Page 1

2009

Hemispheric Envoys for Artistic Transformation & Culture

Yakima, Washington


Table of Contents Mission Statement ................................................................................................................................................. 1 Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................................... 1 Problem .................................................................................................................................................................. Solution ................................................................................................................................................................... Funding Requirements ............................................................................................................................................ Organization and Expertise ..................................................................................................................................... Statement of Need .................................................................................................................................................. Fact/Figures/Statistics ............................................................................................................................................ Demographics ......................................................................................................................................................... Projections .............................................................................................................................................................. Project Description .................................................................................................................................................. Goals ....................................................................................................................................................................... Objectives ............................................................................................................................................................... Methods.................................................................................................................................................................. Staffing/Administration .......................................................................................................................................... Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................................... Outcomes................................................................................................................................................................ Budget ..................................................................................................................................................................... Expenses ................................................................................................................................................................. Organization Information ........................................................................................................................................ Board of Directors ................................................................................................................................................... Director of Development ........................................................................................................................................ Program Director .................................................................................................................................................... Field Staff ................................................................................................................................................................ Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................................... Appendix ................................................................................................................................................................. Michoacan/Patzcuaro Quick Facts .......................................................................................................................... Popular Traditions/Arts .......................................................................................................................................... Endorsements in Michoacan .................................................................................................................................. Endorsements in Washington State .......................................................................................................................


Criteria and Application Process ............................................................................................................................. “Get Active� Contract ............................................................................................................................................. Staff Biographies ..................................................................................................................................................... Delegation Itineraries ............................................................................................................................................. Art & Cultural Curricula........................................................................................................................................... Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................................... Delegate Survey ......................................................................................................................................................


Mission Statement Hemispheric Envoys for Artistic Transformation and Culture (HEART & Culture) is a nonprofit organization based in Yakima, Washington. It seeks to create college-bound opportunities for at-risk youth in Yakima County by strengthening participants’ school performance, extracurricular resume, and community involvement via the arts. HEART & Culture seeks to build respect for cultural expression and identity by immersing participants in culturally vibrant communities and discussions.

Executive Summary Youth have stories to tell and experiences to share. However, the opportunities for at-risk youth to utilize the arts as therapy or as a mode of communicating personal experiences are minimal in Yakima County (Washington State). Curricula in standard classroom settings in public high schools do not fully reflect the region’s increasing cultural diversity of its at-risk youth. Consequently, many youth have been marginalized. The need for a cultural program that caters to the talent, personal histories, and heritages of diverse youth in Yakima County’s public schools is pressing. Due to a variety of factors, public schools in Washington State continue to underperform. The Yakima Herald-Republic reported that in Washington State “thirty percent of the schools facing the most severe [No Child Left Behind] sanctions are in the Yakima Valley area. Out of the 64 schools statewide that have been placed on Step 5 of ‘needs improvement’ status, 19 of them are in Yakima or Grant counties. Of that, eight of the schools are in the Yakima School District....”i Why art? It challenges youth to think critically, creatively, and responsibly in school and general life. It may also be a creative new opportunity for academically challenged youth to pursue a college education. Because ideal candidates for college admittance are usually those with diversified experiences outside of school, HEART & Culture serves as a local source of alternative arts, with an emphasis on college admittance. It is critical for classrooms in Yakima County to adopt college- and career-prepatory art curricula centered on local, struggling, at-risk youth. In efforts to provide students with cutting-edge, supplemental education, it is the focus of HEART & Culture to facilitate culturally challenging art curricula in Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico. The following partnerships have been established: Cave Moon Productions-Yakima, Secretaria de Turismo-Morelia, Centro Cultural-Patzucaro, Casa de las Artesanas-Morelia.


Why Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico? “Yakima and Morelia have strong familial and commercial links, noted by our city’s Chamber of Commerce participation in the Yakima-Morelia Sister City Association. Morelia is a culturally relevant region to many at-risk youth in Yakima County, particularly the state of Michoacan. “A quarter of the people born in the state of Michoacan have moved elsewhere and a tenth of Mexican immigrants in the United States were born in Michoacan, which demonstrates not only the population’s strong links with its immediate environment but also their tenacity” (Gobierno Del Estado De Michoacan). If educational instruction can hone in on this

relationship, the pursuit of and candidacy for college may be approached with new fervor. HEART & Culture proposes working within this cultural framework to install supplemental envoy-curricula specifically tailored towards individual artistic interests that generate greater college entrance, and cultural understanding of these two communities. Yakima County is in a period of critical economic and cultural change, and we must aid the youth most affected. HEART & Culture is a nonprofit organization established in Yakima, Washington (2009). Because our services are only as strong as its donor base, we are asking for your contribution to achieve the goals of HEART & Culture. Our staff is comitted to developing cultural workshops and curricula alongside professionals in Michoacan, Mexico, and Yakima County to ensure both a safe and nutritive college-building experience. With a capacity to maintain a solid 1:4 staff/youth ratio while abroad, HEART & Culture aims at sponsoring an average of (8) delegate youth per cultural envoy in its first year of service.


Statement of Need Facts/figures/statistics: “Yakima County is located in rural eastern Washington State. With roughly 233,105 inhabitants (2006 estimate), it is an area experiencing a significant increase in immigration. Between 1990 and 2006, the state’s foreign born population nearly doubled from 6.6 percent in 1990 to 12.4 percent in 2006. Yakima County’s has a thriving agricutural industry that is dependent on this particular workforce. It is the number one producer in fruit trees, apples, winter pears, and hops and fourth in the value of all fruits in the U.S. and provides 70.2% of the nation’s supply of spearmint. In addition, Yakima Valley also has the largest inventory of cattle and sheep in Washington State, is the foremost producer of milk per cow in the nation and has just recently begun to garner national attention for its wineries. It is also a large supplier of corn, onions and asparagus. Yakima County employs 23% of Washington States agricultural labor force. However, despite its richness in agriculture, this is a distressed area with very high unemployment rates, high poverty levels, high crime rates, and low graduation rates.” As noted in the article: “Yakima’s jobless figures keeps rising,” Yakima Herald-Republic (Dec. 16, 2008).

