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Rehabilitation Information Pack A range of products from Pearson Assessment for professionals working in the area of rehabilitation

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Welcome... Introducing our new rehab information pack for 2012 Dear Colleague, Pearson (Assessment) is one of the UK’s leading publishers of standardised assessments. Our tests are used by a number of professionals in both clinical and educational settings and we strive to develop tools that are in line with good practice guidelines, as set out by policies such as the National Service Framework for Long Term Conditions and NHS Pathway-Stroke (Psychological care after stroke). Early recognition of debilitating neurological and cognitive disorders including dementia is a high government priority. We offer a range of products to identify cognitive impairments and assist you in the evaluation of your clients; helping you to plan intervention strategies and enhance your evidence-based practice. Among these assessments is the new Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE) which is designed to assess a client’s cognitive ability quickly and reliably. Together with early diagnosis, assessment of activities of daily living can be vital in assisting service users maintain independence or return to everyday life. The UK-normed Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test-III, Rookwood Driving Battery and The Functional Living Scales – UK Version all have excellent ecological validity which places assessment in real life context; making the results more meaningful to you as a professional, and your clients. Alongside these measures, we have tools including the internationally respected BecksTM range which can aid in the screening of co-morbid problems such as mood disorders and other mental health issues.

This pack contains:

►►An overview of useful assessments for rehabilitation settings ►►Individual assessment product bulletins (including case studies) on a range of rehabilitation products designed to measure cognition, executive functioning, memory and functional needs ►►Your Area Sales Consultant details (we offer free, no obligation product demos).

For order and price enquiries, contact Customer Services on 0845 630 88 88, visit us at www.pearsonclinical.co.uk or contact your Area Sales Consultant for a free product demo. Yours faithfully,

Nicola Owens Sales Manager Pearson Assessment (UK) 01291 626 333 / 0776 482 2394 nicola.owens@pearson.com

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Press Release May 2012

Lisa Dibsdall is announced as winner of the first College of Occupational Therapists (COT) and Pearson Assessment Award for education, research or continuing professional development Lisa Dibsdall, a member of the British Association of Occupational Therapists (BAOT), has been named as the winner of the first COT and Pearson Assessment award for education, research or continuing professional development. Lisa, who has an MSc in Advanced Occupational Therapy, works part-time as an occupational therapist in social care for Wiltshire Council. She is currently in her first year as a part-time, self-funded PhD student with the University of the West of England. On hearing of her success, Lisa said: ‘I was thrilled to receive the Pearson Award this year. I applied for the Award to fund a place on a specific course on the design, analysis and reporting of randomized controlled trials… to support my PhD studies and to develop my role as an occupational therapy senior practitioner. My objective is for the results of my doctoral research to inform the potential for a randomized controlled trial, to be undertaken as a post-doctoral study. Attendance at this course will help me achieve this goal by giving me in-depth knowledge of the design of randomized controlled trials and how they could be utilized more expansively in the social care field. I am keen to encourage evidence-based occupational therapy practice.’ The Award was developed as a joint initiative between the College of Occupational Therapists and Pearson Assessment, and opened to entrants in October 2011. It aims to provide support for an individual professional or student BAOT member towards an activity that forms part of their education, research or continuing professional development. A sum of £1,000 was made available to fund Lisa Dibsdall’s course, which is due to begin in the new academic year. Naomi Hankinson, Chair of the Awards Panel and Chair of COT Council said of the new Award: ‘I am delighted with the outcome of the 2012 Pearson Award and am grateful to Pearson for supporting the ongoing education and research interests of our members. The College received a number of high quality proposals for this new award, reflecting members’ interests in their continuing professional development. The winner will benefit from support for her doctoral studies, both enhancing her own research development and also contributing to the development of the evidence-base for occupational therapy practice.’ Shelley Hughes, Occupational Therapy and Training Manager for Pearson Assessment, commended Lisa Dibsdall on her success: ‘Pearson Assessment would like to congratulate Lisa on the outcome of her application for the new Pearson award. We wish her every success in her course later this year and are confident it will benefit her continuing research. Our aim in working with the College of Occupational Therapists and forming this Award is to continue to support the fantastic work and commitment that individuals make to the profession of occupational therapy.’ Pearson Assessment is the leading publisher of assessments for professionals working in health, psychology and educational settings. Their portfolio covers a range of bestselling standardised assessment and intervention tools in areas including: motor, visuo-perceptual, sensory, functional skills and wellbeing. These include the Movement Assessment Battery for Children - Second Edition (Movement ABC-2), Sensory Profile™ and the newly published The Functional Living Scale - UK Version (TFLS UK).


- Ends For more information, please contact Simone Gilson, Marketing Communications Manager, on 0207 010 2880 or email simone.gilson@pearson.com Notes for editors About Pearson Assessment • Pearson Assessment is the world’s largest commercial developer and distributor of educational assessments and psychological testing materials with a 90 year history of commitment to researching and developing products to a reliable high standard. • Pearson Assessment is dedicated to the pursuit of professional excellence, leadership, and growth through acquisition, development, publication, and the maintenance of quality assessment tools in order to anticipate and meet the needs of its customers. • Drawing on our knowledge and capabilities, Pearson Assessment is dedicated to creating proven standardised assessments and interventions that transform lives and help professionals in education, health services and other areas to provide the best possible diagnosis and care. • For more information, visit www.pearsonclinical.co.uk or follow @PsychCorpUK About the College of Occupational Therapists • The College of Occupational Therapists is the professional body for occupational therapists and support workers and is the voice of occupational therapy in the UK. We champion the unique and vital work of occupational therapy staff, promoting value, excellence and innovation across the profession • The College sets the professional and educational standards for the occupational therapy profession and represents the profession at national and international levels • The College has over 28,000 members including researchers, practitioners, students and overseas members. Practitioners work in a range of settings including hospitals, health centres, schools, residential and nursing care, childrens’ centres, prisons, workplaces, voluntary organizations and independent practice.


Pearson Assessment’s Guide to Selecting Rehabilitation Assessments Our handy decision tree can help you establish which of Pearson Assessment’s tests will best meet your needs. Take a look at the key to the right to see which tests are limited to CL1 registered users, and which three of our tests can also be accessed by CL2 users when the Cognitive Assessment Training - Online (CAT-O) - endorsed by the College of Occupational Therapists - is completed. Visit www.pearsonclinical.co.uk/cato for more details. We’ve also highlighted which tests include children’s norms or where a children’s version is available.

#

Key Children’s norms, or children’s version of test available

Accessed by CL1 users only

Training requirement for CL2 users - CAT-O

General Ability and Screeners Wellbeing and Life Skills Life Skills • Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition (Vineland-II) # • Adaptive Behavior Assessment System® - Second Edition (ABAS) # • Rookwood Driving Battery (RDB) • The Functional Living Scales - UK Edition NEW

Evaluation Scale

• Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Fourth UK Edition (WAIS-IVUK) #  • Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS™) • Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT) • Wessex Head Injury Matrix (WHIM) • Kaplan Baycrest Neurocognitive Assessment (KBNAUK)  • Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence - Second Edition (WASI-II)  NEW • Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE) NEW • The Functional Living Scales - UK Edition NEW

Pre-Morbid Abilities

The Well-being Evaluation Scale (WES) is a brief, self report measure designed to measure well-being in older people.

• Test of Premorbid Functioning - UK Version (TOPFUK)  NEW • Spot the Word (STW 2) NEW

Wellbeing • Self Image Profile for Adults (SIP-Adult) # • Wellbeing Evaluation Scale (WES) NEW

Cognitive Assessments

Spot the Word 2

Examiners Manu

C. Munro Cullum

al

, Myron F. Weine r and Kathleen C. Saine

Social Cognition

General Memory • Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test - Third Edition (RBMT-3) # • Wechsler Memory Scale - Fourth Edition - UK (WMS-IVUK) 

• The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT)

Executive Function • Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System™ (D-KEFS™) #  • Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) #  • Hayling and Brixton Tests

Older People • Middlesex Elderly Assessment of Mental State (MEAMS) • Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS™)

Attention • Test of Everyday Attention (TEA) #

Speech, Language and Communication

Prospective Memory Visual Perception

• Cambridge Prospective Memory Test (CAMPROMPT)

Verbal and Visual Memory • Doors and People # • California Verbal Learning Test - UK Second Edition (CVLT-IIUK) # 

• Behavioural Inattention Test (BIT) • Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration, Sixth Edition (Beery VMI) # NEW • Visual Object and Space Perception Battery (VOSP) • Cortical Vision Screening Test (CORVIST) • Developmental Test of Visual Perception - Adolescent and Adult (DTVP-A) #

• Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT) • Communication Checklist - Adult (CC-A) # • Communication Checklist - Self Report (CC-SR) #

Cognitive Assessment Training - Online (CAT Online) • This online training package enables professional therapists to use certain neuropsychological assessments usually restricted to psychologists. Endorsed by the College of Occupational Therapists

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Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Fourth UK Edition (WAIS-IVUK)

