum P, Verhey L, Lach L, Ronen GM. Age-Related variables in childhood epilepsy: how do they relate to each other and to quality of life? Epilepsy Behav. 2013;26:71-74. McCauley D, Gorter JW, Russell DJ, Rosenbaum P, Law M, Kertoy M. Assessment of environmental factors in disabled children 2-12 years: development and reliability of the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF) for Children-Parent Version. Child Care Health Dev. 2013;39(3):337-344. Washington K, Thomas-Stonell N, Oddson B, McLeod S, Warr-Leeper G, Robertson B, et al. Construct validity of the FOCUS (c) (Focus on the Outcomes of Communication Under Six): a communicative participation outcome measure for preschool children. Child Care Health Dev. 2013 Jul;39(4):481-489. Klein B, Gorter JW, Rosenbaum P. Diagnostic shortfalls in early childhood chronic stress: a review of the issues. Child Care Health Dev. 2013;39(6):765-771. Avery LM, Russell JD, Rosenbaum PL. Criterion validity of the GMFM-66 item set and the GMFM-66 basal and ceiling approaches for estimating GMFM-66 scores. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2013;55(6):534-538. Rosenbaum P. Deep brain stimulation in cerebral palsy: an opportunity for collaborative research. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2013;55(7):584585.

Kertoy MK, Russell DJ, Rosenbaum P, Jaffer S, Law M, Gorter JW et al. Development of an outcome measurement system for service planning for children and youth with special needs. Child Care Health Dev. 2013;39(5):750-759. Bamm EL, Rosenbaum P, Wilkins S. Is Health Related Quality Of Life of people living with chronic conditions related to patient satisfaction with care? Disabil Rehabil. 2013;30(9):766774. Thomas-Stonell N, Washington K, Oddson B, Robertson B, Rosenbaum P. Measuring communicative participation using the FOCUS (c): Focus on the Outcomes of Communication Under Six. Child Care Health Dev. 2013;30(4):474-480. Garner GE, Arim RG, Kohen DE, Lach LM, MacKenzie MK, Brehaut JC, et al. Parenting children with neurodevelopmental disorders and/or behaviour problems. Child Care Health Dev. 2013;30(3):412-421. Thomas-Stonell N, Oddson B, Robertson B, Rosenbaum P. Validation of the Focus on the Outcomes of Communication under Six outcome measure. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2013;55(6):546-552. Ronen GM, Rosenbaum PL. Health outcomes measurement: concepts, guidelines and opportunities. Handb Clin Neurol. 2013;111:35-41. Rosenbaum P. Invited commentary: Motor function outcome in postnatal insultrelated cerebral palsy. J Pediatr Rehabil Med. 2013;6(3):185-7. Cross A, Rosenbaum P, Gorter JW. Exploring the aquatic environment for children with disabilities: how we can conceptualize and advance interventions with the ICF. Crit Rev Phys Rehabil Med. 2013;25(1-2):59-76. Bartlett DJ, Chiarello LA, McCoy SW, Palisano RJ, Jeffries L, Fiss AL, et al. Determinants of gross motor function of young children with cerebral palsy: a prospective cohort study. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2014;56(3):275-282.

Rosenbaum P, Eliasson AC, Hidecker MJC, Palisano RJ. Classification in Childhood Disability: Focusing on Function in the 21st Century. J Child Neurol. 2014;29(8):1036-1045. Ballantyne M, Stevens B, Guttmann A, Willan AR, Rosenbaum P. Maternal and infant predictors of attendance at Neonatal FollowUp programmes. Child Care Health Dev. 2014;40(2):250-258. Cunningham BJ, Rosenbaum P. Measure of processes of care: a review of 20 years of research. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2014;56(5):445452. Ronen GM, Streiner DL, Boyle MH, Cunningham CE, Lach L, Verhey LH, et al. Outcomes trajectories in children with epilepsy: hypotheses and methodology of a Canadian longitudinal observational study. Pediatr Neurol. 2014;50(1):38-48. Wright FV, Rosenbaum P, Fehlings D, Mesterman R, Breuer U, Kim M. The Quality Function Measure: reliability and discriminant validity of a new measure of quality of gross motor movement in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2014;56(8):770778. Rosenbaum P. What causes cerebral palsy? Br Med J. 2014;349. Ballantyne M, Benzies K, Rosenbaum P, Lodha A. Mothers’ and health care providers’ perspectives of the barriers and facilitators to attendance at Canadian neonatal follow-up programs. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Oct 1. [Epub ahead of print]. Constantine Samaan Samaan MC, Obeid J, Nguyen T, Timmons B. Chemokine C. C Ligand 2 is a potential biomarker of inflammation & physical fitness in obese children: a cross-sectional study. BMC Pediatr 2013;13:47. 
 Samaan MC. Management of pediatric and adolescent Type 2 diabetes. Int J Pediatr. 2013;2013:972034. [Epub ahead of print]. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications Samaan MC, Thabane L, Burrow S, Dillenburg RF, Scheinemann K. Canadian Study of Determinants of Endometabolic Health in ChIlDrEn (CanDECIDE study): a cohort study protocol examining the mechanisms of obesity in survivors of childhood brain tumours. BMJ Open. 2013 Jun 20;3(6). Samaan MC. Prader Willi Syndrome: Genetics & Neurobehavioral phenotype-genotype correlations. Curr Psychiatry Rev. 2014;10:153-166. Klassen A, Grant C, Tsangaris E, Wickert N, Brill H, Barr, R, et al. Validation of a unique scale to measure transition readiness in adolescents with chronic health conditions. Child Care Health Dev. 2014. [Epub ahead of print]. Dennis B, Samaan MC, Bawor M, Paul J, Plater C, Pare G, et al. Evaluation of clinical and inflammatory profile in opioid addiction patients with comorbid pain: results from a multi-centre investigation.
Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2014;10:2239-2247. Bawor M, Dennis B, Samaan MC, Plater C, Worster A, Varenbut M, Daiter J, et al. Methadone induces testosterone suppression in patients with opioid addiction. Sci Rep. 2014 Aug 26;4:6189. 
 Samaan MC, Valencia M, Cheung C, Wilk B, Lau K, Thabane L. The design, implementation ads evaluation of pediatric & adolescent Type 2 diabetes management program in a tertiary pediatric center. J Multidiscip Healthc. 2014;7:321–331. O’Neill HM, Galic S, Lally JS, Thomas M, Azizi, P, Fullerton MD, et al. AMPK phosphorylation of ACC2 is required for skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation and insulin sensitivity in mice. Diabetologia. 2014;57(8):1693-702. Samaan MC, Xia J, Badhiwala J. Mechanisms & drivers of type 2 diabetes in children & adolescents. Br J Med Med Res. 2014;4(23):40544064. Samaan MC, Scheinemann K, Burrow S, Dillenburg R, Barr R, Wang K, et al. Recruitment 72

