Page 1

Saunders Brothers, Inc.

BOXWOOD GUIDE ‘JUSTIN BROUWERS’


Nestled in the foothills on the ‘Sunrise Side’ of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains, Saunders Brothers began as a partnership between five brothers in 1915. Today, third generation brothers, Tom, Bennett, Jim and Robert, with their dad, Paul, operate a wholesale nursery. Our wholesale nursery operation now consists of approximately 75 acres of container production and 75 acres of field production. We ship more than 1,000 products to garden centers, landscapers and re-wholesalers throughout the mid-Atlantic region, and our 125 acre apple and peach orchard provides fresh fruit for wholesale and local retail markets.


Saunders Brothers, Inc.

BOXWOOD GUIDE Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Using the Boxwood Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Boxwood Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

The Cultivars Upright ‘Dee Runk’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11 ‘Fastigiata’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-13 ‘John Baldwin’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15 Very dwarf ‘Grace Hendrick Phillips’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-17 ‘Green Pillow’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-19 ‘Morris Dwarf’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-21 ‘Morris Midget’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-23 small to medium insularis ‘Nana’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-25 ‘Jensen’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-27 ‘Justin Brouwers’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-29 ‘Suffruticosa’ (English) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-31 medium ‘Elegantissima’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-33 ‘Glencoe’ (Chicagoland Green®). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-35 ‘Green Beauty’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36-37 ‘Green Mound’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38-39 ‘Green Mountain’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40-41 ‘Green Velvet’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42-43 ‘Jim Stauffer’ (‘Jim’s Tru Spreader’) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44-45 ‘Vardar Valley’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46-47 ‘Wintergreen’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48-49 Large sempervirens (American) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50-51 Boxwood Foliage Comparison Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54-56 Boxwood Specimen Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

800-307- 2127

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


i n t r o d U ction

Boxwood—A Family Tradition Boxwood have been part of the family tradition at Saunders Brothers for over 60 years. What started as one boy’s 4-H project evolved into the foundation of our wholesale nursery. Today we supply hundreds of garden centers and landscapers with a large selection of both container and field-grown cultivars. As coordinators of the National Boxwood Trials, we look at how boxwood are performing at trial sites around the United States in order to predict which new cultivars will be considered “the best of the best.”

Why Boxwood? Modern-day gardeners are rediscovering boxwood, a staple of formal gardens for centuries. There are many qualities that make boxwood fitting in today’s landscapes.Their slow-to-moderate growth rates mean they fit into small areas and require very little pruning. They are nearly deer-resistant and thrive in shady locations. A wide range of shapes and sizes provides gardeners with a boxwood to fit almost every need, from upright accents to dwarf edging. When combined with other herbaceous and woody plants, boxwood instantly add timeless elegance to any garden.

2


The National Boxwood Trials One exciting thing we do at Saunders Brothers is coordinate the National Boxwood Trials. This project began in the late 1990’s when we found that there was little information available to compare the performance of boxwood in varying microenvironments. With the help of several other boxwood enthusiasts, we set up a format for cooperators to use to evaluate plants. Since its inception, 17 major botanical gardens and arboreta, 13 universities, colleges and test stations, as well as over 20 other shrines, individuals, and nurseries have participated in the project. The test sites range from Connecticut to Chicago, and then south across the “boxwood belt” to Alabama and Georgia. Most recently we have added international contributors from England, the Republic of Georgia and the Ukraine. Participants are asked to define their micro-climates, exposures, geographical locations, protection (natural and artificial), soil drainage, and pH. Approximately 20 different cultivars are then evaluated and the data is reported. Analysis of this data allows the gardener to better identify “the good, the bad, and the ugly” in boxwood cultivars. If you would like more information on the National Boxwood Trials, please contact Saunders Brothers.

