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PEDDIE SCHOOL 201 South Main Street Hightstown, NJ 08520-3349

NonproFIt organization U.S. POSTAGE PAID MIAMI, FL PERMIT NO. 6737

PEDDIE C

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Splashdown! 24

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Plus, Q&A with Chris Acito Good-bye, Roby and Elaine

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Members of the Peddie swim team had the honor of “christening” the school’s new pool on Jan. 25 with a ceremonial first plunge, then enjoyed themselves in their new digs before getting down to practice. Next up in the renovation and expansion of the Ian H. Graham Athletic Center is a new fitness center, which will be located on the site of the old Clinton Sprout Natatorium. For more coverage on the new state-of-the art aquatic center and the Peddie swim program, which is celebrating its 100th year, see stories on Pages 16 and 18.


PEDDIE SCHOOL 201 South Main Street Hightstown, NJ 08520-3349

NonproFIt organization U.S. POSTAGE PAID MIAMI, FL PERMIT NO. 6737

PEDDIE C

H

R

O

N

I

C

L

E

Spring 2010

4

8

16

14

24

Splashdown! 24

28

30

Plus, Q&A with Chris Acito Good-bye, Roby and Elaine

Page 16 Page 4 Page 8

Members of the Peddie swim team had the honor of “christening” the school’s new pool on Jan. 25 with a ceremonial first plunge, then enjoyed themselves in their new digs before getting down to practice. Next up in the renovation and expansion of the Ian H. Graham Athletic Center is a new fitness center, which will be located on the site of the old Clinton Sprout Natatorium. For more coverage on the new state-of-the art aquatic center and the Peddie swim program, which is celebrating its 100th year, see stories on Pages 16 and 18.


Spring 2010

2 3 4 8 14 16 18 24

Letter to the Editor Alumni embody Annenberg spirit

Falcon 411 A tasty tale, plus some good signs for Peddie

Q&A with Chris Acito The board chair shares his views on the school

The Fondest of Farewells Roby and Elaine McClellan to retire

Destination: India Peddie’s newest peer-school partnership

The Game Changer State-of-the-art aquatic center opens

The Spirit of Swimming A century of excellence in the water

Grammy Nominee John Sprout ’70 earns nod for ‘Heroes’

26 Bookmarks 28 Center Campus 30 Computer History 32 Class Notes

Chronicle Vol. 138, No. 2

Peddie School 201 South Main Street Hightstown, NJ 08520-3349

Editor: Steve Kelly Copy Editors: Assenka Oksiloff and Patricia O’Neill Design: Carter Halliday Associates Photography: P.J. Morreale, Jim Inverso Cover Photo: Jim Inverso Printing: Franklin Communications

Tel: 609.944.7501 www.peddie.org/chronicle

This report was printed on 10% post-consumer recycled paper.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PEDDIE C

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FALCON 411

Alumni Embody Annenberg Spirit To the Editor:

Fall 2009

Seeds of Success

As the former executive director of the Annenberg Foundation, I took more than a passing interest in the reflections of Peddie graduates who benefited from Ambassador Walter H. Annenberg’s extraordinary gift to the school in 1993 (“The Annenberg Effect,” vol. 138, No. 1). Although the ambassador could not have known the details of these individual stories, he certainly understood the myriad ways in which his support could reinforce the fine personal qualities of Peddie students and lay the foundation for their continuing and impressive accomplishments. From the private equity specialist who recognized that a part of the Annenberg gift was designated for faculty recruitment (“it attracted some of the finest faculty to Peddie”), to the

As the first beneficiaries of the Annenberg gift make their marks, they all agree: Peddie paved the way. Their stories, Page 26 Finn M.W. Caspersen ’59, Peddie’s board chair, dies. Page 2

nonprofit program officer who acknowledged the energizing impact of diversity (“I learned so much from faculty and students from so many different backgrounds”), to the science teacher whose own career path has modeled the generosity of spirit she experienced at Peddie (“I also learned that there are many ways to give back to the community”) — all the stories resonate with Ambassador Annenberg’s dreams and expectations for future generations at his beloved alma mater. They, too, have become the embodiment of generosity and committed citizenship. Walter Annenberg could not have made a better investment. Sincerely, Gail Levin

Show Your

Pride

ARTWORK TO COME FROM FRANKLIN Just Click ’n’ Buy Plus, hats, jackets, coffee mugs, book bags, blankets and more. Visit the School Store website at www.peddie.org or call 609.490.7537 2 Peddie Chronicle

The Legend of the Swiss Yummies

500–600 boxes and takes 3–4 years to build. When one is done (we are on our fourth or fifth one now) we play a giant game of Jenga to bring it down. Every couple weeks I buy 10–12 boxes, which works out to approximately one Yummy per student per week.

By Dr. David “Doc” Martin, Peddie Historian I have often been asked how the Latin Club became addicted to Swiss Cake Rolls (fondly called “Swiss Yummies”). Well, back when I first started at Peddie I was dating a girl who worked as a test cook for Hershey Foods Corp. When I visited her there, they had boxes of free candy bars by the door, so I used to bring home pockets full. Since I couldn’t eat them by myself I would give them to my students. Then we started selling them to make money for the Latin Club.

Dr. David “Doc” Martin enjoying a “Swiss Yummies” break with students earlier this year.

cakes, especially the Yummies (which are similar to, but better than, Yodels). They are now the official food of the Latin Club.

For approximately the last 25 years, we have been having a Yummy-eating contest (by time, not by quantity). We post the best times on a poster like the top swimming times down at the pool. The boys’ all-time leader is Josh Plotkin ’02 in 1.43 seconds in 2001, and the girls’ all-time leader is Claire Pearson ’00 in 2.68 seconds in 2000. The Great Wall of Yummy is so noted that we regularly have tour groups come by to see it or get their picture taken next to it, as Nikki Semenetz Dunigan ’99 did for the last Chronicle issue.

Around 1980 my girlfriend moved from Hershey to work at Alpo. Since my students didn’t much care for dog food, we had to find a new kind of treat. We tried Twinkies and cupcakes and quickly settled on Little Debbie snack

Each student gets a box on their birthday, and I give them out on holidays and for rewards. We started saving the boxes one year, and then started piling them up from the bookcase to the ceiling in what we call the “Great Wall of Yummy.” Each wall contains

The Word Is Out: Peddie’s Star Is Rising

When families sent their SSAT scores to Peddie, here are the top five other schools they also sent their scores to in 2000–01 vs. 2008–09.

Peddie alumni have known for years that their alma mater is a great school. Test scores and college lists offer further proof. Now this: Peddie School is on the radar of national education writers and students everywhere looking for a boarding school to call home.

students surfing the Web C Prospective and researching the most selective boarding schools in America will find Peddie School among a dozen at About.com, a New York Timesowned site.

“Peddie is a very selective school,” About.com’s Robert Kennedy writes. “You will need what the school is looking for in order to be accepted. Once there you will enjoy a state-of-theart campus, exciting academic courses, a rich arts program together with some of the best sports programs anywhere.”

SSAT Overlap Data 2000–2001 RANK

SCHOOL

2008–2009

# OF TESTS % OF TESTS

RANK

SCHOOL

# OF TESTS % OF TESTS

1

Lawrenceville

416

42%

1

Lawrenceville

530

50%

2

Hun

254

25%

2

Hotchkiss

220

21%

3

Pennington

159

16%

3

Deerfield

205

19%

4

PDS

152

15%

4

Choate

198

19%

5

George

98

10%

5

Blair

191

18%

teens with designs on C Meanwhile, attending upper-echelon boarding schools increasingly have Peddie on their minds. In 2000–01, teens who took the Secondary School Admission Test and sent their scores to Peddie

most often also shared their scores with Lawrenceville, The Hun School, Pennington, Princeton Day School and George School. Last year’s statistics revealed a sharply different landscape, as is evident in the accompanying chart.

“Peddie is a very selective school.” —About.com’s, Robert Kennedy

Spring 2010 3


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PEDDIE C

H

R

O

N

I

C

L

E

FALCON 411

Alumni Embody Annenberg Spirit To the Editor:

Fall 2009

Seeds of Success

As the former executive director of the Annenberg Foundation, I took more than a passing interest in the reflections of Peddie graduates who benefited from Ambassador Walter H. Annenberg’s extraordinary gift to the school in 1993 (“The Annenberg Effect,” vol. 138, No. 1). Although the ambassador could not have known the details of these individual stories, he certainly understood the myriad ways in which his support could reinforce the fine personal qualities of Peddie students and lay the foundation for their continuing and impressive accomplishments. From the private equity specialist who recognized that a part of the Annenberg gift was designated for faculty recruitment (“it attracted some of the finest faculty to Peddie”), to the

As the first beneficiaries of the Annenberg gift make their marks, they all agree: Peddie paved the way. Their stories, Page 26 Finn M.W. Caspersen ’59, Peddie’s board chair, dies. Page 2

nonprofit program officer who acknowledged the energizing impact of diversity (“I learned so much from faculty and students from so many different backgrounds”), to the science teacher whose own career path has modeled the generosity of spirit she experienced at Peddie (“I also learned that there are many ways to give back to the community”) — all the stories resonate with Ambassador Annenberg’s dreams and expectations for future generations at his beloved alma mater. They, too, have become the embodiment of generosity and committed citizenship. Walter Annenberg could not have made a better investment. Sincerely, Gail Levin

Show Your

Pride

ARTWORK TO COME FROM FRANKLIN Just Click ’n’ Buy Plus, hats, jackets, coffee mugs, book bags, blankets and more. Visit the School Store website at www.peddie.org or call 609.490.7537 2 Peddie Chronicle

The Legend of the Swiss Yummies

500–600 boxes and takes 3–4 years to build. When one is done (we are on our fourth or fifth one now) we play a giant game of Jenga to bring it down. Every couple weeks I buy 10–12 boxes, which works out to approximately one Yummy per student per week.

By Dr. David “Doc” Martin, Peddie Historian I have often been asked how the Latin Club became addicted to Swiss Cake Rolls (fondly called “Swiss Yummies”). Well, back when I first started at Peddie I was dating a girl who worked as a test cook for Hershey Foods Corp. When I visited her there, they had boxes of free candy bars by the door, so I used to bring home pockets full. Since I couldn’t eat them by myself I would give them to my students. Then we started selling them to make money for the Latin Club.

Dr. David “Doc” Martin enjoying a “Swiss Yummies” break with students earlier this year.

cakes, especially the Yummies (which are similar to, but better than, Yodels). They are now the official food of the Latin Club.

For approximately the last 25 years, we have been having a Yummy-eating contest (by time, not by quantity). We post the best times on a poster like the top swimming times down at the pool. The boys’ all-time leader is Josh Plotkin ’02 in 1.43 seconds in 2001, and the girls’ all-time leader is Claire Pearson ’00 in 2.68 seconds in 2000. The Great Wall of Yummy is so noted that we regularly have tour groups come by to see it or get their picture taken next to it, as Nikki Semenetz Dunigan ’99 did for the last Chronicle issue.

Around 1980 my girlfriend moved from Hershey to work at Alpo. Since my students didn’t much care for dog food, we had to find a new kind of treat. We tried Twinkies and cupcakes and quickly settled on Little Debbie snack

Each student gets a box on their birthday, and I give them out on holidays and for rewards. We started saving the boxes one year, and then started piling them up from the bookcase to the ceiling in what we call the “Great Wall of Yummy.” Each wall contains

The Word Is Out: Peddie’s Star Is Rising

When families sent their SSAT scores to Peddie, here are the top five other schools they also sent their scores to in 2000–01 vs. 2008–09.

Peddie alumni have known for years that their alma mater is a great school. Test scores and college lists offer further proof. Now this: Peddie School is on the radar of national education writers and students everywhere looking for a boarding school to call home.

students surfing the Web C Prospective and researching the most selective boarding schools in America will find Peddie School among a dozen at About.com, a New York Timesowned site.

“Peddie is a very selective school,” About.com’s Robert Kennedy writes. “You will need what the school is looking for in order to be accepted. Once there you will enjoy a state-of-theart campus, exciting academic courses, a rich arts program together with some of the best sports programs anywhere.”

SSAT Overlap Data 2000–2001 RANK

SCHOOL

2008–2009

# OF TESTS % OF TESTS

RANK

SCHOOL

# OF TESTS % OF TESTS

1

Lawrenceville

416

42%

1

Lawrenceville

530

50%

2

Hun

254

25%

2

Hotchkiss

220

21%

3

Pennington

159

16%

3

Deerfield

205

19%

4

PDS

152

15%

4

Choate

198

19%

5

George

98

10%

5

Blair

191

18%

teens with designs on C Meanwhile, attending upper-echelon boarding schools increasingly have Peddie on their minds. In 2000–01, teens who took the Secondary School Admission Test and sent their scores to Peddie

most often also shared their scores with Lawrenceville, The Hun School, Pennington, Princeton Day School and George School. Last year’s statistics revealed a sharply different landscape, as is evident in the accompanying chart.

“Peddie is a very selective school.” —About.com’s, Robert Kennedy

Spring 2010 3


Is there anything you learned or realized about the school in the last couple months that you didn’t know prior to becoming board chair?

When you’re on the road in your role as chair talking to current parents, what do they most appreciate about Peddie?

Being an active member of the Board prepares you reasonably well to be Board chair, at least with regard to understanding how the school operates and understanding the business of secondary education. That said, being Board Chair takes the intensity up a few notches. I think about the school daily, and rarely a week goes by when I am not in contact with Mr. Green, Mr. (Michael) McKitish (assistant head for finance and operations), or another senior faculty member or alumnus. This close contact confirms to me both how hard the faculty and staff work and how talented they are.

The first impression one gets is how thoroughly satisfied parents have been with the Peddie experience. Of course, I probably have been talking to a select group of people and there’s probably a sample bias. But among this sample are parents who had kids who did not make it to graduation or who didn’t have spotless Peddie records but nonetheless feel so strongly about the value of the Peddie experience and the transformation their kids went through. It’s very inspiring. You get the sense that Peddie is doing very well for the students.

How might your fellow board members describe your management style?

of Peddie’s Board of Trustees in October. When he’s not at work or enjoying time with

Peddie has been blessed with the great leadership of Finn Caspersen for so many years. I can’t say enough about what Mr. Caspersen did for the school. There is no way anybody can step into his shoes. With his blessing, over two years ago, we began to really revamp the way in which the Board works. To some extent we will be decentralizing the Board’s duties and decision making. Committees have been empowered with clear and important objectives. We will be asking more from a broader group of Board members, and hopefully keeping them highly engaged with the school.

his family, he devotes much of his energy to his alma mater, doing his part to ensure

What is the board’s primary focus right now?

Q&A: CHRIS ACITO It has been quite a busy stretch for Chris Acito ’85 since he assumed the leadership

that Peddie continues on the trajectory the school has taken into the upper echelon of the nation’s finest boarding schools. In the ensuing Q&A, Acito weighs in on everything from how Peddie might further distinguish itself academically and challenging fundraising issues to the board’s new approach and what might be the next big project on campus. Q: Peddie has undergone dramatic changes since you attended the school in the mid-1980s. What does the school need to do to continue its trajectory?

Is there a moment, experience or faculty member from your days as a student that inspired you to become involved with Peddie as a member of its board?

A: What comes next is not an easy question to answer. We’ve made so much progress, particularly in the past 10 to 15 years, that there is a very reasonable temptation to want to say “let’s just keep doing what we’re doing.” But I think we challenge ourselves to ask the question, “How do we take ourselves not only from good to great, but from great to distinguished?” Much of what John Green has put together in his strategic plan addresses this challenge. For example, he is emphasizing a capstone experience for students that will be very focused on individual learning and one-one-one mentorship with a faculty member to answer a question that the student has self-generated. Such a program is fairly unique.

There are many teachers that I look back on fondly. Thankfully, even then I recognized that they were exceptional people and that I was in a pretty special place. But, I wouldn’t have been able to attend Peddie without significant financial aid for which I am greatly appreciative. Therefore, while I greatly enjoy my work with Peddie, my commitment also reflects a deep gratitude.

4 Peddie Chronicle

You were heavily involved in the arts programs while a student at Peddie. How do those experiences help you today?

I’ve asked the Board to focus on three things. The first is to give its full support to John Green in implementing the strategic plan. This requires the Board to be educated on all aspects of the program and to be prepared to provide input when Mr. Green seeks it. The second thing we’re focused on is the way the Board manages itself — for example, the committee restructuring that I’ve previously mentioned. Third, is to get the Board more active in development — that is, actively seeking financial and other resources for the school.

…Is there an area of concern that comes up more frequently in these meetings?

Among the many I’ve heard are: financial aid, the need for teaching basic financial literacy, the appropriate proportion of international students, and the food. I don’t think these issues are particular to Peddie, but are of common concern for all boarding schools. If you were an admission officer trying to convince a student to choose Peddie, what would you say to him/her?

I think the obvious thing you do is highlight Peddie’s accomplishments whether it be college placement, course offerings, AP scores, etc. But at the end of the day, Peddie is being viewed by that student amongst a group of schools that honestly, on paper, are all going to look similar. It is my experience that to win over a potential student we need to get that kid to campus. I’m amazed by how powerful a visit to campus is. First, I think visitors see a very cohesive school. Five hundred students is a nice size. They understand that kids don’t get lost here. Second of all, they love the campus. Third, they hear and see the culture. I don’t know how we’ve created our culture over the years, but the fact is people do walk away from Peddie saying, “That was different. I really enjoyed my visit.” I think you put all those intangibles together with meeting some of the individual faculty members, and I think that’s what begins to put us over the top.

“How do we take ourselves not only from good to great, but from great to distinguished?” —Chris Acito

It is a valuable skill to be able to stand confidently in front of other people and project a character or a message. You use this skill throughout your career. My thanks to Harry Holcombe. Spring 2010 5


Is there anything you learned or realized about the school in the last couple months that you didn’t know prior to becoming board chair?

When you’re on the road in your role as chair talking to current parents, what do they most appreciate about Peddie?

Being an active member of the Board prepares you reasonably well to be Board chair, at least with regard to understanding how the school operates and understanding the business of secondary education. That said, being Board Chair takes the intensity up a few notches. I think about the school daily, and rarely a week goes by when I am not in contact with Mr. Green, Mr. (Michael) McKitish (assistant head for finance and operations), or another senior faculty member or alumnus. This close contact confirms to me both how hard the faculty and staff work and how talented they are.

The first impression one gets is how thoroughly satisfied parents have been with the Peddie experience. Of course, I probably have been talking to a select group of people and there’s probably a sample bias. But among this sample are parents who had kids who did not make it to graduation or who didn’t have spotless Peddie records but nonetheless feel so strongly about the value of the Peddie experience and the transformation their kids went through. It’s very inspiring. You get the sense that Peddie is doing very well for the students.

How might your fellow board members describe your management style?

of Peddie’s Board of Trustees in October. When he’s not at work or enjoying time with

Peddie has been blessed with the great leadership of Finn Caspersen for so many years. I can’t say enough about what Mr. Caspersen did for the school. There is no way anybody can step into his shoes. With his blessing, over two years ago, we began to really revamp the way in which the Board works. To some extent we will be decentralizing the Board’s duties and decision making. Committees have been empowered with clear and important objectives. We will be asking more from a broader group of Board members, and hopefully keeping them highly engaged with the school.

his family, he devotes much of his energy to his alma mater, doing his part to ensure

What is the board’s primary focus right now?

Q&A: CHRIS ACITO It has been quite a busy stretch for Chris Acito ’85 since he assumed the leadership

that Peddie continues on the trajectory the school has taken into the upper echelon of the nation’s finest boarding schools. In the ensuing Q&A, Acito weighs in on everything from how Peddie might further distinguish itself academically and challenging fundraising issues to the board’s new approach and what might be the next big project on campus. Q: Peddie has undergone dramatic changes since you attended the school in the mid-1980s. What does the school need to do to continue its trajectory?

Is there a moment, experience or faculty member from your days as a student that inspired you to become involved with Peddie as a member of its board?

A: What comes next is not an easy question to answer. We’ve made so much progress, particularly in the past 10 to 15 years, that there is a very reasonable temptation to want to say “let’s just keep doing what we’re doing.” But I think we challenge ourselves to ask the question, “How do we take ourselves not only from good to great, but from great to distinguished?” Much of what John Green has put together in his strategic plan addresses this challenge. For example, he is emphasizing a capstone experience for students that will be very focused on individual learning and one-one-one mentorship with a faculty member to answer a question that the student has self-generated. Such a program is fairly unique.

There are many teachers that I look back on fondly. Thankfully, even then I recognized that they were exceptional people and that I was in a pretty special place. But, I wouldn’t have been able to attend Peddie without significant financial aid for which I am greatly appreciative. Therefore, while I greatly enjoy my work with Peddie, my commitment also reflects a deep gratitude.

4 Peddie Chronicle

You were heavily involved in the arts programs while a student at Peddie. How do those experiences help you today?

I’ve asked the Board to focus on three things. The first is to give its full support to John Green in implementing the strategic plan. This requires the Board to be educated on all aspects of the program and to be prepared to provide input when Mr. Green seeks it. The second thing we’re focused on is the way the Board manages itself — for example, the committee restructuring that I’ve previously mentioned. Third, is to get the Board more active in development — that is, actively seeking financial and other resources for the school.