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feasibility to a cohort study to ascertain endocrine and metabolic health among survivors of childhood brain tumors: A report from the Canadian study of Determinants of Endometabolic Health in ChIlDrEn (CanDECIDE). BMJ Open. 2014;4(6):e005295. Samaan MC, Marcinko K, Fullerton M, Khan MI, Ziafazeli T, Steinberg G. Chronic endurance interval training in obese mice reduces muscle macrophage inflammation independently of weight loss. Physiol Rep. 2014 May 19;2(5). Klassen AF, Grant C, Barr R, Brill H, Krause de Camargo O, Ronen GM, et al. Development and validation of a generic scale for use in transition programmes to measure self-management skills in adolescents with chronic health conditions: the TRANSITION-Q. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Oct 28. [Epub ahead of print]. Samira Samiee-Zafarghandy Samiee-Zafarghandy S, Mazer-Amirshahi M, van den Anker JN. Trends in paediatric clinical pharmacology data in US pharmaceutical labelling. Arch Dis Child. 2014;99(9):862-865. Mazer-Amirshahi M, Samiee-Zafarghandy S, Gray G, van den Anker JN. Trends in pregnancy labeling and data quality for US-approved pharmaceuticals. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014;211(6):690.e1-11. Vasanthan T, Rochow N, Mian F, Codini T, DeFrance B, Fusch G, et al. LPS from bovine serum albumin drives TNF-a release during ex-vivo placenta perfusion experiments, contaminates the perfusion system but can be effectively removed by oxidative cleaning. Placenta. 2014;35(12):1095-1098. Samiee-Zafarghandy S, Feberova J, Williams K, Yasseen AS, Perkins SL, Lemyre B. Influence of skin colour on diagnostic accuracy of the jaundice meter JM 103 in newborns. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2014;99(6):F480-484. Katrin Scheinemann Samaan MC, Thabane L, Burrow S, Dillenburg RF, Scheinemann K. Canadian Study of Determinants of Endometabolic Health in

ChIlDrEn (CanDECIDE study): a cohort study protocol examining the mechanisms of obesity in survivors of childhood brain tumours. BMJ Open. 2013;3(6). Manoranjan B, Wang X, Hallett RM, Venugopal C, Mack SC, McFarlane N, et al. FoxG1 interacts with Bmi1 to regulate self-renewal and tumorigenicity of medulloblastoma stem cells. Stem Cells. 2013;31(7):1266-1277. Manoranjan B, Venugopal C, McFarlane N, Doble BW, Dunn SE, Scheinemann K, et al. Medulloblastoma stem cells: Modeling tumor heterogeneity. Cancer Lett. 2013;338(1):23-31. Chong AL, Pole JD, Scheinemann K, Hukin J, Tabori U, Huang A, et al. Optic pathway gliomas in adolescence-time to challenge treatment choices? Neuro Oncol. 2013;15(3):391400. Anthony SJ, Selkirk E, Sung L, Klaassen RJ, Scheinemann K, Klassen AF, et al. Considering quality of life for children with cancer: a systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures and the development of a conceptual model. Qual Life Res. 2014;23(3):771-789. Buczkowicz P, Hoeman C, Rakopoulos P, Pajovic S, Letourneau L, Dzamba M, et al. Genomic analysis of diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas identifies three molecular subgroups and recurrent activating ACVR1 mutations. Nat Genet. 2014;46(5):451-456. Samaan MC, Scheinemann K, Burrow S, Dillenburg RF, Barr RD, Wang KW, et al. Recruitment feasibility to a cohort study of endocrine and metabolic health among survivors of childhood brain tumours: a report from the Canadian study of Determinants of Endometabolic Health in ChIlDrEn (CanDECIDE). BMJ Open. 2014;4(6). Anthony SJ, Selkirk E, Sung L, Klaassen RJ, Dix D, Scheinemann K, et al. Considering quality of life for children with cancer: a systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures and the development of a conceptual model. Qual Life Res. 2014;23(3):771-789.


