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STUDENTS’ BOOK 3 Neville Grant

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Achieve!

A complete English course for the Caribbean learner

You can Achieve!

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Achieve!

STUDENTS’ BOOK

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f o r e s r u o c h s li g n E e a r e l n er n t a e b e b l i r p a C m e co th Neville Grant


STUDENTS’ BOOK

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Neville Grant Contributions from Gillian Pilgrim-Thomas Consultants: Daytona Campbell, Gloria Cave, Dr Paulette Feraria, Mavis Findlay-Joseph, Herina George, Rafer Gordon, Christene Phillips, Gillian Pilgrim-Thomas and Cherri-Ann Sesankar

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s t n e t n o C Extended contents Introduction Scheme of work Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit

1 Music 2 People 3 Going green: ethical shopping 4 The Wild West 5: Made in the Caribbean 6 Technology then and now 7 Mainly revision (1) 8 Home is where the heart is 9 Heroes and heroines 10 Emergency! 11 Bullying 12 Mainly revision (2) 13 The war against drugs 14 Careers 15 Saving the environment 16 Reading a short story 17 Mainly revision (3)

v x xii 1 21 37 57 75 92 107 121 137 155 173 187 207 229 253 271 285

Appendices: Appendix 1 Spelling

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Appendix 2 Irregular verb forms

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Appendix 3 Glossary: terms used in language and literature

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Index 318 iv A01_ACHI_SB3_CAR_1881_PREL.indd 4

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n o i t c u d Intro You can Achieve! Achieve! is a four-level print and digital English language course designed specifically for the Caribbean learner. Spanning lower secondary and CSEC, Achieve! delivers comprehensive syllabus coverage through its range of components that support students and teachers in the improvement of long-term English language and literacy skills.

What makes Achieve! so great? Each learning unit is theme-based so that students are not just learning language, but exploring interesting areas of human experience too. Within each unit there are sections on all elements in the syllabus: listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as the mechanics of language, grammar and vocabulary. The scheme of work in this book helps to identify many of these. There is also a consistent infusion of literature, language appreciation, media and cross-curricular skills development. These are treated in an integrated way so that work in one section will help with work in the others. For example, a text in the reading section at the start of the unit creates a context for language use in the grammar and speech work sections; it also generates work on vocabulary and creates a springboard or model for writing. Every section emphasises the importance of student activity and encourages independent learning. While Achieve! offers a comprehensive and systematic treatment of language and skills development, the emphasis on this course is very much on flexibility. Achieve! has been developed so that it can be adapted for a wide variety of students and classes as we recognise that classes all learn at different speeds.

Your guide to the student book features A detailed contents list helps teachers to clearly navigate their way through the text, and specific features also assist teachers and students to work through material in a manageable and tailored way. Features and activities throughout the text span individual, paired and group work for a variety of approaches to ensure that students have enough practice. • A wide of range of Caribbean and international reading passages are included. Annotated passages encourage discussion and opinion as students improve their reading and comprehension skills. • Word power provides a sustained and systematic approach to vocabulary development and arms students with the words and skills to better articulate their thoughts using the English language. • Language in action is a grammar component that is treated within the context of each reading passage. x A01_ACHI_SB3_CAR_1881_PREL.indd 10

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students are invited to complete self assessment exercises at the end of each unit in things to do

each unit sets out the objectives

Things

to do

1

Research Find out what anti-drug programmes exist locally, and write a short presentation to give to the class.

2

Find out more about Caricom. What does it stand for? What are its aims? Why has it been criticised?

3

Look at the poster, which was published by Trinidad’s National Drug Abuse Control Council (NDACC). Design your own advert to discourage drug-taking.

4

Imagine that a cousin has written this letter to you:

<insert 931881_ph_13.11: Caribbean anti-drug poster; ideally find a more recent poster or reuse (SiE p. 159)>

I really need your advice – I am in deep trouble. I stupidly started playing around with cannabis, and though it made me feel ill, I have found it hard to stop, though I am trying to. Now a local guy is demanding payment – money I just don’t have. Please help me. Can you give me some advice on what to do! Write an informal letter advising your cousin what he or she should do.

In this unit you

Re self-aview and ssess ment

• read a short story and drew inferences

Was the story just an exciting story or did it have a significant theme?

• developed your vocabulary, using synonyms and antonyms Did you make a note of new words in your vocabulary notebook?

• listened to the end of a story, and retold it

Did you realise that in retelling the story, you were summarising it?

• learned and practised the changes needed in reported speech If you need more practice, go to ACHIEVE! DIY Manual Unit 13

• acted and improvised TV interviews

Is your oral production improving? If not, what do you think you need to work on?

• wrote a newspaper report

Would you make a good newspaper reporter? Why / why not?

• revised topic sentences and used signal words in a text Did this help in your comprehension of the text?