In Yakima County, roughly 30% of persons 18 years and younger live below poverty level. It is uncertain what portion of that will graduate from high school or achieve an advanced degree. The Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, in “Graduation Project,” (2008), has concluded that the graduation rate in Yakima School 7th Disrict is 57.8, compared to the national average of 70.6 (2005). There are 24 schools, 14,374 students, 57.8% are Hispanic, and 65% are free or reduced lunch eligible. The unemployment rate in Yakima County (12. 1%) is significantly above the Washington State average (5.7%), and ever increasing. 28.8% of persons of Hispanic or Latino origin (of any race) in Yakima County are below poverty (2006). Opportunities must be created in order to stimulate their minds and intellectual potential of unemployed youth. HEART and Culture, partnered with locally-based Cave Moon Productions, aim to help the community transition to a culturally centered and literary perceptive population. Cave Moon Productions would collaborate in generating a book of letters and poetry that reflect the experiences of scholars and participants to foster litaracy in both English and Spanish. (http://www.cavemoonproductions.com). The National Center for Education Statistics issued a report on high school dropout rates in the United States 2005. In abstract: “*T+he average income of persons ages 18 through 65 who had not completed high school was roughly $20,100 in 2005. By comparison, the average income of persons ages 18 through 65 who completed their education with a high school credential…was nearly $29,700 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2006). Dropouts are also less likely to be in the labor force than those with a high school credential or higher and are more likely to be unemployed if they are in the labor force (U.S. Department of Labor, 2006)...” (http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2007/dropout05/).


The destruction is apparent. Dropouts are more than eight times as likely to be in jail or in prison than are high school graduates.ii Yakima has consistently ranked high in national crime rates, as reported in the article: “County’s Crime Rate Among the Worst in U.S.,” (Yakima Herald-Republic, Nov. 25, 2008). The Federal Bereau of Investigation recently ranked Yakima County as 299th out of 338 in the U.S. (2007). We must respond with decisive action and address this problem with a greater sense of urgency or else we stand to lose against crime, illiteracy, and unemployment. Art and cultural programs must condition themselves to the ‘wavelengths’ of our youths’ interests if we expect positive change in Yakima County: HEART & Culture is a place where isolated youth from both Yakima County in Washington State and Morelia, Michoacan in Mexico can join hands and collaborate in cultural diplomacy. It is a mentorship opportunity for youth at A.C. Davis High School that will comitt to the student for one academic year. Participants’ will reflect on issues of identity and community, both local and on an international level. We must also work smarter to create options for youth who desire to strengthen their career path in the arts. HEART & Culture hopes its program will serve as a model to other communities. HEART & Culture proposes a unique hands-on opportunity for high school youth to study Mexican art and culture abroad. E) Does program address the need differently or better than other projects that preceded it? Describe how your work complements, but does not duplicate, the work of others. -“Allied Arts of Yakima” (http://www.alliedartsyakima.org/) -Yakima School of Art

-“Yakima-Morelia Sister City Association”


Project Description “By injecting the worlds of art and everyday aesthetic into the educational process, young people can learn to broaden their understanding of the world on their terms” (Hsiao).

At-risk youth will have an opportunity to share their personal stories and make sense of the world around them. Our organization will host a series of interviews and workshops abroad with selected scholars with intentions to personalize their curricular experience. A) The goals of this locally driven program are: 1- To screen and select talented, at-risk youth of Yakima County for cultural envoys to Michoacan, Mexico. 2- To broaden Yakima County’s at-risk youth understanding of higher education and provide supplemental college counseling via art and cultural curricula. 3- To promote an understanding of the Mexican arts and its cultural influences on Yakima County. 4- To promote civic participation in Yakima County amongst our youth via a ‘Get Active’ contract. B) Objectives: 1- Behavioral: Screen and select delegate scholars per cultural envoy. Process: All participants will undergo rigorous application processes and post-delegation follow-up. Product: Select eight at-risk youth as leaders of their community per envoy in the first year of service. 2- Behavioral: Directly expose program participants to Mexican culture that will enable them to attain valuable insight into Mexico and its relations to them as college-aspiring individuals in Yakima County. Process: Scholars will have engaged in at least one Mexican craft upon completion of an envoy. Provide the materials necessary for executing projects/crafts (paints, sketchpads, journals, portfolios). Product: All participants will have completed a craft / project within one month of their envoy experience, with intention to share their craft projects with their local communities. 3- Behavioral: To develop essential research methods in a field-based environment necessary to become high-caliber college students. Process: Participants will have committed at least 3 hours per educational workshop while abroad, and at minimum have participated in two cultural excursions per day. Product: All participants will have put sincere efforts into graduating high school and applying to college.