Fonseca A, Scheinemann K, Jansen J, Barr RD. Testicular Myeloid Sarcoma: An unusual presentation of infant Acute Myeloid Leukemia. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2014;36(3):E155-E157. Walker RG, Obeid J, Nguyen T, Ploeger H, Proudfoot NA, et al. Sedentary time and screen-based sedentary behaviours of children with a chronic disease. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2014. [Epub ahead of print]. Johnston DL, Keene D, Kostova M, Strother D, Lafay-Cousin L, Scheinemann K, et al. Incidence of medulloblastoma in Canadian children. J Neurooncol. 2014;120(3):575-579. Sandra Seigel Bitnun A, Brophy J, Samson L, Alimenti A, Kakkar F, Lamar V, et al. Prevention of vertical HIV transmission and management of the HIVexposed infant in Canada in 2014. Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol. 2014;25(2):75-77. Lu D, Liu J, Samson L, Bitnun A, Seigel S, Brophy J, et al. Factors responsible for mother-to-child HIV transmission in Ontario, Canada, 1996-2008. Can J Public Health. 2014;105(1):e47-52. Mary Sherlock Sherlock ME, Walters T, Tabbers MM, Frost K, Zachos M, Muise A, et al. Infliximab-Induced Psoriasis and Psoriasiform Skin Lesions in Pediatric Crohn Disease and a Potential Association With IL-23 Receptor Polymorphisms. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2013;56(5):512-518. Shouval DS, Biswas A, Goettel JA, McCann K, Conaway E, Redhu NS, et al. Interleukin-10 receptor signaling in innate immune cells regulates mucosal immune tolerance and antiinflammatory macrophage function. Immunity. 2014;40(5):706-719. Sandesh Shivananda Shivananda S, Lee KS, Leong K, Hellmann J, Braid S, Kim JH. Defining the Threshold Where Health Care Professionals Consider Withdrawing of Life Sustaining Ventilation in Neonatology. J Palliative Care Med. 2013;S4:001. [Epub ahead of print].

Wong C, Mak M, Shivananda S, Yang J, Shah PS, Seidlitz W. Outcomes of Neonatal Patent Ductus Arteriosus Ligation in Canadian Neonatal Units with and without Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Programs. Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2013;48(5):909-914. McNamara PJ, Shivananda SP, Sahni M, Freeman D, Taddio A. Pharmacology of Milrinone in Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn (PPHN). Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2013;14(1):74-84. Shahid S, Dutta S, Symington A, Shivananda S. Standardizing Umbilical Catheter Usage in Preterm Infants. Pediatrics. 2014;133:e1742– e1752. Mondal T, Chaudhauri D, Li B, Shivananda S, Dutta S. Prophylactic Indomethacin Worsens Short-Term Respiratory Outcomes in Extremely Low-Birth Weight Infants. Am J Perinatol. 2014;31(1):61-67. Arif Somani Khan KM, Sarafoglou K, Somani A, Frohnert B, Miller BS. Can ultrasound be used to estimate bone mineral density in children with growth problems? Acta Paediatr. 2013;102:E407-E412. Swarnalatha B, Nair SL, Shalumon KT, Milbauer LC, Jayakumar R, Paul-Prasanth B, et al. Poly (lactic acid)-chitosan-collagen composite nanofibers as substrates for blood outgrowth endothelial cells. Int J Biol Macromol. 2013;58:220-224. Mark Tarnopolsky Abadi A, Crane JD, Ogborn D, Hettinga B, Akhtar M, Stokl A, et al. Supplementation with a-lipoic acid, coQ10, and vitamin E, augments running performance and mitochondrial function in female mice. PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e60722. Amburgey K, Bailey A, Hwang JH, Tarnopolsky MA, Bonnemann CG, Medne L, et al. Genotype-phenotype correlations in recessive RYR1-related myopathies. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2013;8:117.

Cermak, N, Snijders T, McKay B, Parise G, Verdijk L, Tarnopolsky M, et al. Eccentric exercise increases satellite cell content in type II muscle fibers. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013;45(2):230-7. Curry CJ, Rosenfeld JA, Grant E, Gripp KW, Anderson C, Aylsworth AS, et al. The duplication 17p13.3 phenotype: Analysis of 21 families delineates developmental, behavioural and brain abnormalities, and rare variant phenotypes. Am J Med Genet A. 2013;161(8):1833-52. Crane JD, Abadi A, Hettinga BP, Ogborn DI, MacNeil LG, Steinberg GR et al. Elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress impairs metabolic adaptations to exercise in skeletal muscle. PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e81879. Crane JD, MacNeil LG, Tarnopolsky MA. Longterm aerobic exercise is associated with greater muscle strength throughout the life span. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2013;68(6):631-8. Devries M, Samjoo I, Hamadeh M, McCready C, Raha S, Watt MJ, et al. Endurance training modulates intramyocellular lipid compartmentalization and morphology in skeletal muscle of lean and obese women. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013;98(12):4852-62. Gillen J, Percival M, Ludzki A, Tarnopolsky M, Gibala M. Interval training in the fed or fasted state improves body composition and muscle oxidative capacity in overweight women. Obesity. 2013;21(11):2249-2255. Hayflick S, Kruer M, Gregory A, Haack T, Kurian M, Houlden HH, et al. Beta-propeller proteinassociated neurodegeneration: a new x-linked dominant disorder with brain iron accumulation. Brain. 2013;136(Pt 6):1708-17. Leary SC, Cobine PA, Nishimura T, Verdijk RM, de Krijger R, de Coo R, et al. COX19 mediates the transduction of a mitochondrial redox signal from SCO1 that regulates ATP7Amediated cellular copper efflux. Mol Biol Cell. 2013;24(6):683-691.

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2013 & 2014 Publications Joanisse S, Gillen JB, Bellamy LM, McKay BR, Tarnopolsky MA, Gibala MJ, et al. Evidence for the contribution of muscle stem cells to nonhypertrophic skeletal muscle remodelling in humans. FASEB. 2013;27(11):4596-4605.

Nilsson M, Nissar A, Al-Sajee D, Tarnopolsky M, Parise G, Lach B, et al. Xin is a marker of skeletal muscle damage severity in myopathies. Am J Pathol. 2013;183(6):1703-9.

Brady LI, MacNeil LG, Tarnopolsky MA. Impact of habitual exercise on the strength of individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2014;93(9):739-50.

Kitaoka Y, Ogborn DI, Nilsson MI, Mocellin NJ, MacNeil LG, Tarnopolsky MA. Oxidative stress and Nrf2 signalling in McArdle disease. Mol Genet Metab. 2013;110(3):297-302.