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a brief warm-up session engages students' in the theme(s) of the unit

skills focus boxes help students learn how to learn with relevant skills

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students can pause and reflect on the unit through the review and self assessment

• Speak for yourself develops students’ oral skills. • A wide range of writing tasks is offered, which covers the full scope of important writing skills for your portfolio. • Language and literature cannot be separated because literature is language used in its most effective and creative way. The range of literature pieces in Achieve! includes literature by great writers as well as effective writing. • There is a special focus on media communication to interest and help students as citizens of the modern world. • Listening comprehension is an invaluable skill for world citizens generally, but also hones critical listening. This is a feature of the Communication Studies syllabus at the CXC CAPE level. Passages appear in the Teacher’s Handbook.

What else is in the Achieve! course? • Comprehensive Teacher Handbooks with accompanying resource CD-ROMs

provide additional support, ideas and strategies for teachers. • A companion website including a wealth of resources for teachers and students, including audio recordings of literature pieces, interactive spelling and grammar practice, story-building exercises and many more additional activities to complement your textbooks. Log on to www.pearsoncaribbean.com/Achieve to see more: Username: Achieve_student Password: b8dkpea4 xi

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Scheme of work Unit

Listening & speaking Reading & summary

Word power

Language in use: grammar

1 Music

1 Listening to songs and evaluating them, mood and message 2 Group discussion work

1 Classifying musical genres 2 Magazine article: Music: the Caribbean’s gift to the world; Pop Muis: the Sound of the Charts in T&T 3 M-C questions 4 Group discussion Rude Boys

1 Dictionary practice 2 Vocabulary notebooks

1 Revision: the parts of speech 2 Problem-shooting with pronouns

2 People

1 Discussion groups 2 Acting 3 Telling jokes 4 Listening to as story: critical listening 5 The moral

1 Reading a short story: Bobbing Jones 2 Character analysis motivation 3 Stages in a story 4 Supplementary texts: more character studies

1 Word inference 2 Suffixes 3 Synonyms 4 Vocabulary notebooks

Revision: verb tenses

3 Going green: ethical shopping

1 Pair work 2 Discussing shopping issues 3 Role play 4 Buy local: pros & cons 5 Survey on shopping habits

1 Magazine article: Shopping today 2 Completing a table 3 Fact and opinion 4 Newspaper item: WTO questions Barbados ‘Buy Local’ campaign Cubing

1 Compound words 2 Phrasal verbs 3 The Maami Rap

1 Revision: main and dependent clauses 2 Adverb clauses of time and contrast

4 The Wild West

1 Listening for information: North American Indians 2 Group discussions 3 Discussing films and advertisements 4 Reading aloud

1 Extract from an autobiography: Attacked by Indians 2 Group discussion 3 Bias

1 Synonyms 2 Clichés 3 Using a thesaurus

1 Using the present participle 2 Expressing contrast with in spite of and despite, etc.

5 Made in the Caribbean

Role-play: money matters–negotiating a loan

1 An essay: Our creative Caribbean 2 Completing a table 3 From a magazine: Jobless divorcee invents a hair band A Carnival Artist

1 Word inference 2 Word building 3 Protecting intellectual property: cloze 4 Idioms and phrasal verbs

1 Revision using the passive 2 Describing an invention 3 Different uses of quotation marks

6 Technology then 1 Class survey: consumer and now

Essay: Changing times: inference, value judgements, summary

1 Word inference 2 Language of computers 3 Phrasal verbs

1 What’s it used for? 2 Verb tenses: revision 3 Talking about the future

7 Mainly revision (1)

1 Listening to students’ presentations 2 Talking about books and films

1 Extracts from novels: Treasure Island 2 Comprehension: Miss Haversham

1 Coping with new words: revision 2 Throwaway words

1 Revision of verb tenses 2 Phrasal verbs

8 Home is where the heart is

1 Listening for information: The Caribs of St VincentI 2 Role play: being a travel guide

1 Extract from a Caribbean autobiography: Cacique Bay 2 Critical reading

1 Increasing vocabulary 2 Inference and using a dictionary

1 Revision: commas 2 Commas in nondefining relative clauses

questionnaire 2 Debate

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Writing

Skills focus

Literature

Media matters

Things to do

1 Writing an expository essay 2 Identifying ideas 3 Planning and drafting

1 How to discuss things in class 2 How to search using the Internet 3 Writing an expository essay

1 Lyric: You can get it if you really want 2 Poem: Government memorandum 3 Creating a song

1 Musical appreciation 2 Designing a CD cover

1 T-diagram: the pros and cons of foreign music 2 Internet research 3 Finding songs that make social comment 4 Review and self assessment