3 800-307- 2127

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


U s i n g t h e Boxwood Gu i de

We have prepared the Boxwood Guide so that you can quickly find the most appropriate boxwood for your particular design needs and site conditions. When consulting the Guide, please keep in mind the following annotations: Hardiness This refers to the winter hardiness of the boxwood. Consult the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map to find out which zone you live in. This map can be found on the Internet or in most horticultural reference books. Growth Rate This is an average growth rate and will vary depending on the soil and micro-environment of your particular site. This tool allows the gardener the ability to compare cultivars on a similar scale. Exposure It is important to pay close attention to the exposure for each type of boxwood. Cultivars that are listed for “sun� can take full sun, but all cultivars of boxwood will do best with some shade, especially in the afternoon. Features A description and comments on the cultivar are listed here. Uses Suggested uses of the cultivar in the landscape are included here. Remember, each location is unique, so the gardener must be careful in selecting the correct cultivar. Consult other gardeners to see what cultivars are most successful in your area. Care Comments These comments refer to pruning, soils, and other items with regard to boxwood care. Micro-environments, rainfall, and other site data will all affect the care of certain cultivars.

4


Substitutes Be sure to read more about our suggested substitutes to find the best boxwood for your design needs and site conditions. Size This is a tool to help select a cultivar based on the relative size of plants that are approximately 15 years old. Remember, size is greatly affected by the mirco-enviroment of your plant.

Constantly Evaluating We as growers are constantly updating evaluations as to growth rates and adaptability of boxwood on different sites. Remember, the micro-environment can and does change from one side of your home to the opposite side. There may not be a perfect plant for a particular site, but surely some are better suited than others, and that is what we are trying to present.

‘ Morri s Dwar f ’

‘ Gre e n B e aut y’

5 800-307- 2127

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


B ox wo o d car e

Planting Correct planting to ensure proper drainage is crucial to the longevity and health of boxwood. • Dig the hole 2 times as wide, and 2/3 to 3/4 as deep, as the root ball of the boxwood. Place any soil that has been removed from the hole in a wheelbarrow or other container. Make sure the hole is not too deep, as the plant may settle and poor drainage could become a problem. • Add up to 20% compost, new topsoil, or other soil amendment to the soil that was removed from the hole. You will use this amended soil for backfill around the plant. Do not amend with peat moss; it is too acidic. • Place the plant in the hole and backfill with newly-amended soil that was removed from the hole. Mound the soil up onto the root ball. Be sure that 1/3 to 1/4 of the root ball is above the original soil level. Do not place soil directly on the base or trunk of the plant.

6


• Water the plant thoroughly. A careful soaking at the time of planting is the most important watering a plant will ever have. Do not allow the root ball to dry out. • Mulch the plant with no more than one inch of mulch. We recommend aged, shredded hardwood mulch. Do not overmulch or place mulch on the base or trunk of plant. • Monitor soil moisture weekly and re-apply water as necessary. (see Irrigation below) • Avoid planting boxwood in poorly drained areas where gutter downspouts empty.

Irrigation • New plantings should receive approximately one inch of water per week for the first three months after planting, then one inch every two weeks for the remainder of the first year. • Established plants will achieve optimum growth when they receive one inch of water per week between midMarch and mid-June, and periodic waterings thereafter based on rainfall and soil conditions. • Deep periodic waterings are best for boxwood. Avoid daily lawn irrigation system waterings. • Avoid allowing the plant to dry to the point of showing stress. Boxwood have difficulty recovering from stress resulting from lack of water. The first two years after planting are the most critical for irrigation. Generally, after two years the plant will need irrigation only in extreme droughts. • Avoid over-watering boxwood. Some cultivars, especially Buxus sempervirens (American Boxwood), are susceptible to root rot resulting from continuously wet or soggy soil conditions.