…Is there an area of concern that comes up more frequently in these meetings?

Among the many I’ve heard are: financial aid, the need for teaching basic financial literacy, the appropriate proportion of international students, and the food. I don’t think these issues are particular to Peddie, but are of common concern for all boarding schools. If you were an admission officer trying to convince a student to choose Peddie, what would you say to him/her?

I think the obvious thing you do is highlight Peddie’s accomplishments whether it be college placement, course offerings, AP scores, etc. But at the end of the day, Peddie is being viewed by that student amongst a group of schools that honestly, on paper, are all going to look similar. It is my experience that to win over a potential student we need to get that kid to campus. I’m amazed by how powerful a visit to campus is. First, I think visitors see a very cohesive school. Five hundred students is a nice size. They understand that kids don’t get lost here. Second of all, they love the campus. Third, they hear and see the culture. I don’t know how we’ve created our culture over the years, but the fact is people do walk away from Peddie saying, “That was different. I really enjoyed my visit.” I think you put all those intangibles together with meeting some of the individual faculty members, and I think that’s what begins to put us over the top.

“How do we take ourselves not only from good to great, but from great to distinguished?” —Chris Acito

It is a valuable skill to be able to stand confidently in front of other people and project a character or a message. You use this skill throughout your career. My thanks to Harry Holcombe. Spring 2010 5


Peddie has established a relationship with EFZ School in China and a similar relationship with a school in India is being established. Why are these affiliations important to Peddie’s future?

The world is flat. I’ve had the benefit of working globally for most of my professional career. In the past 24 hours alone I’ve dealt with people in the Middle East, Asia, Ireland and Switzerland. These are people that I interact with as seamlessly as if they were in my office in New York. The internet and technology are making this integration happen at such an incredible pace. Kids today are truly growing up in a global world. These affiliations are important because it makes the global reality very tangible. It’s one thing to say we appreciate the world community; it’s another to say we will form an affiliation by which we will exchange students, exchange ideas and think about how we will actually work together. Why Asia? The impact of Asia in the 21st century culturally, politically, economically will dwarf, in my opinion, other regions. How would you respond to critics who say that the atmosphere of privilege associated with private schools does more harm than good in preparing students for the real world?

That’s a 500-year-old critique and worthy of debate. I believe Peddie is doing an admirable job in preparing kids for the real world. We are teaching kids to be better thinkers and doers. More importantly, we expect our students to be good citizens — of their local communities, their country, and internationally. Peddie’s campus may provide a few sheltered years, but we are preparing kids to be successful in the real world. How has Peddie adjusted the management of its endowment in the wake of the economic downturn last fall?

Recent financial events have been jarring. But, we must remember that the success of an endowment should always be measured over longer time frames. By most comparisons I’ve seen, Peddie’s endowment has performed well. We are ranked in upper tiers of performance relative to peer institutions. Mr. (David) Fey (senior investment officer) and Mr. McKitish recently completed an analysis that showed that over the decade beginning January 1, 2000, the endowment’s cumulative performance was plus 55.9 percent versus minus 9.3 percent for the S&P equity index. Unfortunately there are risks associated with managing an endowment. An endowment needs to do two things. First, it needs to generate an annual income stream that we use to fund the school each and every year. Second, it must keep up with inflation so that future generations of students can benefit from the same level of real resources. To achieve these two objectives the endowment must generate over time an annual return of

about 8 or 9 percent per annum. Such expected returns cannot be achieved without facing some volatility. Going forward, therefore, while we are constantly adapting the school’s investment program, you are not likely to see a fundamentally different approach.

Board Welcomes Three New Members

If you had a crystal ball and could identify the next big building project on campus, what do you think it would be?

Liberson, a Skillman, N.J., resident who joined the board in January, has devoted her life to education. She worked at Walden School in Manhattan from 1963 to 1984, including eight years as head of school. From 1984 until 2007, Liberson was director of Interschool, a consortium of eight New York City independent schools. She has been retired since June 2007.

There are no current plans to add a significant new building to the campus. That said, such projects are sometimes decades in the making. We’ve recently asked a Board Committee to develop a long-term plan for the school’s campus. While Peddie is now considered among the upper echelon of the nation’s boarding schools, its annual giving levels rank below its competitors in most cases. How important is it to Peddie’s long-term success to close that gap and how can it be accomplished?

It is incredibly important that we begin to make improvements. Part of our challenge is historical. Peddie starts with an alumni base that is different from our peer schools from a socioeconomic standpoint and frankly there were some periods of times in Peddie’s history where the students left without the broad-based camaraderie and great feelings that I think students have today. I’m not making excuses but I do think there are some starting points that make things a little more challenging for Peddie. But, we have to do better. We do now have a generation or two of students who have been part of a not just good but great school and we have to make sure that they feel the sense of obligation and make the contributions that they are capable of making. Both the administration as well as the Board are thinking quite actively about how to make those improvements in the years ahead.

Annette Liberson, Roger B. Hansen ’61 and James J. Wong ’82 are the newest members of the Board of Trustees.

Hansen and Wong were appointed to the board in the fall. Hansen returns to the board, having served from 1988–96. “I am very excited to come back on the board of Peddie School,” shared Hansen. “I have always felt that Peddie made a tremendous difference in my life, and it is nice to know that I can give a little back to the school.” Upon graduating from Peddie, Hansen went on to receive a degree in industrial arts engineering from Lafayette College. After serving a term with the U.S. Army Reserve in 1967, Hansen joined the family business, Ole Hansen & Sons, Inc., and became executive vice president of the company in 1974. He went on to assume the role of chairman and chief executive officer in 1982.

That comes up periodically. True, the Annenberg gift allows for Peddie to have a very healthy endowment, measured both in relative and absolute standards. But, endowment income is only one of three primary sources of income for the school, the others being tuition (net of financial aid) and annual giving. If we are to provide the same financial resources to our students as do our peers, and if we are to keep tuition increases manageable, we must find ways to increase annual giving.

Recognizing alumni and friends whose bequests or other planned gifts honor Peddie.

Megan E. Thomas, Esq., and Sara Probasco Olson ’95, the youngest member of the Bell Society.

Bell Society member Sara Probasco Olson will celebrate her 15th reunion as Class Captain for 1995 and a member of the Reunion Committee. The mother of two joined the Bell Society by naming Peddie as a beneficiary of her Individual Retirement Account. “Distributions from qualified retirement plans can be heavily taxed by the government unless you name a charitable beneficiary,” said Sara. Coincidentally, Sara’s mother-in-law, Megan E. Thomas Esq. of Stevens & Lee, represents Peddie on gift planning matters. She drafts charitable bequest provisions, such as those to the right.

Annette Liberson

Wong, a partner and managing director of Paulson & Co. Inc., a global investment management firm, is senior product specialist and the principal liaison between the investment team and the firm’s nearly 500 global institutional investors. He is a 1986 graduate of Tufts University. “I am honored to join the Peddie Board of Trustees,” said Wong. “I look forward to working with such an esteemed group of people in order to help John Green, his staff and the faculty implement their vision for the school.”

Sample Provisions for Peddie School Specific bequest: I give and devise to The Trustees of Peddie School, a nonprofit corporation located in Hightstown, New Jersey, the sum of ______ Dollars ($ ______) to be used for its general support (or for the support of a specific program or fund, such as faculty support). Residuary bequest: I give and devise to The Trustees of Peddie School, a nonprofit corporation located in Hightstown, New Jersey, all (or a stated percentage) of the residue of my property and estate, to be used for its general support (or for a specific program, such as faculty support). I.R.A./403(b) designation: The Trustees of Peddie School, Tax I.D. number 210634492. Peddie cannot give you or your family any legal advice. Please consult with your attorney or tax advisor for help in deciding whether a charitable bequest intention or any other planned gift for Peddie is appropriate in your particular circumstances.

Meet the Team Regina Ketting Director of Gift Planning 609.944.7615 rketting@peddie.org

6 Peddie Chronicle

BELL SOCIET Y

PEDDIE SCHOOL

Do you think the Annenberg gift and robust endowment hinder Peddie’s fundraising efforts among alumni?

James J. Wong ’82

%

Gift Planning Made Easy E TH

Roger B. Hansen ’61

Mary Donohue Gift Planning Manager 609.944.7608 mdonohue@peddie.org

Spring 2010 7


Peddie has established a relationship with EFZ School in China and a similar relationship with a school in India is being established. Why are these affiliations important to Peddie’s future?

The world is flat. I’ve had the benefit of working globally for most of my professional career. In the past 24 hours alone I’ve dealt with people in the Middle East, Asia, Ireland and Switzerland. These are people that I interact with as seamlessly as if they were in my office in New York. The internet and technology are making this integration happen at such an incredible pace. Kids today are truly growing up in a global world. These affiliations are important because it makes the global reality very tangible. It’s one thing to say we appreciate the world community; it’s another to say we will form an affiliation by which we will exchange students, exchange ideas and think about how we will actually work together. Why Asia? The impact of Asia in the 21st century culturally, politically, economically will dwarf, in my opinion, other regions. How would you respond to critics who say that the atmosphere of privilege associated with private schools does more harm than good in preparing students for the real world?

That’s a 500-year-old critique and worthy of debate. I believe Peddie is doing an admirable job in preparing kids for the real world. We are teaching kids to be better thinkers and doers. More importantly, we expect our students to be good citizens — of their local communities, their country, and internationally. Peddie’s campus may provide a few sheltered years, but we are preparing kids to be successful in the real world. How has Peddie adjusted the management of its endowment in the wake of the economic downturn last fall?

Recent financial events have been jarring. But, we must remember that the success of an endowment should always be measured over longer time frames. By most comparisons I’ve seen, Peddie’s endowment has performed well. We are ranked in upper tiers of performance relative to peer institutions. Mr. (David) Fey (senior investment officer) and Mr. McKitish recently completed an analysis that showed that over the decade beginning January 1, 2000, the endowment’s cumulative performance was plus 55.9 percent versus minus 9.3 percent for the S&P equity index. Unfortunately there are risks associated with managing an endowment. An endowment needs to do two things. First, it needs to generate an annual income stream that we use to fund the school each and every year. Second, it must keep up with inflation so that future generations of students can benefit from the same level of real resources. To achieve these two objectives the endowment must generate over time an annual return of

about 8 or 9 percent per annum. Such expected returns cannot be achieved without facing some volatility. Going forward, therefore, while we are constantly adapting the school’s investment program, you are not likely to see a fundamentally different approach.

Board Welcomes Three New Members

If you had a crystal ball and could identify the next big building project on campus, what do you think it would be?

Liberson, a Skillman, N.J., resident who joined the board in January, has devoted her life to education. She worked at Walden School in Manhattan from 1963 to 1984, including eight years as head of school. From 1984 until 2007, Liberson was director of Interschool, a consortium of eight New York City independent schools. She has been retired since June 2007.

There are no current plans to add a significant new building to the campus. That said, such projects are sometimes decades in the making. We’ve recently asked a Board Committee to develop a long-term plan for the school’s campus. While Peddie is now considered among the upper echelon of the nation’s boarding schools, its annual giving levels rank below its competitors in most cases. How important is it to Peddie’s long-term success to close that gap and how can it be accomplished?

It is incredibly important that we begin to make improvements. Part of our challenge is historical. Peddie starts with an alumni base that is different from our peer schools from a socioeconomic standpoint and frankly there were some periods of times in Peddie’s history where the students left without the broad-based camaraderie and great feelings that I think students have today. I’m not making excuses but I do think there are some starting points that make things a little more challenging for Peddie. But, we have to do better. We do now have a generation or two of students who have been part of a not just good but great school and we have to make sure that they feel the sense of obligation and make the contributions that they are capable of making. Both the administration as well as the Board are thinking quite actively about how to make those improvements in the years ahead.

Annette Liberson, Roger B. Hansen ’61 and James J. Wong ’82 are the newest members of the Board of Trustees.

Hansen and Wong were appointed to the board in the fall. Hansen returns to the board, having served from 1988–96. “I am very excited to come back on the board of Peddie School,” shared Hansen. “I have always felt that Peddie made a tremendous difference in my life, and it is nice to know that I can give a little back to the school.” Upon graduating from Peddie, Hansen went on to receive a degree in industrial arts engineering from Lafayette College. After serving a term with the U.S. Army Reserve in 1967, Hansen joined the family business, Ole Hansen & Sons, Inc., and became executive vice president of the company in 1974. He went on to assume the role of chairman and chief executive officer in 1982.

That comes up periodically. True, the Annenberg gift allows for Peddie to have a very healthy endowment, measured both in relative and absolute standards. But, endowment income is only one of three primary sources of income for the school, the others being tuition (net of financial aid) and annual giving. If we are to provide the same financial resources to our students as do our peers, and if we are to keep tuition increases manageable, we must find ways to increase annual giving.

Recognizing alumni and friends whose bequests or other planned gifts honor Peddie.

Megan E. Thomas, Esq., and Sara Probasco Olson ’95, the youngest member of the Bell Society.

Bell Society member Sara Probasco Olson will celebrate her 15th reunion as Class Captain for 1995 and a member of the Reunion Committee. The mother of two joined the Bell Society by naming Peddie as a beneficiary of her Individual Retirement Account. “Distributions from qualified retirement plans can be heavily taxed by the government unless you name a charitable beneficiary,” said Sara. Coincidentally, Sara’s mother-in-law, Megan E. Thomas Esq. of Stevens & Lee, represents Peddie on gift planning matters. She drafts charitable bequest provisions, such as those to the right.

Annette Liberson

Wong, a partner and managing director of Paulson & Co. Inc., a global investment management firm, is senior product specialist and the principal liaison between the investment team and the firm’s nearly 500 global institutional investors. He is a 1986 graduate of Tufts University. “I am honored to join the Peddie Board of Trustees,” said Wong. “I look forward to working with such an esteemed group of people in order to help John Green, his staff and the faculty implement their vision for the school.”

Sample Provisions for Peddie School Specific bequest: I give and devise to The Trustees of Peddie School, a nonprofit corporation located in Hightstown, New Jersey, the sum of ______ Dollars ($ ______) to be used for its general support (or for the support of a specific program or fund, such as faculty support). Residuary bequest: I give and devise to The Trustees of Peddie School, a nonprofit corporation located in Hightstown, New Jersey, all (or a stated percentage) of the residue of my property and estate, to be used for its general support (or for a specific program, such as faculty support). I.R.A./403(b) designation: The Trustees of Peddie School, Tax I.D. number 210634492. Peddie cannot give you or your family any legal advice. Please consult with your attorney or tax advisor for help in deciding whether a charitable bequest intention or any other planned gift for Peddie is appropriate in your particular circumstances.

Meet the Team Regina Ketting Director of Gift Planning 609.944.7615 rketting@peddie.org

6 Peddie Chronicle

BELL SOCIET Y

PEDDIE SCHOOL

Do you think the Annenberg gift and robust endowment hinder Peddie’s fundraising efforts among alumni?

James J. Wong ’82

%

Gift Planning Made Easy E TH

Roger B. Hansen ’61

Mary Donohue Gift Planning Manager 609.944.7608 mdonohue@peddie.org

Spring 2010 7


1

3

THE

FONDEST OF FAREWELLS 4

Roby and Elaine McClellan, teachers extraordinaire and exemplary role models for four decades, retire. By Steve Kelly, Chronicle editor

2

5

1. For many students over the years, Roby and Elaine McClellan served as exemplary role models.

3. Roby officiated and Elaine cheered on their sons, Edson, left, and Pete, at Halloween in 1979.

2. On teaching art history, Roby said, “Once I got hold of it I wasn’t going to let go of it, because you didn’t have to sell art history to kids; they just liked it.”

4. Peddie graduates Edson and Pete with their parents at Pete’s commencement in 1990.

The unimaginable is about to happen. When Peddie opens for its 147th year next September, school will be in session without the presence of Roby and Elaine McClellan. Really. The couple that has meant so much to so many students and served the school in every imaginable way for more than 40 years is retiring next month. “Looking back as an alumnus,” said Steve Rogers ’88, “it is hard to picture Peddie without them on campus.” Peddie was a boys-only school, Masters House still had that fresh-paint smell, and plans for the original Ian H. Graham Athletic Center were just being drawn up when Florida native Roby McClellan, fresh out of grad school, was hired by Headmaster Albert L. Kerr to teach world and U.S. history in September 1968. Over the next 40 years, generations of students connected with his can-do attitude and down-to-earth yet passionate teaching style, parents felt better knowing he was on campus, and fellow teachers followed his incredible example. In essence, he would become the face — and conscience — of Peddie. And he and Elaine, who joined the school in 1978 as a French teacher, would embody the values that Peddie holds dear. They made everyone feel like members of their family and consequently they were embraced by the entire Peddie community. “Families like the McClellans are the bedrock of the Peddie community,” said Board of Trustees Chair Chris Acito ’85, a former student of Roby’s. “Their devotion to the school and to each other is special. Elaine and Roby are exemplary on so many dimensions.”

The bond between the McClellans and Peddie took hold in the early 1970s when Roby entertained a job offer at another school, but ultimately decided to stay in Hightstown. “We had a wonderful group of students and teachers, and this was true long before the Annenberg gift. I don’t know if that would’ve been true at other places,” said Roby during an interview in his Caspersen History House classroom. He and Elaine chalked it up to a learning experience, never looked back and came to realize that Peddie was home, where they and their boys — Edson ’88 and Pete ’90 — felt happy and comfortable. Roby went on to teach humanities, math, English, studio art, religion and — his favorite — art history. He coached football, baseball, wrestling, golf and tennis. He even coached ice hockey back when it was a club activity. He also served as director of admission, associate director of college counseling and headed the arts and history departments. “There were certainly times when I had no idea how I could get everything done,” he said. Meanwhile, Elaine taught for 16 years before joining the Admission Office in addition to leading several community service projects and the International Students Association. Roby credits the ever-changing landscape at Peddie for enabling him to stay fresh. “I think being able to switch around, so I wasn’t doing the same job year after year, was critical for me,” said Roby. “Every five years or so I was able to change the combo of things I did. That’s very important to longevity. It keeps you moving.

5. Roby loves football and coached the sport for 16 years at Peddie, including five as head coach. Spring 2010 9


1

3

THE

FONDEST OF FAREWELLS 4

Roby and Elaine McClellan, teachers extraordinaire and exemplary role models for four decades, retire. By Steve Kelly, Chronicle editor

2

5

1. For many students over the years, Roby and Elaine McClellan served as exemplary role models.

3. Roby officiated and Elaine cheered on their sons, Edson, left, and Pete, at Halloween in 1979.

2. On teaching art history, Roby said, “Once I got hold of it I wasn’t going to let go of it, because you didn’t have to sell art history to kids; they just liked it.”

4. Peddie graduates Edson and Pete with their parents at Pete’s commencement in 1990.

The unimaginable is about to happen. When Peddie opens for its 147th year next September, school will be in session without the presence of Roby and Elaine McClellan. Really. The couple that has meant so much to so many students and served the school in every imaginable way for more than 40 years is retiring next month. “Looking back as an alumnus,” said Steve Rogers ’88, “it is hard to picture Peddie without them on campus.” Peddie was a boys-only school, Masters House still had that fresh-paint smell, and plans for the original Ian H. Graham Athletic Center were just being drawn up when Florida native Roby McClellan, fresh out of grad school, was hired by Headmaster Albert L. Kerr to teach world and U.S. history in September 1968. Over the next 40 years, generations of students connected with his can-do attitude and down-to-earth yet passionate teaching style, parents felt better knowing he was on campus, and fellow teachers followed his incredible example. In essence, he would become the face — and conscience — of Peddie. And he and Elaine, who joined the school in 1978 as a French teacher, would embody the values that Peddie holds dear. They made everyone feel like members of their family and consequently they were embraced by the entire Peddie community. “Families like the McClellans are the bedrock of the Peddie community,” said Board of Trustees Chair Chris Acito ’85, a former student of Roby’s. “Their devotion to the school and to each other is special. Elaine and Roby are exemplary on so many dimensions.”

The bond between the McClellans and Peddie took hold in the early 1970s when Roby entertained a job offer at another school, but ultimately decided to stay in Hightstown. “We had a wonderful group of students and teachers, and this was true long before the Annenberg gift. I don’t know if that would’ve been true at other places,” said Roby during an interview in his Caspersen History House classroom. He and Elaine chalked it up to a learning experience, never looked back and came to realize that Peddie was home, where they and their boys — Edson ’88 and Pete ’90 — felt happy and comfortable. Roby went on to teach humanities, math, English, studio art, religion and — his favorite — art history. He coached football, baseball, wrestling, golf and tennis. He even coached ice hockey back when it was a club activity. He also served as director of admission, associate director of college counseling and headed the arts and history departments. “There were certainly times when I had no idea how I could get everything done,” he said. Meanwhile, Elaine taught for 16 years before joining the Admission Office in addition to leading several community service projects and the International Students Association. Roby credits the ever-changing landscape at Peddie for enabling him to stay fresh. “I think being able to switch around, so I wasn’t doing the same job year after year, was critical for me,” said Roby. “Every five years or so I was able to change the combo of things I did. That’s very important to longevity. It keeps you moving.