Overview In recognition of emerging demographic and clinical trends, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale® – Fourth UK Edition (WAIS-IVUK) is now available and provides you with the most advanced measure of cognitive ability and results you can trust. Our commitment to excellence led us to focus on four issues to guide the evolution of WAIS-IVUK: ►►changing demographics ►►emerging clinical needs ►►new research ►►increasing caseloads

Changing demographics Since the publication of WAIS-IIIUK in 1999 much has changed both culturally and demographically. The population has aged, standards of living have improved, and society has become more diverse. These are just some of the considerations that influenced the normative data collection for the WAIS-IVUK. In response to the increase in cases involving older clients, WAIS-IVUK is designed to be more developmentally appropriate for older adults through the following: ►►reduced administration time ►►additional teaching items to ensure understanding of tasks ►►reduced vocabulary level for additional instructions ►►decreased emphasis on motor demands and timebonus points ►►enlarged visual stimuli

Emerging clinical needs Meeting the needs of individuals with clinical issues is one of the most important services that psychologists provide. These needs change over time as research improves and new disorders and groups are defined. The WAIS-IVUK has been developed with special emphasis on these unique groups and provides clinicians with valuable data and insight to better support these special populations. The new special group studies include: Gifted Intellectual Functioning, Borderline Intellectual Functioning, Asperger’s Disorder, Autistic Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder and Mild Cognitive Impairment. The WAIS-IVUK has also been co-normed with the new Wechsler Memory Scale®-IV UK

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Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Fourth UK Edition (WAIS-IVUK)

New research The field of Psychology is constantly evolving based on scientific research, new theories, and changes in culture and society. This evolution is represented in improvements to the WAIS-IVUK theoretical foundation and changes in the test structure itself.

Increasing caseloads With increasing workloads and the limited time available for administering assessments, it was important to focus our efforts to provide you with the highest quality clinical information, in the most efficient time possible. Some of the changes that contribute to an overall reduction in administration time include: ►►reduction of core battery from 13 subtests to 10 ►►simplified Record Form ►►shortened discontinue rules contributing to an overall average reduction in administration time of nearly 15%!

Test structure The WAIS-IVUK structure has been modified to align with the widely popular WISC-IVUK and to reflect current theory regarding cognitive ability. The new structure is also more reflective of current cognitive ability theory and divides scores into four specific domains. The core battery consists of ten total subtests that yield the FSIQ and four Index Scores. There are also five supplemental subtests that may be substituted for core subtests or administered for additional information. Updated structural foundations include: New measure of fluid intelligence ►►Developed new subtest to measure fluid reasoning: ►► Visual Puzzles ►► Contributes to Perceptual Reasoning Composite ►► More reliable measure than Object Assembly ►► Requires no motor skills ►►Figure Weights ►► Contributes to Perceptual Reasoning Composite ►► Measure of quantitative and analogical reasoning ►► Requires no motor skills

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Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Fourth UK Edition (WAIS-IVUK) Enhanced measures of working memory ►►Revise arithmetic to emphasize WM ►►Revise digit span to emphasize WM (added Digit Sequencing) ►►Retain auditory WM measures on WAIS, visuo-spatial WM Measures on WMS Improved measure of processing speed ►►Reduce fine motor demands ►►Included an additional supplemental subtest: ►►Cancellation ►► Contributes to Processing Speed Composite ►► Imbedded Stroop Effect ►► Provides scores for omission and commission errors

VERBAL DOMAIN

PERCEPTUAL DOMAIN

Verbal Comprehension Scale

Perceptual Reasoning Scale

Core Subtest Similarities Vocabulary Information

Core Subtest Block Design Matrix Reasoning Visual Puzzles NEW

Supplemental Subtest Comprehension

Supplemental Subtest Figure Weights (16-69 only) NEW Picture Completion

FSIQ (16:0-90:11) Working Memory Scale

Processing Speed Scale

Core Subtest Digit Span Arithmetic

Core Subtest Speech Search Coding

Supplemental Subtest Letter-Number Sequencing (16-69 only)

Supplemental Subtest Cancellation (16-69 only) NEW

WORKING MEMORY DOMAIN

PROCESSING SPEED DOMAIN

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Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Fourth UK Edition (WAIS-IVUK) Endorsement Dr Carol A Ireland, Chair of the Division of Forensic Psychology: I have been involved with administering the WAIS for over fifteen years. I have been involved in regularly training individuals in this tool for many years. Over this time I have seen substantial developments in the tool, and in responses to changes in the literature. I think this undoubtedly continues to be the strength of the WAIS; the willingness to consider developing changes and to waste no time in responding to these accordingly. The earlier WAIS (WAIS-III) was available to purchase in 1997, and so it would appear timely for the revisions presented through the WAIS-IV. The WAIS-IV is a crucial development from the WAIS-III. It offers a more streamlined version without losing any of its quality. Indeed, the quality of the tool is much enhanced by such developments. For example, it removes sub-tests that have more recently been considered unhelpful and which added little to the tool. From the WAIS-III, 12 sub-tests have been retained, four sub-tests have been removed, with three new subtests added. Within the subtests which remain, there have been helpful and timely updates whilst there are some additions to the WAIS-IV, its revised strength is in the fine tuning of its subtests in line with changes to the literature. This not only ensures that the examinee’s time on the test is now more focused on what is key to understanding their general cognitive ability, but its norms for the consequent scores have been substantially updated. For example, the discontinue rules within the sub-tests have been helpfully reduced. I have always been impressed with the careful and considered approach of the publishers when developing this tool, and the WAIS-IV is no exception to this. Adequate time, careful training of researchers and ensuring testing is always undertaken under clear ethical guidelines, has continued to develop a robust and much valued tool. Whilst they may be quick to respond to changes in the literature, they are methodical in their approaches to any changes made. As a result, not only the norms of the tool have been carefully updated, but so have the reliabilities and validity, with floor and ceiling effects within the tool further improved. It is clear that the WAIS-IV had a number of goals in its development, all of which are valid and timely. It has aimed, and succeeded, in enhancing the measure of fluid intelligence. Further, it has clearly responded to changes in research on working memory and processing speed, and has much enhanced these elements of the tool. Of great importance is its co-norming with the Wechsler Memory Scale IV, offering great utility and further application which will be invaluable to the clinician and researcher. Further, the publishers have taken careful consideration of users views of the earlier tool. As such, they have worked hard and been successful in making the tool more user-friendly. This is demonstrated through a reduction in the testing time and therefore not using the valuable time of both the examiner and examinee unnecessarily.

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Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Fourth UK Edition (WAIS-IVUK)

The timing of subtests now has less emphasis, and so is more user-friendly and accurate for some of the clients who require extra time to consider the expectations of the subtest, without having an unnecessary time limit applied. The instructions for the tool have been successfully revised for greater clarity, as well as the development of a clear and helpful record form. For example, instructions for the subtests have been revised to take in to account any comprehension difficulties. A challenge in the older tool was some more impaired individuals not understanding clearly some of the instructions, and which then potentially flawed some of the later results. These considerations have been taken in to account and very successfully removed. Even on a very practical level. The portability of the tool has been much improved. The WAIS-IV continues to have the same applicability as to the earlier WAIS-III. This continues to be a real strength of the WAIS-IV, as you are able to maximise the use of the tool for a variety of purposes. Whilst you always have the option of the full scale IQ, you also have the richness of being able to compute the IQ for each of the index scores, such as working memory and processing speed. This is invaluable to those users who are interested in how best to engage with an individual following the assessment, such as through therapy or simply engaging with them in any one to one or group context. This is a real asset, particularly if the individual presents with any challenges in their cognitive abilities as measured by the WAIS-IV. I think that the WAIS-IV is a timely and crucial development in continuing to examine general cognitive ability. It is a user-friendly, robust and well developed tool. In my opinion it really is top of its class. It is a must for any psychologist who wishes to conduct an assessment of an individual’s cognitive abilities, or any researcher interested in this tool as part of their research. It is something which is highly recommended.

Scoring The WAIS-IVUK can be scored using the WAIS-IV / WMS-IV UK Scoring Software and Report Writer, simply enter raw scores, and the software does the following: ►►Generates concise score reports and statistical reports with graphs and tables. ►►Raw to scaled score conversions ►►Strength and weakness discrepancies ►►Interprets statistically significant discrepancies between scores. ►►Includes comprehensive user manual. View Sample Reports at www.pearsonclinical.co.uk/WAIS

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Wechsler Memory Scale® – Fourth UK Edition (WMS-IVUK)

Overview Offering significant enhancements the new Wechsler Memory Scale® – Fourth UK Edition (WMS-IVUK) has evolved to give you the most comprehensive adult memory measure. WMS-IVUK helps clinicians evaluate memory capabilities as part of a standard adult psychological evaluation. This new edition of the test is brief, easier to administer, and places an increased focus on older adults in response to the increasing average age of clients.