Parikh S, Goldstein A, Koenig MK, Scaglia F, Enns GM, Saneto R, et al. Practice patterns of mitochondrial disease physicians in North America, Part 1: Diagnostic and clinical challenges. Mitochondrion. 2013;13(6):681-687.

Cochran AJ, Percival ME, Tricarico S, Little JP, Cermak N, Gillen JB, et al. Intermittent and continuous high-intensity exercise induce similar acute but different chronic muscle training adaptation. Exp Physiol. 2014;99(5):782-91.

Kitaoka Y, Ogborn DI, Mocellin NJ, Schlattner U, Tarnopolsky MA. Monocarboxylate transporters and mitochondrial creatine kinase protein content in McArdle’s disease. Mol Genet Metab. 2013;108(4):259-262.

Parikh S, Goldstein A, Koenig M, Scaglia F, Enns G, Saneto R, et al. Practice patterns of mitochondrial disease physicians in North America. Part 2: Treatment, care and management. Mitochondrion. 2013;13(6):681-687.

Dunlap HV, MacNeil LG, Tarnopolsky MA. Functional impairment in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis. Can J Neurol Sci. 2014;41(2):253-9.

Li S, Sun B, Nilsson MI, Bird A, Tarnopolsky MA, Thurberg BL, et al. Adjunctive B2-agonists reverse neuromuscular involvement in murine Pompe disease. FASEB. 2013;27(1):34-44.

Samjoo I, Safdar A, Hamadeh M, Glover AW, Mocellin N, Santana J, et al. Markers of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and lipid accumulation are moderately associated with the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance in obese men. PLoS One. 2013;8(6):e66322.

McKay BR, Ogborn DI, Baker JM, Toth KG, Tarnopolsky MA, Parise G. Elevated SOCS3 and altered IL-6 signalling is associated with agerelated human muscle stem cell dysfunction. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2013;304(8):C717-28. Marin SE, Mesterman R, Robinson B, Rodenburg RJ, Smeitink J, Tarnopolsky MA. Leigh syndrome associated with mitochondrial complex I deficiency due to novel mutations in NDUFV1 and NDUFS2. Gene. 2013;516(1):1627. Nilsson M, Laureano M, Saeed M, Tarnopolsky M. Dysferlin aggregation in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B/myoshi myopathy necessitates mutational screen for diagnosis. Muscle & Nerve. 2013;47(5):740-7. Kley R, Tarnopolsky M, Vorgerd. Creatine for treating muscle disorders. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;6:CD004760. No D, Valles-Ayoub Y, Carbajo R, Khokher Z, Sandoval L, Stein B, et al. Novel GNE mutations in autosomal recessive hereditary inclusion body myopathy patients. Genet Test Mol Biomarkers. 2013;17(5):376-82. 74

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Samjoo I, Safdar A, Hamadeh M, Raha S, Tarnopolsky M. The effect of endurance exercise on both skeletal muscle and systemic oxidative stress in previously sedentary obese men. Nutr Diabetes. 2013;3:e88. Tarnopolsky M, Meaney B, Robinson B, Sheldon K, Boles R. Severe infantile leigh syndrome associated with a rare mitochondrial ND6 mutation, m.14487T>C. Am J Med Genet A. 2013;161(8):2020-3.

Dyment DA, Tetreault M, Beaulieu CL, Hartley T, Ferreira P, Chardon JW, et al. Forge Canada Consortium; Care4Rare Canada. Whole-exome sequencing broadens the phenotypic spectrum of rare pediatric epilepsy: a retrospective study. Clin Genet. 2014. [Epub ahead of print]. Gillen JB, Percival ME, Skelly LE, Martin BJ, Tan RB, Tarnopolsky MA. Three minutes of all-out intermittent exercise per week increases skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and improves cardiometabolic health. PLoS One. 2014;9(11):e111489. Forbes N, Goodwin S, Woodward K, Morgan DG, Brady L, Coulthart MB, et al. Evidence for synergistic effects of PRNP and ATP7B mutations in severe neuropsychiatric deterioration. BMC Med Genet. 2014;15(1):22.

Wang D, Zeesman S, Tarnopolsky M, Nowaczyk M. Duplication of AKT3 as a cause of macroephaly in duplication 1q43q44. Am J Med Genet. 2013;161(8):2016-9.

Kolesar JE, Safdar A, Abadi A, MacNeil LG, Crane JD, Tarnopolsky MA, et al. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative damage in muscle of mtDNA mutator mice. Free Radic Biol Med. 2014;75:241-251.

Yoon G, Baskin B, Tarnopolsky M, Boycott K, Geraghty M, Sell E, et al. Autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia-clinical and genetic characteristics of a well-defined cohort. Neurogenetics. 2013;14(3-4):181-8.

Lines MA, Jobling R, Brady L, Marshall CR, Scherer SW, Rodriguez AR, et al. Peroxisomal D-bifunctional protein deficiency: Three adults diagnosed by whole-exome sequencing. Neurology. 2014;82(11):963-968.

Tarnopolsky MA. Exercise as a therapeutic strategy for primary mitochondrial cytopathies. J Child Neurol. 2014;29(9):1225-1234.