5. Roby loves football and coached the sport for 16 years at Peddie, including five as head coach. Spring 2010 9


‘Partners in Their Devotion to Peddie’ From John Green, Head of School

I have worked almost 30 years at four different boarding schools in the course of my career, and I have never met any faculty member at any school better than Roby McClellan. He is the consummate boarding school “schoolmaster” in the best sense of that word. Not only did Roby perform a remarkably wide variety of tasks at Peddie over his 39-year career at the school — e.g., art department chair, director of admission, college counselor, teacher extraordinaire, head football coach and head golf coach for girls, to name just a few — he performed them all with distinction. Roby was so effective in these roles and as a role model on campus that two alumni chose to make considerable donations in his honor. Having devoted himself to Peddie before our school had acquired the resources that make it easier for faculty members to retire here now, Roby is

the consummate gentleman and often, and in many ways, serves as the moral conscience of our community. He has certainly served me well as a trusted and confidential advisor, whether in my office or on the golf course. In addition to acting as Roby’s balance and alter ego, Elaine McClellan served Peddie for 32 years with distinction in her own right. An outstanding French teacher and senior associate director of admissions, Elaine touched the lives of Peddie students with her attention to detail, her warmth and her legendary sense of humor. Though Roby may have worked at Peddie for more calendar years than Elaine, I have always considered the McClellans partners in their devotion to Peddie students and to Peddie.

10 Peddie Chronicle

You Can Now Make the Difference for Peddie Invest in the Present and Future of the Peddie Community. Your Community.

That partnership may be best exemplified in their everyother-year adventure to Asia on behalf of the school, which often takes place during part of the Thanksgiving holiday. On these trips, they bring news of the school to anxious parents, who are reassured by their visit, and they interview prospective students who, as a result of their interactions with the McClellans, decide that Peddie is their first choice. In short, Peddie has been enormously fortunate to have the McClellans on campus for nearly four decades and, quite honestly, I am not certain that our school will ever see the likes of them again.

“…Peddie has been enormously fortunate to have the McClellans on campus for nearly four decades and, quite honestly, I am not certain that our school will ever see the likes of them again.”

“Teaching requires you to keep learning, which I enjoy. And Peddie has allowed me to teach many different subjects, which makes it even more exciting.” In the eyes of retired science teacher Ray Oram, another Peddie pillar who served the school for 35 years, Roby has a fervor for Peddie that comes from the heart. “His passion has been exemplified by a love of learning, a desire to do the very best for his students, advisees, and team members, and his genuine caring to make Peddie — all aspects of it — the best school it can be … He has done it all with diligence, grace, humility and good humor. What a role model.” There are dozens of reasons why Roby and Elaine love Peddie. Being around students day in and day out may top the list. “It’s great to be around young people because they tend to be energetic, optimistic and fun-loving,” he said. “Kids know how to have fun. There’s rarely a dull moment.” “Our own children have grown up,” said Elaine, who loves watching the students traverse campus from her office, “but I still get to be around students and prospective students every day. I have interviewed hundreds of eighth-graders, and then seen them grow so much more mature and confident. Every student has a different story coming in and also going out.”

Peddie Faculty Made the Difference for You

In the McClellans’ eyes Peddie students share a unique quality. “Almost every Peddie student I’ve worked with over the past 40-plus years has been a good, down-to-earth kid who was fun to know. Some of them were unusually talented. Almost all of them cared about learning and participating, and valued the opportunity to be at Peddie,” Roby said. He has a theory on what sets Peddie kids apart from other boarding school students. “One of the problems with schools with big names is that some of their students think they no longer need to prove themselves. Peddie kids don’t think like that. Because Peddie isn’t famous, our students don’t think they have suddenly become famous by enrolling. They still need to do something important. They recognize that Peddie is a great opportunity that they are lucky to have.” The students who were fortunate enough to have Roby or Elaine as a teacher, coach or mentor treasure their experiences and many remain in touch with the couple years after graduation. The lifelong passion for learning they impart resonates with alumni and so do the life lessons that students glean from the couple. “Roby’s passion for the subject matter he is teaching becomes infectious and his students want more,” said David Bair ’73,

“Peddie has always taken special pride in the strong relationships between its students and teachers. Our faculty members are educators in so many areas of a student’s life.” —Head of School John Green

Continue the Tradition Every gift matters. All gifts make a difference. Give online at www.peddie.org/give

Spring 2010 11


‘Partners in Their Devotion to Peddie’ From John Green, Head of School

I have worked almost 30 years at four different boarding schools in the course of my career, and I have never met any faculty member at any school better than Roby McClellan. He is the consummate boarding school “schoolmaster” in the best sense of that word. Not only did Roby perform a remarkably wide variety of tasks at Peddie over his 39-year career at the school — e.g., art department chair, director of admission, college counselor, teacher extraordinaire, head football coach and head golf coach for girls, to name just a few — he performed them all with distinction. Roby was so effective in these roles and as a role model on campus that two alumni chose to make considerable donations in his honor. Having devoted himself to Peddie before our school had acquired the resources that make it easier for faculty members to retire here now, Roby is

the consummate gentleman and often, and in many ways, serves as the moral conscience of our community. He has certainly served me well as a trusted and confidential advisor, whether in my office or on the golf course. In addition to acting as Roby’s balance and alter ego, Elaine McClellan served Peddie for 32 years with distinction in her own right. An outstanding French teacher and senior associate director of admissions, Elaine touched the lives of Peddie students with her attention to detail, her warmth and her legendary sense of humor. Though Roby may have worked at Peddie for more calendar years than Elaine, I have always considered the McClellans partners in their devotion to Peddie students and to Peddie.

10 Peddie Chronicle

You Can Now Make the Difference for Peddie Invest in the Present and Future of the Peddie Community. Your Community.

That partnership may be best exemplified in their everyother-year adventure to Asia on behalf of the school, which often takes place during part of the Thanksgiving holiday. On these trips, they bring news of the school to anxious parents, who are reassured by their visit, and they interview prospective students who, as a result of their interactions with the McClellans, decide that Peddie is their first choice. In short, Peddie has been enormously fortunate to have the McClellans on campus for nearly four decades and, quite honestly, I am not certain that our school will ever see the likes of them again.

“…Peddie has been enormously fortunate to have the McClellans on campus for nearly four decades and, quite honestly, I am not certain that our school will ever see the likes of them again.”

“Teaching requires you to keep learning, which I enjoy. And Peddie has allowed me to teach many different subjects, which makes it even more exciting.” In the eyes of retired science teacher Ray Oram, another Peddie pillar who served the school for 35 years, Roby has a fervor for Peddie that comes from the heart. “His passion has been exemplified by a love of learning, a desire to do the very best for his students, advisees, and team members, and his genuine caring to make Peddie — all aspects of it — the best school it can be … He has done it all with diligence, grace, humility and good humor. What a role model.” There are dozens of reasons why Roby and Elaine love Peddie. Being around students day in and day out may top the list. “It’s great to be around young people because they tend to be energetic, optimistic and fun-loving,” he said. “Kids know how to have fun. There’s rarely a dull moment.” “Our own children have grown up,” said Elaine, who loves watching the students traverse campus from her office, “but I still get to be around students and prospective students every day. I have interviewed hundreds of eighth-graders, and then seen them grow so much more mature and confident. Every student has a different story coming in and also going out.”

Peddie Faculty Made the Difference for You

In the McClellans’ eyes Peddie students share a unique quality. “Almost every Peddie student I’ve worked with over the past 40-plus years has been a good, down-to-earth kid who was fun to know. Some of them were unusually talented. Almost all of them cared about learning and participating, and valued the opportunity to be at Peddie,” Roby said. He has a theory on what sets Peddie kids apart from other boarding school students. “One of the problems with schools with big names is that some of their students think they no longer need to prove themselves. Peddie kids don’t think like that. Because Peddie isn’t famous, our students don’t think they have suddenly become famous by enrolling. They still need to do something important. They recognize that Peddie is a great opportunity that they are lucky to have.” The students who were fortunate enough to have Roby or Elaine as a teacher, coach or mentor treasure their experiences and many remain in touch with the couple years after graduation. The lifelong passion for learning they impart resonates with alumni and so do the life lessons that students glean from the couple. “Roby’s passion for the subject matter he is teaching becomes infectious and his students want more,” said David Bair ’73,

“Peddie has always taken special pride in the strong relationships between its students and teachers. Our faculty members are educators in so many areas of a student’s life.” —Head of School John Green

Continue the Tradition Every gift matters. All gifts make a difference. Give online at www.peddie.org/give

Spring 2010 11


whose daughter, Bryn Bair ’09, studied art history under Roby last year. “I can honestly say that he is one of the lifechanging teachers I came in contact with in my studies. I took an appreciation for art and history beyond Peddie to become a double major in college. This gift enables his students to see and appreciate the world differently for years to come. His masterful way of connecting art to history brings both subjects to life when he adds his strong dose of passion for the subjects.” Chip Craig ’72, a student in one of the first sessions of art history, recalls how Roby played a pivotal role in his maturation. “Having developed by that time a pretty credible academic record at Peddie, I was not inclined to adjust and change during senior year and my fall mid-term grade of a C- spoke to my inability or unwillingness to change,” he said. “Like the wonderful coach and mentor he was, Roby…encouraged and prodded me to apply myself differently, more effectively. I ultimately did very well in the course and, more interestingly, loved it and the subject matter. “In today’s rapid-paced world we often have to wonder if we need to ‘recreate’ an aspect of our services or, even ourselves, so we remain relevant. I was fortunate to have an early lesson, from Roby, about the capacity within me to change, adjust and do better. It was a life lesson, carried out instinctively by an extraordinary educator.” Perhaps no life lesson was more important than the one Noel Gordon ’82 and hundreds of other students took away from watching the McClellans live their lives at Peddie. “I learned how wonderful, exciting and happy you are when you are truly in love with your wife. Mr. McClellan was not only an amazing teacher but he also modeled a fantastically happy partnership with his spouse and the lesson greatly influenced me and many of my classmates,” he said.

For Lisa Lebak ’09, now a Quinnipiac University freshman, and a host of other former students, Elaine’s guidance and everpresent smile made all the difference. “After I was feeling defeated my freshman year because of the rigorous academic curriculum…Mrs. McClellan became my advisor and took me under her wing as if I were one of her own. Her smile and positive attitude allowed me and everyone around her to become more at ease. She has the ability to make you feel as if you are a part of her family.” Roby and Elaine’s influence beyond the books and classroom will be passed along for generations to come and even for future Peddie students. “My parents have always been guided by one principle: If you put the students first and make decisions based on what is good for the students, then you will be successful at your job and the school will be O.K.,” said history teacher Pete McClellan, who joined Peddie in 2003 after teaching at Westfield High School for seven years. “I try to keep this in mind as I approach my job, though I know I’m not quite as disciplined as my folks.” So as retirement inches closer and they look forward to spending time with Pete’s family and with Edson’s family in California plus traveling through Europe in addition to enjoying their beach house, they do have a couple of concerns. “We’ll find out if we really like each other,” said Roby with the warm smile he caps so many statements with. “I told John (Green) he has to keep inviting us to the parties,” said Elaine. And where might they be when school opens next year? “I heard the Jersey Shore is really nice in September.” chronicleXtra To read more tributes to Roby and Elaine McClellan go to www.peddie.org/chronicle

YEARS OF SERVICE 66 44 42 42 42 42* 41 40 40 40 39 39 39* 36

Carl E. Geiger 1918–83 William M. Thompson 1939–42, 1945–86 Ralph E. Harmon 1907–49 Clinton I Sprout 1920–61, 1962–63 Robert L. Tifft 1936–76, 1977–78, 1979–80 Jeffrey R. Holcombe 1968–current J. Walter Reeves 1912–53 George W. Weed 1926–66 Francis A. Towne 1962–2002 Maurice P. Shuman 1935–75 Phares E. Hertzog 1910–49 Oscar L. Rand 1939–42, 1946–82 Roby. B. McClellan 1968–96, 1999–2010 Roger W. Swetland 1898–1934

RETIREMENTS

Anne Marie Gustavson enjoying time at the French table.

Kathy and Gerry Schwieger

Merci et au revoir, Anne Marie Gustavson

The Schwiegers: A Shared Passion for Peddie

“Once you can speak someone’s language, you have a feel for where they are coming from, and can understand their perspective on global issues. Learning languages is what ultimately will help us, both as individuals and as a country.”

Kathy and Gerry Schwieger have had fun during their time at Peddie, and it shows. From the moment Kathy’s eyes lit up upon learning that working here would allow her to teach both in and outside the classroom, to the point when Gerry was hired to work in the Admission office and told by then Head Tom DeGray that “It almost won’t be fair because you’ll have such a good time,” the Schwiegers have truly enjoyed working here; and their enthusiasm has been infectious.

Anne Marie Gustavson is passionate about language, and though she is closing the book on her teaching career after more than 30 years, that passion will remain with her. In fact, one of her first goals upon retirement is to become more proficient in Spanish. “My son-in-law is Mexican, so we now have this whole side of the family who speaks Spanish. I want to work on that,” she explains. Arriving at Peddie 15 years ago, Gustavson filled the position of chair of the Language Department. She began shortly after the Annenberg gift was presented to Peddie, and it was a transformative time for the school. “I was asked to form a five-year plan for our department; so we all put our heads together. Transitional times are difficult, but they bring people together. It was really a wonderful time. Our department did achieve all of our goals — not in five years, but in seven. I think we did a pretty good job.”

TITANS IN TENURE

FACULTY

36 35 35 35 35* 34 36 32 32* 31 31* 31* 31*

Evans Hicks 1935–71 Heister R. Hornberger 1919–54 Everett L. Swift 1940–42, 1946–79 Raymond F. Oram 1964–99 David G. Martin 1975–current Robert B. Lawson 1956–90 Alfred A. Masonheimer 1936–68 Philip M. Hood 1936–68 Elaine McClellan 1978–2010 Clifford E. Timmons 1928–57 Timothy E. Corica 1979–current Linda Geldmacher 1979–current William McMann 1979–current * Denotes still active

Stepping down from the position after an illness, Gustavson imagined that life would be simpler without that responsibility. It turned out to be a more challenging period then she imagined; balancing her level of involvement after investing so much emotional and psychological energy into the workings of the department was a challenge. Nonetheless, she says, “I’ll miss being involved in the workings of the department, and I’ll miss the kids — I really enjoy them.” Her legacy, however, remains. The French table, a faculty/ student group that meets weekly for lunch to speak French exclusively, continues. International day, which she brought to Peddie from her previous school, will go on. The Student Year Abroad program, in which students spend a school year in abroad, is thriving. And, so long as her husband, Eric, continues to teach at Peddie, Anne Marie won’t be a stranger.

One of their most exciting experiences came unexpectedly when Kathy held a meeting to gauge interest in starting a girls’ ice hockey team and found herself in a room full of eager girls. It turned out to be one of those magical moments that pulled together kids from all different perspectives, including the Schwieger’s daughter, Kate, and shaped them into a unified team. And, of course, it was a lot of fun. “Those are the kinds of real teaching experiences I love,” Kathy shares as she reflected on her more than 20 years at the school. “Math has been my vehicle for teaching; I really like math, but teaching is what I do.” Sharing their workplace, and their enthusiasm for it, has made all the difference. Gerry, or “Mr. Enthusiasm,” as Kathy fondly refers to him, felt a part of the community from the start, and has been a “huge fan” ever since. Quickly extending his reach beyond admission work, Gerry moderated the business club and even taught an economics elective. “Nothing is more humbling,” says Gerry, “than teaching for years, getting better and better, and recognizing how incredibly talented the really great teachers are.” Each spring, they host the annual “Schwieger advisee cookout.” Gerry shuttles all of their advisees and guests to their home for volleyball, burgers and hot dogs, and a chance to play. It’s something they look forward to each year, and are nostalgic about as their retirement approaches this spring. “It’s just been so great to teach with friends and share everything,” explains Kathy. “What I’ve found over the course of my career is that my friends come from all age groups, and I enjoy that.”

Stories by Patricia O’Neill

u To make a Peddie Fund gift in honor of a retiring faculty member, please contact the Alumni & Development office at 609-944-7521, kmorse@peddie.org, or www.peddie.org/give. 12 Peddie Chronicle

Spring 2010 13


whose daughter, Bryn Bair ’09, studied art history under Roby last year. “I can honestly say that he is one of the lifechanging teachers I came in contact with in my studies. I took an appreciation for art and history beyond Peddie to become a double major in college. This gift enables his students to see and appreciate the world differently for years to come. His masterful way of connecting art to history brings both subjects to life when he adds his strong dose of passion for the subjects.” Chip Craig ’72, a student in one of the first sessions of art history, recalls how Roby played a pivotal role in his maturation. “Having developed by that time a pretty credible academic record at Peddie, I was not inclined to adjust and change during senior year and my fall mid-term grade of a C- spoke to my inability or unwillingness to change,” he said. “Like the wonderful coach and mentor he was, Roby…encouraged and prodded me to apply myself differently, more effectively. I ultimately did very well in the course and, more interestingly, loved it and the subject matter. “In today’s rapid-paced world we often have to wonder if we need to ‘recreate’ an aspect of our services or, even ourselves, so we remain relevant. I was fortunate to have an early lesson, from Roby, about the capacity within me to change, adjust and do better. It was a life lesson, carried out instinctively by an extraordinary educator.” Perhaps no life lesson was more important than the one Noel Gordon ’82 and hundreds of other students took away from watching the McClellans live their lives at Peddie. “I learned how wonderful, exciting and happy you are when you are truly in love with your wife. Mr. McClellan was not only an amazing teacher but he also modeled a fantastically happy partnership with his spouse and the lesson greatly influenced me and many of my classmates,” he said.

For Lisa Lebak ’09, now a Quinnipiac University freshman, and a host of other former students, Elaine’s guidance and everpresent smile made all the difference. “After I was feeling defeated my freshman year because of the rigorous academic curriculum…Mrs. McClellan became my advisor and took me under her wing as if I were one of her own. Her smile and positive attitude allowed me and everyone around her to become more at ease. She has the ability to make you feel as if you are a part of her family.” Roby and Elaine’s influence beyond the books and classroom will be passed along for generations to come and even for future Peddie students. “My parents have always been guided by one principle: If you put the students first and make decisions based on what is good for the students, then you will be successful at your job and the school will be O.K.,” said history teacher Pete McClellan, who joined Peddie in 2003 after teaching at Westfield High School for seven years. “I try to keep this in mind as I approach my job, though I know I’m not quite as disciplined as my folks.” So as retirement inches closer and they look forward to spending time with Pete’s family and with Edson’s family in California plus traveling through Europe in addition to enjoying their beach house, they do have a couple of concerns. “We’ll find out if we really like each other,” said Roby with the warm smile he caps so many statements with. “I told John (Green) he has to keep inviting us to the parties,” said Elaine. And where might they be when school opens next year? “I heard the Jersey Shore is really nice in September.” chronicleXtra To read more tributes to Roby and Elaine McClellan go to www.peddie.org/chronicle

YEARS OF SERVICE 66 44 42 42 42 42* 41 40 40 40 39 39 39* 36

Carl E. Geiger 1918–83 William M. Thompson 1939–42, 1945–86 Ralph E. Harmon 1907–49 Clinton I Sprout 1920–61, 1962–63 Robert L. Tifft 1936–76, 1977–78, 1979–80 Jeffrey R. Holcombe 1968–current J. Walter Reeves 1912–53 George W. Weed 1926–66 Francis A. Towne 1962–2002 Maurice P. Shuman 1935–75 Phares E. Hertzog 1910–49 Oscar L. Rand 1939–42, 1946–82 Roby. B. McClellan 1968–96, 1999–2010 Roger W. Swetland 1898–1934

RETIREMENTS

Anne Marie Gustavson enjoying time at the French table.

Kathy and Gerry Schwieger

Merci et au revoir, Anne Marie Gustavson

The Schwiegers: A Shared Passion for Peddie

“Once you can speak someone’s language, you have a feel for where they are coming from, and can understand their perspective on global issues. Learning languages is what ultimately will help us, both as individuals and as a country.”

Kathy and Gerry Schwieger have had fun during their time at Peddie, and it shows. From the moment Kathy’s eyes lit up upon learning that working here would allow her to teach both in and outside the classroom, to the point when Gerry was hired to work in the Admission office and told by then Head Tom DeGray that “It almost won’t be fair because you’ll have such a good time,” the Schwiegers have truly enjoyed working here; and their enthusiasm has been infectious.

Anne Marie Gustavson is passionate about language, and though she is closing the book on her teaching career after more than 30 years, that passion will remain with her. In fact, one of her first goals upon retirement is to become more proficient in Spanish. “My son-in-law is Mexican, so we now have this whole side of the family who speaks Spanish. I want to work on that,” she explains. Arriving at Peddie 15 years ago, Gustavson filled the position of chair of the Language Department. She began shortly after the Annenberg gift was presented to Peddie, and it was a transformative time for the school. “I was asked to form a five-year plan for our department; so we all put our heads together. Transitional times are difficult, but they bring people together. It was really a wonderful time. Our department did achieve all of our goals — not in five years, but in seven. I think we did a pretty good job.”