800-307- 2127

7

w w w. sau n d e rs b roth e rs .com


Pests Boxwood leaf miner is the primary pest of which boxwood gardeners must be aware. Leaf miner causes blistering of the leaves and defoliation. Buxus sempervirens cultivars seem to be more resistant to leaf miner than other cultivars. • The gardener can apply an insecticide in late April to early May to kill the small white flying adults before they lay eggs. Multiple applications may be necessary. • Systemic insecticides are used to kill the larvae after it has hatched and is feeding inside the leaf. Applications from midJune to early fall are usually effective. This method of control is often more effective because most (or many) gardeners do not notice the insect until blisters have appeared on the leaves. • Consult a Pest Management Guide for recommendations of methods for control of boxwood leaf miner. Pest Management Guides are typically available through your local County Extension service. Boxwood psyllid is a pest that may attack boxwood. You will recognize its presence by the upward cupping of the leaves resulting from the pest chewing on new foliage. Psyllid typically does not drastically affect the plant. If control is needed, application of an insecticidal soap should be made in late March to early April as new growth appears. A second application may be necessary several weeks later. Mites are also a pest of boxwood. Mite-damaged leaves typically have tiny spots and marks on them. Mite damage is generally superficial. Control methods, such as applying horticultural oil, should be used in severe cases.

8


Exposure Before selecting cultivars, be sure to know the sun and wind exposure of the area where you are planting. Refer to data on individual cultivars to choose the best boxwood for your landscape. Some cultivars are very tolerant of a wide range of exposures; however, all boxwood perform better when planted in some shade and in areas not fully exposed to southwest sun and west winds.

Fertilization and Liming Use a soil test to determine the pH of your soil. Boxwood do not require heavy fertilization. Be sure to use fertilizers that do not lower the pH of the soil. Boxwood thrive when soil pH is around 6.5. When soil pH drops below 5.8, the gardener may typically see problems in boxwood, especially in Buxus sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’. Annual applications of lime are often necessary to maintain proper pH.

‘ G re e n Ve l ve t ’

800-307- 2127

9

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Trained specimen

Unpruned


Buxus sempervirens

‘Dee Runk’ hardiness: Zone 6 growth rate: Fast to medium, 3 to 6 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Partial shade preferred. Features: An excellent upright cultivar, both for its form and its ability to thrive in a variety of site conditions. Slightly narrower but very similar to ‘Fastigiata’. This plant has two distinct forms. With annual late winter pruning, a striking, slim, conical form with a central leader is achieved. Little or no training will yield a multi-branched columnar habit. This is a superb plant. Uses: Upright specimen, tall hedge, frame doorways and windows, accent corners. care comments: Prune as needed in late winter to maintain density and desired form. substitutes: ‘Fastigiata’, ‘John Baldwin’. size at 15 years: 8’ Tall x 2.5’ Wide 8’

2.5’ 800-307- 2127

12

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus sempervirens

‘Fastigiata’ hardiness: Zone 6 growth rate: Fast to medium, 3 to 6 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Partial shade preferred. Features: An outstanding upright cultivar. Foliage is rich green in color with a hint of blue. Slightly broader but very similar to ‘Dee Runk’. This plant has two distinct forms. With annual late winter pruning, a beautiful conical habit can be achieved. Little or no pruning will yield a broad pyramidal plant. Uses: Upright specimen, tall hedge, frame doorways and windows, accent corners. care comments: Prune as needed in late winter to maintain density and desired form. substitutes: ‘Dee Runk’, ‘John Baldwin’. size at 15 years: 8’ Tall x 3’ Wide

8’

3’ 800-307- 2127

14

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus microphylla

‘John Baldwin’

hardiness: Zone 6 growth rate: Medium, 2 to 4 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Partial shade preferred. Features: A broad, upright, conical grower. Foliage is finetextured, blue-green and leaves are relatively small. An excellent substitute for conical Japanese hollies. Very new to the market but shows great promise. More adaptable to wet areas. Uses: Specimen, medium height hedge, frame doorways, accent corners. care comments: Prune juvenile plants as needed in late winter to maintain density and desired form. Becomes a very handsome plant as it matures, requires very little pruning. substitutes: ‘Dee Runk’, ‘Fastigiata’, ‘Green Mountain’. size at 15 years: 4’ Tall x 2.5’ Wide

4’

2.5’

800-307- 2127

16

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus microphylla

‘Grace Hendrick Phillips’ Hardiness: Zone 6 Growth Rate: Slow, 0.75 to 1.5 inches per year. Exposure: Part sun or shade. Needs afternoon shade.