4- Behavioral: To help students develop skills in community service, public speaking, organization and management, and the cultural skills necessary to work with diverse people. Process: Staff will uphold a volunteer/ ‘Get Active’ contract, and will maintain daily progress notes, journal entry, and periodic evaluation. Product: Scholarsh will have volunteered (4 hours/week) of their time to relay their learned craft/skill/experience to other at-risk youth and entrepreneurs in their hometowns/schools. C) Methods:

1- Screening and Selection of Program Participants. Recruitment, screening, and selection processes will be held (on a periodic basis) at the following participating school: A.C. Davis High School. Annually, approximately (8) at-risk youth from Yakima County will be invited to participate as community leaders in a (two-week) cultural envoy to Mexico. The Selection Board will consist of (#) HEART & Culture Staff and volunteers. This body will determine the eligibility of every candidate. Since giving back to the community is essential, scholars will adhere to a rigorous application process to ensure that each delegate maintains solid post-delagation follow-up and correspondence. (‘Criteria’ and ‘Application’ processes outlined in Appendix). 2- Expose program participants to Mexican art and culture: HEART & Culture will facilitate expeditions with underlying themes of tolerance and respect for multiculturalism. The period for this effort will be for one academic year, with an intense introductory period of one month. HEART & Culture will collaborate with Secretaria de Turismo, Casa de las Artesanias in Morelia, Michoacan and Centro Cultural Colegio Jesuita in Patzcuaro, Michoacan. HEART & Culture will provide scholars the tools necessary for quality participation and creation of a Mexican craft. Scholars will have daily exposure to hands-on activities, consisting of 1-3 hour workshops. Scholars will note take, observe, and imitate the skills and crafts taught by guest speakers. Scholars will contribute to constructive discussions per cultural seminar. (Delegation itinerary outlined in Appendix). 3- Higher education. HEART & Culture will collaborate with Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Washington and Heritage University in Toppenish, Washington. HEART & Culture is uniquely tailored towards stimulating the unconventional and talented minds of Yakima County’s at-risk youth. It


is an alternative and complementary opportunity for well-rounded educational experiences. HEART & Culture is an opportunity for youth to jump-start their college-building trajectory: Time management, Basic research/interview methods, Language competency, Writing skills, Cultural awareness and sensitivity, Constructive group dialogue and discussion, Professionalism. Participants will engage in cultural workshops, i.e. field-based research to gain better insight into a particular cultural history of Mexico. Scholars will have compiled research questions for and conduct interviews with a diverse body of students, professors, and community leaders while abroad. Scholars will have interviewed with key figures, visited historical settings, explored flora and fauna, attended cultural festivals, visited art galleries, and participated in a wealth of arts and crafts. Participants will be expected to complete a cultural project of their choosing. (‘Art & Cultural Curricula’ outlined in Appendix). -Locations: Morelia and Patzcuaro. -Heritages: Purehepechas, Nahuat, Spanish. -Facilitators: Secretaria de Turismo, Centro Cultural Colegio Jesuita, Casa de las Artesanias. -Disciplines: ceramics, woodwork, copper, music and dance, culinary, architecture. -Themes: Immigration, Architecture, Agriculture, Culinary, Music. 4- Develop skills in community service (“Get Active” contract): HEART & Culture will collaborate with (the Yakima Police Department, YMCA, Greenway, Homeless feeds, Humane Society, Yakima Regional Hospital, etc) to ensure scholars have options to complete their projects. It is important to reward our youth for their imagination. HEART & Culture hopes to address that unique perspective by involving youth in projects that are meaningful to them. To provide appropriate venues for participants and engage one another’s culture, lifestyle and traditions. The student “get-active” package is also a way to reward our community by giving back. It encourages youth to participate in school/community programs upon completion of cultural envoy. To provide re-entry orientation that prepares students for community service. (“Get Active” contract provided in Appendix).

D) Outcomes: Outcomes in collaboration with Cave Moon Press: 1) Cave Moon Press a literary non-profit, would collaborate in generating a book of letters and poetry that reflect the experiences of scholars and participants. Javier Lopez-Ortiz, a watercolorist from Michoacan has collaborated in the past with A.C. Davis High school, teaching students about folkloric themes, and in cooperation with the artists of Morelia, the produced book would be able to travel with exhibits of panels in the community. The panels would potentially be exhibited at Central Washington University, Allied Arts as well as the Dia de los


Muertos Altar exhibit that is sponsored by the Sisters of Morelia Association. A portion of the sale of the books could be offered to offset costs of the grant, and or be donated to future programming in the community that fostered scholarship and awareness of the rich cultural traditions found in Morelia. This book would take 3-6 months to produce after the reflective journals and poems were collected from the at-risk student participants and the cooperating scholars. The book, would be available as a bilingual book in English in Spanish to foster literacy in both languages for students and scholars as they seek to be ready for college. 2) A.C. Davis High School Library has pillars that measure approximately 3’ x 12’. In cooperation with Davis Art department and the Latino Literature class, participants and scholars could take what they learned in the envoy and generate 4-7 panels that would act as movable murals. The number of panels would depend on the number of scholars able to help with this process. These panels would thematically represent the traditions represented by the sister city of Morelia and its rich history. These panels would take 3 months to produce as the scholars invested their volunteer hours in the school setting working with A.C. Davis Art and Latino Literature students. While these outcomes would take longer than the timeline offered, they would still meet the behavioral objectives and offer a lasting exhibit that would eventually be displayed at A.C. Davis High School as a permanent tribute to the scholarly research into the rich culture of Morelia. Outcomes in collaboration with Secretaria de Turismo, Morelia: 3. To offset costs, the Secretaria de Turismo in Morelia, Michoacan has offered one week of free housing to participants. Outcomes in collaboration with Centro Cultural – Patzcuaro: 4. To offset costs, the Centro Cultural in Patzcuaro, Michoacan has offered one week of free housing to participants. Furthermore, the Centro Cultural has been key in developing cultural itineraries with local artists in Michoacan, Mexico. Other outcomes: 5. Participants will acquire an understanding of higher education, including an awareness and appreciation for the entrepreneurial spirit that makes a student successful. Participants will take greater steps in boosting their academic standing, graduating high school, and apply to college thereafter. (#) 100% of scholars will be enrolled in college by (time period) (specifics outlined in ‘Get Active’ Contract).