1 Writing process 2 Describing a character

1 Describing a person 2 Features of a story

Reading a novel: setting, Photographs characterisation, theme, plot, moral

1 Writing a formal letter 2 Exposition: advantages and disadvantages of buying local

Writing a formal letter: layout and style

A poem: Village Song: rhyme, rhythm, alliteration and assonance

Interpreting and making a film: shop lifting

1 Role play 2 Research 3 Books to read and enjoy 4 Review and self assessment

1 Writing a story 2 Writing a film review

Writing a film review

1 Autobiography: authorial style and intention 2 Avoiding stereotypes 3 Reading aloud: Chief Seattle’s speech

1 Analysing film adverts 2 Designing a film advertisement

1 Research 2 Wider reading 3 Discussion and writing about race prejudice: cubing 4 Review and self assessment

1 Describing an invention 2 Writing a summary Peter Minshall

1 How to approach writing a summary 2 How to approach a poem

1 Poem Canto of Progress 2 Figures of speech 3 Irony

1 Writing a familiar essay 2 Exposition: future developments

Giving a presentation

1 Prose: features of a personal essay 2 Poem: Remember when: a poem about technology

Summary: The effect of 1 Poem: The computer new media on the news swallowed Gran’ma industry 2 Preparing a talk 3 Research 4 Review and self assessment

1 Writing a book review 2 Creative writing 3 Exposition

1 Revision: fix-it strategies 2 Writing a book review

1 Revision: similes and metaphors 2 Poem: Schooner

1 Internet research 2 Cubing

Describing a placing using the five senses

1 Using a dictionary 2 Writing for a purpose: AMPS

1 Prose extracts using the five senses 2 From a novel 3 From a diary

Designing and writing a 1 Research travel brochure 2 Dictionary 3 Review and self assessment

1 Making a Bobbing Jones puppet 2 A recipe 3 Doing Dudley’s experiment 4 A self-portrait 5 Review and self assessment

1 Research 2 Designing a Carnival costume 3 Describing an invention 3 Review and self assessment

1 Research 2 Wider reading and looking at films 3 Presentations 4 Learning English questionnaire 5 Review and self assessment

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Unit

Listening & speaking Reading & summary

Word power

Language in use: grammar

9 Heroes and heroines

Listening, note-making 1 Famous speeches by and summary Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela, Sojourner Truth and others 2 Rhetorical devices

1 Metaphor 2 Repetition 3 Imagery 4 Alliteration 5 Assonance 6 Rhetorical questions

1 Reported speech: dayto-day examples 2 Reporting a speech

10 Emergency!

1 Responding to an emergency on the phone 2 Presentations about cellphones

1 A quiz 2 Newspaper article: First Aid: M-C questions, interpretation, summary 3 Interpreting a table: accidents: detecting trends, summary

1 Word inference 2 Using the right word 3 Interesting comparisons 4 Cloze: Careers in medicine 5 Emergency!

1 Talking about possibility: may and might 2 Reported speech: reporting commands and instructions, to… and that…

11 Bullying

Group discussion of case, problems and solutions

1 Extract from a story: My friend Syo: inferences 2 Reading for summary: Bullying: Another view

Developing your vocabulary

1 Reported speech: using modal verbs 2 Reporting questions

12 Mainly revision (2)

1 Listening for key information: The Nobel prizes 2 Derek Walcott 3 Group discussions 4 Presentations

1 An extract from a novel: Words associated with Carnival! Carnival 2 Style: Walcott on Desert Island Discs

13 The war against drugs

1 Listening to a story and retelling it 2 Doing a TV interview 3 Group discussion 4 Presentations

1 A short story: Voyage to Devil’s Cay: drawing inferences 2 An information leaflet on drug abuse 3 Summary

1 Synonyms 1 Antonyms 3 Words associated with the sea

Revision: Reported speech: changes required

14 Careers

1 Speeches of welcome and votes of thanks 2 Presentations

1 Careers leaflet: preparing for a job interview 2 Summary: what employers look for

1 The language of the workplace 2 Suffix –ee 3 Common spelling errors

1 Using the Present Simple to talk about a schedule 2 Prepositions 3 Language signposts

15 Saving the environment

1 A newspaper article: 1 Group discussions The Wages of 2 Role play: Deforestation: M-C environmental issues questions, summary 3 Presentations 2 Two articles on forestry in Guyana: detecting bias

1 Vocabulary relating to the environment 2 Sentence completion

1 Positives and negatives 2 Distinguishing few/a few and little/a little

16 Reading a short story

1 Listening to a story 2 Presentations

Extracts from a short 1 Sentence completion story: Do Angels wear 2 Synonyms brassieres?: inference, 3 Antonyms interpretation, evaluation

1 Verb tense use in short stories 2 Standard Caribbean English

17 Mainly revision (3)

1 Listening to an extract from an autobiography and drawing conclusions 2 Conflict resolution 3 Presentations

1 Extract from an autobiography: The Cricket Lesson 2 Book review 3 M-C questions 4 Interpretation 5 Critical reading

1 Idioms 2 Synonyms 3 Antonyms 4 Sentence completion

Revision: 1 Colons and semicolons 2 Sentence construction 3 Active and passive 4 Advert clauses