Developments WMS-IVUK developments: ►► improved assessment of visual memory with the addition of the NEW Design Memory subtest: ►► Containing four items of increasing difficulty, Design Memory evaluates immediate and delayed recall as well as delayed recognition. It does not include drawing and reduces the opportunity to guess the correct response. You can obtain scores for spatial, details, and correct content in the correct location as well as contrast scores for spatial versus detail, immediate versus delayed, and recognition versus delayed. ►► enhanced working memory is now completely visual with the addition of the NEW Symbol Span and Spatial Addition subtests (WAIS-IVUK is completely auditory so there is no overlap): ►► Spatial Addition - Based on “N-Back Paradigm”, Spatial Addition requires minimal motor function as the client must: ►► remember location of dots on two separate pages ►► add or subtract locations ►► hold and manipulate visual spatial information ►► Symbol Span ►► A “Visual Analogue to Digit Span”, clients are asked to remember the design and the left to right sequence of the design. The clients are then asked to select the correct design from foils and choose them in the correct sequence. ►► expanded clinical studies ►► inclusion of a NEW cognitive screener which can be used to quickly evaluate significant cognitive impairment. You can assess: Temporal orientation; Mental control; Clock drawing; Memory; Inhibitory control; Verbal productivity. ►► increased focus on older adults with a brief older adult battery to reduce fatigue, and reduce visual motor demands

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Wechsler Memory Scale® – Fourth UK Edition (WMS-IVUK) Features and benefits Expanded Clinical utility ►► Improved floors across subtests ►► Includes a general cognitive screening tool ►► Enhanced assessment of visual memory ►► Co-normed with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale®-IV UK Enhanced User Friendliness ►► Includes a brief older adult battery ►► Reduced subtest administration time ►► Minimised visual motor demands ►► Assesses working memory ►► Modified story content and administration process Improved Psychometric Properties ►► Updated normative data for ages 16-90 years ►► Improved floors ►► Improved subtest and composite reliability ►► Reduced item bias

Endorsement Professor Jane L Ireland, School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire The first difference that will undoubtedly be noted between the fourth edition of this test and its predecessor is its complete revision. It would be more aptly described as a revolution of this test than an evolution. The timing for such a significant change was perfect with regards to advances in the literature over recent years, and a growing application of such tests to a range of diverse populations, including forensic groups. The only downside, however, is for the avid users of the WMS-III who will have to break from their welldeveloped administration skills and learn what is effectively a ‘new’ test. Previous knowledge of the WMS-III is simply not required: WMS-IV is more than a simple updating, it is an impressive revision. For example, a range of subtests have been removed from the WMS-III to create the WMS-IV, namely Faces, Family pictures, Word Lists, Letter-Number Sequencing, Digit Span, Spatial Span, Information and Orientation, and Mental Control. This has proven very helpful for administration to forensic populations since what appears to have been

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Wechsler Memory Scale® – Fourth UK Edition (WMS-IVUK) removed are the subtests which can, advertently, cause considerable frustration to forensic clients with impulsivity or affect disorders – anyone who has tried to administer Letter-Number Sequencing to an offender with a low tolerance threshold will certainly appreciate the sentiment here. What comes with this revolution in revision, however, is an entirely updated administration manual that now provides an excellent core basis for both clinical and research interpretation and application. The manual includes invaluable detail on the rationale for the changes, and the importance of such a significant revision. In addition to the removal of tests, three of the original tests have also been modified, with four new tests developed, one of which includes a Brief Cognitive Status Exam. This latter test will be particularly helpful to practitioners who are after a quick ‘sketch’ of initial ability. The WMS-IV has also sought to solve some of the previous difficulties across a range of areas such as the rather limited previous range of normative samples available, to enhance the practical interpretation of the scores, to increase the comparability with broader tests such as the WAIS-III, and to improve content, reliability and, importantly, clinical application. Within forensic practice there is certainly a need to assess more routinely the full extent of memory difficulties that our clients present with. Too often such assessments are either not completed, are rudimentary in nature, or do not respond to the engagement style of such a client group. The value of obtaining a full assessment of immediate memory (auditory and visual), delayed (auditory, visual and auditory recognition), general and working memory is essential both for research and practice purposes, and is aptly provided via the WMS-IV. With regards to the research, there is a need for research exploring memory in depth, with the majority of alternative tests tending to focus on working memory, immediate recall and inattention. For offenders, research application is broad, and we can use tests such as the WMS-IV to explore how memory correlates with substance disorders, information processing (e.g. hostile interpretations; and regulation disorders that result in anger loss and impulsivity etc), offence recall and denial, witness recall, suggestibility and compliance, executive functioning, cognitive interviewing, and a range of clinical disorders, to name but a view. The potential research application of tests such as the WMS-IV are thus significant, and could assist with the development of theories into offence engagement and treatment responsivity. With regards to this area, specifically the area of practice, the value in assessing memory in detail has application to the whole remit of forensic practice, whether this involves completing treatment or assessments with victims, perpetrators and/ or witnesses. Tests such as the WMS-IV can provide practitioners with a detailed individual profile that can assist with an indication of how treatment, assessments or interviews can be best matched to an individual’s learning style. Treatment and interviews can sometimes suffer from a lack of information on memory profile which the practitioner can then utilise to ensure that they attend to the responsivity needs of their clients. The WMS-IV now provides one possible solution to this.

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Wechsler Memory Scale® – Fourth UK Edition (WMS-IVUK) As noted earlier, although other memory tests do exist, none provide the depth of memory assessment in such an accessible form for use with forensic clients, as does the WMS-IV. This is an important point, particularly when you are dealing with offenders who present with attention and/or impulsivity difficulties, where being able to focus their attention for long periods of time can be challenging for even the most skilled practitioner. The WMS-IV has such a variety of tests that the management of these challenges are really assisted, with tests presented to clients in an engaging fashion, and importantly, in a way which does not automatically engender ‘failure’. The latter is a vital area to be aware of when dealing with clients who may routinely present with a self-depreciating style and/or a proness to feeling ‘punished’. Thus, I warmly recommend the WMS-IV to any practitioner or researcher who has a keen interest in understanding the complexities of memory, and in applying the most up-to-date assessments to benefit their clinical and research practice. It should provide an invaluable further tool in the repertoire of clinical and research assessments available.

Scoring ►► Scores are now derived for Older Adult Battery (65–90) and Adult Battery (16–69) ►► Ability / Memory Discrepancy Scores (for use with WAIS–IV UK) ►► Index Scores ►► Auditory Memory ►► Visual Memory ►► Visual Working Memory ►► Immediate Memory ►► Delayed Memory ►► NEW – Contrast Scores ►► Scaled scores contrasting performance across scores ►► Provide information on clinical significance of changes in scores across subtests or indexes The WMS-IVUK can be scored using the WAIS-IV / WMS-IV UK Scoring Software and Report Writer, simply enter raw scores, and the software does the following: ►►Generates concise score reports and statistical reports with graphs and tables. ►►Raw to scaled score conversions ►►Strength and weakness discrepancies ►►Interprets statistically significant discrepancies between scores. ►►Includes comprehensive user manual. View Sample Reports at www.pearsonclinical.co.uk/WMS

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WAIS/WMS Online Training

WAIS/WMS Online Training To aid your understanding and application of your new Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Fourth UK Edition (WAIS-IV UK) and Wechsler Memory Scale - Fourth UK Edition (WMS-IV UK) we have prepared a free online training course for your use. This online training package equips the psychologist with indepth information on the new test. The tool enables you to learn at your own pace in the convenience of your home or office. Training includes: ►► Administration and scoring guidelines for all subtests in the new WAIS-IV UK ►► Discussion of reversal and discontinue rules applicable to each subtest ►► Video examples to illustrate the use of the test ►► Games and quizzes to enhance learning To access WAIS/WMS Online Training please contact Customer Services on 0845 630 8888 or visit www.pearsonclinical.co.uk/WAIS for more details.

Additional WAIS-IV Courses: WAIS-IV Administration and Interpretation 3 day Training Course Location: Leyland, Lancashire Date: September 26-28, 2012 Fee: £828 incl VAT per delegate WAIS-IV Interpretation 1 day Training Course Location: Leyland, Lancashire Date: November 26, 2012 Fee: £239 inc VAT per delegate For more information, or to book your place, please visit www.pearsonclinical.co.uk/WAIS or email Dr Ireland on caireland@uclan.ac.uk.

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Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE)

NEW UK Adaptation

Overview The Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE) helps evaluate global cognitive functioning in patients with suspected memory deficits or who are diagnosed with a wide range of neurological, psychiatric and developmental disorders. Including those with dementia, mild learning difficulties, or suspected Alzheimer’s disease. This brief, reliable screening tool is a stand-alone version of the optional Brief Cognitive Status Exam found in the WMS®-IV (Wechsler Memory Scale®, Fourth Edition).

Uses and applications The Brief Cognitive Status Exam can be used with patients aged 16 years and older. It can be used by clinical psychologists, medical professionals, and other mental health professionals in hospitals, mental health facilities and assisted living facilities to obtain an overall picture of cognitive functioning.