Lopes Costa A, Le Bachelier C, Mathieu L, Rotig A, Boneh A, De Lonlay P, et al. Beneficial effects of resveratrol on respiratory chain defects


in patients’ fibroblasts involve estrogen receptor and estrogen-related receptor alpha signalling. Hum Mol Genet. 2014;23(8):2106-19. Henriksbo BD, Lau TC, Cavallari JF, Denou E, Chi W, Lally JS, et al. Fluvastatin causes NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated adipose insulin resistance. Diabetes. 2014;63(11):3742-7. MacNeil LG, Glover E, Bergstra TG, Safdar A, Tarnopolsky M. The order of exercise during concurrent training for rehabilitation does not alter acute genetic expression, mitochondrial enzyme activity or improvements in muscle function. PLoS One. 2014;9(10):e109189. Morrison KM, Shin S, Tarnopolsky M, Taylor VH. Association of depression and health related quality of life with body composition in children and youth with obesity. J Affect Disord. 2014;172C:18-23. Nilsson MI, Kroos MA, Reuser AJ, Hatcher E, Akhtar M, McCready ME, et al. Novel GAA sequence variant c.1211 A>G reduces enzyme activity but not protein expression in infantile and adult onset Pompe disease. Gene. 2014;537(1):41-45. Nilsson MI, MacNeil LG, Kitaoka Y, Alqarni F, Suri R, Akhtar M, et al. Redox state and mitochondrial respiratory chain function in skeletal muscle of LGMD2A patients. PLoS One. 2014;9(7):e102549. Ogborn DI, McKay BR, Crane JD, Parise G, Tarnopolsky MA. The unfolded protein response is triggered following a single, unaccustomed resistance-exercise bout. Am J Physiol Regul Intergr Comp Physiol. 2014;307(6):R664-669. Wu Y, Lach B, Provias JP, Tarnopolsky MA, Baker SK. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathies: a pathophysiologic spectrum. Can J Neurol Sci. 2014;41(5):638-647. Pandolfo M, Arpa J, Delatycki MB, Le quan Sang KH, Mariotti C, Munnich A, et al. Deferiprone in Friedreich ataxia: A 6-month randomized controlled trial. Ann Neurol. 2014;76(4):509-521.

Parikh S, Goldstein A, Koenig MK, Scaglia F, Enns GM, Saneto R, et al. Diagnosis and management of mitochondrial disease: a consensus statement from the Mitochondrial Medicine Society. Genet Med. 2014. [Epub ahead of print]. Sawyer S, Schwartzentruber J, Beaulieu C, Dyment D, Smith A, Warman Chardon J, et al. Exome sequencing as a diagnostic tool for pediatric-onset ataxia. Hum Mutat. 2014;35(1):45-49. Steriade C, Andrade DM, Feghfoury H, Tarnopolsky MA. Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) may respond to adjunctive ketogenic diet. Pediatr Neurol. 2014;50(5):498-502. Zykovich A, Hubbard A, Flynn JM, Tarnopolsky M, Fraga MF, Kerksick C, et al. Gemone-wide DNA methylation changes with age in disease free human skeletal muscle. Aging Cell. 2014;13(2):360-366. Sumesh Thomas Rashish G, Paes BA, Nagel K, Chan AK, Thomas S. Spontaneous neonatal arterial thromboembolism: infants at risk, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. 2013;24(8):787-797. Brian Timmons Aragón-Vargas LF, Wilk B, Timmons BW, Bar-Or O. Body weight changes in child and adolescent athletes during a triathlon competition. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2013;113(1):233-239. Carson V, Tremblay M, Spence JC, Timmons BW, Janssen I. The Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for the Early Years (zero to four years of age) and screen time among children from Kingston, Ontario. Paediatr Child Health. 2013;18(1):25-28. Whitney R, Bhan H, Persadie N, Streiner DL, Bray SR, Timmons BW, et al. The feasibility of pedometer use to assess physical activity and its relationship with quality of life in children with epilepsy: A pilot study. Pediatr Neurol. 2013;49(5): 370-373.

Colley RC, Garriguet D, Adamo KB, Carson V, Janssen I, Timmons BW, et al. Physical activity and sedentary behavior during the early years in Canada: A cross-sectional study. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10(1):54. Gabel L, Proudfoot NA, Obeid J, MacDonald MJ, Bray SR, Cairney J, et al. Step count targets corresponding to new physical activity guidelines for the early years. Med Sci Sports Exers. 2013;45(2):314-318. Nguyen T, Ploeger HE, Obeid J, Issenman RM, Baker JM, Takken T, et al. Reduced fat oxidation rates during submaximal exercise in adolescents with Crohn’s disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2013;19(12):2659-2665. Samaan MC, Obeid J, Nguyen T, Thabane L, Timmons BW. Chemokine C-C Ligand-2 is a potential biomarker of physical fitness and inflammation in obese children: A cross-sectional study. BMC Pediatrics. 2013;13(1):47. Wilk B, Pender N, Volterman KA, Bar-Or O, Timmons BW. Influence of pubertal stage on sweating patterns of girls exercising in the heat. Ped Exer Sci. 2013;25:212-220. Abdulsatar F, Walker RG, Timmons BW, Choong K. “Wii-Hab” in critically ill children: A pilot study. J Pediatr Rehabil Med. 2014;1:6(4):193204. Batey CA, Missiuna CA, Timmons BW, Hay JA, Faught BE, Cairney J. Self-efficacy and the physical activity behaviour of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder. Hum Mov Sci. 2014;36:258-271. Claridge EA, McPhee P, Timmons BW, MartinGinis KA, MacDonald MJ, Gorter JW. Quantification of physical activity and sedentary time in adults with cerebral palsy. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014. [Epub ahead of print]. Cunha GS, Leites GT, Timmons BW. New horizons for aerobic fitness normalization in children: Breaking the paradigm. Braz J Kinanth Hum Perform. 2014;16(6):709-713. 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2013 & 2014 Publications Gray C, Barnes J, Cowie Bonne J, Cameron C, Chaput JP, Faulkner G, et al. Results from Canada’s 2014 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. J Physical Activity Health. 2014;11(Suppl 1):S26-S32. Gray C, Larouche R, Barnes J, Colley R, Cowie Bonne J, Arthur M, et al. Are we driving our kids to unhealthy habits? Results of the Active Healthy Kids Canada 2013 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014;11(6):60096020. Mahon AD, Timmons BW. Application of stable isotope tracers in the study of exercise metabolism in children. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2014;26(1):3-10. Moore DR, Volterman KA, Obeid J, Offord EA, Timmons BW. Post-exercise protein ingestion increases whole body net protein balance in children. J Appl Physiol. 2014;117(12):14931501. Nguyen T, Obeid J, Baker JM, Takken T, Pedder L, Timmons BW. Reduced fat oxidation rates during submaximal exercise in boys with cystic fibrosis. J Cystic Fibrosis. 2014;13(1):92-98. Obeid J, Balemans AC, Noorduyn SG, Gorter JW, Timmons BW. Objectively measured sedentary time in youth with cerebral palsy compared with age-, sex-, and season-matched youth who are developing typically: An explorative study. Phys Ther. 2014;94(8):1163-1167. Obeid J, Nguyen T, Walker RG, Gillis LJ, Timmons BW. Circulating endothelial cells in children: Role of fitness, activity and adiposity. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014;46(10):1974-1980. Nguyen T, Bake JM, Obeid J, Raha S, Parise G, Pedder L, et al. The effects of resting and exercise serum from children with cystic fibrosis on C2C12 myoblast proliferation in vitro. Physiol Reports. 2014;2(6):pii: e12042. Papadopoulos E, Muir C, Russell C, Timmons BW, Falk B, Klentrou P. Markers of biological stress and mucosal immunity during a week 76