6. Participants will develop an appreciation for Latin-American/American culture, an understanding of the diversity in Yakima County, and increased respect for others with differing cultural histories. 7. Participants will collaborate on projects that extend beyond delegation dates and partnerships will be ongoing. They will acquire understanding of important elements of community volunteerism, field-based research, and sensitivity for multiculturalism. They will present their experiences to donors and local communty members (venue TBA). 8. Participants will have generated enduring ties with a diverse body of scholars and Mexican citizens. E) Staffing/Administration: (Biographical sketch provided in appendix) HEART & Culture’s team will consist of (#) Board of directors, one Office Director, one Development Associate, one Project Director, and two Field Staff. The following responsibilities are as follows:

F) Evaluation: HEART & Culture will conduct mid-year evalutations to assess the progress of its services and execution of program goals. A separate evaluation will be conducted after every envoy. (Postdelegation ‘Evaluation’ and ‘Survey’ provided in Appendix).


Budget Identifying and working with appropriate host organizations abroad is time-consuming. It requires resources and professional staff. Operating costs, recruiting staff, producing orientation material, and maintaining correspondence with mentor-sponsors are significant. The process of preparing, training, transporting, housing, feeding, and supervising scholars are financially demanding. Additional services such as, re-entry assistance, travel medical insurance, and more, all add to the expenses of a program.

Expenses Line Item

Total Cash Expenses

Foundation 1 Funds

Other Funds

In-Kind Contributions

Notes

Operating Costs: Project Manager (two months FT)

8,601

Xi

a

Field Staff (two months FT)

13,830

Omicron

b

Artist seminar fees (10 days)

1,500

Pi

c

Materials/Supplies

1,680

Rho

d

Sigma

e

Other Contracted Services Travel—Out of Country (flight)

6,400

f

Meals (14 days)

3,360

g

Total Operating Costs:

42,371

Indirect Costs: Director

$48,700

h


Development Associate

29,020

i

Accounting Services

600

j

Insurance

Tau

k

Upsilon

l

Printing & Copying

500

Phi

m

Postage & Delivery

185

Chi

n

Travel—Local

500

Psi

o

Fundraising costs

1,000

p

Equipment Purchase

2,572

q

Supplies Purchase

1,312

r

Occupancy and Utilities

3,600

s

Total Indirect Cost:

87,989

Total Expenses

126,040

Omega

a. Two months full time at $51,610 = $8601( http://www.bls.gov/oes/2008/may/oes_wa.htm#b43-0000 (431011)). b. Two full time staff, 2 months at $41,490 = $6,915 ( http://www.bls.gov/oes/2008/may/oes_wa.htm#b21-0000 (21-1099)). c. Artist fees @ $150/seminar facilitated by Centro Cultural Antiguo Colegio Jesuita de Pátzcuaro. d. Research: portfolios, internet access, books, etc. Backpacks at $50.00 x 8 students = 400. Painting kits at $90.00 x 8 students (Yakima Bindery). Daily calling cards at $5. e. Cave Moon Productions publication services. A.C. Davis art teacher’s salary x hours dedicated (in kind). f. Eight program participants at $800/flight ticket to Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico (round-trip). g. $10USD/meal. Three times daily. h. Salaried/Full-time (http://www.bls.gov/oes/2008/may/oes_wa.htm#b43-0000 (43-1011)). i.Salaried/Full-time. (http://www.bls.gov/oes/2008/may/oes_wa.htm#(2)) (43-9061)). j. Cuevas & Villa, Inc. (Rate: $100/hr). One hour bimonthly. k. l. m. Minuteman Press (http://www.yakima.minutemanpress.com/servicecenter/index.html).


n. Nonprofit mailing permit (http://www.usps.com/send/postagepermitimprintsandmeters/mailingpermitimprints.htm). o. p. q. Dell Desktop Optiplex 960 Minitower (w/Quickbooks software), desk, chair, printer, fax, phone, bookcase, desk lamp (Office Depot). r. Office Depot. s. 9x16’ office space leased at $300/month for 12 months.

Funding opportunities (foundations to apply to): HEART & Culture is a newly developed organization and hasen’t fully developed longterm strategies for self-sufficiency. But, Cave Moon Press a literary non-profit, and partner of HEART & Culture, would collaborate in generating a book of letters and poetry that reflect the experiences of scholars and participants. Javier Lopez-Ortiz, a watercolorist from Michoacan has collaborated in the past with A.C. Davis High school, teaching students about folkloric themes, and in cooperation with the artists of Morelia, the produced book would be able to travel with exhibits of panels in the community. The panels would potentially be exhibited at Central Washington University, Allied Arts as well as the Dia de los Muertos Altar exhibit that is sponsored by the Sisters of Morelia Association. A portion of the sale of the books could be offered to offset costs of the grant, and or be donated to future programming in the community that fostered scholarship and awareness of the rich cultural traditions found in Morelia. HEART & Culture will request grant assistance from the following foundations: -Latino Community Fund -Yakima Schools Foundation -WA State Arts Commission -Self-Reliance Foundation -WA Apple Education Foundation -National Endowment for the Arts Partnership -The National Endowment for the Humanities Partnership -The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Partnership -U.S. – Mexico Commission for Educational and Cultural Exchange -U.S. – Mexico Foundation for Culture, Inc. -Humanities Washington -The Wallace Foundation -The Pew Charitable Trust