Features: A cultivar known for its mounding, as well as spreading habit. More vigorous than ‘Morris Dwarf’ or ‘Morris Midget’. This is a handsome, superb plant. Uses: Informal edging, rock gardens, bonsai.

Care Comments: Requires little to no pruning. Avoid afternoon sun. New growth appears slightly later than most boxwood. Substitutes: ‘Morris Dwarf’, ‘Morris Midget’, ‘Green Pillow’. Size at 15 years: 1’ Tall x 2’ Wide

1’ 2’

800-307- 2127

18

w w w. sau n d e rs b roth e rs .com


Buxus microphylla

‘Green Pillow’

Hardiness: Zone 5

Growth Rate: Slow, 0.75 to 1 inch per year. Exposure: Part sun or shade. Needs afternoon shade.

Features: This cultivar is known for its dense, compact, oval habit. Responds very well when pruned into a small hedge. Slightly larger than ‘Morris Dwarf’ or ‘Morris Midget’. Uses: Edging, small foundation planting, bonsai.

Care Comments: Requires little to no pruning. Avoid afternoon sun. Substitutes: ‘Morris Midget’, ‘Morris Dwarf’, ‘Grace Hendrick Phillips’. Size at 15 years: 1’ Tall x 1.5’ Wide

1’ 1.5’

800-307- 2127

20

w w w. sau n d e rs b roth e rs .com


Buxus microphylla var. japonica

‘Morris Dwarf’

Hardiness: Zone 6 Growth Rate: Very slow, 0.5 to 1 inch per year. Exposure: Sun or shade.

Features: An excellent performing cultivar that is very compact and sun tolerant. It is outstanding for edging formal beds or in parterre gardens. Responds well to pruning. Slightly larger than and possibly more winter tolerant than ‘Morris Midget’. Uses: Edging, bonsai, parterre gardens.

Care Comments: Requires little to no pruning. Very low maintenance plant. Substitutes: ‘Morris Midget’, ‘Grace Hendrick Phillips’, ‘Green Pillow’. Size at 15 years: 1.25’ Tall x 1.5’ Wide

1.25’ 1.5’

800-307- 2127

22

w w w. sau n d e rs b roth e rs .com


Buxus microphylla var. japonica

‘Morris Midget’

Hardiness: Zone 6 Growth Rate: Very slow, 0.5 to 1 inch per year. Exposure: Sun or shade.

Features: An excellent performing cultivar that is very compact and sun tolerant. Outstanding for edging formal beds or in parterre gardens. Responds well to pruning. Slightly smaller than ‘Morris Dwarf’. Uses: Edging, bonsai, parterre gardens.

Care Comments: Requires little to no pruning. Very low maintenance plant. Has shown some sensitivity to colder sites as a juvenile plant. Substitutes: ‘Morris Midget’, ‘Grace Hendrick Phillips’, ‘Green Pillow’. Size at 15 years: 1’ Tall x 1’ Wide

1’ 1’

800-307- 2127

24

w w w. sau n d e rs b roth e rs .com


Buxus sinica var. insularis

‘Nana’

Hardiness: Zone 6

Growth Rate: Slow to medium, 1 to 2 inches per year. Exposure: Part sun or shade. Needs afternoon shade.

Features: A low spreading cultivar with lime green new growth in the spring. Very popular in some areas of the Northeast. Very similar to Buxus ‘Tide Hill’. Uses: Edging, low hedge, low foundation planting.

Care Comments: Prune lightly in late winter to make a stronger and denser plant. Avoid afternoon sun. Substitutes: ‘Justin Brouwers’, ‘Vardar Valley’. Size at 15 years: 1.5’ Tall x 3’ Wide

1.5’ 3’