Features and benefits ►► ►► ►► ►► ►► ►► ►► ►► ►► ►►

BCSE covers seven content areas: Orientation, Time Estimation, Mental Control, Organisation - Planning, Incidental Recall, Inhibitory Control and Verbal Production Examinees are asked to perform simple tasks to create an overall picture of cognitive functioning Designed to yield a performance classification focused on impaired rather than normal or superior performance (Average, Low Average, Borderline, Low, Very Low) Provides classifications stratified by age and years of education UK adaptation with notes for scoring and interpretation Can be administered individually in approximately 15 to 20 minutes Brevity makes it useful for repeated evaluations and for individuals unable to tolerate longer examinations Data collected as part of the new WAIS-IV/WMS-IV project Value as a research instrument Can be used for general clinical evaluations and for rehabilitation evaluations.

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Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE)

Content The BCSE is composed of 12 items in seven content areas: Content Area Orientation Time Estimation Mental Control Clock Drawing Incidental Recall Inhibition Verbal Production

Description Contains five items that measure orientation to time e.g. current date including day, month, year. A measure of orientation to time of day. Two items measure attention and the ability to manipulate commonly known sequences in memory. Measurement of organisation and planning Measurement of recall for images without a prompt to recall the item at time of presentation. Measure of the patient’s ability to inhibit a leaner response in order to provide a novel response. Measure of the patient’s ability to produce words within a semantic category within a 30-second period.

Record and Score The BCSE is organised into the seven domain sections on the record form, each of which clearly details individual administration, recording and scoring instructions. A conversion table is included that enables you to covert section-specifc scores to weighted raw scores, which in turn contribute to the Total Raw Score. Scores are weighted to increase the sensitivity of the measure of cognitive dysfunction. Measures of processing speed and mental control are frequently impaired in individuals with significant cognitive impairment, and scores are more heavily weighted in measures of these abilities. A BCSE Total Raw Score can be converted to provide a classification level that indicates the patient’s level of cognitive functioning. This classification is based on four broad age categories and five education levels. For more information visit www.pearsonclinical.co.uk/BCSE

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The Functional Living Scale - UK Version (TFLSUK)

NEW

The Fu

nction

al

T FL S Living

UK

Scale UK Edi

tion

Examin

er’s Man

ual

C. Munro Cullum Myron F. Weine r Kathleen C. Saine

Overview

The Functional Living Scale – UK version (TFLSUK) is an ecologically valid, performance based measure of functional abilities with an emphasis on instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) skills. Brief and easy to use, TFLSUK assesses an individual’s ability to perform a variety of tasks related to independent living that are thought to be more susceptible to cognitive decline than basic activities of daily living. Additionally, the measure is especially well suited to other clinical populations including learning disability, mental health and traumatic brain injury.

Users and Applications TFLSUK can be used in comprehensive assessments, to support placement decisions, aid treatment planning, evaluate treatment outcomes, and monitor disease progression. It can be administered by a variety of professionals including: ►► Clinical Psychologists and Occupational Therapists working with all age ranges, to determine appropriate level of care ►► Health and Social Care Professionals to evaluate changes in level of care for individuals ►► Researchers in pharmaceuticals companies, to help conduct Alzheimer/dementia drug efficacy trials. The TFLSUK covers four functional domains: ►► Time – Assesses the ability to use clocks and calendars ►► Money and Calculation – Assesses the ability to count money and write cheques ►► Communication – Assesses the ability to prepare a snack, use a phone and phone books ►► Memory – Assesses the ability to remember simple information and to take medications Subscale cumulative percentages and an overall T-Score can be used to help determine the examinee’s ability to function independently.

Benefits ►► ►► ►► ►► ►► ►► ►►

Assesses functional abilities quickly and easily Screens for dementia with a tool focused on skills likely to be affected by cognitive decline Monitors functional decline and disease progression Monitors treatment/drug efficacy Determines level of care required to adapt treatment plans Linked with key tools including the WAIS-IVUK,TOPFUK, WMS-IVUK, and the BCSE Compliments the new Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE) to provide cognitive and performance based assessment.

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The Functional Living Scale - UK Version (TFLSUK)

UK Project The anglicisation and validation of the TFLS was carried out in the UK primarily to provide clinicians with a tool that they can be confident to use with the local population. Data were collected on a representative sample of UK individuals. The validation sample consisted of 215 people (114 females, 101 males) ranging in age from 16 to 90 years with a mean age of 47.52 years (SD = 19.91). The validation study examined the reliability of the scale, its relationship with other measures, and the comparability of the UK and US means and SDs for the TFLS total scores (T scores) and subscales. The validation study provides sufficient evidence that the UK data closely reflects that of the US, thereby allowing TFLSUK to be used with confidence in the UK.

Links to other measures Links between the TFLS and other measures have also been examined. These include the Independent Living Scale (ILS), Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System - Second Edition (ABAS-II), Wechsler Memory Scale - Fourth Edition (WMS-IV), California Verbal Learning Test - Second Edition (CVLT-II), Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV), Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV Test of Pre-Morbid Functioning (AC TOPF) and the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). The TFLS standardisation sample was collected with the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV standardisation samples. The standardisation version of the TFLS was included within the WMS-IV standardisation protocol, enabling clinicians to directly compare performance between the instruments. Overall, the studies on cognitive functioning and adaptive functioning demonstrate a complex relationship. Higher correlations are observed in more impaired individuals.

Special Group Studies A number of special group studies were conducted concurrently with the scale’s standardisation to examine the clinical utility of the TFLSUK. The special groups were selected due to their known or presumed deficits in functional ability, as well as their high incidence in clinical referrals. The TFLS adds pertinent information to an evaluation because the performance of instrumental activities of daily living is important to patients and their families, and is an important predictor for an individual’s ability to live and function independently.

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The Functional Living Scale - UK Version (TFLSUK)

Special Group Studies Continued... Group studies include: ►► ►► ►► ►► ►► ►► ►►

Alzheimer’s Disease - Mild Severity Mild or Moderate Intellectual Disability Major Depressive Disorder Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Schizophrenia Autistic Disorder Living Status Groups

Find out more about the TFLSUK at www.pearsonclinical.co.uk/tfls

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Wellbeing Evaluation Scale (WES)

Evaluation Scale The Well-being Evaluatio n Scale (WES) is a brief, self report measure designed to measure well-being in older people.

NEW Overview The Wellbeing Evaluation Scale (WES) is a brief, self report measure designed to measure wellbeing in older people (age 55+). Informed by an evidence-based theoretical framework the WES was developed with a reading age of 12 years, and has both long (47 item) and short (19 item) questionnaires. Respondents rate themselves against statements on a 5-point likert scale The 47 item Long Form provides a measure of subjective, behavioural and contextual dimensions of wellbeing across 6 structural properties of well-being: ►► Integrity of self ►► Integrity of others ►► Belonging ►► Agency ►► Enrichment ►► Security Responses are collated and provide a profile of well-being across all 6 domains in addition to population percentages. The 19 item Short Form provides an average wellbeing score and population percentages. The short form can be completed in 5-10 minutes and the long form in 10-15 minutes. The WES has been developed on both clinical and non-clinical populations, and can be used as a clinical assessment or care planning tool, as well as providing an overall measure of well-being. It is exceptional in that it is relevant for both individual and population based assessment in all social and health care settings as well as demographic and epidemiological research.

Features ►► UK data ►► Short Form – ideal for screening ►► Enables large, population based assessment ►► Long form – for more detailed assessment ►► Can be used for care planning on an individual or population basis ►► Results presented graphically for easy comparison ►► Can be used in all health and social care settings ►► A useful demographic and research tool ►► Reading age of 12 years on the questionnaires.

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Wellbeing Evaluation Scale (WES)

References Papadopoulos, A. Biggs, S. Tinker, A. (2011) Wellbeing in later life: a proposed ecosystemic framework. British Journal of Wellbeing 2 (6) 22-31

Author Interview: Dr Andrew Papadopoulos Dr Andrew Papadopoulos, author of Wellbeing Evaluation Scale (WES), tells us about life as a Consultant Clinical Psychologist and his varying musical tastes - from Handel to club anthems. I am a Consultant Clinical Psychologist employed by Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust. I currently work with both adults of working age, older adults and families who experience a range of mental health difficulties. My colleagues include nurses, occupational therapists, social workers, doctors, managers, academics, activity co-ordinators and other psychologists. Where did you study and what are your qualifications? I obtained a BSc degree in Behavioural Science from the University of Aston in Birmingham in 1982 and qualified as a Clinical Psychologist in 1985 from Leeds University. I have recently completed a PhD in Gerontology from King’s College London which has informed the development of the Wellbeing Evaluation Scale. What inspired you to get into this field? I have always had a strong sense of curiosity and compassion about the world and about people. If you weren’t a clinical psychologist, what would you be? I believe that I have been very fortunate in that I was clear about wanting to practise as a clinical psychologist from when I studied psychology at A level back in the 1970’s. Had I not qualified as a clinical psychologist, I most probably would have gone into medicine, nursing or social work. What are your current projects? Since qualifying as a clinical psychologist, I have specialised in the psychological care of older people across physical health, primary care, social care and secondary mental health. I consider that my work is privileged in that I am accepted by and able to help many people who suffer with serious mental health difficulties including those who have experienced abuse and exploitation. I hope to continue to develop the wellbeing agenda and have another book planned for the coming year.