Organization Information HEART & Culture was founded in (2010) and is currently seeking to fill the following positions. It will seek grant-based opportunites to employ its staff. The salary scale is based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 1-Board of Directors: () -Level of expertise: -Educational background: -Practical experience: -Responsibilities/assignments:

2-Director of Development: () -Level of expertise: -Educational background: -Practical experience: -Responsibilities/assignments:

3-Program Director: () -Level of expertise: -Educational background: -Practical experience: -Responsibilities/assignments: 4-Field Staff/Volunteers: -Level of expertise: -Educational background: -Practical experience/assignments: -Responsibilities: (Safety)


Conclusion “…the voicies of young people ought to be heard on their terms….” (Hsiao). Hemispheric Envoys for Artistic Transformation & Culture is dedicated to creating an unprecedented level of cultural participation amongst youth in Yakima County. A ($) grant from (Foundation 1) will enable us to reach our goal of promoting higher education via the arts. A (full time staf) is needed to accommodate the growing demand of Yakima’s struggling high school youth and establish an educational presence in the community. We urgently request your support.


Appendix Michoacan Quick Facts: “The name ‘Michihuacan’, meaning ‘land of fisherman’ comes from the Nahuatl language of Ancient Mexico. It was used by the nearby Mexicas to describe the inhabitants of the then state of Purhepecha, wha had settled the lakes. When the Spanish adventured west, having consolidated their position in the old Mexica dominions, they found a domain characterised by a strong identity and a social structure with an advanced knowledge of urban space and architecture. Approximately midway through 1522, Hernan Cortes sent Cristobal de Olid with eight Spanish soldiers and thousands of allied natives to Michoacan, to conquer the Purhepechas. Vasco de Quiroga: The arrival of Vasco de Quiroga in Michoacan in the year 1533 and the launch of his peace project, ushered in a policy of tolerance and acceptance of Purhepecha customs, giving rise to a new mestizo or mixed-race culture region. In addition to farming activities, Vasco de Quiroga also promoted an economy based on age-old crafts enriched with new techniques. Hence, each village specialized in a particular product: ceramics and oilskin mats in Tzintzuntzan; adobes in Santa Ana Chapitiro and Ihuatzio; woodwork in Paracho and Cocucho; shoes in Urapicho and Pomacuaran; hats in Nurio; textiles in Aranza and Ahuiran; tanning in Nahuatzen and Cheran; copper in Santa Clara, and clay utensils in La Canada de los Once Pueblos. A state with abundant natural resources, Michoacan is one of Mexico's main producers of agricultural products. Michoacan is the leading state for avocado, blackberry, strawberry and guava production, and ranks second for wheat, green fodder, lemon and red tomato production. In manufacturing, it ranks third for iron production. Michoacán is located in west-central Mexico. It has an area of 59,865 square kilometers (23,114 square miles), which is a little smaller than the US state of West Virginia. Michoacán citizens have migrated in large numbers to work in the United States and elsewhere. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that Mexican workers saw their wages increase 17%, from $2.09 an hour in 1999 to $2.46 an hour in 2000. (The average US worker earned $19.86 an hour in 2000.)”


Patzcuaro, Michoacan Quick Facts: “In the 16th century, the city of Patzcuaro was the most important site in the diocese of Michoacan, having been chosen by Vasco de Quiroga as the seat of his episcopate. The city of Patzcuaro is regarded as the pearl of the lakeside region, not only because of its historical importance as the diocesan center since 1538 and the second capital of the Michoacan province since 1553, but also because of its crucial position in the regional economy during the Viceroyalty, being the site of the tianguis or market where the various villages exchanged their goods. The Island of Janitzio is situated in the southern part of the lake and belongs to the municipality of Patzcuaro. Picturesque and lovely island, full of beautiful traditions, a colossal statue as a homage to the independence patriot Jose Maria Morelos was built on the summit of the rounded hill iland. The town occupies a hilltop of volcanic origin. Inhabited since the pre-Hispanic period, it once boasted a temple dedicated to the Moon goddess, where offerings in gold and sliver were deposited in her honour. During the Viceroyalty it formed part of the religious jurisdiction of the Augustinian Order in Patzcuaro. The Island has been a popular tourist destination due to its landscape merits and the customs of the local inhabitants.�


Popular Traditions/Arts (Pending investigations by Guillermina Romero Neri, Coordinadora de Talleres Artisticos): Paracho: Woodwork (guitars, furniture, etc). Santa Clara: Copper. Uruapan: Cloth. Patzcuaro historical center: orchestra. ( ): Ceramics/painting.

PROPUESTAS DE TALLERES. Taller Pintura de Paisaje

Lugar Zonas naturales, aledañas a Pátzcuaro.

Laca (artesanía local)

11 Patios. Ciudad de Pátzcuaro.

Telar de cintura (artesanía de la comunidad de Cuanajo)

Instalaciones del Centro Cultural

Escultura en cantera

Cerámica

Papel reciclado

Taller artesanal de la comunidad de Patambicho.

Taller artesanal de Tzinzunzan

Taller de Erongarícuaro


CERAMICA.