26 800-307- 2127

w w w. sau n d e rs b roth e rs .com


Buxus sempervirens

‘Jensen’

hardiness: Zone 6 growth rate: Slow to medium, 1 to 2 inches per year. exposure: Part sun or shade. Afternoon shade required. Features: A cultivar that closely resembles ‘Suffruticosa’ (English) boxwood. Has bluish-green new growth in the spring. A relatively new plant that is showing good promise in the market. Shows more tolerance of Phytophthora (root rot) and tolerates sunnier sites than Suffruticosa. Uses: Foundation planting, low hedge. care comments: Little to no pruning required. Avoid shearing. Avoid afternoon sun and areas that are unprotected from harsh winter winds. Plant in well-drained soil. substitutes: ‘Justin Brouwers’, ‘Suffruticosa’. size at 15 years: 2’ Tall x 2’ Wide

2’

2’ 800-307- 2127

28

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


29

‘ M or r i s D w a r f ’

‘J u s tin B r o u w er s’


Buxus sinica var. insularis

‘Justin Brouwers’

Hardiness: Zone 6

Growth Rate: Slow to medium, 1 to 3 inches per year. Exposure: Sun or shade.

Features: A compact mounding cultivar that is very suntolerant. An excellent choice for edging formal gardens. It responds very well to pruning. Small leaves with excellent deep-green winter color. Uses: Edging, foundation planting, low hedge.

Care Comments: Little to no pruning required. Very low maintenance plant. Shows sensitivity to poorly drained soils. Substitutes: ‘Jensen’. Other possible substitutes include ‘Green Mound’, ‘Suffruticosa’ (English), ‘Glencoe’ (Chicagoland Green®) and ‘Green Velvet’ but all are more vigorous and they will become larger. Size at 15 years: 2’ Tall x 2.5’ Wide

2’

2.5’ 800-307- 2127

30

w w w. sau n d e rs b roth e rs .com


31


Buxus sempervirens

‘Suffruticosa’ (English)

Hardiness: Zone 6 Growth Rate: Slow to medium, 1 to 2 inches per year. Exposure: Part sun to full shade. Needs moderate shade to achieve maximum quality. High dappled shade preferred.

Features: The basic plant in many colonial gardens. This cultivar is known for its soft, billowy outline and lush foliage. Plant in well-drained soils. Plant has distinct odor. Uses: Foundation planting, low hedge.

Care Comments: Little to no pruning required. Avoid shearing. Avoid afternoon sun and areas that are unprotected from harsh winter winds. Plant in well-drained soil. Substitutes: ‘Jensen’, ‘Justin Brouwers’, ‘Green Beauty’, ‘Green Velvet’, ‘Glencoe’ (Chicagoland Green®). Size at 15 years: 2’ Tall x 2.25’ Wide

2’

2.25’ 800-307- 2127

32

w w w. sau n d e rs b roth e rs .com


Buxus sempervirens

‘Elegantissima’

hardiness: Zone 6 growth rate: Slow to medium, 1 to 2 inches per year. exposure: Part sun or shade. Prefers afternoon shade. Needs more shade than many boxwood cultivars. Features: This variegated cultivar adds color to your landscape with its green leaves accented with creamy-white edges. Great for use in holiday decorations. Uses: Foundation planting, hedge, specimen. care comments: Prune lightly in late winter to maintain desired habit. Avoid afternoon sun and areas that are unprotected from harsh winter winds. Plant in well-drained soil. substitutes: There are other variegated cultivars, but this is the best. size at 15 years: 2.5’ Tall x 2’ Wide

2.5’

2’ 800-307- 2127

34

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus x

‘Glencoe’

(Chicagoland Green®)

hardiness: Zone 4 growth rate: Medium, 2 to 3 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Features: An excellent cold-hardy cultivar. Extremely uniform in its growth. Very similar to ‘Green Velvet’. Responds well to pruning. Uses: Foundation planting, hedge. care comments: Prune lightly in late winter to maintain desired habit. substitutes: ‘Green Velvet’, ‘Green Mound’. size at 15 years: 2.5’ Tall x 2.5’ Wide

2.5’

2.5’

800-307- 2127

36

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus microphylla var. japonica