| Department of Pediatrics

leading to competition in adolescent swimmers. J Immunol Res. 2014 Jun [Epub ahead of print]. Stone N, Obeid J, Dillenburg R, Milenkovic J, MacDonald MJ, Timmons BW. Objectivelymeasured physical activity levels of young children with congenital heart disease. Cardiol Young. 2014;25:1-6. Volterman KA, Obeid J, Wilk B, Timmons BW. Effects of milk consumption in youth on rehydration following exercise in the heat. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2014;39(11):1257-1264. Volterman KA, Obeid J, Wilk B, Timmons BW. Effects of post-exercise milk consumption on whole body protein balance in youth. J Appl Physiol. 2014;117(10):1165-1169. Walker RG, Obeid J, Nguyen T, Ploeger HE, Proudfoot NA, Bos C, et al. Sedentary time and screen-based sedentary behaviours of children with a chronic disease. Ped Exerc Sci. 2014. [Epub ahead of print]. Wilk B, Meyer F, Bar-Or O, Timmons BW. Mild to moderate hypohydration reduces boys’ cycling performance in the heat. Eur J Appl Physio. 2014;114(4):707-713. Rahim Valani Abuelaish I, Fazal N, Doubleday N, Arya N, Poland B, Valani R. The mutual determinants of individual, community, and societal peace and health. International Journal of Peace and Development. 2013;4:1-7. Fitz-Clarke J, Quinlan D, Valani R.  Flying with a pneumothorax: a model of altitude limitations due to gas expansion. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2013;84:834-839. Ramakrishna J, Valani R, Sriharan A, Scolnik D. Design and pilot implementation of an evaluation tool assessing professionalism, communication, and collaboration during a unique global health elective.  Med Confl Surviv. 2014;30(1):56-65.

Gita Wahi Wahi G, Wilson J, Miller R, Anglin R, McDonald S, Morrison K, et al. Aboriginal birth cohort (ABC): a prospective cohort study of early life determinants of adiposity and associated risk factors among Aboriginal people in Canada. BMC Public Health. 2013;13:608. Oliviera AP, Kalra S, Wahi G, McDonald S, Desai D, Morrison K, et al. Maternal and Newborn Health Profile in First Nations Community in Canada. J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013;35(10):905-913. Wahi G, Anand SS. Race/Ethnicity, Obesity, and Related Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors: A Life-Course Perspective. Curr Cardiovasc Risk Rep. 2013;7:326-335. Wahi G, Boyle MH, Morrison KM, Georgiades K. Body mass index among immigrant and nonimmigrant youth: evidence from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Can J Public Health. 2014;105(4):e239-244. Christine Wekerle Wekerle C. Maltreated adolescents: Social and health service opportunities for resilience. International Journal of Child and Adolescent Resilience. 2013;1(1):88-96. Wekerle C, Wolfe D. Risk and resilience in the context of child maltreatment: The way forward. Child Abuse Negl. 2013;37:90–92. Jacobson D, Niec A, Wekerle C. Clinician’s Corner: Multiple bruises in an infant. Paediatr Child Health. 2013;18(5):231-233. Goldstein AL, Wall AM, Krank M, Wekerle C. The impact of perceived reinforcement from alcohol and involvement in leisure activities on adolescent alcohol use. J Child Adolesc Subst Abuse. 2013;22(4):340-363. Ellenbogen S, Trocmé N, Wekerle C. The relationship between dimensions of physical abuse and aggressive behavior in a Child Protective Services involved sample of adolescents. J Child Adolesc Trauma. 2013;6(2):91-105.


Rhodes AE, Khan S, Boyle MH, Tonmyr L, Wekerle C, Goodman D, et al. Sex differences in suicides among children and youth – the potential impact of help-seeking behaviour. Can J Psychiatry. 2013;58(5):274-282. Tonmyr L, Wekerle C. Risk and resilience in association with child maltreatment. Child Abuse Negl. 2013;37(1):1-3. Wekerle C. Resilience in the context of child maltreatment: Connections to the practice of mandatory reporting. Child Abuse Negl. 2013;37(2-3):93-101. Longman-Mills S, Gonzale WY, Melendez MO, Garcia MR, Gomez JD, Juarez CG, et al. Exploring child maltreatment and its relationship to alcohol and cannabis use in selected Latin American and Caribbean countries. Child Abuse Negl. 2013;37(1):77-85. Goldstein A, Faulkner B, Wekerle C. The relationship between internal resilience, smoking, alcohol use, and depression symptoms in emerging adults transitioning out of child welfare. Child Abuse Negl. 2013;37(1):22-32. Rhodes AE, Boyle MH, Bethell J, Wekerle C, Tonmyr L, Goodman D, et al. Child maltreatment and repeat emergency department presentations for suicide-related behaviors. Child Abuse Negl. 2013;37(2-3):139-149.