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Wellbeing Evaluation Scale (WES)

Author Interview Continued... Whom do you most admire? Whilst I have the greatest of respect for those like Mr Nelson Mandela who have fought for justice all their lives, my inspiration comes from those hardest hit by adversity and disability and those dedicated volunteers, carers and professionals who give so much of themselves to help. For me, greatness is about what one gives, it is about the power to transform people’s lives for the better. Above all, it is about the capacity for unconditional love and acceptance. I can remember being asked by a client who had been suffering on and off with depression for several years, what was the point to life. I replied to be able to experience love, love of family and friends, love of one’s work, love of one’s environment and the natural world and love of one’s self. I am also fortunate in having children and grandchildren all of whom are loving, caring and empathic individuals. What’s your favourite album? I don’t really have a favourite album or artist. My musical tastes vary from classical through to rock, R and B and dance. However, I do listen to Handel, Queen, Elton John, Il Divo, Leona Lewis and club anthems rather a lot although I suspect that is because my CD changer has got stuck recently! What are your professional interests? My professional interests include well-being, neuroscience, and existential approaches to therapy. What do you do away from work? I enjoy gardening, cooking, DIY and being a grandparent and annoying my children.

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Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test - Third Edition (RBMT-3)

Overview The Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test – Third Edition (RBMT-3) is the latest edition of the popular memory test developed by Barbara Wilson and colleagues. This test has continued the tradition of ecologically valid assessment and provides an updated version of the test which includes more contemporary materials, more difficult items than the RBMT-II, a new subtest and new normative data and scoring studies.

Features ►►Ecologically valid tool which gives information about everyday memory problems ►►2 versions of tool allowing retesting ►►New subtest ‘Novel Task’ which assesses new learning ►►New easel-bound Stimulus Book which contains instructions for ease of administration ►►Rehabilitation chapter to help you think about possible interventions with your client ►►Improved Record Form with a Subtest Scaled Score Profile to help you understand a person’s strengths and weaknesses ►►New scoring examples included for subtests to aid scoring ►►Normative data on a demographically representative sample of the UK matched by Age and Education ►►Scoring studies mean that subtest raw scores can be converted to scaled scores with a mean of 10 and a standard deviation of 3. An overall General Memory Index can also be derived which has a mean of 100 and standard deviation of 15 ►►New tests of reliability and validity demonstrate the utility of the tool

Description of the test The RBMT-3 includes 14 subtests assessing aspects of visual, verbal, recall, recognition, immediate and delayed everyday memory. Additionally prospective memory skills and the ability to learn new information are measured. It takes approximately 30 minutes to complete and retesting can be completed with Version 2 of the tool. Please see overleaf for descriptions of the subtests

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Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test - Third Edition (RBMT-3)

Subtest First and Second Names - Delayed Recall

Belongings - Delayed Recall

Appointments - Delayed Recall Story - Immediate Recall Picture Recognition - Delayed Recall

Face Recognition - Delayed Recall

Route - Immediate Recall

Route - Delayed Recall

Messages - Immediate Recall

Messages - Delayed Recall

Orientation Novel Task - Immediate Recall Novel Task - Delayed Recall

Task The examinee is shown two photographic portraits and asked to remember the first and second names of both people in the photographs at a later point. Two possessions belonging to the examinee are borrowed and hidden. The examinee is required to remember where these have been hidden at a later point. An alarm is set. The examinee is required to ask some specified questions when the alarm sounds. A story is read to the examinee and they have to recall it immediately The examinee is shown a set of pictures and then is asked to recognise them from a further set of pictures at a later time in the testing session The examinee is shown a set of faces and then is asked to recognise them from a further set of faces at a later time in the testing session The examiner shows the examinee a route to walk around the room and then asks the examinee to demonstrate it The examinee is asked to demonstrate the route the examiner took around the room earlier, this time without it being demonstrated to them The examinee is required to take a message and book with them when they demonstrate the route and put them in the same place that the examiner did The examinee is required to take a message and book with them when they demonstrate the route again and put them in the same place that the examiner did The examinee responds to a number of questions relating to person, time and place The examinee uses different coloured pieces to make a shape as demonstrated by the examiner The examinee uses different coloured pieces to make the same shape at a later time in the testing session, this time without demonstration from the examiner

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Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test - Third Edition (RBMT-3)

Case Study Mrs B: a woman with particular difficulties in visual memory functioning Mrs B was a 60-year-old woman who suffered a right-hemisphere stroke 18 months prior to the assessment. She had been working as a librarian at the time. At the time of the assessment she reported ongoing problems with memory. On Version 1 of the RBMT-3 she showed mild problems with several of the RBMT-3 subtests, but her scores on the Picture Recognition - Delayed Recognition subtest, Face Recognition - Delayed Recognition subtest, Route subtests (Immediate and Delayed Recall), and the Novel Task subtests (Immediate and Delayed Recall) were particularly low. On the Route - Immediate Recall, she only managed to score 2 points and remembered nothing after a delay. She failed to score on the Face Recognition - Delayed Recognition, saying that she had not seen any of the faces before. She was unable to learn the Novel Task (see Figure 1). On a number of verbal and prospective tasks (Story - Immediate and Delayed Recall; Names - Delayed Recall; Belongings - Delayed Recall; Appointments - Delayed Recall), Mrs B’s scores were in the low average range (see Figure 1). Her General Memory Index was below the 2nd percentile.

Figure 1.1 Given her relative strengths on the verbal subtests, rehabilitation focused on utilizing these strengths, i.e. visual tasks were turned into verbal tasks as far as possible. Compensatory strategies also emphasized verbal rather than visual skills. For learning new tasks errorless learning and spaced retrieval were used. Mrs B’s poor visual memory was probably comprised of perceptual difficulties and a degree of unilateral neglect. Strategies for reducing neglect and improving perceptual functioning should be used in conjunction with the memory rehabilitation strategies.

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Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test - Third Edition (RBMT-3)

Technical Information Sample Characteristics The core standardisation sample consisted of 333 people (172 females, 161 males) ranging in age from 16 to 89, with a mean age of 44.3 years (SD = 18.17). The extent to which the standardisation sample matched the general adult population was examined using data from the UK 2001 census. Chi-square goodness-offit tests revealed that the actual sample distribution of age, education, gender and ethnicity did not differ significantly from the expected census figures. In addition to the core standardisation sample, a mixed clinical sample of participants with cerebral pathology was recruited (n=75). All clinical participants completed both versions of the RBMT-3. In order to examine possible score differences on the RBMT-3 for different types of clinical disorder, this sample contained participants from each of the following clinical categories: ►►Traumatic Brain Injury ►►Stroke ►►Encephalitis ►►Progressive conditions such as Alzheimer’s Disease Generating norms for the RBMT-3 Raw scores on the 14 RBMT-3 subtests are converted subtest scaled scores with a mean of 10 and a standard deviation of 3. Percentile ranks for scaled scores are also provided. Subtests take into account an individual’s age and data is reported for the following age bands: 16-24 years of age; 25-34 years of age; 3544 years of age; 45-54 years of age; 55-64 years of age; 65-74 years of age; 75-89 years of age. In addition to providing scaled scores for the RBMT-3 subtests, a General Memory Index (GMI), representing overall memory performance, was also created. This index is standardised to have a mean of 100 and a standard deviation of 15. GMI scores are calculated by summing the scaled scores on the RBMT-3 subtests and then converting this sum to a GMI using the appropriate conversion table. These conversion tables also report the confidence intervals and percentile ranks for each GMI. Alternate form reliability for each subtest was measured for Version 1 and Version 2 of the sample with the normative and clinical sample combined. Reliability coefficients ranged from 0.57 to 0.86. The reliability coefficient of the GMI was 0.87 for both Versions 1 and 2. With the exception of the Messages Delayed subtest the inter-scorer reliability for the RBMT-3 subtests were 0.9 or higher, indicating a high level of agreement between scorers. The lower level of agreement on the Messages Delayed subtest was attributable to only two of the 18 pairs who completed the inter-scorer study and is thought to be due to two examinees whose results were particularly difficult to score on this subtest.

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Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test - Third Edition (RBMT-3)

Technical Information Continued... The RBMT-3 demonstrated good construct and ecological validity (as supported by performance against the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire; Smith et al., 2000). In assessing the clinical validity of the tool the results provided strong evidence of the sensitivity of the RBMT-3 to memory problems.

References Smith, G. V., Della Sala, S., Logie, R. H., & Maylor, E. A. M. (2000). Prospective and retrospective memory in normal ageing and dementia: A questionnaire study. Memory, 8, 311-321.