En Tzintzuntzan se trabaja una gran variedad de estilos, formas y decoración, pero destaca la cerámica vidriada que se presenta también con sus variantes. Una de las más tradicionales es la loza denominada “fritada” -esmaltada con una frita preparada por los propios artesanos, ver detalles técnicos en capítulo “Introducción a la cerámica”-. Se producen objetos utilitarios como platones, platos, cajetes, soperas, jarros, etc., pero también se hacen piezas modeladas a mano como vírgenes de la Salud, candeleros con querubines, Nacimientos, etc. Las piezas tienen generalmente fondo de color marfil y una decoración a pincel con delicadas líneas de color café oscuro o negro, y los más diversos motivos: pescadores, pescados, aves, guías de hojas y plantas, así como un recurso de discreto punteado en los bordes. En otras ocasiones se invierten los tonos, el fondo es oscuro y el dibujo color crema, casi blanco. Otra cerámica también engretada –es decir que tiene una capa de esmalte-, pero con fondo verde y el dibujo en café oscuro casi negro, se elabora en la misma población: vajillas, platones, ollas y hasta macetas. También se produce cerámica bruñida, con formas variadas, unas con reminiscencias de vasijas prehispánicas como el patojo -o vasija con forma de zapato y boca lateral-, y otras con formas hispánicas como los botijos. Todas ellas decoradas con tierras rojas en grecas y líneas de influencia prehispánica. Pero en Tzintzuntzan también se trabaja la cerámica de alta temperatura: vajillas con una combinación de esmaltes de colores café y gris, y una fina decoración de aves y motivos fitomorfos de influencia oriental.


LACA.

Fotos de lacas de Pátzcuaro Michoacán.

LA LACA.- Es una técnica prehispánica de México, consiste en decorar objetos con una mezcla hecha de diversos materiales -minerales, vegetales y animales-, especialmente aceites y tierras de diversos colores. Las lacas de Pátzcuaro en particular son confeccionadas a pincel con delicadeza en el trazado, el fondo que se maneja en esta región es negro, marrón, purpura, verde o naranja. Los bordes del dibujo son delineados con oro de hoja de 24 kilates (técnica de dorado).

Los motivos tradicionales son en general de flores y pájaros, sin embargo ahora se han integrado nuevos y variados diseños. Algunos autores opinan que esta técnica tiene influencias orientales, debido a la influencia que ejerció el comercio con Asia, en los objetos y pinturas traídos a México durante el Siglo XVIII por el galeón de Manila, también conocido como "Nao de la China”, sin embargo otros opinan que su origen es genuinamente autóctono desde tiempos inmemoriales en Mesoamérica.


EL TELAR DE CINTURA.

Comunidad de Cuanajo, Mich. Es un instrumento fundamental para el desarrollo de los textiles indígenas de México desde la época prehispánica. Consiste en dos tiras horizontales y paralelas sujetadas por correas, llamadas enjulios, que se colocan en los extremos de la urdimbre. El enjulio superior se fija a un elemento vertical, sea una estaca clavada al piso, un poste o un árbol, en tanto que el enjulio inferior se coloca mediante otra correa alrededor de la cintura de la tejedora, lo que le permite tensar firmemente el telar con un movimiento de su propio cuerpo sin necesidad de un marco adicional. Para la organización de la urdimbre, los hilos se separan en dos grupos a diferentes alturas, los pares y los impares, mismos que se mantienen separados por un carrizo o “varilla de paso”. El lizo es otra varilla auxiliar, a la cual se atan todos los hilos, pares o nones de la urdimbre, por medio de un cordel auxiliar, manteniendo cada grupo de hilos separado. Al accionar alternadamente la varilla de paso y el lizo, se entrecruzan los hilos de la urdimbre y se abre un espacio –la calada- entre los dos grupos. Por la calada se pasan transversalmente a la urdimbre, los hilos de la trama, generalmente enrollados en un palito. Luego interviene el machete o espada, una tabla plana, bien pulida y pesada que sirve para apretar la trama y para abrir la calada. Después de pasar la trama por la apertura lograda en el lizo, se inserta el machete del lado de la varilla de paso y se pone de canto para abrir otra vez y pasar la trama por esta nueva calada. Y así consecutivamente. Finalmente un templador colocado bajo la tela, cercano al hilo de trama que se está pasando, o lo que es lo mismo cercano a la orilla de la tela que se está enrollando, permite mantener un ancho constante en el tejido. El telar de cintura tiene ventajas y desventajas. Entre las primeras se considera su versatilidad, ya que con él se pueden tejer las prendas más diversas de cuantas componen la indumentaria de los diferentes grupos étnicos en México: huipiles, fajillas, enredos, los rebozos que tienen la urdimbre teñida, etc.; por otro lado sus “palitos”, o sea el conjunto de varas mencionadas anteriormente, se constituye como una prolongación de los brazos de la tejedora, lo que le


permite improvisar y ejecutar técnicas manuales difíciles de realizar en otros tipos de telar. Hay ciertas técnicas que sólo se pueden hacer en el telar de cintura, como los lienzos de cuatro orillas terminadas. Esto se logra fijando mediante un cordel, los extremos de la urdimbre con el enjulio superior, iniciando la trama justamente en la orilla de la tela. Se teje una corta franja y luego se voltea el telar empezando por el otro lado de la misma manera. Al unirse los dos tejidos ya no es posible meter el machete para apretar el tejido, por lo que la tejedora se vale de peines o agujas para cerrarlo con la misma tensión. Entre sus desventajas se encuentra el hecho de que no obstante se pueden tejer lienzos largos, el peso del enjulio inferior con el lienzo ya tejido, tiene que ser sostenido por la artesana con su cuerpo, lo que supone una limitación dependiendo de su capacidad física. Por otro lado en virtud de que la tejedora se encuentra frente al telar y lo tensa con su cuerpo, sólo dispone del largo de sus brazos para determinar el ancho de la tela, que suele tener entre 60 y 70 centímetros en lienzos sencillos y hasta 45 centímetros en telas muy elaboradas por la maniobra que se necesita en los lados de la urdimbre.


ESCULTURA EN CANTERA.