1 Error correction 2 M-C questions

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Writing

Skills focus

Literature

Media matters

Things to do

1 Writing up research 2 Writing a speech in a debate and to get elected

1 How to do research 2 How to plan and write a speech: AMPS

1 Poem: Martin Luther King 2 Mixed metaphors 3 Hyperbole

Research using the library and the Internet

1 Reading widely 2 Presentations 3 Debating 4 Review and self assessment 3 Review and self assessment

1 Using thought connectors: Snake bites 2 Summary based on a table 3 A letter to a newspaper 1 How to do a survey 1 Creative writing 2 Writing a letter of 2 Exposition: The complaint problem with bullying 3 A letter of complaint

An extract from Yevtuchenko’s autobiography

Carrying out a survey

1 Research 2 A poem: Bully asleep 3 Review and self assessment

1 An essay 2 Personal writing

1 Doing a radio or TV commentary 2 How to write a poem

Poem: Paper boats: free verse, use of imagery

1 Performing on radio or TV 2 Creating and evaluating photo essays

1 A photo essay competition 2 Writing a poem 3 Review and self assessment

1 Faulty arguments 2 Argumentative essay on drug abuse 3 An informal letter of advice

More advice on writing a Two poems: Addition summary and Waiting to exhale: poetic devices

Study of function and use of cartoons: to entertain or make social and political comment

3 Review and self assessment

1 Letters of application 2 Writing a CV

1 More on how to write a summary 2 How to complete a form

1 Cause and effect: How a rainforest dies 2 A letter of a newspaper about a local issue

1 How to recognise reading traps 2 Common fallacies

A poem: The Tree’s Prayer: personification, assonance, alliteration

1 Character analysis 2 A short story

Language use in short stories

The structure of short stories: examples: Family photographs and ‘The Revenge of Robert-7’

1 Describing an event from two different points of view: A War of Words! 2 A story

How to write a story: the A poem: Geography essential elements lesson: poetic devices

1 Role play: job interviews 2 Presentations: my future career 3 Completing a form 4 Review and self assessment Interpreting a diagram

1 Writing 2 Research 3 Presentation 4 Review and self assessment

1 Wider reading 2 Research 3 Loan words 4 Review and self assessment Press releases

1 Research 2 Wider reading 3 Book reviews 4 Review and self assessment

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15

e h t g n i Sav t n e m n o envir

OBJECTIVES

In this unit you will • read an article on deforestation and write a summary • write about causes and effects, while interpreting a diagram • develop your knowledge of vocabulary about environmental issues • learn to distinguish few/a few and little/a little • revise and extend your understanding of logical fallacies • develop critical reading skills by considering bias in two reading texts • role-play a TV discussion about difficult environmental issues • write a letter to a newspaper about a local environmental issue • appreciate the role of personification and alliteration in a poem.

The Caribbean is one of the most beautiful areas in the world: no wonder tourists flock to it from all over the world. But are we doing everything to ensure that it will be still be there, as lovely as ever, for future generations? What do you think?

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There are two articles about the operations of a timber company in Guyana on this page and the next. They give two very different views of the company’s operations. Read the first article carefully and answer the questions that follow.

The Sarawhacking of Guyana Secret decisions are being made to auction off or give away all of Guyana’s lands to foreign interests. The governments of Guyana and Suriname are considering bids that would put over 80 per cent of the region’s forest under foreign control. According to the Bretton Woods Reform Organisation, the people of the region are poised to lose, forever, major portions of their land at a token price from multi-national corporations. At the rate at which logging is presently being conducted, the forests will all be gone in eight to ten years. These lands, if they belong to anyone at all, belong to their people and no individual or government has the right to give away concessions over public territory without the consent of its people. These concessions are granted in an atmosphere of secrecy and the people are given no opportunity to be part of the decision-making process. Basically, it means that the company that has been butchering the forests of Sarawak in East Malaysia and Papua New Guinea have been given an open invitation to rape Guyana’s virgin forest. The Northwest District of Essequibo alone equals about 10 per cent of Guyana. In addition to the land grant, the company has been granted a five-year tax holiday,

minimum royalty payments and the right to export unprocessed timber, tax-free. In return, after five years, Guyana gets a measly 20 million dollars annually. Furthermore, the company gets its labour as cheap as possible, and there are no workers’ rights, health care, insurance, accident coverage, pension schemes, and so on. With the continued devaluation of the Guyanese dollar, the company will make even more money off the forests and backs of Guyanese people because the royalty payments are fixed for the next 20 years. The company in turn sells the timber to Japanese and American companies at a handsome profit. In 1989, 2.4 million hectares of Guyana’s 14 million hectares of loggable forests were being exploited. Today, contracts for more than 9.1 million hectares have been signed and a further 4 million hectares are in the pipeline. The income is ridiculously low, onetwentieth of the US cent per acre. Environmentalism aside, these are not sound economic or social policies. At best, they are the desperate actions of politicians to generate cash for cash-starved economies. Now, not only are the people of the region being evicted from their homes, and their traditional livelihoods being lost, but the trees, animals and land will be destroyed as well.