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Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test - Third Edition (RBMT-3)

Meet the author - Barbara Wilson Where did you study/what did you study/what are your qualifications? My bachelor’s degree in psychology was awarded by Reading University. I went to university at the age of 30 as a mature student, married and with three school aged children. From Reading I went to the Institute of Psychiatry in London to complete my M.Phil.training in clinical psychology. I also registered for a PH.D at the Institute of Psychiatry and completed this while working full time as a clinical psychologist (it took me six years). Professional experience? I have worked in brain injury rehabilitation for over 32 years. I have won several awards for my work, including an OBE for services to medical rehabilitation in 1998 and two lifetime achievement awards: one from the British Psychological Society and one from the International Neuropsychological Society. In 2011 I will receive the Ramon Y Cahal award from the International Neuropsychiatric Association. I have published 18 books, over 270 journal articles and chapters and 8 neuropsychological tests. I am editor-inchief of the journal “Neuropsychological Rehabilitation”, which I established in 1991. In 1996 I founded the Oliver Zangwill Centre| for Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. This is a centre for people with non–progressive brain injury. It aims to provide high quality rehabilitation for the individual cognitive, social, emotional and physical needs of people with acquired brain injury. It was named after Oliver Zangwill, the founder of British neuropsychology who carried out important work with brain injured soldiers during World War II. A rehabilitation centre in Quito, Ecuador is named after me. It was opened by Drs Martha De La Torre and Guido Enriquez Bravo. It is called CENTRO DE REHABILITACION NEUROLOGICO INTEGRAL CERENI “BARBARA A. WILSON”. This centre accepts people with non-progressive brain injury and is staffed by neuropsychologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and speech and language therapists. I am currently president of the Encephalitis Society, Vice president of the Academy for Multidisciplinary Neurotrauma and on the management committee of The World Federation of Neuro Rehabilitation. The Division of Neuropsychology has named a prize after me, the Barbara A Wilson prize for distinguished contributions to neuropsychology. I am a Fellow of The British Psychological Society, The Academy of Medical Sciences and The Academy of Social Sciences. What are your current projects? In September 2007 I officially retired. However, I still spend about three days a month at the Oliver Zangwill Centre and another three days a month at The Raphael Medical Centre in Kent. At these two centres I perform a mixture of clinical work, staff training and advising on research projects. I also travel overseas at least once a month to give lectures and workshops on neuropsychological rehabilitation. I am currently writing my memoirs for my grandchildren.

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Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test - Third Edition (RBMT-3)

Meet the author - Barbara Wilson Who have you worked with? When I first qualified as a clinical psychologist I worked with children with severe learning difficulties and three excellent psychologists: Janet Carr, Glynis Murphy and Pat Howlin. In 1979 I moved to Rivermead Rehabilitation Centre in Oxford and began my career in brain injury rehabilitation. Soon after this I started working with Alan Baddeley and continued this collaboration for a number of years. I have also worked with Narinder Kapur, Karalyn Patterson and Jonathan Evans. Jonathan was a trainee of mine who came to work with me after training and we worked together for 14 years. Other students and trainees whom I am proud to have known are Nick Alderman, Jane Powell and Linda Clare. What inspired you to get into this field? During my clinical training, I was taught neuropsychology by Tony Buffery. I also spent four months completing a clinical placement with him. He was a good teacher and a very funny man (he had once been in the “Cambridge Footlights”). He made neuropsychology fascinating. I knew I wanted to work in this field but there were no jobs available within commuting distance when I qualified so, instead, I worked in what was then called “mental handicap”. Two years later, the post in neuropsychological rehabilitation came up in Oxford. I moved there in 1979 and knew from my first day that this was the work I wanted to do for the rest of my career. If you weren’t a clinical neuropsychologist, what would you be? For many years I wanted to be a midwife. I think that delivering babies must be a very rewarding job. My pipe dream is to have been musically talented and be a world class cellist. What do you do away from work? Hobbies? Favourite bands/sports teams/holiday destinations? My family is important. My eldest daughter, Sarah, died in a white water accident in Peru in May 2000. I have a surviving daughter, Anna, and a son Matthew. I also have four grandchildren. I am involved with The Compassionate Friends, a support group for bereaved parents and siblings. I travel frequently both for work and for pleasure. I have visited 89 independent countries so far and want to get to 100 before I die. I like challenges. In 2008 I completed the London Marathon and in 2010 my husband and I completed a charity trek in the Transylvanian Alps. I go to the gym and the swimming pool nearly every day. What’s your favourite album, and why? “Times they are a changin’” by Bob Dylan. This was Dylan’s third album. His first came out the year Mick and I were married. This album reminds me of the early years of our marriage, our hippy days, the birth of our first two babies and the optimism we felt about being able to change the world. Barbara founded the Oliver Zangwill Centre in 1996 and is Visiting Scientist at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit|.

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Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)

Overview The RBANS is a brief, individually administered test measuring attention, language, visuospatial / constructional abilities, and immediate and delayed memory. There are 12 subtests that can be administered in about 20-30 minutes. It is intended for use with adults aged 20-89 years. Alternate forms are available and it is compact thus allowing for easy transport for bedside administration.

Features Developed initially with a three-fold purpose: 1. As a stand alone “core” battery for the detection and characterisation of dementia in the elderly. Most current standardised assessments are excessively difficult for an older population or are extremely lengthy therefore not useful as older individuals are more prone to fatigue. Also existing dementia scales are relatively insensitive to mild dementia (Petersen et al 1994). RBANS overcomes these difficulties and provides a theoretically informed, portable and effective tool for the detection, characterisation and tracking of dementing disorders 2. As a neuropsychological “screening battery” for use when lengthier assessments are impracticable or inappropriate. There are a number of clinical situations in which a rapid neurocognitive screening test is more preferable to a lengthier battery: ►► screening for deficits in acute care settings ►► tracking recovery during rehabilitation ►► tracking progression in degenerative diseases ►► neuropsychological screening for non-psychologists The rapid, easily administered and interpreted nature of RBANS allows fulfilment of these needs. NB It can be used by Psychologists, OTs and SLTs 3. For repeat evaluations when an alternate form is desirable in order to control for practice effects.

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Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)

Organisation of the scale The score from each subtest contributes to one of the 5 domains. In addition a total score can be computed and is formed by combining the five domain scores:

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Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)

Description of the subtests and indexes

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Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)

Description of the subtests and indexes continued...

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Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)

Scoring Index scores using the general standard score system (mean = 100; standard deviation = 15) can be obtained for the 5 indexes. A total scale score can be obtained by summing the index scores (again mean = 100; standard deviation =15) percentile and confidence intervals are also available.

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Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)

Scoring continued...

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Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)

Technical information The standardisation sample consisted of 540 adults in the US divided into 6 age groups: 20-39; 40-49; 50-59; 60-69; 70-79 and 80-89. Average reliability for the content indexes is .80s with the total scale having content reliability coefficient of .94. Total scale test re-test reliability was tested in 2 studies yielding correlation coefficients of 0.88 and 0.82. Correlational studies were conducted with numerous other assessments including WAIS-R, WMS-R, Judgement of Line Orientation test, Rey complex figure test, WRAT 3.

Special group studies To enhance clinical utility a number of special group studies were also conducted including Alzheimer’s disease, Vascular dementia, HIV dementias, Huntingdon’s Disease, Parkinson’s disease, Major depression, schizophrenia and Closed head Injury.

Case study

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Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)

Case study continued...

References Petersen, R.C., Smith, G.E., Ivnik, R.J., Kokmen, E & Tangalos, E.G. (1994). Memory Function in very early Alzheimer’s disease. Neurology, 44, 867-872

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Behavioural Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS)

Overview The Behavioural Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) is a test battery aimed at predicting everyday problems arising from the dysexecutive syndrome. The term Dysexecutive Syndrome includes disorders of planning, organisation, problem solving, setting priorities, and attention; and is one of the major areas of cognitive deficit that can impede functional recovery and the ability to respond to rehabilitation programmes. The BADS is an individually administered assessment that is standardised for use for ages 16 -87 (a separate child version is available for 8 to 16 years). BADS specifically assesses the skills and demands involved in everyday life. It is sensitive to the capacities affected by frontal lobe damage, emphasising those usually exercised in everyday situations. These being: ►►Temporal judgement ►►Cognitive flexibility and inhibition of response ►►Practical problem solving ►►Strategy formation ►►Ability to plan ►►Task scheduling BADS is useful for Clinical Psychologists, Neuropsychologists and other Therapists* working in neuropsychological and psychiatric rehabilitation. It will assist in identifying whether or not a patient has executive deficits likely to interfere with everyday life; and will help determine whether a client has a general impairment of executive functioning or a specific kind of executive disorder. The BADS might also prove to be useful in neuropsychological and psychiatric rehabilitation. Because the BADS provides a tool for picking up subtle difficulties in planning and organisation, particularly in those people who appear to be cognitively well preserved and functioning well in structured situations, it may prove to be particularly useful in assessing and preparing patients for moves from hospital care into more independent living situations. *The test is available to professionals other than Psychologists, in particular Occupational Therapists, Psychiatrists and Neurologists. However, further training will be required. Please contact Customer Services on 0845 630 88 88 for more details.