TITANS IN TENURE

FACULTY

36 35 35 35 35* 34 36 32 32* 31 31* 31* 31*

Evans Hicks 1935–71 Heister R. Hornberger 1919–54 Everett L. Swift 1940–42, 1946–79 Raymond F. Oram 1964–99 David G. Martin 1975–current Robert B. Lawson 1956–90 Alfred A. Masonheimer 1936–68 Philip M. Hood 1936–68 Elaine McClellan 1978–2010 Clifford E. Timmons 1928–57 Timothy E. Corica 1979–current Linda Geldmacher 1979–current William McMann 1979–current * Denotes still active

Stepping down from the position after an illness, Gustavson imagined that life would be simpler without that responsibility. It turned out to be a more challenging period then she imagined; balancing her level of involvement after investing so much emotional and psychological energy into the workings of the department was a challenge. Nonetheless, she says, “I’ll miss being involved in the workings of the department, and I’ll miss the kids — I really enjoy them.” Her legacy, however, remains. The French table, a faculty/ student group that meets weekly for lunch to speak French exclusively, continues. International day, which she brought to Peddie from her previous school, will go on. The Student Year Abroad program, in which students spend a school year in abroad, is thriving. And, so long as her husband, Eric, continues to teach at Peddie, Anne Marie won’t be a stranger.

One of their most exciting experiences came unexpectedly when Kathy held a meeting to gauge interest in starting a girls’ ice hockey team and found herself in a room full of eager girls. It turned out to be one of those magical moments that pulled together kids from all different perspectives, including the Schwieger’s daughter, Kate, and shaped them into a unified team. And, of course, it was a lot of fun. “Those are the kinds of real teaching experiences I love,” Kathy shares as she reflected on her more than 20 years at the school. “Math has been my vehicle for teaching; I really like math, but teaching is what I do.” Sharing their workplace, and their enthusiasm for it, has made all the difference. Gerry, or “Mr. Enthusiasm,” as Kathy fondly refers to him, felt a part of the community from the start, and has been a “huge fan” ever since. Quickly extending his reach beyond admission work, Gerry moderated the business club and even taught an economics elective. “Nothing is more humbling,” says Gerry, “than teaching for years, getting better and better, and recognizing how incredibly talented the really great teachers are.” Each spring, they host the annual “Schwieger advisee cookout.” Gerry shuttles all of their advisees and guests to their home for volleyball, burgers and hot dogs, and a chance to play. It’s something they look forward to each year, and are nostalgic about as their retirement approaches this spring. “It’s just been so great to teach with friends and share everything,” explains Kathy. “What I’ve found over the course of my career is that my friends come from all age groups, and I enjoy that.”

Stories by Patricia O’Neill

u To make a Peddie Fund gift in honor of a retiring faculty member, please contact the Alumni & Development office at 609-944-7521, kmorse@peddie.org, or www.peddie.org/give. 12 Peddie Chronicle

Spring 2010 13


About Modern School

DESTINATION:

INDIA Peddie is teaming up with a premier school in the world’s largest democracy. By Steve Kelly, Chronicle editor A tradition dating back to 1874, state dinners are the most formal honor a United States president can offer a foreign dignitary. When President Obama chose to host his first such gala, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh was the guest of honor. The largest democracy in the world, India touts one of the fastest-growing economies around the globe and the secondlargest work force on the planet — 500 million-plus reasons, including a highly educated middle class, why many scholars and President Obama believe India could be the next global superpower. Just days after the president toasted India in November, Peddie students were learning about the significance of the Washington, D.C., event in Modern India, a refocused class in the History Department. The course is a key element in a school-wide initiative to establish a peer-school relationship in India. The effort is emblematic of the school’s proven ability to stay ahead of the curve. The blueprint for the peer-school program is Peddie’s successful relationship with EFZ School in Shanghai. “It started with our Asian Studies program — we weren’t necessarily ready to go to India right away, but soon those two pieces sort of came together,” said Catherine Rodrigue, assistant head for teaching/academic programs. “Most importantly, educating students about India and having a presence there fits with our fundamental mission to be more globally connected.” The plan gained momentum with the 2007 hiring of Brad Nicholson, an outstanding educator who has a master’s degree in Islamic/Indian studies plus an impressive record of leading study-abroad programs and extensive experience traveling in India. 14 Peddie Chronicle

“John (Green) had his eye on India before I was hired, and my experience in India is one of the main reasons for the school’s interest in me,” said Nicholson during an interview in his classroom. “Peddie has been involved with Asia, through EFZ and in the classroom, for a long time. “We chose to focus on a country that we really believe is a rising power. I think in a globalized economy you can’t really avoid the world in general, but India especially.” Nicholson wasted little time fine-tuning an existing course Peddie had offered on India and Mahatma Gandhi, who led his country to independence before being assassinated in 1948. “I’ve tried as much as possible to make it an interdisciplinary course…I’ve added pieces of Indian culture to the history, like religion and Bollywood films that I felt the kids needed to know in order to understand contemporary India,” said Nicholson. “This course is set up in a somewhat experiential way.” He solicited the opinions of parents of Peddie’s IndianAmerican students, many of whom call New Jersey home, on what they think should be part of the Modern India curriculum, inviting those who operate businesses with ties to India to speak to his students. Fellow teachers add yet another dimension. “Cathy Watkins did yoga with the kids, and Paul Watkins came to talk about cricket, which was a lot of fun. Scott McCormick did a unit on environmental issues in India,” said Nicholson, “and several of the Indian-American parents came in to talk about India from their perspective and about the Indian economy.” Assistant Head Rodrigue described the development of Modern India and other electives at the school as an “organic process” that is oftentimes teacher-driven. Junior Christopher Anastasio, who took the initial offering of Modern India last spring, sees the course paying dividends for him in the future. “I hope to pursue Asian studies as a minor or major in college,” he said. “I see India as a major future business partner with America. Knowing about the structure of India will definitely help in the business world.”

Location: New Delhi Faculty: 130 Enrollment: 2,800, grades 6 through 12, includes some boarders Campus: 27 acres in urban setting Famous alum: Former Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi Motto: “Perfection cannot be achieved by the weak.” Guiding principles: Truthfulness, unselfishness, frankness and self-control Dress code: Uniforms in school color, blue Nickname: The Modernites

Brad Nicholson working with junior Hope Callari and seniors Steve Jacobi and Connor Signorin.

Athletics: Swimming, tennis, basketball, squash, badminton, cricket, hockey, football, and table tennis. Swimming and table tennis are sponsored by Reebok. Website: www.modernschool.net

While Nicholson shaped the course, he also launched a The partnership puts Peddie in unique company. “There are search for a peer school in India that Peddie could partner with. very few schools going to India at this point,” said Nicholson, In November 2008, he, fellow history teacher Alison Hogarth “and almost all of the schools that do go there are going for and McCormick traveled community service work rather to India. than in any kind of exchange “We were looking for schools capacity.” that are similar to Peddie,” said The first official exchange Nicholson. ”Their kids could between Peddie and Modern just as easily go to Peddie. School is taking place this month They’re targeting the same with eight Indian students, universities when they come to Modern’s principal and a faculty the U.S. that our kids are. member immersing themselves Nicholson narrowed the in everything Peddie. list down to three schools but In March, Nicholson and ultimately found Modern Hogarth led eight Peddie School in New Delhi, a private students on a 14-day tour of coed school, which lists former India. Issues of globalization and Peddie chose to partner with Modern School, in part, because of Indian Prime Minister Indira the many hurdles India faces as the New Delhi school’s annual leadership conference. Gandhi among its graduates, it continues to develop were the to be the best fit, thanks to a focus of the trip, which included distinctive conference the school hosts every November. a tour of New Delhi led by formerly homeless children, The Community Development & Leadership Summit followed by a visit the next day to the affluent Delhi suburb is an international gathering of young minds that includes of Gurgaon, a high-tech hotbed and home to the software delegations from Australia, China, Egypt, Great Britain, development firm of Sanjeev Midha, a Cranbury resident and Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, father of Ashim Midha ’09 and Akhil ’12. Singapore, South Africa, Thailand and Ukraine — and will “One of the themes of the course is how India is trying to include Peddie students later this year if all goes according deal with the extreme polarization of poverty and wealth,” said to plan. The summit aims to instill in students a sense of social Nicholson, citing some of the challenges facing the developing responsibility and leadership qualities, a point of emphasis in country. “Some of these things are difficult to really drive home Peddie’s recently released Strategic Vision for 2010–15. without the trip.” “It’s very academically intense and it really matches well Other stops included a guided tour of the Taj Mahal, a with our stated goal of developing global leaders,” said get-to-know-you visit to Modern School and a trip to Bandra Nicholson. “Twenty years from now these kids are going to — setting for the Oscar-winning film Slumdog Millionaire — be working together in high-level corporate, research, and where senior Tino Kardassis presented a school for homeless educational positions. The fact that we can bring them together children with a check representing money raised by Peddie early and get them to start learning how to interact and to lead students. The Lakhanpal family (Nikhil ’09 and Rahul ’12) also is really appealing.” hosted the group for a traditional Indian dinner in Amritsar.

Spring 2010 15


About Modern School

DESTINATION:

INDIA Peddie is teaming up with a premier school in the world’s largest democracy. By Steve Kelly, Chronicle editor A tradition dating back to 1874, state dinners are the most formal honor a United States president can offer a foreign dignitary. When President Obama chose to host his first such gala, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh was the guest of honor. The largest democracy in the world, India touts one of the fastest-growing economies around the globe and the secondlargest work force on the planet — 500 million-plus reasons, including a highly educated middle class, why many scholars and President Obama believe India could be the next global superpower. Just days after the president toasted India in November, Peddie students were learning about the significance of the Washington, D.C., event in Modern India, a refocused class in the History Department. The course is a key element in a school-wide initiative to establish a peer-school relationship in India. The effort is emblematic of the school’s proven ability to stay ahead of the curve. The blueprint for the peer-school program is Peddie’s successful relationship with EFZ School in Shanghai. “It started with our Asian Studies program — we weren’t necessarily ready to go to India right away, but soon those two pieces sort of came together,” said Catherine Rodrigue, assistant head for teaching/academic programs. “Most importantly, educating students about India and having a presence there fits with our fundamental mission to be more globally connected.” The plan gained momentum with the 2007 hiring of Brad Nicholson, an outstanding educator who has a master’s degree in Islamic/Indian studies plus an impressive record of leading study-abroad programs and extensive experience traveling in India. 14 Peddie Chronicle

“John (Green) had his eye on India before I was hired, and my experience in India is one of the main reasons for the school’s interest in me,” said Nicholson during an interview in his classroom. “Peddie has been involved with Asia, through EFZ and in the classroom, for a long time. “We chose to focus on a country that we really believe is a rising power. I think in a globalized economy you can’t really avoid the world in general, but India especially.” Nicholson wasted little time fine-tuning an existing course Peddie had offered on India and Mahatma Gandhi, who led his country to independence before being assassinated in 1948. “I’ve tried as much as possible to make it an interdisciplinary course…I’ve added pieces of Indian culture to the history, like religion and Bollywood films that I felt the kids needed to know in order to understand contemporary India,” said Nicholson. “This course is set up in a somewhat experiential way.” He solicited the opinions of parents of Peddie’s IndianAmerican students, many of whom call New Jersey home, on what they think should be part of the Modern India curriculum, inviting those who operate businesses with ties to India to speak to his students. Fellow teachers add yet another dimension. “Cathy Watkins did yoga with the kids, and Paul Watkins came to talk about cricket, which was a lot of fun. Scott McCormick did a unit on environmental issues in India,” said Nicholson, “and several of the Indian-American parents came in to talk about India from their perspective and about the Indian economy.” Assistant Head Rodrigue described the development of Modern India and other electives at the school as an “organic process” that is oftentimes teacher-driven. Junior Christopher Anastasio, who took the initial offering of Modern India last spring, sees the course paying dividends for him in the future. “I hope to pursue Asian studies as a minor or major in college,” he said. “I see India as a major future business partner with America. Knowing about the structure of India will definitely help in the business world.”

Location: New Delhi Faculty: 130 Enrollment: 2,800, grades 6 through 12, includes some boarders Campus: 27 acres in urban setting Famous alum: Former Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi Motto: “Perfection cannot be achieved by the weak.” Guiding principles: Truthfulness, unselfishness, frankness and self-control Dress code: Uniforms in school color, blue Nickname: The Modernites

Brad Nicholson working with junior Hope Callari and seniors Steve Jacobi and Connor Signorin.

Athletics: Swimming, tennis, basketball, squash, badminton, cricket, hockey, football, and table tennis. Swimming and table tennis are sponsored by Reebok. Website: www.modernschool.net

While Nicholson shaped the course, he also launched a The partnership puts Peddie in unique company. “There are search for a peer school in India that Peddie could partner with. very few schools going to India at this point,” said Nicholson, In November 2008, he, fellow history teacher Alison Hogarth “and almost all of the schools that do go there are going for and McCormick traveled community service work rather to India. than in any kind of exchange “We were looking for schools capacity.” that are similar to Peddie,” said The first official exchange Nicholson. “Their kids could between Peddie and Modern just as easily go to Peddie. School is taking place this month They’re targeting the same with eight Indian students, universities when they come to Modern’s principal and a faculty the U.S. that our kids are.” member immersing themselves Nicholson narrowed the in everything Peddie. list down to three schools but In March, Nicholson and ultimately found Modern Hogarth led eight Peddie School in New Delhi, a private students on a 14-day tour of coed school, which lists former India. Issues of globalization and Peddie chose to partner with Modern School, in part, because of Indian Prime Minister Indira the many hurdles India faces as the New Delhi school’s annual leadership conference. Gandhi among its graduates, it continues to develop were the to be the best fit, thanks to a focus of the trip, which included distinctive conference the school hosts every November. a tour of New Delhi led by formerly homeless children, The Community Development & Leadership Summit followed by a visit the next day to the affluent Delhi suburb is an international gathering of young minds that includes of Gurgaon, a high-tech hotbed and home to the software delegations from Australia, China, Egypt, Great Britain, development firm of Sanjeev Midha, a Cranbury resident and Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, father of Ashim Midha ’09 and Akhil ’12. Singapore, South Africa, Thailand and Ukraine — and will “One of the themes of the course is how India is trying to include Peddie students later this year if all goes according deal with the extreme polarization of poverty and wealth,” said to plan. The summit aims to instill in students a sense of social Nicholson, citing some of the challenges facing the developing responsibility and leadership qualities, a point of emphasis in country. “Some of these things are difficult to really drive home Peddie’s recently released Strategic Vision for 2010–15. without the trip.” “It’s very academically intense and it really matches well Other stops included a guided tour of the Taj Mahal, a with our stated goal of developing global leaders,” said get-to-know-you visit to Modern School and a trip to Bandra Nicholson. “Twenty years from now these kids are going to — setting for the Oscar-winning film Slumdog Millionaire — be working together in high-level corporate, research, and where senior Tino Kardassis presented a school for homeless educational positions. The fact that we can bring them together children with a check representing money raised by Peddie early and get them to start learning how to interact and to lead students. The Lakhanpal family (Nikhil ’09 and Rahul ’12) also is really appealing.” hosted the group for a traditional Indian dinner in Amritsar.

Spring 2010 15


SPORTS

INTRODUCING THE ‘GAME

CHANGER’ Peddie’s new aquatic center is a difference-maker not only for the swim team but for the entire community. Peddie’s new state-of-the-art aquatic center, the sparkling centerpiece in the renovation of the Ian H. Graham Athletic Center, opened in January to rave reviews and a large crowd that saw Falcon swimmers defeat rival Germantown Academy. Designed by RMJH Hillier, the eco-friendly natatorium is the newest gem on the school’s impressive landscape. The pool, which features a flexible design, is considered a ‘game-changer’ not only for the school’s renowned swim team but also for the entire school population and its neighboring communities. Nearly twice the size of the pool in the former Clinton Sprout Natatorium, the new pool is 35 meters long by 25 yards wide, holds 413,233 gallons of water and includes a moveable bulkhead that, in effect, allows the school to change dimensions of the pool and create two pools. For swim coach Greg Wriede ’95, having a larger pool affords him the opportunity to incorporate the best training exercises into the team’s practice workouts. He can utilize the pool at full length (eight 35-meter lanes) or run as many as 15 lanes cross-wise at 25 yards. “The new pool is a game changer for us,” said Wriede, a former All-American at Harvard. “It allows more flexibility in practice design, more specific workouts for individuals based on their needs and goals, and it provides a hybrid training system where we can get the speed of a short course and the aerobic endurance of a long course pool all in one.

“We’re very excited about our move. We’ve always gotten the job done with the six-lane pool, but this is a major step up.” By utilizing the 9,000-pound bulkhead, which can be moved into place in 10 minutes, the pool can also be reconfigured into an eight-lane, 25-yard-by-25-yard pool with, essentially, a separate five-lane pool. The innovative, flexible pool set-up will serve Peddie on multiple fronts. Peddie Aquatics will be able to expand its programs and conduct youth swim lessons during swim meets. In addition, swimming will be incorporated into the school’s physical activities program for the first time. “This tremendous facility supports the mission of our school by recognizing the vital role that sports and fitness play in providing the highest quality educational experience,” said Director of Athletics Sue Cabot. “The new facility also gives us the opportunity to share space with the community as we expand our programs.” The natatorium, with a seating capacity of 300, features a design that challenges the rules of energy consumption. The building’s exterior is composed of a clear architectural cladding material that allows daylight to naturally filter into the building’s interior. Meanwhile, a 20-inch cavity between the building’s exterior layers will collect sunlight and heated air, which will help warm the building and reduce energy costs. Another “green” dimension of the building is the pool’s filtration system, which is expected to save thousands of gallons of water each year and significantly reduce chemical usage. The system will even improve the air quality inside the building by reducing the strong aroma of chlorine usually found in indoor pool facilities. The former Sprout Natatorium, which opened in 1972 and was home to many great Peddie swimming memories, is being converted into a new fitness center.

The aquatic center got off to a flying start as the swim team defeated rival Germantown Academy. 16 Peddie Chronicle

Spring 2010 17


SPORTS

INTRODUCING THE ‘GAME

CHANGER’ Peddie’s new aquatic center is a difference-maker not only for the swim team but for the entire community. Peddie’s new state-of-the-art aquatic center, the sparkling centerpiece in the renovation of the Ian H. Graham Athletic Center, opened in January to rave reviews and a large crowd that saw Falcon swimmers defeat rival Germantown Academy. Designed by RMJH Hillier, the eco-friendly natatorium is the newest gem on the school’s impressive landscape. The pool, which features a flexible design, is considered a ‘game-changer’ not only for the school’s renowned swim team but also for the entire school population and its neighboring communities. Nearly twice the size of the pool in the former Clinton Sprout Natatorium, the new pool is 35 meters long by 25 yards wide, holds 413,233 gallons of water and includes a moveable bulkhead that, in effect, allows the school to change dimensions of the pool and create two pools. For swim coach Greg Wriede ’95, having a larger pool affords him the opportunity to incorporate the best training exercises into the team’s practice workouts. He can utilize the pool at full length (eight 35-meter lanes) or run as many as 15 lanes cross-wise at 25 yards. “The new pool is a game changer for us,” said Wriede, a former All-American at Harvard. “It allows more flexibility in practice design, more specific workouts for individuals based on their needs and goals, and it provides a hybrid training system where we can get the speed of a short course and the aerobic endurance of a long course pool all in one.

“We’re very excited about our move. We’ve always gotten the job done with the six-lane pool, but this is a major step up.” By utilizing the 9,000-pound bulkhead, which can be moved into place in 10 minutes, the pool can also be reconfigured into an eight-lane, 25-yard-by-25-yard pool with, essentially, a separate five-lane pool. The innovative, flexible pool set-up will serve Peddie on multiple fronts. Peddie Aquatics will be able to expand its programs and conduct youth swim lessons during swim meets. In addition, swimming will be incorporated into the school’s physical activities program for the first time. “This tremendous facility supports the mission of our school by recognizing the vital role that sports and fitness play in providing the highest quality educational experience,” said Director of Athletics Sue Cabot. “The new facility also gives us the opportunity to share space with the community as we expand our programs.” The natatorium, with a seating capacity of 300, features a design that challenges the rules of energy consumption. The building’s exterior is composed of a clear architectural cladding material that allows daylight to naturally filter into the building’s interior. Meanwhile, a 20-inch cavity between the building’s exterior layers will collect sunlight and heated air, which will help warm the building and reduce energy costs. Another “green” dimension of the building is the pool’s filtration system, which is expected to save thousands of gallons of water each year and significantly reduce chemical usage. The system will even improve the air quality inside the building by reducing the strong aroma of chlorine usually found in indoor pool facilities. The former Sprout Natatorium, which opened in 1972 and was home to many great Peddie swimming memories, is being converted into a new fitness center.