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Activity 1

Questions

1 Explain what the heading ‘The Sarawhacking of Guyana’ mean? 2 What does the writer of that article accuse the government of Guyana of doing? 3 What are the writer’s three main reasons for objecting to the government’s actions? 4 Explain why the government’s income is likely to diminish over the years the concession is in operation. 5 List the reasons why the company finds the contract with Guyana attractive. 6 In what ways are the local people suffering, according to the writer? Now read the second article below and answer the questions that follow.

GUYANA MOVES ON: What Barama is doing A Caribbean Week Special section

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While some other tropical countries were mashing up their forests in the 1970s and 1980s, Guyana was in an economic tailspin, and traditional logging continued very much in its own sweet way. Guyanese-owned companies concentrated on species that were in demand, like greenheart and purple heart, and left the forest canopy largely intact. Natural regeneration could close the gaps. There was no land-hungry peasant population. Waterfalls and rapids on the rivers made access to many parts of the interior commercially impossible. Traditional Guyanese logging practices were not perfect. Few realworld industries are. But it did not produce a ‘red desert’ of bare laterite either. Large-scale tropical forest management has now learned from mistakes which have been made elsewhere, and Guyana is able to benefit from these lessons. Managers

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feel that it should be possible to increase production on a sustainable yield basis, which will maintain the forest resource for long-term use and retain the essential features of the ecosystem. In 1991, the Barama company, which is owned by Malaysian and South Korean interests, was granted a concession covering over four million acres (17,000 km2) in the North West region. Logs are transported by barge from Port Kaituma in the North West out to sea, then up the Demerara River to a new plywood plant at Land of Canaan, 15 miles from Georgetown. Plywood is a high valueadded product – and it generates more jobs in the processing plant than in the forestry operation itself. The Edinburgh Centre for Tropical Forestry, based in Scotland, has been advising the company on sustainedyield forestry techniques. There is now an approved

65 Forest Management Plan. An

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agreed annual cut – about eight trees per hectare – will be taken out under the supervision of the Forestry Commission. Amerindian reservations will be excluded from the concession. No Barama employee is allowed to enter a reservation without the explicit permission of its Amerindian Captain. And the gold producers will not be affected – Barama has no mining rights. The company will also rehabilitate and equip the hospital at Port Kaituma, and recruit a doctor and support staff. The company will also provide an electricity and pumped water supply for the settlement. Barama says it will be employing 300 people in the North West and 1,200 at Land of Canaan when the project is on-stream; at a later stage, there may be up to 5,000 jobs.

Unit 15

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In this unit you

Revie self a w and ssess ment

• read an article on deforestation and wrote a summary

How did you do on the multiple-choice questions? Did you find the group discussion of them helpful?

• wrote about causes and effects, while interpreting a diagram

Which did you consider more likely to convey information – your summary or the diagram? Give reasons for your answer.

• developed your knowledge of vocabulary about environmental issues Did you make a note of any new items in your vocabulary notebook?

• learned to distinguish few/a few and little/a little • revised and extended your understanding of logical fallacies Are you now more aware of possible ‘reading traps’?

• developed critical reading skills by considering bias in two reading texts What was the most important thing you learned about critically comprehending newspaper reports?

• role-played a TV discussion about difficult environmental issues

What insights did this role-play give you into how people treat problems in different ways?

• wrote a letter to a newspaper about a local environmental issue Who wrote the best letters, and why?

• appreciated the role of personification and alliteration in a poem

Which did you find more persuasive – the poem or the first reading text in this unit (on page 263)?

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Achieve!

STUDENTS’ BOOK

Achieve! is a four-level print and digital English language course designed specifically for the Caribbean learner. Spanning lower secondary and CSEC®, Achieve! delivers comprehensive syllabus coverage through its range of interactive components that support students and teachers in the life-long development of English language and literacy skills. Through a range of features and themes, each section of this book covers core skills related to listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as the mechanics of language, grammar and vocabulary. Literature, language appreciation, media and cross-curricular skills development are integrated consistently throughout. Achieve! is designed to be flexible so that the series will suit a diversity of classrooms, and teaching and learning styles. The accompanying Teacher’s Handbook helps with teacher support and differentiation strategies. Log on to www.pearsoncaribbean.com/Achieve to access your digital support resources and to view our wide range of additional English language and literature resources.