La escultura en cantera es una actividad de mucha importancia. Diversos pueblos en todo el país se dedican a hace objetos que responden a la iconografía local, a veces se representan a héroes y personajes destacados y temas característicos de la región, en otros casos la escultura en este material se enfoca a la elaboración de objetos comunes, como fuentes de diferentes tipos y accesorios para la construcción. Al paso de los años la talla de cantera se ha convertido en una actividad que conserva su vigencia por el interés de los consumidores por poseer algún objeto hecho de este material. El trabajo de cantera se hace en el estado de Michoacán se hace en una comunidad a 20 min de Pátzcuaro.


Michoacan, Mexico Endorsements (Morelia, Michoacan) L.C.C. Mitzi Janeth Arreola Rodriguez Jefa del Departamento de Relaciones Publicas Secretaria de Turismo, Gobierno del Estado de Michoacan Av. Tata Vasco No. 80 esq. Hospitales, Col. Vasco de Quiroga C.P. 58230, Morelia, Michoacan (Patzcuaro, Michoacan) Mtro. Francisco Rodriguez Onate Director Centro Cultural Antiguo Colegio Jesuita, Michoacan Ensenanza Esq. Alcantarilla s/n Domicilio Conocido Patzcuaro, Michoacan (Patzcuaro, Michoacan) L.A.V. Guillermina Romero Neri. Coordinadora de Talleres Artisticos. Centro Cultural Antiguo Colegio Jesuita, Michoacan Ensenanza Esq. Alcantarilla s/n Domicilio Conocido Patzcuaro, Michoacan (Morelia, Michoacan) Manuel Tzintun Artesano Casa de las Artesanias del Estado de Michoacan Fray Juan de San Miguel #29 Centro Morelia, Michoacan Codigo Postal 58000


Washington State Endorsements (working) Gilberto Mireles (Title) Carole Hsiao Kathleen Hall Vicky Ibarra Johnson Douglas/ Cave Moon Production Yakima Superintendent A.C. Davis High/Principal Central Washington University Heritage University Yakima-Morelia Sister City Association Yakima Mayor


Criteria and Application Process The application process is similar when applying to college. The plan is to familiarize students with the process. -Criteria: -High school Junior. -GPA: N/A. -Must reside within Yakima County. -Basic Spanish Proficiency exam. -Teacher recommendation. -ID / Passport. -Application process: -Background/biography. -Personal statement/essay. -History. -Career goals. -Educational goals. -Proposed research topic. -Compiled research questions. -Transcript. -Reference letters. -Extra-curricular involvement. -Program compliance: Rules/regulations. -Permission slips/Leave of Absence. -Volunteer/ ‘Get Active’ contract. -Insurance: -Medical Standing Order/Medical compliance. -Emergency Contact:


“Get Active” Contract ‘Get-Active’ contract: tutoring/mentorship, GPA, SAT’s, meet college application deadlines, and seek college counseling and follow up: 1) Scholar: Scholars are responsible for completing the required volunteer hours, submitting an academic project that meets his/her Mentor’s expectations, and maintaing appropriate correspondence with designated parties. Pre Delegation 1st Week 2nd Week 3rd Week 4th Week

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-Final paper = (5 pages). -When (timeline/ anticipated project completion): (1 month post delegation). Post Delegation 1st Week 2nd Week 3rd Week 4th Week

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2) Teacher-sponsor/mentor: This person will evaluate the scholar’s cultural project and completing an evaluation of the project. It is the Scholar’s responsibitily to schedule meetings with his/her Mentor and ensure that expectations are understood and followed. What mentor is required to do? 1) Meet with HEART & Culture Scholar. 2) Evaluate the final paper/project. 3) Evaluate the student’s work. How often should the mentor meet with the scholar? -When (timeline): At least once per week. (For one month).


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What are the guidelines for the final academic paper/equivalent project? 1) Must be academic in nature. 2) The student must cite at least (3) sources from cultural envoy. 3) HEART & Culture Field-Staff Supervisor: This person will directly oversee the scholar’s work while abroad. You and your Staff Supervisor should be making explicit arrangements concerning overall goals, projects, duties, hours, and other expectations.Your SS will need to verify that you have completed your desire to learn, overall responsibility (including time management), job performance, professionalism, and conern for clients and community. What field staff is required to do? 1) Verify that the Scholar adheres to rules and participates while abroad. 2) Keep in contact with HEART & Culture family and collaborating school. 3) Evaluate the student’s performance. -When (Timeline): Pre Delegation 1st Week 2nd Week 3rd Week 4th Week

Project Prep.

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Home

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4) Parent/ Guarding:


Staff Biographies -person 1: -Person 2:


Delegation Itinerary Patzcuaro, Michoacan (Pending investigations by Guillermina Romero Neri, Coordinadora de Talleres Artisticos) Day 1 ( ): Day 2 ( ):