The aquatic center got off to a flying start as the swim team defeated rival Germantown Academy. 16 Peddie Chronicle

Spring 2010 17


The Power of Peddie Swimming For alumni, the true measure of the 100-year-old program is in the values they learned and the friendships they made. By Doug Mariboe ’69 Peddie swimmers know the drill: The alarm clock rudely kick-starts the day, then it’s a pre-dawn trek across campus and lap after lap following the black line at the bottom of the pool. After classes, you’re back in the pool, refining strokes, building endurance, honing turns — all to pare fractions of seconds off your time on race day. For Peddie swimming, the rigorous routine works. The program, which marked its 100th season this year with the opening of a gleaming new aquatic center in January, is regarded as among the best in the country. Peddie has produced eight national titles, scores of scholastic records, 19 Eastern crowns and eight Olympians, two of whom own gold medals. As the program celebrates a century of excellence, generations of former Falcons can be proud of the many achievements and accolades. But for many swimmers, the true measure of Peddie swimming is in the perseverance, dedication, discipline and other values they learned — as well as the enduring friendships they made along the way.

UUU “Hey, Rocco!” came a familiar voice from the stands. Rocco Aceto ’82 had just finished a race at the 1986 Atlantic Coast Conference Championships and found former teammate John Jefferson ’82 yelling down from the bleachers. “Looking up at John I had to decide whether to warm down and get mentally prepared for my next race or expect to take a lambasting from my coach for leaving the pool deck,” said Aceto, an All-American at North Carolina State University and member of the Peddie Sports Hall of Fame. “So I scurried over the railing to connect with my teammate. He complimented me and my future Hall of Fame relay partners Dan McDonough, Andy Sayko and Bill Barr. John was not a gifted swimmer, but I actually looked to him for inspiration because he was never going to quit nor be outworked.” Whether they are lane-one champions chasing national records or lane-six competitors simply striving for their personal best, Peddie swimmers support each other and foster a culture of camaraderie. “I am that guy…the last guy in the slowest lane, but today I am usually the first person in my age group out of the water in most of my triathlons,” said Jefferson. “I was so honored that Rocco remembered me because we were not buddies in high school, but I looked up to him as an elite athlete. Lane one was a different world. Whatever they were doing over there I never saw. I was just trying to make my interval and stay on the team.

100 YEARS High-Water Marks in 100 Years of Peddie Swimming Peddie’s renowned swimming program has stockpiled championship trophies, broken records, and produced dozens of worldclass scholar-athletes over the years.

18 Peddie Chronicle

1909 The Peddie Swim Club is

started by William Fairhurst ’11, father of William ’39 and Tom ’47, both of whom later served as swim team captains. Team trained in Alumni Gymnasium pool, dubbed the “bathtub.”

1911 First meet vs. Lawrenceville,

a loss.

1920

“At the ACC meet, I said to myself, ‘Rocco is still on top of his game, high school is all done and we’re friends.’ ” UUU Outstanding athletic ability and a swim-to-win attitude took Jane Skillman ’91 to international competitions and to Stanford, but her fondest recollections are not of the award podiums.

1952 Peddie boys win their first

Eastern Interscholastic championships at Princeton University pool, defeating Lawrenceville.

1972 The Clinton Sprout Natatorium

and the Ian H. Graham Athletic Center open.

1973 Three years after girls are

Swim club, which died out during World War I, is revived by Clinton I. Sprout, who coached until 1954.

admitted to Peddie, they get their own swim team.

1951 25-yard, six-lane pool opens in Mills Gymnasium.

Easterns title and first of four National Championships.

1977 Peddie boys win their second

UUU

“Part of the power of Peddie swimming was the camaraderie and the feeling it gave you to be a part of that team,” said Skillman, whose distance freestyle times are still envied today. “I would argue that the sense of belonging was as much a part of it as the winning. Those who are involved in it know what an enormous role their teammates play in one’s individual success.” None played a greater role than Skillman’s distance swimming “buddy” in lane one, Alissa MacMillan ’91. A consistent contributor to Eastern Championships in the freestyle events, MacMillan epitomized the team’s dynamic that raised the bar of success. “Alissa’s intensity made everyone work harder, and I am proud she was my teammate,” Skillman said. “I am still in awe of her commitment to the daily regimen and ability to make an impact and lead by example.”

1977

1981

Peddie girls win their first Eastern Interscholastic championships.

1982 Girls’ team repeats at Easterns

and wins first of four National Championships.

1990 Both the boys’ and girls’ teams

win National Championships.

1991 Dynasty! The girls’ team wins

their third straight national title and the boys their second in a row.

“I have a lot of recollections about morning workouts and every once in a while I have flashbacks,” said Daren Demcsik ’90, a Peddie All-American and Fordham University captain. “I roomed with Royce Sharp ‘91 (a 1992 Olympian) my senior year, one of the most intense focused individuals I’ve ever run into. I remember rolling out of bed and putting on the headphones trekking down to the athletic center semi-awake wondering what I am doing jumping into a cold pool when it was 20 degrees out in the middle of winter. It was one of those moments when you ask yourself. ‘What was I thinking?’

UUU

“One of the great things about the team, and how Chris coached, is that, especially when it came to practice, every individual was taken as seriously as the next, no matter what our times and what our goals were,” said MacMillan. “I was a much better swimmer than I ever should have been because of the team, the level of commitment of everyone involved, and friends like Jane.”

1920

It has been said that swimming is the only sport in which you go from point A to point A and repeat the task for two hours even under formidable conditions. Over the past four decades, Peddie swimmers have hiked across the football field to suit up for a 5:30 a.m. practice.

“But at the same time you realize the benefits of doing that. Until recently, I used to get up early and go for a jog during the winter just to keep in shape. People think I am crazy, but it’s been a part of me since I was 16 years old. The discipline I learned in the pool stayed with me.”

Both Skillman and MacMillan credit coach Chris Martin for providing the environment that allowed swimmers to reach beyond their dreams of what was possible.

1909

Skillman added, “The feeling of accomplishment that was set in high school for hard work and dedication is something I’ve been trying to match in my life every day, and I am not embarrassed to say that.”

J.J. Clark ’76 arrived at Peddie in the fall of 1971 as an eighth-grader and had the privilege of being on teams that defeated Lawrenceville, Hill and Mercersburg for the first time. “Peddie swimming was defined by its competitiveness and dedication to win, and it spilled over into academics,” Clark said. “Every year we climbed another step on the ladder and brought name recognition to the program. We knew that colleges were going to give team members a hard look. For

1990

1992 Nelson Diebel ’90 wins a pair

of gold medals (100m Breaststroke and 4 x 100m Medley Relay) in the Barcelona ’92 Summer Olympics.

1995 Peddie boys and girls swimmers become the first team to sweep the relays in nationals, an achievement that still stands alone today. In doing so, the boys win the national championship and girls finish second. 2000

Backstroker B.J. Bedford ’90 captures gold at the Sydney 2000 Summer Olympics as a member of the

1992

2000

2010

U.S. 4 x 100m Medley Relay team.

2001 Former Falcon swimmer Greg Wriede ’95 takes over the reins as coach. 2007 It’s all Peddie at the Easterns with the both the boys and the girls taking home the titles. 2010 The school’s new state-of-theart aquatic center, a 35-meter, eightlane gem, opens. Peddie sweeps rival Germantown Academy. Spring 2010 19


The Power of Peddie Swimming For alumni, the true measure of the 100-year-old program is in the values they learned and the friendships they made. By Doug Mariboe ’69 Peddie swimmers know the drill: The alarm clock rudely kick-starts the day, then it’s a pre-dawn trek across campus and lap after lap following the black line at the bottom of the pool. After classes, you’re back in the pool, refining strokes, building endurance, honing turns — all to pare fractions of seconds off your time on race day. For Peddie swimming, the rigorous routine works. The program, which marked its 100th season this year with the opening of a gleaming new aquatic center in January, is regarded as among the best in the country. Peddie has produced eight national titles, scores of scholastic records, 19 Eastern crowns and eight Olympians, two of whom own gold medals. As the program celebrates a century of excellence, generations of former Falcons can be proud of the many achievements and accolades. But for many swimmers, the true measure of Peddie swimming is in the perseverance, dedication, discipline and other values they learned — as well as the enduring friendships they made along the way.

UUU “Hey, Rocco!” came a familiar voice from the stands. Rocco Aceto ’82 had just finished a race at the 1986 Atlantic Coast Conference Championships and found former teammate John Jefferson ’82 yelling down from the bleachers. “Looking up at John I had to decide whether to warm down and get mentally prepared for my next race or expect to take a lambasting from my coach for leaving the pool deck,” said Aceto, an All-American at North Carolina State University and member of the Peddie Sports Hall of Fame. “So I scurried over the railing to connect with my teammate. He complimented me and my future Hall of Fame relay partners Dan McDonough, Andy Sayko and Bill Barr. John was not a gifted swimmer, but I actually looked to him for inspiration because he was never going to quit nor be outworked.” Whether they are lane-one champions chasing national records or lane-six competitors simply striving for their personal best, Peddie swimmers support each other and foster a culture of camaraderie. “I am that guy…the last guy in the slowest lane, but today I am usually the first person in my age group out of the water in most of my triathlons,” said Jefferson. “I was so honored that Rocco remembered me because we were not buddies in high school, but I looked up to him as an elite athlete. Lane one was a different world. Whatever they were doing over there I never saw. I was just trying to make my interval and stay on the team.

100 YEARS High-Water Marks in 100 Years of Peddie Swimming Peddie’s renowned swimming program has stockpiled championship trophies, broken records, and produced dozens of worldclass scholar-athletes over the years.

18 Peddie Chronicle

1909 The Peddie Swim Club is

started by William Fairhurst ’11, father of William ’39 and Tom ’47, both of whom later served as swim team captains. Team trained in Alumni Gymnasium pool, dubbed the “bathtub.”

1911 First meet vs. Lawrenceville,

a loss.

1920

“At the ACC meet, I said to myself, ‘Rocco is still on top of his game, high school is all done and we’re friends.’ ” UUU Outstanding athletic ability and a swim-to-win attitude took Jane Skillman ’91 to international competitions and to Stanford, but her fondest recollections are not of the award podiums.

1952 Peddie boys win their first

Eastern Interscholastic championships at Princeton University pool, defeating Lawrenceville.

1972 The Clinton Sprout Natatorium

and the Ian H. Graham Athletic Center open.

1973 Three years after girls are

Swim club, which died out during World War I, is revived by Clinton I. Sprout, who coached until 1954.

admitted to Peddie, they get their own swim team.

1951 25-yard, six-lane pool opens in Mills Gymnasium.

Easterns title and first of four National Championships.

1977 Peddie boys win their second

UUU

“Part of the power of Peddie swimming was the camaraderie and the feeling it gave you to be a part of that team,” said Skillman, whose distance freestyle times are still envied today. “I would argue that the sense of belonging was as much a part of it as the winning. Those who are involved in it know what an enormous role their teammates play in one’s individual success.” None played a greater role than Skillman’s distance swimming “buddy” in lane one, Alissa MacMillan ’91. A consistent contributor to Eastern Championships in the freestyle events, MacMillan epitomized the team’s dynamic that raised the bar of success. “Alissa’s intensity made everyone work harder, and I am proud she was my teammate,” Skillman said. “I am still in awe of her commitment to the daily regimen and ability to make an impact and lead by example.”

1977

1981

Peddie girls win their first Eastern Interscholastic championships.

1982 Girls’ team repeats at Easterns

and wins first of four National Championships.

1990 Both the boys’ and girls’ teams

win National Championships.

1991 Dynasty! The girls’ team wins

their third straight national title and the boys their second in a row.

“I have a lot of recollections about morning workouts and every once in a while I have flashbacks,” said Daren Demcsik ’90, a Peddie All-American and Fordham University captain. “I roomed with Royce Sharp ‘91 (a 1992 Olympian) my senior year, one of the most intense focused individuals I’ve ever run into. I remember rolling out of bed and putting on the headphones trekking down to the athletic center semi-awake wondering what I am doing jumping into a cold pool when it was 20 degrees out in the middle of winter. It was one of those moments when you ask yourself. ‘What was I thinking?’

UUU

“One of the great things about the team, and how Chris coached, is that, especially when it came to practice, every individual was taken as seriously as the next, no matter what our times and what our goals were,” said MacMillan. “I was a much better swimmer than I ever should have been because of the team, the level of commitment of everyone involved, and friends like Jane.”

1920

It has been said that swimming is the only sport in which you go from point A to point A and repeat the task for two hours even under formidable conditions. Over the past four decades, Peddie swimmers have hiked across the football field to suit up for a 5:30 a.m. practice.

“But at the same time you realize the benefits of doing that. Until recently, I used to get up early and go for a jog during the winter just to keep in shape. People think I am crazy, but it’s been a part of me since I was 16 years old. The discipline I learned in the pool stayed with me.”

Both Skillman and MacMillan credit coach Chris Martin for providing the environment that allowed swimmers to reach beyond their dreams of what was possible.

1909

Skillman added, “The feeling of accomplishment that was set in high school for hard work and dedication is something I’ve been trying to match in my life every day, and I am not embarrassed to say that.”

J.J. Clark ’76 arrived at Peddie in the fall of 1971 as an eighth-grader and had the privilege of being on teams that defeated Lawrenceville, Hill and Mercersburg for the first time. “Peddie swimming was defined by its competitiveness and dedication to win, and it spilled over into academics,” Clark said. “Every year we climbed another step on the ladder and brought name recognition to the program. We knew that colleges were going to give team members a hard look. For

1990

1992 Nelson Diebel ’90 wins a pair

of gold medals (100m Breaststroke and 4 x 100m Medley Relay) in the Barcelona ’92 Summer Olympics.

1995 Peddie boys and girls swimmers become the first team to sweep the relays in nationals, an achievement that still stands alone today. In doing so, the boys win the national championship and girls finish second. 2000

Backstroker B.J. Bedford ’90 captures gold at the Sydney 2000 Summer Olympics as a member of the

1992

2000

2010

U.S. 4 x 100m Medley Relay team.

2001 Former Falcon swimmer Greg Wriede ’95 takes over the reins as coach. 2007 It’s all Peddie at the Easterns with both the boys and the girls taking home the titles. 2010 The school’s new state-of-theart aquatic center, a 35-meter, eightlane gem, opens. Peddie sweeps rival Germantown Academy. Spring 2010 19


me, it was Benn Doyle ’76 who brought so many people to the program and put Peddie over the top.” A member of the Peddie Sports Hall of Fame, Doyle recalls Clark’s introductory speech at his induction.

Attention, Former

u Falcon Swimmers

“There could not have been a better suited classmate that portrayed the spirit, fun, enthusiasm and friendship of Peddie swimming,” Doyle said. “He was a great promoter and could get students away from their busy schedules and come to a meet and sit in a hot, poorly ventilated grandstand to cheer us on.”

You are cordially invited to participate in a special alumni swim meet on Saturday June 5 in Peddie’s new aquatic center.

UUU

Please contact Karin Morse for more details at kmorse@peddie.org or 609.944.7609.

The Peddie swimming tradition is firmly rooted in the selfless teammate, and most of all, the bond of camaraderie that few programs in the country can match. Carol Ammermueller ’75 knows that as well as anyone. She stepped onto the pool deck of the old Mills Gymnasium in the fall of 1971 and made history. She was the first girl to swim for Peddie, but received encouragement from coach Bob Ballou and a boys’ squad that fostered a challenging and respectful workout environment. “No one would join the team with me,” Ammermueller recalled. “I didn’t want to be the only girl and be in a tank suit…that I remember clearly. But, I always felt supported and encouraged by the team even though I was 14 years old and totally self-conscious and intimidated. I thank Coach for that and my teammates. Alan Clancy ’74 took me under his wing and perfected my flip turn. Tom Gerber ’74 was right by his side, and they stayed after practice to help me become a better swimmer. “I will never forget my first race in the 100-yard freestyle against Blair. J.J. Clark was in lane four and I was in five. J.J. won and I took second. Talk about adrenaline!” said Ammermueller, who credited her positive team experience for setting the stage of the meteoric rise of the girls’ program.

UUU Amy Jacobi ’07, who owns top-five times at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the 50m through the 500m free, and the 100m backstroke, reflected on her good fortune to be a member of a team guided by the values of respect and responsibility under current coach Greg Wriede ’95. “Swimming at Peddie is an experience I don’t think can happen at many other places. The team is so close-knit: eating with each other in the dining hall two or three times a day, spending almost four hours together at practice, being in classes with a teammate or two, sometimes having a swimmer as your roommate. It all adds up to a lot of together time… caring for each other, which is why Peddie swimming is like a family.” chronicleXtra To read about more former Falcon swimmers go to www.peddie.org/chronicle

Move over the Class of ’97, you have company The Class of ’10 became the second class in the 22-year history of the Potter-Kelley Cup to complete its four years at Peddie with a perfect 4–0 mark against Blair Academy in the annual fall sports competition, joining the Class of ’97. With the triumph, Peddie now holds a commanding 15–4–3 advantage over its rivals from upstate. The Class of ’10’s final Blair Day triumph was a convincing one. On a muddy track in Hightstown, the Falcons raced out to an early lead and dominated the competition, beating the Bucs, 9–1–1. Afterward, Head of School John Green raised the cup for a sea of gold and blue partisans who had assembled at the school’s new turf field complex to watch the boys’ varsity soccer game, which ended in a 1–1 tie.

Seniors Will O’Connor and A.J. Helfet hoist the Potter-Kelley Cup.

Moments earlier, the Falcon football team clinched a hardfought 23–20 victory, using big plays on offense and a determined defensive effort at Maurice P. Shuman field. Senior Evan Rothfeld scored on a 76-yard run, senior Rhett Bender connected with junior Hakeem Valles for an 85-yard scoring strike, and senior Gary Sharp ran 24 yards for a score.

In boys’ soccer, the freshmen squad won handily, 5–1, and the junior varsity team scored a 1–0 shutout.

Peddie’s state champion varsity field hockey team got goals from Gabby Horner, Becca Hetrick and Jenna Petrucelli to post a 3–0 victory and wrap up a banner 15–3–1 season. Carolyn Horner posted her 10th shutout of the season. Junior varsity field hockey posted a 5–2 win.

Inclement weather forced the cancelation of tennis.

At the Peddie Golf Club, the Peddie boys’ cross country team closed out a perfect 9–0 season by beating Blair Academy 26–33. The girls’ squad lost 23–36 despite Kelly Bailey’s first-place finish.

The girls’ varsity soccer team blanked the Bucs 4–0, with freshman Sarah Marion finding the back of the net twice and Megan McSherry and Ashlyn Soellner scoring a goal each. The junior varsity squad recorded a 1–0 victory.

Falcon Feats / Peddie Athletes in College Action By Doug Mariboe ’69

Bucknell University

Harvard University

Lafayette College

Women’s Soccer

Football

Women’s Soccer

Junior Caitlin Holtz ’07 made the All-Patriot League team for the second year in a row. She was a first-team selection as a defender last season, and in 2009 she was named to the second team as a midfielder. A starter in all 59 games over the last three seasons, the Bison junior netted two goals and recorded a team-high five assists. She ranked third on the team with nine points.

Freshman linebacker Brian Reilly ’09 saw action in four games for the Crimson, recording three solo and two assisted tackles. Harvard went 7–3 overall and 6–1 in the Ivy League in the 2009 season. A three-year starter for the Falcons, Reilly received the Maurice P. Shuman Football Award as the most outstanding player for the 2008 season.

Freshman goaltender Lauren Smedley ’09 capped off a sensational rookie campaign, starting 15 games with a goals against average of 1.44 per game. She earned four shutouts and during one incredible stretch between the posts, she held opponents scoreless for 337 minutes. For her efforts, she was named Brine Patriot League Goalkeeper of the Week.

20 Peddie Chronicle

Temple University

Wesleyan University

Women’s Soccer

Football

Men’s Baseball

Senior Shelly Moeller ’06 was named to the 2009 NSCAA/Adidas Women’s College Scholar All-America second team. A four-time all-conference selection, she scored 18 goals and added seven assists for her career, which ranks first all-time among Navy defenders. She started all 90 games of her collegiate career, a Patriot League record.

Freshman running back Matt Brown ’07 was a main cog in the turnaround of the Owls’ program, which put together a school record nine-game win streak and a co-regular season Mid-American Conference East Division Championship. Brown was the second leading rusher for the Owls, gaining 529 yards and scoring five TDs. His 940 all-purpose yards ranked second on the team.

Brett Yarusi ’08, a sophomore at Wesleyan, was awarded The E.R.A. Award for the 2009 baseball season. Yarusi was the first freshman since 1991 to receive the honor, given to the pitcher with the lowest earned run average. He ended his first campaign with a 3.50 ERA and a 3–3 record, including one complete game. He struck out 44 batters in 43.2 innings.

U.S. Naval Academy

Spring 2010 21


me, it was Benn Doyle ’76 who brought so many people to the program and put Peddie over the top.” A member of the Peddie Sports Hall of Fame, Doyle recalls Clark’s introductory speech at his induction.

Attention, Former

u Falcon Swimmers

“There could not have been a better suited classmate that portrayed the spirit, fun, enthusiasm and friendship of Peddie swimming,” Doyle said. “He was a great promoter and could get students away from their busy schedules and come to a meet and sit in a hot, poorly ventilated grandstand to cheer us on.”