In this series: Students’ Books 1, 2, 3 and 4 with companion website Teacher’s Handbooks 1, 2, 3 and 4 with CD-ROM and companion website

Not for distribution without prior permission from Pearson Education

www.pearsoncaribbean.com

Neville Grant

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STUDENTS’ BOOK 3

About the author Neville Grant has worked as an English specialist, educational writer and consultant in many parts of the world, including the Caribbean, Africa, Asia and Europe. Formerly in the British Council, he has taught in several universities, and is the author of well over a hundred books, including High School courses for the Caribbean. He also edited the Pearson Read Awhile series for Caribbean Primary Schools.

A complete English course for the Caribbean learner

You can Achieve!

3 ! e v e

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f o r e s r u o c h s li g n E e a r e l n er n t a e b e b l i r p a C m e co th Neville Grant


Lucy Blackburn

www.pearson.com/caribbean

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TEACHER’S HANDBOOK 3

In this series: Students’ Books 1, 2, 3 and 4 with companion website Teacher’s Handbooks 1, 2, 3 and 4 with CD-ROM and companion website

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f o r e s r u o c h s li g n E e earner l t n a e e b l b i r p a C m e co th

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About the author Lucy Blackburn is an experienced educational author and has written numerous books for the Caribbean and Africa. She is also an experienced teacher who has taught in international schools, lectured in education and has an MA in Applied Linguistics and TESOL.

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This handbook contains reduced pages of the Students’ Book, together with general support for lesson planning and class instruction, additional activity ideas and differentiation strategies – your easy reference handbook during lessons. Access your digital support resources on the accompanying CD-ROM and by logging on to http://caribbean.pearson.com/achieve.

A complete English course for the Caribbean learner

Achieve! is a four-level print and digital English language course designed specifically for the Caribbean learner. Spanning lower secondary and CSEC® Achieve! delivers comprehensive syllabus coverage through its range of interactive components that support students and teachers in the life-long development of English language and literacy skills.

P LE

Achieve!

You can Achieve!

3 ! e v e

TEACHER’S HANDBOOK Lucy Blackburn

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Speak for yourself

Speak for yourself

Activity 1

Activity 1

Recently, I drove along Spanish Town Road in order to get to Six Miles, but I forgot that the fire at Riverton dump was still burning. Even inside my car, with all the windows and vents closed, I found myself choking; I can’t imagine what it must be like for those living or working in the area. This is not just a smoke nuisance: it is a major public health issue and needs urgent action by the authorities.

LE

In the longer term, it is good news that new contracts have been negotiated by the government to build waste-to-energy plants. Can we hope that the toxic smell of burning garbage will then become a thing of the past?

Con (against development) Economist, critical of the deal Conservation group representative Member of the Amerindian Peoples’ Association Local politician Local logging company employee

Edward Jones-Cameron EJC49@stm.com

Activity 1

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Writing your own letter

Write a letter to the newspaper or council complaining about a local issue you feel strongly about.

2 Spend a few minutes thinking about what you would like to say in the role of your character.

If you like, choose one of the following: 1 The centre of the city has recently seen a huge influx of street vendors who clutter up the road and represent a traffic hazard. In addition, they are taking away business from local shopkeepers. 2 A formerly attractive local park has been allowed to deteriorate. Make specific points about what is wrong and how it could be improved. The Editor 3 Write a letter to your local council pointing out the need Trinidad & Tobago Gu for more recreational facilities in your neighbourhood. ardian P.O. Box 122 4 Write a letter to the newspaper pointing out the need Port-of-Spain to plant more trees in your area. The lack of trees is causing soil erosion, and the area is unattractive. Don’t forget to address the envelope properly.

Use the information in the articles on pages 273 and 274 to brief yourself on your arguments. If your character is for or against the new project in the North West of Guyana, be prepared to argue your case strongly, courteously and clearly. If you are the chairperson, you have the toughest job of all. You must ensure that everyone gets a fair hearing and that the viewers or listeners to the programme obtain a balanced picture of the issues involved. You must also be prepared to decide who should speak if two people start talking at once.

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Students can choose one of the options suggested in their books, or they can choose another, local issue to complain about (although they should check the latter with you before writing the letter). They should use the example on this page as a model, following a similar format, structure and style. Students should follow the usual stages in the writing process for this activity and put a final copy in their portfolios (you may wish to encourage those who have written about a real issue to send their letters to the editor of a local newspaper). You should also assess each letter according to its format, content and style, and give appropriate feedback too.

Dear Editor I feel compelled to write to you about an urgent public health issue.

Chairperson

3 Carry out your discussion for the TV programme.

276

Writing your own letter

Letters to the Editor

Imagine that there is a TV discussion about Barama’s activities in Guyana. 1 Work in groups of about eight. Choose one of the following roles for each person. (You are also free to choose any other role you can think of, if you wish.)