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Behavioural Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS)

Features BADS consists of 6 subtests and a Dysexectutive Questionnaire (DEX): Subtest 1 - Rule Shift Cards Test - This is a simple measure of ability to shift from one rule to another and to keep track of the colour of the previous card and the current rule. Subtest 2 - Action Program Test. This test was originally devised by Klosowska in 1976 and was designed to provide subjects with a novel, practical task that required the development of a plan of action in order to solve a problem. This test was adapted minimally for inclusion in the BADS, and requires five steps to its solution. All five steps involve simple skills that are in everyone’s repertoire; but one has to work backwards, working out what needs to be done before concentrating on how that end is to be achieved. Subtest 3 - Key Search Test - Subjects are presented with an A4 piece of paper with a 100mm square in the middle and a small black dot 50mm below it. The subjects are told to imagine that the square is a large field in which they have lost their keys. They are asked to draw a line, starting at the black dot, to show where they would walk to search the field to make absolutely certain that they would find their keys. This enables us to examine the subject’s ability to plan an efficient and effective course of action. Subtest 4 - Temporal Judgement Test. This test comprises of four questions concerning commonplace events which take from a few seconds to several years (e.g. how long does a dog live for). Subjects are assured that they are not expected to know the exact answer to the four questions, they are being asked to make a sensible guess. Subtest 5 - Zoo Map Test - Subjects are required to show how they would visit a series of designated locations on a map of a zoo. However, when planning the route certain rules must be obeyed. There are two trials. While the aim of the task is identical in both trials, the instructions given vary. The first trial is a high demand version of the task in which the planning abilities of the subject are rigorously tested. The second (low demand) trial requires the subject to simply follow the instructions to produce an error free performance. Subtest 6 - Modified Six Elements Test. This involves the subject being given instructions to do three tasks (dictation, arithmetic and picture naming), each of which is divided in to two parts (A and B), giving 6 tasks in total. The subject is required to attempt at least something from each of the 6 tasks within a ten minute period. In addition, there is one rule that must not be broken: they are not allowed to do the two parts of the same task consecutively. This test makes demands on a person’s ability to plan, organise and monitor behaviour. It also taps ‘prospective memory’ i.e. the ability to remember to carry out an intention at a future time.

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Behavioural Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS)

The Dysexecutive Questionnaire - This is a 20 item questionnaire constructed in order to sample a range of problems commonly associated with the Dysexecutive Syndrome. The questions sample four broad areas of likely changes: emotional or personality changes, motivational changes, and cognitive changes. The Dysexecutive Questionnaire supplements information provided by performance on the full assessments, through the provision of additional qualitative information. It is therefore not used in the calculation of the profile score for the full assessment.

Performance norms The control sample consists of a stratified sample of 216 neurologically healthy subjects comprising approximately equal numbers of subjects in each of 3 ability bands - ‘below average’, ‘average’ and ‘above average’ (determined by the National Adult Reading Test (NART) IQ equivalent scores of 89 and below, 90-109 and 110 and above respectively). The patient sample consists of 92 patients, who presented with a variety of neurological disorders. There was no significant difference between the normal controls and patients on performance on the NART.

Reliability Inter-rater reliability across the six tests is high, ranging from 0.88 to 1.00. Absolute agreement was obtained on 8/18 items. Test - retest reliability - 29 of the normal control subjects were re-tested on the battery 6 - 12 months after completing it for the first time. The same group of subjects also completed three frequently administered frontal lobe tests on both these occasions so that test-retest phenomena observed on the BADS could be contrasted with performance on these measures. Results showed that there is a general tendency for those normal controls re-tested to perform slightly better on the six BADS tests on the second occasion they were tested. However none of these reached statistical significance. This alongside administration of other frontal lobe tests supports the idea that testretest reliability may not be high on tests measuring executive functioning, as they are not novel when administered for a second time.

Validity The overall BADS profile score successfully differentiates the performance of subjects with a brain injury from those who do not. In addition the performance of the brain injured group is significantly poorer on all six of the individual tests of the BADS compared to the controls.

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Doors and People

Overview The Doors and People is a test of long-term memory. It yields a single age-scaled overall score which can be ‘unpacked’ to give separate measures of visual and verbal memory, recall and recognition, and forgetting. It is designed for use both as a clinical tool and as a research instrument; enabling the clinician to analyse the nature of any underlying deficit with memory and learning. The Doors and People is an individually administered assessment for use with individuals from 5 years 1 month to adult (child norms were added in 2006). This provides the clinician with the flexibility of using the tool across a wide range and different settings. The test will appeal to those working with adults and / or children in neuropsychological, educational, academic and mental health settings. *The test is available to professionals other than Psychologists, in particular Occupational Therapists, Psychiatrists and neurologists. However, further training will be required. Please contact Customer Services on 0845 630 88 88 for more details.

Features The test comprises four subcomponents: Visual Recognition: The Doors Test: The respondent is presented with coloured photographs of doors from different buildings (e.g. houses, garages, sheds, barns, churches) in a random order. They are then asked to recognise these doors from a page with photographs of 4 different doors; these are presented in a different random order. Doors were chosen for this subtest as they have the advantage of being meaningful, visually rich and yet, provided the distracters are carefully chosen, allow little help from verbal cues. Visual Recall: The Shapes Test: The stimuli for this test are four line drawings of crosses. These vary systematically on three dimensions, overall shape (elongated or square), presence of features at the end of the arms, and the presence of a feature at the intersection of the arms. The shapes chosen were judged to be easy to copy; and although they have obvious significance, this is unhelpful in remembering the detail for adequate performance. A total of 3 learning trials are allowed for this, followed by a delayed recall to measure forgetting. Verbal Recognition: The Names Test: The subject is presented with forename / surname pairs. They are shown one name to read aloud, they then have to select that name from a group of names later. They are presented with twelve names before they are asked to recognise them from a set of four names. Names were chosen as this offered material that is ecologically meaningful, but where coding in terms of meaning or visual imagery seems much less likely than would be the case for unrelated words.

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Doors and People

Features continued... Verbal Recall: The People Test This subtest asks the respondent to recall the forename / surname of 4 different people who have been paired together with an occupation. i.e. Jim Green - is the Doctor, Cuthbert Cattermole is the minister, Tom Webster is the Postman, and Philip Armstrong is the Paperboy. They are then asked to recall the Doctor’s name, the Ministers name etc. This offers and ecologically plausible task which can be readily scored. Again, three learning trials are allowed for this, followed by a delayed recall to measure forgetting.

Performance norms Scores provided by this assessment are: ►► The overall score ►► Visual-verbal discrepancies ►► Recall-recognition discrepancies ►► Forgetting scores

Scoring Data was collected from a stratified sample of 238 subjects comprising equal numbers of subjects from each of the six social class categories as defined in the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys ‘Classification of Occupations 1980’, and balanced so as to have equal numbers of men and women in each category. These were divided in to five age groups, 16 - 31, 32 - 47, 48 - 63, 64 - 79, and a similarly balanced group of 80 - 97.

Summary Studies indicate that the Doors and People test is a robust and sensitive memory assessment for use across a wide range of abilities, from elderly patients with Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, schizophrenia, of low educational level to young graduate students. Christopher Jarrold, Stephen Wood, Faraneh Vargha-Khadem and Alan Baddeley have collected normative data for the Doors and People Test on 148 individuals aged between 5 years and 1 month and 16 years and 1 month.

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Doors and People

Review Dr Carol A Ireland, Vice-Chair of the Division of Forensic Psychology The Doors and People is really what it states: Doors, and People. It is an assessment of long-term memory, specifically episodic memory, taking a broad-based view. It has the benefit of a number of studies that have explored its applicability, and it comprises of four parts. The first is an assessment of an individual’s ability to recognise visual stimuli, in this instance coloured photographs of doors that they have seen before, and provided as part of the assessment. The second is the recall of visual stimuli, in this instance the drawing of four patterns, and their ability to do this from memory. The third is an assessment of their ability to recognise verbal information. Here the individual is asked to read a series of names, and to then recognise these names from a list. Finally, it assesses the ability to recall verbal information, and where the individual is asked to recall the names of four people that they are given. I have used this assessment for a number of years, with a range of clients both in the community and closed settings. One of the real strengths of this tool is its accessibility to the client. In my experience of conducting cognitive assessments, this test does not appear overwhelming for the client in regard to presentation and content. As such, its layout appears accessible to the client, and it is one which clients tend to enjoy and engage with. The clinical data provided by the Doors and People is very helpful. For example, with my client group, it can be helpful to know if they are able to recognise information reasonably or extremely well, or if they have a real challenge in recalling information. This ensures I tailor any interventions to meet the client’s needs, and in order to maximise success. Furthermore, the test is straightforward to use, and does not appear to disengage the client. It is relatively quick to administer, taking around 40 minutes. This can be a real advantage when working with some clients who benefit from shorter engagement sessions. The scoring of the assessment can at first seem a little tricky, and can be overly complex. As such, there needs to be care when scoring, and any later interpretation. As a recommendation, this assessment should not be used without a reasonable knowledge of memory theory. Yet, such an observation would not be unique to the Doors and People, and any interpreter of a tool is required to know the theories upon which the tool is developed, as well as the limitations of any such approaches. There can also be some occasional instances where the scores achieved can fall outside of the normed sample. Yet, this is not frequent. Ultimately, it can offer a wealth of information for the clinician, and can be a real asset to understanding a client’s long-term memory. It can further offer the opportunity to explore any potential patterns in the client’s episodic memory, whilst reducing any potential sense of failure in a client who may present with challenges in their ability.