You are cordially invited to participate in a special alumni swim meet on Saturday June 5 in Peddie’s new aquatic center.

UUU

Please contact Karin Morse for more details at kmorse@peddie.org or 609.944.7609.

The Peddie swimming tradition is firmly rooted in the selfless teammate, and most of all, the bond of camaraderie that few programs in the country can match. Carol Ammermueller ’75 knows that as well as anyone. She stepped onto the pool deck of the old Mills Gymnasium in the fall of 1971 and made history. She was the first girl to swim for Peddie, but received encouragement from coach Bob Ballou and a boys’ squad that fostered a challenging and respectful workout environment. “No one would join the team with me,” Ammermueller recalled. “I didn’t want to be the only girl and be in a tank suit…that I remember clearly. But, I always felt supported and encouraged by the team even though I was 14 years old and totally self-conscious and intimidated. I thank Coach for that and my teammates. Alan Clancy ’74 took me under his wing and perfected my flip turn. Tom Gerber ’74 was right by his side, and they stayed after practice to help me become a better swimmer. “I will never forget my first race in the 100-yard freestyle against Blair. J.J. Clark was in lane four and I was in five. J.J. won and I took second. Talk about adrenaline!” said Ammermueller, who credited her positive team experience for setting the stage of the meteoric rise of the girls’ program.

UUU Amy Jacobi ’07, who owns top-five times at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the 50m through the 500m free, and the 100m backstroke, reflected on her good fortune to be a member of a team guided by the values of respect and responsibility under current coach Greg Wriede ’95. “Swimming at Peddie is an experience I don’t think can happen at many other places. The team is so close-knit: eating with each other in the dining hall two or three times a day, spending almost four hours together at practice, being in classes with a teammate or two, sometimes having a swimmer as your roommate. It all adds up to a lot of together time… caring for each other, which is why Peddie swimming is like a family.” chronicleXtra To read about more former Falcon swimmers go to www.peddie.org/chronicle

Move over the Class of ’97, you have company The Class of ’10 became the second class in the 22-year history of the Potter-Kelley Cup to complete its four years at Peddie with a perfect 4–0 mark against Blair Academy in the annual fall sports competition, joining the Class of ’97. With the triumph, Peddie now holds a commanding 15–4–3 advantage over its rivals from upstate. The Class of ’10’s final Blair Day triumph was a convincing one. On a muddy track in Hightstown, the Falcons raced out to an early lead and dominated the competition, beating the Bucs, 9–1–1. Afterward, Head of School John Green raised the cup for a sea of gold and blue partisans who had assembled at the school’s new turf field complex to watch the boys’ varsity soccer game, which ended in a 1–1 tie.

Seniors Will O’Connor and A.J. Helfet hoist the Potter-Kelley Cup.

Moments earlier, the Falcon football team clinched a hardfought 23–20 victory, using big plays on offense and a determined defensive effort at Maurice P. Shuman field. Senior Evan Rothfeld scored on a 76-yard run, senior Rhett Bender connected with junior Hakeem Valles for an 85-yard scoring strike, and senior Gary Sharp ran 24 yards for a score.

In boys’ soccer, the freshmen squad won handily, 5–1, and the junior varsity team scored a 1–0 shutout.

Peddie’s state champion varsity field hockey team got goals from Gabby Horner, Becca Hetrick and Jenna Petrucelli to post a 3–0 victory and wrap up a banner 15–3–1 season. Carolyn Horner posted her 10th shutout of the season. Junior varsity field hockey posted a 5–2 win.

Inclement weather forced the cancelation of tennis.

At the Peddie Golf Club, the Peddie boys’ cross country team closed out a perfect 9–0 season by beating Blair Academy 26–33. The girls’ squad lost 23–36 despite Kelly Bailey’s first-place finish.

The girls’ varsity soccer team blanked the Bucs 4–0, with freshman Sarah Marion finding the back of the net twice and Megan McSherry and Ashlyn Soellner scoring a goal each. The junior varsity squad recorded a 1–0 victory.

Falcon Feats / Peddie Athletes in College Action By Doug Mariboe ’69

Bucknell University

Harvard University

Lafayette College

Women’s Soccer

Football

Women’s Soccer

Junior Caitlin Holtz ’07 made the All-Patriot League team for the second year in a row. She was a first-team selection as a defender last season, and in 2009 she was named to the second team as a midfielder. A starter in all 59 games over the last three seasons, the Bison junior netted two goals and recorded a team-high five assists. She ranked third on the team with nine points.

Freshman linebacker Brian Reilly ’09 saw action in four games for the Crimson, recording three solo and two assisted tackles. Harvard went 7–3 overall and 6–1 in the Ivy League in the 2009 season. A three-year starter for the Falcons, Reilly received the Maurice P. Shuman Football Award as the most outstanding player for the 2008 season.

Freshman goaltender Lauren Smedley ’09 capped off a sensational rookie campaign, starting 15 games with a goals against average of 1.44 per game. She earned four shutouts and during one incredible stretch between the posts, she held opponents scoreless for 337 minutes. For her efforts, she was named Brine Patriot League Goalkeeper of the Week.

20 Peddie Chronicle

Temple University

Wesleyan University

Women’s Soccer

Football

Men’s Baseball

Senior Shelly Moeller ’06 was named to the 2009 NSCAA/Adidas Women’s College Scholar All-America second team. A four-time all-conference selection, she scored 18 goals and added seven assists for her career, which ranks first all-time among Navy defenders. She started all 90 games of her collegiate career, a Patriot League record.

Freshman running back Matt Brown ’07 was a main cog in the turnaround of the Owls’ program, which put together a school record nine-game win streak and a co-regular season Mid-American Conference East Division Championship. Brown was the second leading rusher for the Owls, gaining 529 yards and scoring five TDs. His 940 all-purpose yards ranked second on the team.

Brett Yarusi ’08, a sophomore at Wesleyan, was awarded The E.R.A. Award for the 2009 baseball season. Yarusi was the first freshman since 1991 to receive the honor, given to the pitcher with the lowest earned run average. He ended his first campaign with a 3.50 ERA and a 3–3 record, including one complete game. He struck out 44 batters in 43.2 innings.

U.S. Naval Academy

Spring 2010 21


Hoops Heaven

The versatile Haley Peters creates headaches for opposing players on both ends of the basketball court.

Duke University-bound Haley Peters earns a spot in McDonald’s All-American game. Haley Peters, Peddie’s extraordinary senior forward, joined an exclusive club in February when she was voted the school’s third McDonald’s High School All American girls basketball player. She was one of 20 players chosen from hundreds of nominees nationwide, including 25 in New Jersey, and joins former Falcons Bridgette Mitchell ’06 and Crystal Goring ’05 as the school’s only McDonald’s All-Americans. She participated in the McDonald’s All America game in Columbus, Ohio, on March 31. “It’s an honor to have been chosen for the McDonald’s team. It’s mostly a testament to how blessed I’ve been, with a tremendous family, great coaches, and great teammates, and the opportunities they’ve given to me,” said Peters. “Each of them has played a huge role in this for me. I’m excited about the chance to play in Columbus with some of the best players in the country.” Peters helped lead the Falcons to their 14th straight state Prep ‘A’ championship and 12th consecutive MAPL crown this winter. She averaged 19.8 points per game and 8.1 rebounds per game to lead the team in both categories. A Red Bank, N.J., native, Peters finished second on the Falcons all-time scoring list with 1,521 points behind Christina Campion ’03’s 1,618. Peters has a wealth of weapons to tap into whenever she steps onto the court. At 6-feet, 3-inches tall, she possesses guard-like ball-handling skills and playmaking ability plus excellent range on her jump shot. Peters also is credited with having an exceptional basketball IQ and an unsurpassed work ethic, which extends beyond the basketball court. The Duke University-bound Peters is one of the top studentathletes in the country. She earned a perfect score on the ACT college entrance exam and, remarkably, maintains a GPA that exceeds 4.0 at Peddie. “Haley is just a remarkable student-athlete. Her natural ability and work ethic speak for themselves both in the classroom and on the court. She certainly deserves all the accolades she’s receiving,” said Peddie coach Sean Casey.

22 Peddie Chronicle

Boys’ and girls’ basketball teams make history.

Nothing But Net for Agho ’08

For the first time in school history, both Peddie basketball teams won NJISAA Prep A State Championships in the same season with thrilling victories against rival Blair Academy.

The former Peddie standout leads the nation in 3-point shooting.

In Cinderella fashion, the boys’ basketball team knocked off two higher seeds, on the road, to win their first state championship since the 1988–89 season. Peddie boys advanced through the bracket by knocking off second-seed Hun School in a wild semi-final shootout 55–53. In the semis, the Falcons were led by Columbia-bound Steve Frankoski who scored 21 points on six three-point field goals, and senior-captain John Golden, who scored 11 of his 20 points in the fourth quarter with the game in the balance. After two postponements due to snow, the Peddie boys traveled to Blairstown to face top-seeded Blair in front of a raucous, standing-room only crowd. In a back-and-forth battle, the Falcons maintained a tight lead throughout the contest, bolstered by the sharp-shooting of sophomore-guard John Martin, who was starting his second game of the year. Martin scored 14 points, knocking down four three-point field goals, as Peddie rolled to the title 61–55. Earlier in the week, the top-seeded girls’ basketball team also defeated Blair 48–40 to win their unprecedented 14th consecutive NJISAA Prep A State Championship in front of a packed house at Peddie’s Erik B. Hanson Fieldhouse. After trailing for most of the first 20 minutes, the Falcons mounted a second-half surge ignited by crucial three-point baskets from senior co-captains Bridgette McKnight and Nekole Jackson. Senior-guard Alex Smith sealed the game from the foul line, allowing the Falcons to cut down the nets once again.

The countless hours in the gym are paying off in multiples of three for Noruwa Agho ’08 and the Columbia University Lions. Agho finished the season as one of the top 3-point marksmen in men’s college basketball, hitting 58 of 130 behind the 20-foot 9-inch arc for a 44.6 percentage. The 6-foot, 3-inch sophomore shooting guard averaged a team-high 16.3 points and his shooting accuracy from the entire field was 42.5 percent. “He has put a lot of time into his game,” Columbia coach Joe Jones said. “He’s fearless. And I mean this — he’s got one of the best work ethics I’ve ever seen or been around. He works his tail off.” Peddie coach Joe Rulewich, who coached Agho during the postgraduate year he played for the Falcons, is familiar with his former player’s dedication to improving his game. “I can still remember Noruwa in his hooded sweatshirt, backpack on, trudging through the early January mornings in the dark on the way to the gym,” Rulewich said. “I’d hear the door open from inside our dorm and I knew exactly who it was. He knew the gym was open at 5:30 and there he was every morning. “That sound of the beep when the doors open in our dorm building, at that time in the morning, I knew exactly who it was. It was always Noruwa.” Sharpshooter Noruwa Agho ’08 / Photo credit: Mike McLaughlin

UUU

Coach Casey Moving On Sean Casey, who built the Peddie girls basketball program into a perennial national power, is leaving the school after 17 years.

Peddie Greats Tapped for Hall

Peddie’s director of marketing and communications since 2007, Casey has accepted a position at Wesleyan School in Norcross, Ga., approximately 20 miles northeast of Atlanta. He will be the principal of Wesleyan’s high school (grades 9–12).

Four former Falcons and three teams will become the newest members of the Peddie Sports Hall of Fame during Reunion Weekend on June 5.

Casey filled numerous roles at Peddie since arriving in Hightstown in 1993, including teaching psychology and mathematics at the AP level as well as serving as associate director of athletics and director of external programs. In February, his basketball team won its 14th consecutive state Prep “A” championship and 12th straight MAPL title. He compiled a 326–89 record and sent more than a dozen players to NCAA Division I programs, including three All-Americans, Bridgette Mitchell ’06, Crystal Goring ’05 and Haley Peters ’10.

The 1940 Golf Team was undefeated and untied. It had three “whitewash” 9–0 wins during the season en route to winning Easterns in Greenwich, Conn. Most of its members went on to be outstanding golfers, including several as “pros.” Bill Goldthorp, the team’s most outstanding golfer, lost just one match in his senior year. Bill Saul ’60 was a two-sport star. He led the basketball team in scoring, was a tenacious defender and an exceptional team leader during the 1958–59 season when the team reached the state finals. He captained those teams as a junior and senior. In soccer, Saul was a major factor in the success of the 1958 and 1959 teams as a goalie. He was voted the school’s “Best Athlete” in the senior poll.

Terry Hensle ’60 was a three-year starter in football, a “fearsome defensive player at tackle” and senior captain. Hensle went on to win four varsity letters in football and baseball at Penn. He also won the Maxwell Cup — the Heisman Trophy for schools such as those in the Ivy League. Mark Boillotat ’80 was a “force to be dealt with” on the gridiron as a defensive standout on three football teams. He was a three-time All-Prep, two-time All-State player and an outstanding team leader. He was elected captain his senior year. Mark Nesbitt ’80 won the Winant Cup as the school’s best male athlete. As the no. 1 tennis player for three years, he captained the team for two years, was a strong contributor to the football team, and was also Peddie’s best hockey player. The 1990 Boys and Girls Swim Teams were both Eastern Champions. They trounced formidable Germantown Academy. Coach Chris Martin described the win at Easterns as “the sum total of my existence. I was put on earth to witness this championship.” Four swimmers went on to the Olympic Trials, and two — Nelson Diebel and Barbara “BJ” Bedford — won Olympic gold medals.

Spring 2010 23


Hoops Heaven

The versatile Haley Peters creates headaches for opposing players on both ends of the basketball court.

Duke University-bound Haley Peters earns a spot in McDonald’s All-American game. Haley Peters, Peddie’s extraordinary senior forward, joined an exclusive club in February when she was voted the school’s third McDonald’s High School All American girls basketball player. She was one of 20 players chosen from hundreds of nominees nationwide, including 25 in New Jersey, and joins former Falcons Bridgette Mitchell ’06 and Crystal Goring ’05 as the school’s only McDonald’s All-Americans. She participated in the McDonald’s All America game in Columbus, Ohio, on March 31. “It’s an honor to have been chosen for the McDonald’s team. It’s mostly a testament to how blessed I’ve been, with a tremendous family, great coaches, and great teammates, and the opportunities they’ve given to me,” said Peters. “Each of them has played a huge role in this for me. I’m excited about the chance to play in Columbus with some of the best players in the country.” Peters helped lead the Falcons to their 14th straight state Prep ‘A’ championship and 12th consecutive MAPL crown this winter. She averaged 19.8 points per game and 8.1 rebounds per game to lead the team in both categories. A Red Bank, N.J., native, Peters finished second on the Falcons all-time scoring list with 1,521 points behind Christina Campion ’03’s 1,618. Peters has a wealth of weapons to tap into whenever she steps onto the court. At 6-feet, 3-inches tall, she possesses guard-like ball-handling skills and playmaking ability plus excellent range on her jump shot. Peters also is credited with having an exceptional basketball IQ and an unsurpassed work ethic, which extends beyond the basketball court. The Duke University-bound Peters is one of the top studentathletes in the country. She earned a perfect score on the ACT college entrance exam and, remarkably, maintains a GPA that exceeds 4.0 at Peddie. “Haley is just a remarkable student-athlete. Her natural ability and work ethic speak for themselves both in the classroom and on the court. She certainly deserves all the accolades she’s receiving,” said Peddie coach Sean Casey.

22 Peddie Chronicle

Boys’ and girls’ basketball teams make history.

Nothing But Net for Agho ’08

For the first time in school history, both Peddie basketball teams won NJISAA Prep A State Championships in the same season with thrilling victories against rival Blair Academy.

The former Peddie standout leads the nation in 3-point shooting.

In Cinderella fashion, the boys’ basketball team knocked off two higher seeds, on the road, to win their first state championship since the 1988–89 season. Peddie boys advanced through the bracket by knocking off second-seed Hun School in a wild semi-final shootout 55–53. In the semis, the Falcons were led by Columbia-bound Steve Frankoski who scored 21 points on six three-point field goals, and senior-captain John Golden, who scored 11 of his 20 points in the fourth quarter with the game in the balance. After two postponements due to snow, the Peddie boys traveled to Blairstown to face top-seeded Blair in front of a raucous, standing-room only crowd. In a back-and-forth battle, the Falcons maintained a tight lead throughout the contest, bolstered by the sharp-shooting of sophomore-guard John Martin, who was starting his second game of the year. Martin scored 14 points, knocking down four three-point field goals, as Peddie rolled to the title 61–55. Earlier in the week, the top-seeded girls’ basketball team also defeated Blair 48–40 to win their unprecedented 14th consecutive NJISAA Prep A State Championship in front of a packed house at Peddie’s Erik B. Hanson Fieldhouse. After trailing for most of the first 20 minutes, the Falcons mounted a second-half surge ignited by crucial three-point baskets from senior co-captains Bridgette McKnight and Nekole Jackson. Senior-guard Alex Smith sealed the game from the foul line, allowing the Falcons to cut down the nets once again.

The countless hours in the gym are paying off in multiples of three for Noruwa Agho ’08 and the Columbia University Lions. Agho finished the season as one of the top 3-point marksmen in men’s college basketball, hitting 58 of 130 behind the 20-foot 9-inch arc for a 44.6 percentage. The 6-foot, 3-inch sophomore shooting guard averaged a team-high 16.3 points and his shooting accuracy from the entire field was 42.5 percent. “He has put a lot of time into his game,” Columbia coach Joe Jones said. “He’s fearless. And I mean this — he’s got one of the best work ethics I’ve ever seen or been around. He works his tail off.” Peddie coach Joe Rulewich, who coached Agho during the postgraduate year he played for the Falcons, is familiar with his former player’s dedication to improving his game. “I can still remember Noruwa in his hooded sweatshirt, backpack on, trudging through the early January mornings in the dark on the way to the gym,” Rulewich said. “I’d hear the door open from inside our dorm and I knew exactly who it was. He knew the gym was open at 5:30 and there he was every morning. “That sound of the beep when the doors open in our dorm building, at that time in the morning, I knew exactly who it was. It was always Noruwa.” Sharpshooter Noruwa Agho ’08 / Photo credit: Mike McLaughlin

UUU

Coach Casey Moving On Sean Casey, who built the Peddie girls basketball program into a perennial national power, is leaving the school after 17 years.

Peddie Greats Tapped for Hall

Peddie’s director of marketing and communications since 2007, Casey has accepted a position at Wesleyan School in Norcross, Ga., approximately 20 miles northeast of Atlanta. He will be the principal of Wesleyan’s high school (grades 9–12).

Four former Falcons and three teams will become the newest members of the Peddie Sports Hall of Fame during Reunion Weekend on June 5.

Casey filled numerous roles at Peddie since arriving in Hightstown in 1993, including teaching psychology and mathematics at the AP level as well as serving as associate director of athletics and director of external programs. In February, his basketball team won its 14th consecutive state Prep “A” championship and 12th straight MAPL title. He compiled a 326–89 record and sent more than a dozen players to NCAA Division I programs, including three All-Americans, Bridgette Mitchell ’06, Crystal Goring ’05 and Haley Peters ’10.

The 1940 Golf Team was undefeated and untied. It had three “whitewash” 9–0 wins during the season en route to winning Easterns in Greenwich, Conn. Most of its members went on to be outstanding golfers, including several as “pros.” Bill Goldthorp, the team’s most outstanding golfer, lost just one match in his senior year. Bill Saul ’60 was a two-sport star. He led the basketball team in scoring, was a tenacious defender and an exceptional team leader during the 1958–59 season when the team reached the state finals. He captained those teams as a junior and senior. In soccer, Saul was a major factor in the success of the 1958 and 1959 teams as a goalie. He was voted the school’s “Best Athlete” in the senior poll.

Terry Hensle ’60 was a three-year starter in football, a “fearsome defensive player at tackle” and senior captain. Hensle went on to win four varsity letters in football and baseball at Penn. He also won the Maxwell Cup — the Heisman Trophy for schools such as those in the Ivy League. Mark Boillotat ’80 was a “force to be dealt with” on the gridiron as a defensive standout on three football teams. He was a three-time All-Prep, two-time All-State player and an outstanding team leader. He was elected captain his senior year. Mark Nesbitt ’80 won the Winant Cup as the school’s best male athlete. As the no. 1 tennis player for three years, he captained the team for two years, was a strong contributor to the football team, and was also Peddie’s best hockey player. The 1990 Boys and Girls Swim Teams were both Eastern Champions. They trounced formidable Germantown Academy. Coach Chris Martin described the win at Easterns as “the sum total of my existence. I was put on earth to witness this championship.” Four swimmers went on to the Olympic Trials, and two — Nelson Diebel and Barbara “BJ” Bedford — won Olympic gold medals.

Spring 2010 23


THE ARTS

A Slick Presentation The T-Birds and Pink Ladies took over the William Mount-Burke Theatre in February as the Upperclassmen Players performed the hit musical, Grease.

1

1.

Sandy (Corey Lynn Hampton ’11) is the center of attention at a sleepover with her new friends.

2.

Danny (Evan Rothfeld ’10) in Greased Lightning.

3.

Rizzo (Rusinel Amarante ’11) poking fun of sweet and innocent Sandy.