Faulkner B, Goldstein AL, Wekerle C. Pathways from childhood maltreatment to emerging adulthood: Investigating trauma-mediated substance use and dating violence outcomes among child-protective services-involved youth. Child Maltreat. 2014;19(3-4):219-232. McPhie M, Weiss J, Wekerle C. Psychological distress as a mediator of the relationship between childhood maltreatment and sleep quality in adolescence: Results from the Maltreatment and Adolescent Pathways (MAP) Longitudinal Study. Child Abuse Negl. 2014; 38(12):2044-2052. Ellenbogen S, Klein S, Wekerle C. Early childhood education as a resilience intervention for maltreated children. Early Child Dev Care. 2014;184(9-10):1364-77. Lyons J, Weegar K, Romano E, The MAP Research Team. Trauma profiles and correlates among maltreated adolescents in child welfare. In Healing Lives and Communities: Addressing the Effects of Childhood Trauma Across the Life Span. J Trauma Stress. 2014;285-86.

Tanaka M, Wekerle C. Dating violence among child welfare-involved youth: Results from the Maltreatment and Adolescent Pathway (MAP) Longitudinal Study. International Journal of Child and Adolescent Resilience. 2014;2:29-31. Mary Zachos Sherlock M, Walters T, Tabbers M, Frost K, Zachos M, Muise A, et al. Infliximab-induced psoriasis and psoriasiform skin lesions in pediatric crohn disease and a potential association with IL-23 receptor polymorphisms. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2013;56:512-18. Webb BD, Barrera M, Beyene J, Carcao M, Daneman D, Elliott I, et al. Determinants of quality of life in children with chronic somatic disease: pilot data from GapS Questionnaire. Qual Life Res. 2013;22(2):339-49. Moran C, Walters T, Guo CH, Kugathasan S, Klein C, Turner D, et al. IL-10R polymorphisms are associated with very-early-onset ulcerative colitis. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2013;19:115-23.

Strike C, Vandermorris A, Rudzinski K, Mozygemba K, Wekerle C, Erickson PG. Emergency departments and street-involved youth: Factors influencing utilization. Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless. 2014;23(1):42-50.

2013 & 2014 Status Report

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2014 Faculty & Trainees Chair/Chief of Pediatrics Lennox Huang

Associate Chair, Clinical Sheri Findlay

Professor Emeritus Patricia Chang Max Chernesky Peter Dent Ken Finkel Jack Holland Haresh Kirpalani Angus MacMillan Bosco Paes Mohan Pai Saroj Saigal Brian Steele Jose Venturelli John Watts Clifton Way Donald Whelan William Wilson

Professors

Stephanie Atkinson Ronald Barr Anthony Chan Christoph Fusch Jan Willem Gorter Robert Issenman Anne Niec Gabriel Ronen Peter Rosenbaum Mark Tarnopolsky John VanderMeulen Robin Williams (Clinical)

Associate Professors Krishna Anchala Steven Arora Uma Athale Burke Baird Herbert Brill David Callen Teresa Carter Karen Choong Anthony Crocco 78

| Department of Pediatrics

Associate Chair, Education Christina Grant

Associate Chair, Niagara Madan Roy

Cynthia Cupido Rejane Dillenburg Salhab El Helou Sheri Findlay Jonathan Gilleland Christina Grant Karen Harman Lennox Huang Natasha Johnson Anne Klassen Olaf Kraus de Camargo Moyez Ladhani Andrew Latchman Chumei Li Rob Lloyd Michael Marrin Karen McAssey Brandon Meaney Ronit Mesterman Tapas Mondal Katherine Morrison Melissa Parker Jeffrey Pernica Carol Portwine Sandeep Raha Rajesh RamachandranNair Elyanne Ratcliffe Madan Roy Sandesh Shivananda Arif Somani Sumesh Thomas Brian Timmons Jackson Wong

Alexandra Hernandez Kevin Jones April Kam Mariya Kozenko Claudia Lace de Almeida Audrey Lim Amit Mukerji Quang Ngo Nikhil Pai Dragos Predescu Constantine Samaan Mary Sherlock Tanya Solano Chris Sulowski Gita Wahi Connie Williams Emma Wyatt

Assistant Professors

Hasan Al Shabanah Bojana Babic Chander Bhagirath Peter Bonsu Parminder Brar Michael Burger Wendy Cheung Bruno DiGravio

Muzafar Gani Abdul Wahab Ereny Bassilious Michelle Batthish Vladimir Belostotsky Vicky Breakey Tania Cellucci Adam Fleming

Associate Clinical Professors William Conner Lucy Giglia Andrea Hunter Marie Kim Ramsay MacNay Ivor Margolis Laura Purcell Sandra Seigel Narendra Singh Shobha Wahi Mary Zachos

Assistant Clinical Professors

Associate Chair, Research Anthony Chan

Enas El Gouhary Caroline Ernst Giuliana Federici Kelly Fitzpatrick Anthony Ford-Jones Kathy Gambarotto Jay Green Kristen Hallett Mazen Hamadeh Melinda Hazlett Kathy Hoegler Gillian Hogan Cathy Humphreys Ben Klein Eric Koelink Eman Loubani Glenn Loy Son Todd MacGregor Douglas Mack Hilda Makken Kuldip Malhotra Philip Mantynen Stacey Marjerrison Dion Neame Kathleen Nolan Seamus Norton Jason Ohayon Natalie Orovec Frank O’Toole Sarah Patterson Umesh Rayar Lillian Rojnica Jodi Rosner Samira Samiee-Zafarghandy Nathalie Schindler William Gary Smith Jennifer Twiss Roxanne Walker Lana Weaver John Wiernikowski Ian Wilson Myrna Zapata