Pro (in favour of development) Government spokesperson Barama company employee Local businessman at Port Kaituma or Land of Canaan Amerindian Captain Local logging company employee

Activity 1

There are times when ordinary citizens feel almost powerless to influence events. One thing you can do is write to your local member of parliament or to a newspaper. Either way, your letter should be set out properly and should include your full address, telephone number and email (even though these are not usually printed in a newspaper). You can see an example below.

Role-play

Do you watch current affairs programmes on TV or radio in which topical issues are discussed? Usually there is a chairperson or link person and several experts or politicians who have differing views about the issue under discussion.

Role-play Working in groups, students should follow the steps outlined in their books for this activity. It may be helpful if the same characters from different groups got together beforehand to plan their arguments (for example, all the students role-playing the government spokesperson in their respective groups could meet separately and discuss ideas about what to argue; all the students role-playing the Economist could do the same, and so on.) Encourage students to base their arguments on what they have read in the articles. It may also be helpful if the students role-playing the Chairperson in each group got together beforehand too, and decided on effective ways of chairing their discussions. For example, they could agree on the following: • Each speaker gets one or two minutes to present his or her point of view. • Speakers in favour of the Barama development should alternate with those against it. • There should be a 15 minute time limit on the whole discussion. • If a particular speaker starts to dominate the discussion, then an effort should be made to elicit the point of view of an opposing speaker. • Once students have prepared themselves for the discussion, they can go ‘on air’ and hold the discussion on TV. If time permits, you may wish to ask each group to hold their discussion in front of the rest of the class or ‘audience’. However, if your class is large and you do not have enough time, then you may have to have group discussions going on simultaneously in different parts of the classroom.

Writing: a letter of protest

Unit 15

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Note: Useful expressions for a TV discussion You may wish to write the following useful expressions on the board for students to use in their group discussions on TV: I’m afraid I disagree with… In my opinion… In my view… I’m sorry, but I have to disagree with… Contrary to what…says, I believe… I’m afraid that opinion is unfounded as there is strong evidence to suggest that… May I interrupt at this point to say… Excuse me, but I don’t think what you’re saying is true…

Saving the environment

12/11/2012 11:44

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Writing: a letter of protest Talk about the example letter to a newspaper editor with the class first, drawing attention to its format, content and style. Point out the following: • The salutation (‘Dear Editor’). • The introductory sentence that states the purpose of the letter. • The main body paragraph that describes the issue and calls for immediate action by the relevant authorities. • The concluding paragraph that sheds an alternative light on the issue and ends with a thought-provoking question. • The writer’s name and email address (sometimes this can be printed as a pseudonym, although you have to send your real name to the newspaper).

Saving the environment

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Speak for yourself

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M15_ACH3_TB_CAR_1928_U15.indd 276-277

There are times when ordinary citizens feel almost powerless to influence events. One thing you can do is write to your local member of parliament or to a newspaper. Either way, your letter should be set out properly and should include your full address, telephone number and email (even though these are not usually printed in a newspaper). You can see an example below.

Role-play

Do you watch current affairs programmes on TV or radio in which topical issues are discussed? Usually there is a chairperson or link person and several experts or politicians who have differing views about the issue under discussion.

Letters to the Editor Dear Editor I feel compelled to write to you about an urgent public health issue.

Imagine that there is a TV discussion about Barama’s activities in Guyana. 1 Work in groups of about eight. Choose one of the following roles for each person. (You are also free to choose any other role you can think of, if you wish.)

Recently, I drove along Spanish Town Road in order to get to Six Miles, but I forgot that the fire at Riverton dump was still burning. Even inside my car, with all the windows and vents closed, I found myself choking; I can’t imagine what it must be like for those living or working in the area. This is not just a smoke nuisance: it is a major public health issue and needs urgent action by the authorities.

Chairperson

Pro (in favour of development) Government spokesperson Barama company employee Local businessman at Port Kaituma or Land of Canaan Amerindian Captain Local logging company employee

In the longer term, it is good news that new contracts have been negotiated by the government to build waste-to-energy plants. Can we hope that the toxic smell of burning garbage will then become a thing of the past?

Con (against development) Economist, critical of the deal Conservation group representative Member of the Amerindian Peoples’ Association Local politician Local logging company employee

Edward Jones-Cameron EJC49@stm.com

Activity 1

If you like, choose one of the following: 1 The centre of the city has recently seen a huge influx of street vendors who clutter up the road and represent a traffic hazard. In addition, they are taking away business from local shopkeepers. 2 A formerly attractive local park has been allowed to deteriorate. Make specific points about what is wrong and how it could be improved. The Editor 3 Write a letter to your local council pointing out the need Trinidad & Tobago Gu for more recreational facilities in your neighbourhood. ardian P.O. Box 122 4 Write a letter to the newspaper pointing out the need Port-of-Spain to plant more trees in your area. The lack of trees is causing soil erosion, and the area is unattractive. Don’t forget to address the envelope properly.