2

3

will afford me the opportunity to keep doing what I love — writing, recording and performing in elementary schools — for a good while longer.” On “Heroes,” the third in a series of recordings for children that highlights the accomplishments of some of America’s best and brightest citizens, Sprout commemorates the lives of 10 Americans. Using musical styles from folk to pop to rock, Sprout created original songs about Milton Hershey (chocolate 7 king/philanthropist), John Muir (conservationist), Elizabeth Blackwell (first U.S. female doctor), Dr. Jonas Salk (developer of the polio vaccine), Jane Addams (Nobel Peace Prize winner), George Washington Carver (agricultural scientist), Wilma Rudolph (Olympic gold medalist), Thomas Jefferson (third president), Pocahontas (peacemaker) and Cesar Chavez (civil rights activist). “Heroes” inspires children with not only the endeavors that brought these individuals to prominence but the personality traits that made their successes possible. In addition to earning the Grammy nod, “Heroes No. 3” has garnered several national awards, including the National Association of Parenting Publications Gold Award, the Parents’ Choice Recommended Award, the iParenting Media Award, Dr. Toy’s 10 Best CDs, the Creative Child Seal of Excellence Award, the Film Advisory Board Award of Excellence and the Dove Foundation Family-Approved Seal. Sprout has performed nearly 6,000 concerts, and continues to present, on average, 200 concerts each year.

Mia! America’s most celebrated soccer star, Mia Hamm, will be leading the Julie Foudy Sports Leadership Academy at Peddie School. U June 27–July 2 U For girls ages 12–18 U Residential camp u

www.juliefoudyleadership.com

Spring Arts Campus Calendar Good times for Tomson ’02 and Vampire

‘A Dream Come True’

May

Sprout ’70 nominated for Grammy

Underclassmen Play The Man Who Came to Dinner, 8 p.m.

Drummer Chris Tomson ’02 and his Vampire Weekend band mates are making some serious noise with the release of their second album. Vampire’s “Contra,” which was recorded in a self-storage unit in Brooklyn at the foot of the Manhattan Bridge, appeared atop the Billboard charts at number one in January. Peddie Director of Instrumental Music Alan Michaels caught the band in full throttle at a concert in New York City in January as part of Vampire’s North America and Europe tour to promote “Contra.” “Chris played great, the band is fun to watch, and people loved them,” said Michaels. “Contra” is the follow-up to Vampire Weekend’s 2008 self-titled debut, which has sold more than a half-million copies worldwide, according to Billboard. The four band members first met while undergraduates at Columbia University.

“American Heroes No. 3,” the ninth album of singersongwriter Jonathan Sprout’s career, just might be his best. The critically acclaimed album, which features songs telling the stories of 10 exceptional citizens, has garnered a host of national awards, plus a prestigious Grammy nomination for Best Musical Album for Children. “It’s a dream come true just to be nominated and in the company of great kids’ recording artists,” said Sprout ’70. “This is going to be etched on my tombstone!” Sprout flew to Los Angeles for the 52nd annual Grammy Awards and performed two songs at the second annual Grammy Children’s Music Celebration. He was joined by the other nominees, including Milkshake, Buck Howdy and winner Ziggy Marley. “I feel honored that my work as a heroes educator has, for the time being, been placed in the spotlight, and I hope it

14–15 20

Student Spring Music Concert, 7:30 p.m.

25

Student Spring Art Exhibit, 6:30–8 p.m.

24 Peddie Chronicle

Excel, Enrich, Explore, Enjoy! At Peddie, there’s something for everyone this summer — challenging academic programs, theater camp and a full lineup of sports camps, including golf, lacrosse, field hockey, swimming, rowing, basketball and tennis. u

www.peddie.org/summerprograms

u

609.944.7570

Spring 2010 25


THE ARTS

A Slick Presentation The T-Birds and Pink Ladies took over the William Mount-Burke Theatre in February as the Upperclassmen Players performed the hit musical, Grease.

1

1.

Sandy (Corey Lynn Hampton ’11) is the center of attention at a sleepover with her new friends.

2.

Danny (Evan Rothfeld ’10) in Greased Lightning.

3.

Rizzo (Rusinel Amarante ’11) poking fun of sweet and innocent Sandy.

2

3

will afford me the opportunity to keep doing what I love — writing, recording and performing in elementary schools — for a good while longer.” On “Heroes,” the third in a series of recordings for children that highlights the accomplishments of some of America’s best and brightest citizens, Sprout commemorates the lives of 10 Americans. Using musical styles from folk to pop to rock, Sprout created original songs about Milton Hershey (chocolate 7 king/philanthropist), John Muir (conservationist), Elizabeth Blackwell (first U.S. female doctor), Dr. Jonas Salk (developer of the polio vaccine), Jane Addams (Nobel Peace Prize winner), George Washington Carver (agricultural scientist), Wilma Rudolph (Olympic gold medalist), Thomas Jefferson (third president), Pocahontas (peacemaker) and Cesar Chavez (civil rights activist). “Heroes” inspires children with not only the endeavors that brought these individuals to prominence but the personality traits that made their successes possible. In addition to earning the Grammy nod, “Heroes No. 3” has garnered several national awards, including the National Association of Parenting Publications Gold Award, the Parents’ Choice Recommended Award, the iParenting Media Award, Dr. Toy’s 10 Best CDs, the Creative Child Seal of Excellence Award, the Film Advisory Board Award of Excellence and the Dove Foundation Family-Approved Seal. Sprout has performed nearly 6,000 concerts, and continues to present, on average, 200 concerts each year.

Mia! America’s most celebrated soccer star, Mia Hamm, will be leading the Julie Foudy Sports Leadership Academy at Peddie School. U June 27–July 2 U For girls ages 12–18 U Residential camp u

www.juliefoudyleadership.com

Spring Arts Campus Calendar Good times for Tomson ’02 and Vampire

‘A Dream Come True’

May

Sprout ’70 nominated for Grammy

Underclassmen Play The Man Who Came to Dinner, 8 p.m.

Drummer Chris Tomson ’02 and his Vampire Weekend band mates are making some serious noise with the release of their second album. Vampire’s “Contra,” which was recorded in a self-storage unit in Brooklyn at the foot of the Manhattan Bridge, appeared atop the Billboard charts at number one in January. Peddie Director of Instrumental Music Alan Michaels caught the band in full throttle at a concert in New York City in January as part of Vampire’s North America and Europe tour to promote “Contra.” “Chris played great, the band is fun to watch, and people loved them,” said Michaels. “Contra” is the follow-up to Vampire Weekend’s 2008 self-titled debut, which has sold more than a half-million copies worldwide, according to Billboard. The four band members first met while undergraduates at Columbia University.

“American Heroes No. 3,” the ninth album of singersongwriter Jonathan Sprout’s career, just might be his best. The critically acclaimed album, which features songs telling the stories of 10 exceptional citizens, has garnered a host of national awards, plus a prestigious Grammy nomination for Best Musical Album for Children. “It’s a dream come true just to be nominated and in the company of great kids’ recording artists,” said Sprout ’70. “This is going to be etched on my tombstone!” Sprout flew to Los Angeles for the 52nd annual Grammy Awards and performed two songs at the second annual Grammy Children’s Music Celebration. He was joined by the other nominees, including Milkshake, Buck Howdy and winner Ziggy Marley. “I feel honored that my work as a heroes educator has, for the time being, been placed in the spotlight, and I hope it

14–15 20

Student Spring Music Concert, 7:30 p.m.

25

Student Spring Art Exhibit, 6:30–8 p.m.

24 Peddie Chronicle

Excel, Enrich, Explore, Enjoy! At Peddie, there’s something for everyone this summer — challenging academic programs, theater camp and a full lineup of sports camps, including golf, lacrosse, field hockey, swimming, rowing, basketball and tennis. u

www.peddie.org/summerprograms

u

609.944.7570

Spring 2010 25


BOOKMARKS

Stories I Remember: My Pilgrimage to Wisdom Reynold Ruslan Feldman ’56 Wisdom Foundation Publishing, 2009

Reynold Rusland Feldman grew up a secular middle-class Jewish child in Great Neck, N.Y., and spent four formative years and two summers at Peddie School in the mid-1950s. He devotes more than a passing mention to that period of his life in his spiritual autobiography, Stories I Remember. Above all, however, it is where Feldman has traveled since his Peddie days — both spiritually and philosophically — that Feldman chronicles in Stories I Remember. And, oh, what a journey it has been. A long-time follower of an interfaith spiritual practice called Subud, Feldman was baptized in 1967 and after 37 years as a Lutheran, he became a Roman Catholic in 2004. Along the way he has studied Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese philosophy, and Islam, including fasting 36 times during Ramadan. A personal narrative, Stories I Remember shows one way in which people can become citizens of a world united by a shared humanity, not divided by religious, cultural and other differences.

Because I Have Loved and Hidden It By Elise Moser ’80 Cormorant Books, 2009

Julia’s mother has died and her married lover, Nicholas, has gone missing in Morocco. Though all she sees are absences, a sequence of events has been put into motion that will redraw the lines connecting her to the people in her life. At her mother’s funeral, she is given a birth certificate that is key to a long-held family secret. Grappling with this mystery and overwhelmed by memories of her lover, Julia is at a loss until comfort, warmth and passion come to her from an unexpected source. Set in present-day Montreal, Because I Have Loved and Hidden It is described as poetic, daring and evocative. In this, her first book, Elise Moser is unafraid to chart the strange geometry of love. A Brooklyn native, Moser holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from McGill University in Montreal, and is the current president of the Quebec Writers’ Federation. Her short stories have been published and broadcast in Canada and the United States. In addition to writing, Moser is also a sales representative with Lexa Publishers’ Representatives. She lives in Montreal.

A Boulder, Colo. resident, Feldman holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Yale University and also earned his Ph.D. there. He has previously authored or co-authored three books: A World Treasury of Folk Wisdom, Wisdom — Daily Reflections for a New Era, and WisingUP — A Youth Guide to Good Living.

Author, Author! If you have recently written a book and would like it to appear in the Book Marks section, please send a copy of the book along with a cover letter including your name and contact information to the Chronicle, Peddie School, 201 South Main Street, Hightstown, N.J. 08520. Also, please send any pertinent press material or reviews and, if you wish, a recent photo of yourself. Books will appear at the editor’s discretion and as space allows.

Fundraising Consultants: A Guide for Nonprofit Organizations By Eugene A. Scanlan ’60 Wiley Publishers, 2009

Brimming with ideas, concepts and information, Fundraising Consultants offers step-by-step guidance and resources to help you decide whether or not to use a consultant for your nonprofit organization, and then shows you how to go about getting the right one for the job. Author Eugene A. Scanlan uses numerous case studies and practical tools — including sample invitation letters to consultants and sample consulting budgets — to equip readers to implement the concepts introduced in the 200-page guide, which is part of the Association of Fundraising Professionals/Wiley Fund Development Series. Readers will also benefit from advice on getting the most out of fundraising via the internet and how to draw up a contract. Scanlan, a recently retired certified fundraising executive, is the founder of eScanlan Company Inc., which provides a full range of nonprofit management consultant services. He has been actively involved with nonprofits since 1966. He earned a Ph.D. from Loyola University of Chicago after attending the University of New Hampshire.

26 Peddie Chronicle

Subtle Suicide: Our Silent Epidemic of Ambivalence about Living By Michael A. Church and Charles I. Brooks ’61 Praeger Publishers, 2009

Each year, up to 40,000 Americans commit suicide. But there are millions of others that, while not making overt attempts to take their lives, engage in patterns of behavior that seem to deliberately move them toward the same fate. Based on thousands of hours of research, psychotherapists Charles I. Brooks and Michael Church have developed the concept of “subtle suicide,” risky behavior where the subject does not care if he/she lives or dies. In addition to discussing risk factors, warning signs and treatment options for both lay and professional readers, Subtle Suicide provides strategies for helping people who exhibit subtle suicide behavior, including how to avoid being pulled into the sufferer’s emotional whirlpool. The book also offers biographical sketches of well-known people who exhibited subtle suicide behavior, including Marilyn Monroe, Anna Nicole Smith, Jim Morrison and Evel Knievel. Brooks is a professor and chair of the psychology department at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre, Penn. He received his bachelor’s degree in psychology from Duke, his master’s from Wake Forest and his doctorate in experimental psychology from Syracuse. He has authored or co-authored more than 40 publications in psychology.

Spring 2010 27


BOOKMARKS

Stories I Remember: My Pilgrimage to Wisdom Reynold Ruslan Feldman ’56 Wisdom Foundation Publishing, 2009

Reynold Rusland Feldman grew up a secular middle-class Jewish child in Great Neck, N.Y., and spent four formative years and two summers at Peddie School in the mid-1950s. He devotes more than a passing mention to that period of his life in his spiritual autobiography, Stories I Remember. Above all, however, it is where Feldman has traveled since his Peddie days — both spiritually and philosophically — that Feldman chronicles in Stories I Remember. And, oh, what a journey it has been. A long-time follower of an interfaith spiritual practice called Subud, Feldman was baptized in 1967 and after 37 years as a Lutheran, he became a Roman Catholic in 2004. Along the way he has studied Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese philosophy, and Islam, including fasting 36 times during Ramadan. A personal narrative, Stories I Remember shows one way in which people can become citizens of a world united by a shared humanity, not divided by religious, cultural and other differences.

Because I Have Loved and Hidden It By Elise Moser ’80 Cormorant Books, 2009

Julia’s mother has died and her married lover, Nicholas, has gone missing in Morocco. Though all she sees are absences, a sequence of events has been put into motion that will redraw the lines connecting her to the people in her life. At her mother’s funeral, she is given a birth certificate that is key to a long-held family secret. Grappling with this mystery and overwhelmed by memories of her lover, Julia is at a loss until comfort, warmth and passion come to her from an unexpected source. Set in present-day Montreal, Because I Have Loved and Hidden It is described as poetic, daring and evocative. In this, her first book, Elise Moser is unafraid to chart the strange geometry of love. A Brooklyn native, Moser holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from McGill University in Montreal, and is the current president of the Quebec Writers’ Federation. Her short stories have been published and broadcast in Canada and the United States. In addition to writing, Moser is also a sales representative with Lexa Publishers’ Representatives. She lives in Montreal.

A Boulder, Colo. resident, Feldman holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Yale University and also earned his Ph.D. there. He has previously authored or co-authored three books: A World Treasury of Folk Wisdom, Wisdom — Daily Reflections for a New Era, and WisingUP — A Youth Guide to Good Living.

Author, Author! If you have recently written a book and would like it to appear in the Book Marks section, please send a copy of the book along with a cover letter including your name and contact information to the Chronicle, Peddie School, 201 South Main Street, Hightstown, N.J. 08520. Also, please send any pertinent press material or reviews and, if you wish, a recent photo of yourself. Books will appear at the editor’s discretion and as space allows.

Fundraising Consultants: A Guide for Nonprofit Organizations By Eugene A. Scanlan ’60 Wiley Publishers, 2009

Brimming with ideas, concepts and information, Fundraising Consultants offers step-by-step guidance and resources to help you decide whether or not to use a consultant for your nonprofit organization, and then shows you how to go about getting the right one for the job. Author Eugene A. Scanlan uses numerous case studies and practical tools — including sample invitation letters to consultants and sample consulting budgets — to equip readers to implement the concepts introduced in the 200-page guide, which is part of the Association of Fundraising Professionals/Wiley Fund Development Series. Readers will also benefit from advice on getting the most out of fundraising via the internet and how to draw up a contract. Scanlan, a recently retired certified fundraising executive, is the founder of eScanlan Company Inc., which provides a full range of nonprofit management consultant services. He has been actively involved with nonprofits since 1966. He earned a Ph.D. from Loyola University of Chicago after attending the University of New Hampshire.

26 Peddie Chronicle

Subtle Suicide: Our Silent Epidemic of Ambivalence about Living By Michael A. Church and Charles I. Brooks ’61 Praeger Publishers, 2009

Each year, up to 40,000 Americans commit suicide. But there are millions of others that, while not making overt attempts to take their lives, engage in patterns of behavior that seem to deliberately move them toward the same fate. Based on thousands of hours of research, psychotherapists Charles I. Brooks and Michael Church have developed the concept of “subtle suicide,” risky behavior where the subject does not care if he/she lives or dies. In addition to discussing risk factors, warning signs and treatment options for both lay and professional readers, Subtle Suicide provides strategies for helping people who exhibit subtle suicide behavior, including how to avoid being pulled into the sufferer’s emotional whirlpool. The book also offers biographical sketches of well-known people who exhibited subtle suicide behavior, including Marilyn Monroe, Anna Nicole Smith, Jim Morrison and Evel Knievel. Brooks is a professor and chair of the psychology department at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre, Penn. He received his bachelor’s degree in psychology from Duke, his master’s from Wake Forest and his doctorate in experimental psychology from Syracuse. He has authored or co-authored more than 40 publications in psychology.

Spring 2010 27


center campus Community Day Benefits Children, Families, Seniors On a cold winter’s day in January, the Ian H. Graham Athletic Center was filled with smiling faces and the sounds of laughter as Peddie held its 13th annual Community Day for more than 360 children and their chaperones. The carnival, which was hosted by more than half of the school’s student body and supported by the Peddie Parents Association, featured a moon bounce, crafts, great food and games galore for the children, who came from social service agencies and schools throughout Central Jersey. Seniors Chelsea Finn, Doug Ahn and Megan McSherry served as student coordinators of Community Day, while Juniors Jess Cook, Jen Prostoff and Nick Celli chaired the carnival. “It’s a lot of work, but watching the kids have so much fun, and having fun with them, makes it more than worth the effort,” said Finn. In addition to the carnival, PPA parents and students cooked 120 turkey dinners for a meals-on-wheels effort at Wheaton Pointe and St. James village. A truckload of food and sundries was delivered to the Green House food bank at St. Anthony’s (RISE) of Hightstown, while other trucks delivered clothing and sporting equipment to Trenton Rescue Mission. Sixtyseven pints of blood were donated to Red Cross, and twentyfour Peddie students spent the afternoon with seniors at the Hamilton Senior Center. “Community Day is a wonderful opportunity for area kids, families and seniors to have a special day,” said Director of Student Activities Jim Truslow, “However, the truly wonderful opportunity is for our own Peddie students. The smiles they help create and the time they get to spend is an experience they’ll never forget. It can be life-changing and help our kids appreciate becoming genuine local and world citizens.”

Peddie students worked with families from throughout Central Jersey.

Children from the local community enjoy face painting during Community Day.

A Night to Savor on Campus From Jamaican snapper and South Korean joomokbap to pierogies and baklava, Peddie’s annual International Food Festival provided community members with the opportunity to indulge in culinary delights from around the world without setting foot off campus. A record 18 student groups filled the dining hall in the Caspersen Campus Center with fare from the Caribbean, China, the Dominican Republic, France, Hong Kong, India/ Southeast Asia, Italy, Korea, Peru, Poland, Russia, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand and offerings from the Jewish Heritage, Greek and Latin clubs. “The event highlights the different cultures, countries, geographic regions, and language clubs within our community,” said Andrew Caglieris, international student advisor. “Beyond our Peddie community, sharing carefully prepared food in the company of family and friends is an important aspect in the daily life of many cultures. Hopefully, we are able to recreate the same experience for our entire school community.” The event, which has been held continuously since 1995 but dates back to the 1970s, is sponsored by the Peddie Language Department in conjunction with the International Student Organization and supervised by Dr. David Martin and the Peddie Food Services staff. The students themselves are the primary chefs.

More than a dozen countries were represented at this year’s International Food Festival.

Students prepared culinary delights from the Dominican Republic, South Korea and more than a dozen other countries.

Dr. Mariboe

Head of School John Green, Anne Seltzer and Doug Mariboe ’69, son of Dr. Herbert Mariboe, on Founders Day.

Paul Muldoon spoke at Peddie as part of the Christensen Speaker Series.

Two Beloved Faculty Members Honored on Founders Day

Pulitzer Winner Unravels Complexities of Poetry

Peddie marked its 115th annual Founders Day by paying tribute to two former faculty members whose dedication, integrity and hard work have enriched the school and the lives of countless former students.

When reading a “true poem,” Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon said, “one comes out the other end with a sense that something has happened to them.” Muldoon appeared at Peddie in January as part of the school’s Christensen Speaker Series, which is supported by Henry “Terry” Christensen ’62.

Dr. Herbert Mariboe, the former longtime chair of Peddie’s History Department and assistant head of school, and Trustee Anne Seltzer, the former English teacher who also served as head of school during her 25 years of service in Hightstown, were honored during a service in February at Ayer Memorial Chapel. History Department Chair Peter Kraft recognized the late Dr. Mariboe’s steadfast commitment to Peddie and belief in the dignity of hard work while always finding the time to respect and be kind to others. In closing his speech, Kraft shared an excerpt from an inspirational chapel speech Dr. Mariboe gave to students in November 1968: “(I hope) you will have the inclination to be interested in other people; the desire to be of service to your community; a willingness to help those who need you without expecting a stated reward; the courage to stand up to and overcome adversity; and the capacity to create happiness in the hearts of those you know.” Trustee Angie Manley Cook ’84 and Peddie’s writer-inresidence/history teacher Paul Watkins both spoke of Seltzer’s infectious enthusiasm for Peddie and the shining example she set for everyone.