‘Green Beauty’ hardiness: Zone 6 growth rate: Medium to fast, 2 to 4 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Features: One of the best medium-sized cultivars. An excellent substitute for English boxwood in foundation plantings. Does well planted on sites where old English boxwood have been taken out. Responds very well to pruning. Does better in poorer draining soils than some cultivars. Very glossy foliage. Uses: Foundation planting, hedge. care comments: Late winter pruning is very important to develop desired habit especially for juvenile plants. Thereafter, prune as needed in late winter to maintain shape. substitutes: ‘Green Velvet’, ‘Green Mound’, ’Glencoe’ (Chicagoland Green®) size at 15 years: 3’ Tall x 3’ Wide

3’

3’ 800-307- 2127

38

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus x

‘Green Mound’

hardiness: Zone 4 growth rate: Medium, 2 to 3 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Features: A very cold-hardy cultivar that is a great substitute for English boxwood in small hedges. Globular habit. Uses: Foundation planting, hedge. care comments: Prune lightly in late winter to maintain desired habit. substitutes: ‘Justin Brouwers’, ‘Green Velvet’, ‘Glencoe’(Chicagoland Green®). size at 15 years: 2.5’ Tall x 2.5’ Wide

2.5’ 2.5’

40 800-307- 2127

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus x

‘Green Mountain’

hardiness: Zone 4 growth rate: Medium to fast, 2 to 5 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Features: A cold-hardy cultivar known for its semi-upright, rounded conical shape. Responds well to pruning. Widely planted throughout the United States. Uses: Foundation planting, medium-height hedge, accent corners. care comments: Prune lightly in late winter to maintain desired habit. substitutes: ‘John Baldwin’. If a tight conical shape is not necessary, ‘Green Velvet’, ‘Glencoe’ (Chicagoland Green®) size at 15 years: 4’ Tall x 3’ Wide

4’

3’

800-307- 2127

42

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus x

‘Green Velvet’

hardiness: Zone 4 growth rate: Medium, 2 to 4 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Features: A proven performer throughout the United States, valued for its cold-hardiness. Responds well to pruning. Beautiful light-green foliage in spring. Very similar to ‘Glencoe’ (Chicagoland Green®). Uses: Foundation planting, hedge. care comments: Prune lightly in late winter to maintain desired habit. substitutes: ‘Glencoe’ (Chicagoland Green®), ‘Green Mound’. size at 15 years: 2.5’ Tall x 2.5’ Wide

2.5’

2.5’

800-307- 2127

44

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus microphylla

‘Jim Stauffer’

(‘Jim’s Tru Spreader’)

hardiness: Zone 5 growth rate: Medium to fast, 2.5 to 5 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Features: A strong foundation plant which is slightly more vigorous than some cultivars, yet can be maintained in a formal state. Has proven to be more cold-hardy than other Buxus microphylla. Uses: Foundation planting, hedge. care comments: Prune in late winter to maintain desired habit. substitutes: ‘Green Beauty’, ‘Wintergreen’. size at 15 years: 3.25’ Tall x 3.5’ Wide

3.25’

3.5’

800-307- 2127

46

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus sempervirens

‘Vardar Valley’ hardiness: Zone 5 growth rate: Slow to medium, 1 to 3 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Features: Distinctive blue foliage in the spring combined with excellent winter hardiness makes this broad, mounding cultivar very appealing. More resistant to leaf miner than most boxwood cultivars. Extremely popular. Uses: Foundation planting. care comments: Prune juvenile plants as needed in late winter to maintain desired shape and density; becomes a very handsome plant as it matures. Requires very little pruning. Avoid soils with poor drainage. substitutes: None. This cultivar is in a class by itself. size at 15 years: 1.5’ Tall x 3’ Wide

1.5’ 3’

800-307- 2127

48

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus sinica var. insularis

‘Wintergreen’

hardiness: Zone 5 growth rate: Fast, 4 to 8 inches per year. exposure: Sun or shade. Features: A vigorous, winter-hardy cultivar that is ideal when a large foundation plant is desired. An excellent choice to substitute for a Japanese holly in shady locations. Fills space quickly. Uses: Foundation planting, hedge. care comments: Prune in late winter to maintain desired habit. Additional prunings may be necessary in early to mid-summer, depending on the desired look. substitutes: ‘Jim Stauffer’, ‘Green Beauty’. size at 15 years: 4’ Tall x 4’ Wide

4’

4’ 800-307- 2127

50

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Buxus

sempervirens (American)

Hardiness: Zone 5 Growth Rate: Medium to fast, 2.5 to 4 inches per year. Exposure: Sun or shade.