Morelia, Michoacan: DAY 1: (Welcoming): -Airport pickup: Bus/taxi -Check-in: Hotel/family hosts -Lunch (introduction/program overview/policies and procedures: Restaurant) -Siesta/nap (optional) - Break/free time -Dinner (introduction/program overview/policies and procedures: Restaurant) Day 2: (workshop 1: Mexican history and landscape): -Breakfast (venue): -Ice-breaker; delegation personal story. -overview of the day -Outing #1: (interview/workshop) -regional history/tour -agriculture/horticulture -Museum of Geology and Mineralogy "Dr. Jenaro Gonzalez Reyna": It is located on the University Campus, its contents is a representative sample of minerals and rocks of different regions of the country and some from abroad. The museum can be visited from Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. -Lunch: -"Cuauhtemoc" Park: The Museums of Natural History and Contemporary Art are located in the former St Peter's Park, traditional recreation center of the city, on one side of the Aqueduct Avenue. -Outing #2: (workshop) -Public Library: (Participants can do homework here. Work on projects perhaps). 17th century baroque construction, it was originally the Temple of the Company of Jesus. Over the years it had multiple uses until the Public Library of the University of "San Nicolas de Hidalgo" was installed there in 1930. -Dinner: -Outing #3: -Museum House of Morelos: Beautiful and sober baroque residence built in 1758, acquired by Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon in 1801. At present time it's a museum, where the life of the pre-insurgent is


related through paintings, photographs, furniture, objects of the period and duplicates of documents. It also holds the Archbishop file of Michoacan. The schedule of visits is from Monday to Sunday from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. -Debrief/Journal entry: Day 3: (workshop 2: Mexico and art): -Breakfast: -Ice-breaker; delegation personal story. -overview of the day -Outing #1: (workshop) Casa de la Cultura: (offers art classes, “Talleres Artisticos.") Go to Secretaria de Cultura and Michoacan). Registration is limited. March/November registration. ~$13 or $25 dollars per session. -guitar sessions? -Museum of Contemporary Art "Alfredo Zalce" This 19th century mansion presents a notable French influence with two levels, surrounded by gardens, it is located in the "Cuauhtemoc" Park, on Aqueduct Avenue. At present time it houses the Museum of Contemporary Art. It can be visited from Tuesday to Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., Sundays from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. -Lunch: -Outing #2: -ceramic/artisan session? -Museum of Colonial Art: Small but notable museum located in an 18th century house which still conserves its original baroque style. The first printing house of the city was established here in 1821. At present time this museum exhibits pieces of work from the viceroyalty, and cane paste crucifixes from the period of the evangelization. The museum can be visited from Monday to Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. -Dinner: -Outing #3: (workshop) -Dance session -University Cultural Center: It is a contemporary building built for the diffusion of Art and Culture. The visiting schedules are from Monday to Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. -Evaluation/group discussion: (input from delegate members) -Debrief/ Journal entry/training (discuss “Get-Active” committment): Day 4: (workshop 3: Immigration and politics): -Breakfast: -Ice-breaker; delegation personal story. -overview of the day -Outing #1: (interview) -Government Palace: Baroque building whose construction began in 1760 and was finished in 1770. This building was originally the Tridentine Seminary of Valladolid. It houses the state


executive branch since 1867, it poses three murals of the muralist born in Michoacan Alfredo Zalce, who recorded several scenes from Mexican history. -Federal Palace: Eclectic, Frenchified, building built in the 18th century, which was originally a convent for nuns of the Order of St. Catherine. Subsequently, it housed the Theresian College of St. Mary of Guadalupe in the 19th century. Since 1935 it is the site of Federal Government Offices. -Lunch: -Outing #2: -painting -Dinner: -Outing #3: -Museum of Natural History "Dr. Manuel Martinez Solorzano": It owes its name to the Naturalist, doctor, and wise man Manuel Martinez Solorzano, who was born in Morelia. The museum can be visited from Monday to Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. -Evaluation/group discussion: -Journal entry/training (prepare for presentation back home): Day 5: -Breakfast: -Ice-breaker; delegation personal story. -overview of the day -Outing #1: -"Benito Juarez" Zoo: (20 pesos entrance for adults. 30peso cab ride from centro/Cathedral). It is the most important zoo of the country in the matter of variety of species (440) and number of specimen (3,800). It has the largest bird collection in Latin America; also its primate collection stands out with 23 different species and its feline collection with 10, of which 6 inhabit the region. The visiting schedule is from Monday to Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Saturdays, Sundays and holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. -Lunch: -Outing #2: -Temple and Conservatory of Music of the Roses: Both, the baroque Temple of St. Rose and the annex that was once the site of the College of St. Mary, were built in the 18th century. From 1738 and up to its closure in the 19th century, it was a girl's school. Since the late 1940's it has housed the School of Music and it is also the site of the internationally famous Boy's Choir of Morelia. -Dinner: -Outing #3: -Evaluation/group discussion: -Journal entry (prepare for presentation back home): Day 6: ( ): -Breakfast: -Lunch:


-Outing: -Casa de las Artesanias: -Free time: -Outing: -Dinner: -Outing: -Evaluation/group: -Journal entry: Day 7: Monarch Butterfly migration (Leave for Canada in March). -(550 pesos w/ english interpreter. bus departure from centro/Cathedral at 9am and returns at 8pm. All day event). -Breakfast. Day 8 (wrap-up): -Breakfast: -Post-delegation packet: -Outlining the next step. -How to substantiate experience. -What’s expected of them upon return home. -Lunch: -Free time: -Market of Sweets and Handicrafts: It's located on the west side of what was once the College of the Jesuits, where you can find all kinds of regional candy, as well as beautiful handicrafts. -Home community planning (post-delegation): -Goodbye Dinner: Departure Day: -Breakfast: -Transportation to airport:


Art & Cultural Curricula “Most promising are efforts that combine more personalized education with enhanced academic supports and college and career ready curricula� (Grad Nation).

(Pending: collaboration with Katheleen Hall, CWU, Heritage University)


Evaluation -Participating students. -CWU -Heritage University -Davis High -Yakima Public Schools


Delegate Survey

i

“19 area schools falling short of standards/ Annual progress report part of No Child Left Behind law,” (August 28, 2008). ii

“Grad Nation/ A Guidbook to Help Communities Tackle the Dropout Crisis,” America’s Promise Alliance.

Heart & Culture proposal  

HEART & Culture background Past, present, and Future!

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