How can you tell the difference between poetry and other writing styles?

The poet opened his presentation, titled “Poetry and School: What Poetry Teaches Us,” by reading poetry from one of his collections, then explained the childhood memories and Irish history that lay at the foundation of each poem before fielding questions from a large audience gathered in Efros Auditorium. Through his curious listeners’ queries, Muldoon addressed the deeper and more complex components of his understanding of poetry. “Poetry teaches us that we are merely conduits, merely media for something that is bigger than us, beyond us.” said Muldoon, who has been called the most significant Englishlanguage poet born since World War II. Prior to his program, Muldoon, who also teaches creative writing at Princeton University, met with students over dinner and shared with them why he gravitated toward writing poetry: “[I] thought it was easier, at that point, to write a poem than an essay.” “He was a really good speaker,” said Jennifer Creel ’12. “Not exactly somebody you meet every day, you know?”

“You have been a wonderful role model, teacher, supporter and friend. Truth is, Peddie would not be the same without you,” said Cook “There are many good schools, but very few truly great schools. Peddie is a great school, because Anne Seltzer helped to make it that way. Follow her example, and the world out there will welcome you with open arms,” Watkins told students assembled in the chapel. Founders Day was instituted in 1895 to celebrate Thomas B. Peddie, whose $25,000 donation rescued the school from bankruptcy in 1872. chronicleXtra To view videos from Founders Day, go to www.peddie.org/chronicle

28 Peddie Chronicle

Spring 2010 29


center campus Community Day Benefits Children, Families, Seniors On a cold winter’s day in January, the Ian H. Graham Athletic Center was filled with smiling faces and the sounds of laughter as Peddie held its 13th annual Community Day for more than 360 children and their chaperones. The carnival, which was hosted by more than half of the school’s student body and supported by the Peddie Parents Association, featured a moon bounce, crafts, great food and games galore for the children, who came from social service agencies and schools throughout Central Jersey. Seniors Chelsea Finn, Doug Ahn and Megan McSherry served as student coordinators of Community Day, while Juniors Jess Cook, Jen Prostoff and Nick Celli chaired the carnival. “It’s a lot of work, but watching the kids have so much fun, and having fun with them, makes it more than worth the effort,” said Finn. In addition to the carnival, PPA parents and students cooked 120 turkey dinners for a meals-on-wheels effort at Wheaton Pointe and St. James village. A truckload of food and sundries was delivered to the Green House food bank at St. Anthony’s (RISE) of Hightstown, while other trucks delivered clothing and sporting equipment to Trenton Rescue Mission. Sixtyseven pints of blood were donated to Red Cross, and twentyfour Peddie students spent the afternoon with seniors at the Hamilton Senior Center. “Community Day is a wonderful opportunity for area kids, families and seniors to have a special day,” said Director of Student Activities Jim Truslow, “However, the truly wonderful opportunity is for our own Peddie students. The smiles they help create and the time they get to spend is an experience they’ll never forget. It can be life-changing and help our kids appreciate becoming genuine local and world citizens.”

Peddie students worked with families from throughout Central Jersey.

Children from the local community enjoy face painting during Community Day.

A Night to Savor on Campus From Jamaican snapper and South Korean joomokbap to pierogies and baklava, Peddie’s annual International Food Festival provided community members with the opportunity to indulge in culinary delights from around the world without setting foot off campus. A record 18 student groups filled the dining hall in the Caspersen Campus Center with fare from the Caribbean, China, the Dominican Republic, France, Hong Kong, India/ Southeast Asia, Italy, Korea, Peru, Poland, Russia, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand and offerings from the Jewish Heritage, Greek and Latin clubs. “The event highlights the different cultures, countries, geographic regions, and language clubs within our community,” said Andrew Caglieris, international student advisor. “Beyond our Peddie community, sharing carefully prepared food in the company of family and friends is an important aspect in the daily life of many cultures. Hopefully, we are able to recreate the same experience for our entire school community.” The event, which has been held continuously since 1995 but dates back to the 1970s, is sponsored by the Peddie Language Department in conjunction with the International Student Organization and supervised by Dr. David Martin and the Peddie Food Services staff. The students themselves are the primary chefs.

More than a dozen countries were represented at this year’s International Food Festival.

Students prepared culinary delights from the Dominican Republic, South Korea and more than a dozen other countries.

Dr. Mariboe

Head of School John Green, Anne Seltzer and Doug Mariboe ’69, son of Dr. Herbert Mariboe, on Founders Day.

Paul Muldoon spoke at Peddie as part of the Christensen Speaker Series.

Two Beloved Faculty Members Honored on Founders Day

Pulitzer Winner Unravels Complexities of Poetry

Peddie marked its 115th annual Founders Day by paying tribute to two former faculty members whose dedication, integrity and hard work have enriched the school and the lives of countless former students.

When reading a “true poem,” Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon said, “one comes out the other end with a sense that something has happened to them.” Muldoon appeared at Peddie in January as part of the school’s Christensen Speaker Series, which is supported by Henry “Terry” Christensen ’62.

Dr. Herbert Mariboe, the former longtime chair of Peddie’s History Department and assistant head of school, and Trustee Anne Seltzer, the former English teacher who also served as head of school during her 25 years of service in Hightstown, were honored during a service in February at Ayer Memorial Chapel. History Department Chair Peter Kraft recognized the late Dr. Mariboe’s steadfast commitment to Peddie and belief in the dignity of hard work while always finding the time to respect and be kind to others. In closing his speech, Kraft shared an excerpt from an inspirational chapel speech Dr. Mariboe gave to students in November 1968: “(I hope) you will have the inclination to be interested in other people; the desire to be of service to your community; a willingness to help those who need you without expecting a stated reward; the courage to stand up to and overcome adversity; and the capacity to create happiness in the hearts of those you know.” Trustee Angie Manley Cook ’84 and Peddie’s writer-inresidence/history teacher Paul Watkins both spoke of Seltzer’s infectious enthusiasm for Peddie and the shining example she set for everyone.

How can you tell the difference between poetry and other writing styles?

The poet opened his presentation, titled “Poetry and School: What Poetry Teaches Us,” by reading poetry from one of his collections, then explained the childhood memories and Irish history that lay at the foundation of each poem before fielding questions from a large audience gathered in Efros Auditorium. Through his curious listeners’ queries, Muldoon addressed the deeper and more complex components of his understanding of poetry. “Poetry teaches us that we are merely conduits, merely media for something that is bigger than us, beyond us.” said Muldoon, who has been called the most significant Englishlanguage poet born since World War II. Prior to his program, Muldoon, who also teaches creative writing at Princeton University, met with students over dinner and shared with them why he gravitated toward writing poetry: “[I] thought it was easier, at that point, to write a poem than an essay.” “He was a really good speaker,” said Jennifer Creel ’12. “Not exactly somebody you meet every day, you know?”

“You have been a wonderful role model, teacher, supporter and friend. Truth is, Peddie would not be the same without you,” said Cook. “There are many good schools, but very few truly great schools. Peddie is a great school, because Anne Seltzer helped to make it that way. Follow her example, and the world out there will welcome you with open arms,” Watkins told students assembled in the chapel. Founders Day was instituted in 1895 to celebrate Thomas B. Peddie, whose $25,000 donation rescued the school from bankruptcy in 1872. chronicleXtra To view videos from Founders Day, go to www.peddie.org/chronicle

28 Peddie Chronicle

Spring 2010 29


1

Computer Memory The technology revolution sprang to life at Peddie with the acquisition of a single unit in 1968. Over the last four decades, Peddie has evolved into a leader in academic computing. By Dr. David “Doc” Martin, Peddie Historian

T

he story of computers and modern technology at Peddie begins in 1968 when the school acquired its first computer, a 7-year-old Monrobot XI, generously donated by Bernard Goldsmith II, father of Bernard (Barry) Goldsmith III ’62. The unit was easy to use because it ran on standard current and required no special temperature or humidity controls, but it had very limited memory, and data had to be loaded by paper tape. It was immediately embraced into the school’s curriculum as seven students took the newly offered computing course and learned how to construct flow charts and write programs that would alphabetize names and compute the school’s teacher/ student ratio. In addition, 50 or 60 boys (yes, the school was not coeducational in those days) enjoyed playing assorted games on it. The father of Peddie computing is popular former math teacher Dietrich E.O. von Schwerdtner. “Mr. Von,” as he is respectfully and fondly called, came to Peddie in 1965 and attended special courses in computing at Dartmouth in the summer of 1968 in order to be able set up our first computer program and courses. The program grew quickly, and by 1971 two more powerful new Monrobots were acquired. Von Schwertner also developed PECOS in 1971 (Peddie Computer Operating System) with the guidance and considerable help of William L. Salmon Jr. ’49, who continued to work with Von Schwertner for a number of years and so became a major factor in the development of computing at Peddie. The Monrobots were replaced in 1975 by an Interdata Model 716 that had a 16-bit processor with 64k bytes of RAM and permitted more than one user at a time. To host the new computer a “Computation Center” was set up by Mr. Von

30 Peddie Chronicle

2

3

4

5

and the parents of Paul Lasko ’77 in the lower level of Annenberg Hall (the space now occupied by Building Services). The new computer room boasted of having six terminals as well as being able to compile FORTRAN programs, which our students were introduced to by Bill Salmon Jr. The old computer room in Annenberg Hall 301 was converted to classroom use for me when I arrived at Peddie in September 1975. A second computer teacher, Tom Lott, came aboard in 1978 and started the task of computerizing the school’s alumni records. He also worked with Bill Salmon Jr.at setting up an assembly language course for our most advanced students. Lott had his hands full when “Calvin,” as the Interdata machine was called, totally broke down while processing grade reports in the fall of 1979. He and his students had to work overtime to transfer the grade-reporting program to Apple BASIC. Peddie computing entered a new era after 1979 when Von Schwertner left to enter the business world and Tom Lott departed a year later. We were lucky to land a new computer “guru,” math teacher Tim Corica, who co-wrote a text in 1986 called “A Guide to Computer Programming in Pascal” as well as several other later texts and manuals. He witnessed the introduction of Apple II computers, which shared data by use of floppy disks. By 1982 a shared hard drive was in use by the Alumni and Development Office, and by 1985 there was a shared hard drive for student use. Our progress in computers was greatly aided by Barry Goldsmith, who gave a donation to set up computers in the library and supported the school to “purchase what we need for computers.” With his aid the school switched in the late 1980s from Apples to Tandy 1000s. Separate Novell-based servers were installed in 1990 for the computer lab, Business Office, and Alumni Office. The technology revolution struck Peddie full force in the early 1990s as we stepped to the forefront in academic computing. Plans were begun for a campus network and, starting in 1991, new students were required to take a course in HIT (Harnessing Information and Technology). The first campuswide network was installed in 1992 and internet e-mail was available to everyone in the fall of 1993. The $250,000 cost

of setting up this campus-wide system was funded by Board Chair Finn M.W. Caspersen ’59. In September 1994 laptop computers were issued to all 30 students participating in the Principio Project as a key component of the program. They proved to work so well that all teachers were issued laptops in 1997 and all students were issued laptops in fall 1998. The first Peddie website was set up in January 1995 and soon afterward the first 21st century classroom was set up. SMART boards were installed in the math classrooms in 1998, and wireless access in all classrooms was achieved in 2001. These innovations were overseen by “Mr. Von,” who returned as computer coordinator from 1990–1994, and by Tim Corica, who served as director of academic computing from 1994–2001, when he became dean of faculty and was replaced by our current director of technology, Tom Phelan. We are proud to say that Peddie remains in the forefront of academic computing and technology to this day. The one-to-one laptop program, which started in 1998 and provides all the faculty and students with a Peddie laptop, is still the foundation upon which the Peddie technology program is built. The Peddie network continues to grow and now contains over 3,000 wired ports and 100 wireless access points all linked together via a 10-Gbps fiber backbone. The server room contains the latest equipment, including blade servers, multi-terabyte SANs, and both a DS3 and Fios connection to the Internet. On the software side, Peddie computers will be migrated to Windows 7 in the coming year, and all come preloaded with software such as Microsoft Office 2007 and Adobe’s full suite of applications. Peddie is also on the leading edge of the trend toward cloud computing, having migrated to Google Apps in September 2008, as well as providing a host of other web-based applications for communicating everything from class assignments, to grade

reports, to summer mailing information. Peddie’s classrooms are well equipped with the latest audio-visual equipment, including fixed projectors, control systems, SMART boards, and document cameras. A new technology center was opened in the lower level of Annenberg Hall in 2007 and the Technology Department has a full-time staff of eight people. When asked if Peddie is still on the cutting edge of technology, Director of Technology Phelan responds with a wry smile, noting that, when he attends technology conferences, he answers more questions than he asks. Special thanks to Tim Corica, Tom Phelan and Dietrich E.O. Von Schwertner (“Mr. Von”) for their help preparing this article.

1. Department of Mathematics Chair Evans Hicks and Barry Goldsmith ’62 review a program tape from the school’s first computer, donated by Barry’s father Bernard Goldsmith in 1968. 2. Dietrich E.O. von Schwerdtner, a.k.a. “Mr. Von,” the father of Peddie computing, works with a student. 3. Steve Tifft ’70 operating a mathematics department computer. 4. Tim Corica (left) demonstrates a calculus lesson to students Lisa Worthington, center, and Laura Norrett, both ’93. 5. Peddie Director of Technology Tom Phelan oversees the school’s vast computer network.

Spring 2010 31


1

Computer Memory The technology revolution sprang to life at Peddie with the acquisition of a single unit in 1968. Over the last four decades, Peddie has evolved into a leader in academic computing. By Dr. David “Doc” Martin, Peddie Historian

T

he story of computers and modern technology at Peddie begins in 1968 when the school acquired its first computer, a 7-year-old Monrobot XI, generously donated by Bernard Goldsmith II, father of Bernard (Barry) Goldsmith III ’62. The unit was easy to use because it ran on standard current and required no special temperature or humidity controls, but it had very limited memory, and data had to be loaded by paper tape. It was immediately embraced into the school’s curriculum as seven students took the newly offered computing course and learned how to construct flow charts and write programs that would alphabetize names and compute the school’s teacher/ student ratio. In addition, 50 or 60 boys (yes, the school was not coeducational in those days) enjoyed playing assorted games on it. The father of Peddie computing is popular former math teacher Dietrich E.O. von Schwerdtner. “Mr. Von,” as he is respectfully and fondly called, came to Peddie in 1965 and attended special courses in computing at Dartmouth in the summer of 1968 in order to be able set up our first computer program and courses. The program grew quickly, and by 1971 two more powerful new Monrobots were acquired. Von Schwertner also developed PECOS in 1971 (Peddie Computer Operating System) with the guidance and considerable help of William L. Salmon Jr. ’49, who continued to work with Von Schwertner for a number of years and so became a major factor in the development of computing at Peddie. The Monrobots were replaced in 1975 by an Interdata Model 716 that had a 16-bit processor with 64k bytes of RAM and permitted more than one user at a time. To host the new computer a “Computation Center” was set up by Mr. Von

30 Peddie Chronicle

2

3

4

5

and the parents of Paul Lasko ’77 in the lower level of Annenberg Hall (the space now occupied by Building Services). The new computer room boasted of having six terminals as well as being able to compile FORTRAN programs, which our students were introduced to by Bill Salmon Jr. The old computer room in Annenberg Hall 301 was converted to classroom use for me when I arrived at Peddie in September 1975. A second computer teacher, Tom Lott, came aboard in 1978 and started the task of computerizing the school’s alumni records. He also worked with Bill Salmon Jr.at setting up an assembly language course for our most advanced students. Lott had his hands full when “Calvin,” as the Interdata machine was called, totally broke down while processing grade reports in the fall of 1979. He and his students had to work overtime to transfer the grade-reporting program to Apple BASIC. Peddie computing entered a new era after 1979 when Von Schwertner left to enter the business world and Tom Lott departed a year later. We were lucky to land a new computer “guru,” math teacher Tim Corica, who co-wrote a text in 1986 called “A Guide to Computer Programming in Pascal” as well as several other later texts and manuals. He witnessed the introduction of Apple II computers, which shared data by use of floppy disks. By 1982 a shared hard drive was in use by the Alumni and Development Office, and by 1985 there was a shared hard drive for student use. Our progress in computers was greatly aided by Barry Goldsmith, who gave a donation to set up computers in the library and supported the school to “purchase what we need for computers.” With his aid the school switched in the late 1980s from Apples to Tandy 1000s. Separate Novell-based servers were installed in 1990 for the computer lab, Business Office, and Alumni Office. The technology revolution struck Peddie full force in the early 1990s as we stepped to the forefront in academic computing. Plans were begun for a campus network and, starting in 1991, new students were required to take a course in HIT (Harnessing Information and Technology). The first campuswide network was installed in 1992 and internet e-mail was available to everyone in the fall of 1993. The $250,000 cost

of setting up this campus-wide system was funded by Board Chair Finn M.W. Caspersen ’59. In September 1994 laptop computers were issued to all 30 students participating in the Principio Project as a key component of the program. They proved to work so well that all teachers were issued laptops in 1997 and all students were issued laptops in fall 1998. The first Peddie website was set up in January 1995 and soon afterward the first 21st century classroom was set up. SMART boards were installed in the math classrooms in 1998, and wireless access in all classrooms was achieved in 2001. These innovations were overseen by “Mr. Von,” who returned as computer coordinator from 1990–1994, and by Tim Corica, who served as director of academic computing from 1994–2001, when he became dean of faculty and was replaced by our current director of technology, Tom Phelan. We are proud to say that Peddie remains in the forefront of academic computing and technology to this day. The one-to-one laptop program, which started in 1998 and provides all the faculty and students with a Peddie laptop, is still the foundation upon which the Peddie technology program is built. The Peddie network continues to grow and now contains over 3,000 wired ports and 100 wireless access points all linked together via a 10-Gbps fiber backbone. The server room contains the latest equipment, including blade servers, multi-terabyte SANs, and both a DS3 and Fios connection to the Internet. On the software side, Peddie computers will be migrated to Windows 7 in the coming year, and all come preloaded with software such as Microsoft Office 2007 and Adobe’s full suite of applications. Peddie is also on the leading edge of the trend toward cloud computing, having migrated to Google Apps in September 2008, as well as providing a host of other web-based applications for communicating everything from class assignments, to grade

reports, to summer mailing information. Peddie’s classrooms are well equipped with the latest audio-visual equipment, including fixed projectors, control systems, SMART boards, and document cameras. A new technology center was opened in the lower level of Annenberg Hall in 2007 and the Technology Department has a full-time staff of eight people. When asked if Peddie is still on the cutting edge of technology, Director of Technology Phelan responds with a wry smile, noting that, when he attends technology conferences, he answers more questions than he asks. Special thanks to Tim Corica, Tom Phelan and Dietrich E.O. Von Schwertner (“Mr. Von”) for their help preparing this article.

1. Department of Mathematics Chair Evans Hicks and Barry Goldsmith ’62 review a program tape from the school’s first computer, donated by Barry’s father Bernard Goldsmith in 1968. 2. Dietrich E.O. von Schwerdtner, a.k.a. “Mr. Von,” the father of Peddie computing, works with a student. 3. Steve Tifft ’70 operating a mathematics department computer. 4. Tim Corica (left) demonstrates a calculus lesson to students Lisa Worthington, center, and Laura Norrett, both ’93. 5. Peddie Director of Technology Tom Phelan oversees the school’s vast computer network.

Spring 2010 31


Come on in, the water’s fine On a cold winter’s day in late January Peddie students heard the words they’d been waiting for: Headmaster’s Holiday. This year’s version, though, came with a little something extra. Students were invited to enjoy the school’s new pool. So while Old Man Winter howled outside, some students took to the warmth of the pool for a well-deserved break.

Above, Rachel Gankiewicz ’13, Tara Cahanap ’13, Jeremy Wong ’12, Ricky Perrine, ’13 and Andy Tavoso ’13 “pose” below the surface for a photograph taken by P.J. Morreale. A day later, a capacity crowd filled the new aquatic center and watched Peddie swimmers sweep rival Germantown Academy thanks to a thrilling victory by the girls’ 400-yard freestyle relay team in the day’s final event.


PEDDIE SCHOOL 201 South Main Street Hightstown, NJ 08520-3349

NonproFIt organization U.S. POSTAGE PAID MIAMI, FL PERMIT NO. 6737

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Splashdown! 24

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Plus, Q&A with Chris Acito Good-bye, Roby and Elaine

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Members of the Peddie swim team had the honor of “christening” the school’s new pool on Jan. 25 with a ceremonial first plunge, then enjoyed themselves in their new digs before getting down to practice. Next up in the renovation and expansion of the Ian H. Graham Athletic Center is a new fitness center, which will be located on the site of the old Clinton Sprout Natatorium. For more coverage on the new state-of-the art aquatic center and the Peddie swim program, which is celebrating its 100th year, see stories on Pages 16 and 18.

Peddie Chronicle, Spring 2010  

Spring 2010 issue of Peddie Chronicle alumni magazine

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