Features: A classic, large-growing boxwood that has stood the test of time. Extensively planted in Colonial American landscapes. Excellent winter foliage color. Cuttings are often used for holiday decorations. Uses: Specimen, large hedge, large foundation planting.

Care Comments: Prune in late winter to maintain desired habit. Plant in well-drained soils. Moderately resistant to boxwood leaf miner.

Substitutes: None. This boxwood is in a class by itself.

Size at 15 years: 4.5’ Tall x 4’ Wide

4.5’

4’

800-307- 2127

52

w w w. sau n d e rs b roth e rs .com


800-307- 2127

w w w. saU n d e rs B roth e rs .com


54 800-307- 2127

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


Boxwood Foliage comparison VERY DWARF ‘Grace H. Phillips’

‘Morris Dwarf’

‘Morris Midget’

‘Green Pillow’ (pg. 17)

(pg. 21)

(pg. 23)

(pg. 19)

SMALL TO MEDIUM insularis ‘Nana’

(pg. 25)

‘Jensen’

(pg. 27) ‘Suffruticosa’ (English)

(pg. 31)

‘Justin Brouwers’

(pg. 29)


MEDIUM ‘Elegantissima’

‘Glencoe’ (Chicagoland Green®)

‘Green Beauty’

(pg. 35)

(pg. 37)

(pg. 33)

‘Green Mound’

‘Green Mountain’

(pg. 43)

(pg. 39) (pg. 41)

800-307- 2127

‘Green Velvet’

56

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


MEDIUM (CONT.) ‘Jim Stauffer’ (‘Jim’s Tru Spreader’)

(pg. 45)

‘Vardar Valley’

(pg. 47) sempervirens (American)

‘Wintergreen’

(pg. 49)

LARGE

(pg. 51) ‘John Baldwin’

UPRIGHT

‘Dee Runk’

‘Fastigiata’

(pg. 15)

(pg. 11) (pg. 13)


Boxwood specimen comparison note: Shapes pictured represent 15 year old plants pruned to our recommendations. Pruning is especially important in the first 3 to 5 years of the plant’s life. Shapes will vary with intensity and intent of pruning as the plant grows to maturity.

Very Dwarf ‘GRACE HENDRICK PHILLIPS’

‘GREEN PILLOW’

‘MORRIS DWARF’

‘MORRIS MIDGET’

Small to Medium

insularis ‘NANA’

‘SUFFRUTICOSA’

‘JENSEN’

‘JUSTIN BROUWERS’

‘GLENCOE’

‘GREEN BEAUTY’

‘GREEN MOUND’

‘JIM STAUFFER’

‘VARDAR VALLEY’

‘WINTERGREEN’

(English)

Medium

‘ELEGANTISSIMA’

‘GREEN MOUNTAIN’

Large

sempervirens (American) 800-307- 2127

(Chicagoland Green®)

‘GREEN VELVET’

Upright

‘DEE RUNK’

‘FASTIGIATA’

‘JOHN BALDWIN’

58

w w w. saU n d ers B roth e rs .com


SAUNDERS BROTHERS, INC. 2717 TYE BROOK HWY. P.O. BOX 597 PINEY RIVER, VA 22964 TOLL-FREE: 800-307-2127 LOCAL: 434-277-5455 FAX: 434-277-5394 E-MAIL: SALES@SAUNDERSBROTHERS.COM WWW.SAUNDERSBROTHERS.COM

Saunders Brothers is a wholesale supplier to landscapers, garden centers and re-wholesalers in the mid-Atlantic region. If you are a retail customer, please ask your local garden center or landscaper for Saunders Brothers boxwood.

2009


Saunders Brothers - Boxwood Guide  

Saunders Brothers - Boxwood Guide

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you