Susan Zeesman

Assistant Clinical Professors (Adjunct)

Zainab Abdurrahman Youness Al-Darazi Zeba Ansari Karen Backway Muhammod Murad Bakht Leah Bartlett Fatima Bhetasi Chee Pyn Chen Samara Chitayat Melanie Colpitts Maisa Dekna Nicholas Dorah Manal El Sayed Lotfia Elkout Michelle Gordon Nura Hawisa Alan P. Hudak Carolyn Hutzal Nyolima Kapalanga Sangeet Kathuria Asif Kazmi Arinder Malik Robert Meeder Trisha Murthy Larry Pancer Jonathan Sam Gagandeep Saund Shaneela Shahid Omer Shaikh Hala Shakhatreh Mohamad Shalan Al-Gazi Iman Shbash Mohit Singla Michael Sorg Kayalvili Thevathasan Meera Umamaheswaran Fernando Visbal Amador Heather Yang Lonnie Zwaigenbaum

Associate Professors, Part Time Keith Lau William Mahoney Linda Pedder Katrin Scheinemann Penelope Thompson Christine Wekerle

Assistant Professor, Part Time Les Berry Mark Duffett Gerhard Fusch Linda Gillis Shruti Mehrotra Kevin Middleton

Associate Members Marilyn Ballantyne Michelle Butt Brian Cameron Jennifer Couturier Andrew Don-Wauchope Martha Fulford Andy Freitag Erich Hanel Margaret Larche Ellen Lipman Alim Pardhan Murray Potter Jonathan Schertzer Deborah Sloboda Nina Stein Lehana Thabane Alejandro Torres-Trejo Susan Waserman Marc Woodbury-Smith

Joint Appointments Gordon Cameron Mark Ferro Harriet MacMillan Janet Pinelli Zubin Punthakee Rahim Valani Anthony Whitton

Fellows

Jameel Al Ghamdi Ghanem Al Ghanem Nawal Al Mashaiki Eidah Al-Ahmari Shaikha Al-Almehzri Mohammed Al-Hasani Nasreen Al-Kafi Reem Al-Khalifah Maher Al-Kuwaiti Ahmad Al-Mosawi Ahmed Al-Nahari Yousef Al-Otaibi Najwa Al-Rahbi

Yousef Al-Rohaimi Hamood Al-Shu’eili Aiiat Al-Waheed Nejoud Ali AlAsmary Eman Alluwaimi Mesbah Alshumrani Nattachai Anantasit Sanaa Baaqeel Abdulaziz BinManee Sladjana Bulatovic-Stajkovic Aravanan Chakkarapani Jenna Dowhaniuk Naveed Durrani Nora Fayed Julia Frei Rasha Gamal Ipsita Goswami Shikha Gupta Hamid Hakak Mariam Hanna Lara Hart Nada Hassounah Mohammad Hussein Ruman Jain Anna John Sharandeep Kaur Emily Kay Razan Kindakji Marcio Leyser Rayan Makhdom Souvik Mitra Rocio Monroy Amit Nigade Praveen Rayar Niels Rochow Smita Roychoudhury Khaldun Rozi Balpreet Singh Cherian Thomas David Ugobi Mary Woodward Janet Yang Elizabeth Yeboah

Residents

Attila Ahmad Meshari Al-Aifan Fawaz Al-Anzi Haifa Alfaraidi Khalid Almajid Kaleem Ashraf Shiba Asim Mena Bahnam Madeline Burdick

Maria Chacon Romy Cho Noreen Choe Caroline Diorio Jessica Dooley Brianna Empringham Lindsay Fleming Mallory Fox Kim Genier Harpreet Gill Juliana Giraldo Rosheen Grady Greg Harvey Jessica Holt Paria Kashani Stephanie Kay Rubeena Khan Andrea Kirou-Mauro Michelle Lee Willa Liao Daisy Liu Ashley Mackey Nadia Mansoor Andrea Martinez Hana Mijovic Anne Moffatt Madhavi Moharir Andrea Mucci Humaira Nael Nancy Nashid Luise Neuendorff-El Helou Jessica Norris Sarah O`Connor Joseph Oliver Helen Paciocco Mihaela Paina Koyelle Papneja Allison Rodrigues Jillian Salvador Adriana Sheridan-Fonseca Shazli Shethwala Katelyn Smith Rebekah Smith Joanna Stanisz Sophie Tanguay Surejini Tharmaradinam Renee Tseng Ania Van Meer Sanjay Vashishtha Laura Waltman Anushka Weeraratne Jessica Woolfson Meijian Zhao 2013 & 2014 Status Report

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Department of Pediatrics Operations Team Director of Administration Tammy Troy-Hempey

Operations Manager Elise Gallant

Finance Manager Jennifer Bailey

Academic Coordinator, Recruitment, Promotion & Tenure Sarah-Kai Antanaitis

Research Services Specialist Lindsay Akrong

Communications Coordinator Antonietta Petrella

Accounting Assistant Ken MacFarland

Assistant to the Chair/Chief Jennifer Jenkins

Assistant to the Associate Chair, Education Giulia Spadafora

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Produced & Designed by Antonietta Petrella Communications Coordinator, Department of Pediatrics Writers Dianne Duckett Glenn Herbert Suzanne Morrison-Dalgleish Antonietta Petrella Copy editing Dianne Duckett Photography Jon Evans Special thank you to all Pediatrics Faculty and Staff who contributed to this report and helped make this publication possible. Printed June 2015


Department of Pediatrics McMaster University 1280 Main Street West Health Sciences Centre 3A Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1 Phone: 905-521-2100 Ext. 73141 Fax: 905-570-8967 fhs.mcmaster.ca/pediatrics

McMaster University, Department of Pediatrics, Status Report  

The 2013 & 2014 Status Report highlights the exciting accomplishments of faculty members in the Department of Pediatrics at McMaster Univers...

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