Use the information in the articles on pages 273 and 274 to brief yourself on your arguments. If your character is for or against the new project in the North West of Guyana, be prepared to argue your case strongly, courteously and clearly. If you are the chairperson, you have the toughest job of all. You must ensure that everyone gets a fair hearing and that the viewers or listeners to the programme obtain a balanced picture of the issues involved. You must also be prepared to decide who should speak if two people start talking at once. 3 Carry out your discussion for the TV programme.

Unit 15

M15_ACHI_SB3_CAR_1881_U15.indd 276

Note: Useful expressions for a TV discussion You may wish to write the following useful expressions on the board for students to use in their group discussions on TV: I’m afraid I disagree with… In my opinion… In my view… I’m sorry, but I have to disagree with… Contrary to what…says, I believe… I’m afraid that opinion is unfounded as there is strong evidence to suggest that… May I interrupt at this point to say… Excuse me, but I don’t think what you’re saying is true…

Writing your own letter

Write a letter to the newspaper or council complaining about a local issue you feel strongly about.

2 Spend a few minutes thinking about what you would like to say in the role of your character.

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12/11/2012 11:44

M15_ACHI_SB3_CAR_1881_U15.indd 277

Students can choose one of the options suggested in their books, or they can choose another, local issue to complain about (although they should check the latter with you before writing the letter). They should use the example on this page as a model, following a similar format, structure and style. Students should follow the usual stages in the writing process for this activity and put a final copy in their portfolios (you may wish to encourage those who have written about a real issue to send their letters to the editor of a local newspaper). You should also assess each letter according to its format, content and style, and give appropriate feedback too.

LE

Working in groups, students should follow the steps outlined in their books for this activity. It may be helpful if the same characters from different groups got together beforehand to plan their arguments (for example, all the students role-playing the government spokesperson in their respective groups could meet separately and discuss ideas about what to argue; all the students role-playing the Economist could do the same, and so on.) Encourage students to base their arguments on what they have read in the articles. It may also be helpful if the students role-playing the Chairperson in each group got together beforehand too, and decided on effective ways of chairing their discussions. For example, they could agree on the following: • Each speaker gets one or two minutes to present his or her point of view. • Speakers in favour of the Barama development should alternate with those against it. • There should be a 15 minute time limit on the whole discussion. • If a particular speaker starts to dominate the discussion, then an effort should be made to elicit the point of view of an opposing speaker. • Once students have prepared themselves for the discussion, they can go ‘on air’ and hold the discussion on TV. If time permits, you may wish to ask each group to hold their discussion in front of the rest of the class or ‘audience’. However, if your class is large and you do not have enough time, then you may have to have group discussions going on simultaneously in different parts of the classroom.

Activity 1

M P

Role-play

Activity 1

A

Activity 1

Writing: a letter of protest

Saving the environment

277

12/11/2012 11:44

S

Speak for yourself

Writing: a letter of protest Talk about the example letter to a newspaper editor with the class first, drawing attention to its format, content and style. Point out the following: • The salutation (‘Dear Editor’). • The introductory sentence that states the purpose of the letter. • The main body paragraph that describes the issue and calls for immediate action by the relevant authorities. • The concluding paragraph that sheds an alternative light on the issue and ends with a thought-provoking question. • The writer’s name and email address (sometimes this can be printed as a pseudonym, although you have to send your real name to the newspaper).

Saving the environment

277

22/01/2013 14:00


Achieve!

Achieve! is a four-level print and digital English language course designed specifically for the Caribbean learner. Spanning lower secondary and CSEC® Achieve! delivers comprehensive syllabus coverage through its range of interactive components that support students and teachers in the life-long development of English language and literacy skills. This handbook contains reduced pages of the Students’ Book, together with general support for lesson planning and class instruction, additional activity ideas and differentiation strategies – your easy reference handbook during lessons. Access your digital support resources on the accompanying CD-ROM and by logging on to http://caribbean.pearson.com/achieve. About the author Lucy Blackburn is an experienced educational author and has written numerous books for the Caribbean and Africa. She is also an experienced teacher who has taught in international schools, lectured in education and has an MA in Applied Linguistics and TESOL.

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Lucy Blackburn

www.pearson.com/caribbean

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f o r e s r u o c h s li g n E e earner l t n a e e b l b i r p a C m e co th

TEACHER’S HANDBOOK 3

In this series: Students’ Books 1, 2, 3 and 4 with companion website Teacher’s Handbooks 1, 2, 3 and 4 with CD-ROM and companion website

A complete English course for the Caribbean learner

You can Achieve!

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TEACHER’S HANDBOOK Lucy Blackburn

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Achieve! Level 3 SAMPLE  

Student Book and Teacher's Handbook sample. A complete English course for the Caribbean learner, spanning Lower Secondary and CSEC

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