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Cognitive Assessment Training NOW ONLINE This online training package enables professional therapists to use certain neuropsychological assessments usually restricted to psychologists Training for:

Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Sydnrome (BADS)

Doors and People

Test of Everyday Attention (TEA)

NOW AVAILABLE Training details:

The training costs £170 + VAT This will give you access to online training for any or all of the three products You will also need to be able to access hard copies of the products you wish to train on. Expected completion time for the whole course is about 5 hours online learning, with a further 3 hours self-directed.

Training includes:

In-depth background on statistical concepts important for test selection, administration, scoring and interpretation Information on theoretical aspects of the featured tests and practical guidance on administration, scoring and interpretative issues to facilitate the therapist’s selection and application of standardised assessments with service users. Multiple choice questions to assess a candidate’s understanding of statistical concepts and the tests involved in the training. Certification on completion to use BADS, Doors and People and TEA.

Training features:

The program enables you to learn at your own pace in the convenience of your home or office Access to online tutor Discussion forums Library of relevant resources.

> > See a video demo of the training: www.pearsonclinical.co.uk/catodemo


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Rookwood Driving Battery (RDB)

Overview Driving a vehicle in traffic requires multiple cognitive, physical and behavioural skills. It also carries an inherent risk so accidents do occur on a regular basis and mostly because of driver error or misjudgement. Beyond the learning phase of driving, most of the skills involved in manoeuvring a car in space and driving in traffic are relegated to automatic processes beyond conscious awareness, many of which rely on intact neuropsychological systems. The Rookwood Driving Battery (RDB) is a simple screen for the core neuropsychological skills needed to drive and was designed specifically to assess fitness to drive in the neurological population. The battery is well suited for use in driving assessment centres. It has also been developed for use as a screening tool in community and hospital settings to decide whether to refer to a specialist driving assessment centre. The battery is particularly suitable for use by psychologists and occupational therapists in older adult and neurological settings.

Description of subtests and indices The subtests used in the battery were chosen not only for their suitability in terms of simplicity and the function tested but for their proven clinical effectiveness in everyday assessment and rehabilitation practice. Visual perception Four subtests are designed to assess visual perception. The first three of these were taken from the Visual Object and Spatial Perception battery (VOSP; Warrington & James, 1991): ►► Incomplete Letters: The Incomplete Letters test contains 20 test items and requires examinees to name the letter of the alphabet that is represented by a degraded black and white illustration. ►► Position Discrimination: Examinees are shown two squares with a dot inside each and asked to determine which dot is placed in the exact centre of the square. ►► Cube Analysis: The Cube Analysis task requires examinees to determine how many bricks have been used to create a 3D arrangement, represented by a two-dimensional line drawing. ►► Es and Fs: The Es and Fs test is a simple letter cancellation task and was originally used to screen for visual neglect. Examinees are given 100 seconds to find and mark target items within a larger array of distracter letters.

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Rookwood Driving Battery (RDB)

Description of subtests and indices continued... Praxis Skills Five subtests are included to assess praxis skills. These tests examine two main aspects of motor production: Cultural or Symbolic Movement The first part examines the basic ability to produce cultural or symbolic movement beyond locomotor movement and contains three subtests. ►► Copying Hand Movements: The subject is asked to copy a set of six simple hand movements demonstrated by the examiner. ►► Gestures: Involves the examinee being asked to perform a gesture from a verbal description or name. ►► Use of Objects: A more complex set of actions involving the mimed use of an object in response to a verbal cue is demanded. Rule-bound Action The second part of praxis screening taps the executive level of rule-bound action. This consists of two subtests. ►► Tapping: This test requires the individual to produce a simple movement (one or two taps) in response to the tapping produced by the examiner. Apart from remembering the simple rule, it requires the individual to inhibit the more basic urge to copy the examiner’s tap and instead do the opposite to the examiner. ►► Sequencing: Here the individual has to learn a simple sequence of three hand movements, learnt by modeling the movements as carried out by the examiner over several trials. Executive Functioning Five tests are included to assess executive functioning, three of which were chosen from the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome Battery (BADS) Wilson, Alderman et al (1996). Other subtests include a sorting test and divided attention task. Rule Shift Cards Test, Action Programme Test and Key Search Test: Taken from the BADS were the Rule Shift Cards Test which relies on predominantly verbal executive skill, the Action Programme Test which relies on predominantly non-verbal executive skill and the Key Search Test Divided Attention Task: The Divided Attention task combines a retest of the Es and Fs test with an audio presentation of a pre-recorded story. Again, the individual must cancel the letters while also marking on the sheet every time the speaker mentions the word “three”.

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Rookwood Driving Battery (RDB)

Description of subtests and indices continued... The Sorting Test: The Sorting Test requires the recognition of colour and shape as dimensions for grouping a set of 12 stimuli. Comprehension: The Comprehension Test makes use of the stimuli of the Sorting Test and the individual is asked to move the stimuli according to instructions.

Scoring The order of subtest administration is important and was determined during the pilot stage of data collection. Following this order of administration ensures that the tests which were found to be the least threatening are given first, and those that could provoke anxiety given last. Raw scores on each subtest are converted into scaled scores of 0 (pass), 1 (borderline), and 2 (fail) with the exception of the tests of visual attention and divided attention which convert to a score of 0 (pass) or 1 (fail). Thus, the overall battery score on the 12 tests can range from 0 to 22. Any overall score greater than 10 is considered a fail and corresponds to a 90 per cent chance of failing an on-road test; a strong indication that the individual is not safe to drive.

Scoring Two standardisation studies and two validation studies were completed. The first standardisation study consisted of 195 volunteers less than 70 years of age (mean age of 42.5, sd.13.8, age range 20-69. All were regular drivers; 106 were female and 88 were male. The group had a mean IQ of 104.4 (sd 10.7) measured using the National Adult Reading Test (NART). There was no correlation between age and battery score (Spearmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coefficient rho .130, sign. .069) and a weak but significant correlation between IQ and battery score ((Spearmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coefficient -.160, p<.05). In the second standardisation study of 202 older adult volunteers, 161 were deemed to be cognitively intact This sample had an age range 70-96 (mean age 81.1, sd 5.5) and 123 were female and 37 were male. The mean NART IQ was 105.7, SD 11.9 (N = 157). Two on-road validation studies directly compared performance on the RDB with on-road driving performance. These were conducted on 142 individuals and later on 543 individuals. Of the 543 individuals in the second study, 449 were men and 94 were women. All individuals had a diagnosis which implicated cerebral pathology. In both studies a score >10 proved the best fit positive predictive value and indicates a highly likely fail on the road.

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Rookwood Driving Battery (RDB)

Case Study Maxine Bell, Occupational Therapist at Portland College, UK “Portland College is a residential college for young people aged 16-25 with physical disabilities and associated learning disabilities. Our students are either ambulant, use powered wheelchairs or manual wheelchairs and have shown an interest in learning to drive to increase their independence. We use the Rookwood Driving Battery (RDB) either within our OT office or a meeting room. We decided to buy the assessment after a meeting with our local mobility centre, who heard about the assessment; after researching the RDB we decided it was suitable for our students. At Portland, we are well aware of what adaptive vehicles a student can use, so we are more concerned about the cognitive abilities of our students when they express an interest in driving. This assessment always makes a difference to how we work with our students. When a student highlights the desire to drive a car, we use the RBD alongside the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT) and the Motor Free Visual Perceptual Test (MVPT-3) to inform us of potential deficits in a particular cognitive domain that may impact on their ability to drive a vehicle. Depending on the outcomes of the assessment and intervention, the student will apply for a provisional driving licence. We then put them in touch with suitable driving schools that have access to adapted vehicles. If a standardised assessment illustrates multiple deficits that may impact driving, our students usually accept this and do not pursue driving - it assists with demonstrating potential issues. Conversely, if the assessment shows minor deficits, it provides a focus for intervention. I found that the different types of assessments in the RDB make it a varied experience for the students, i.e. it’s not just flip books, but listening to the CD, then writing and drawing, as well as the water experiment. Overall, we rate the RDB as being ‘very good’ for for reliability, usability and for it’s content, its costeffectiveness is ‘excellent’. I have recommended this assessment in the past to fellow OT’s at other colleges.”

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Rookwood Driving Battery (RDB)

References Colarusso RP, Hammill DD (2003) Motor-Free Visual Perception Test â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third edition. Novato, CA: Academic Therapy Publications. Coughlan A.K. & Warrington, E.K. (1978). Word comprehension and word retrieval in patients with localised cerebral lesions. Brain, 101, 163-185. Warrington, E. K., & James, M. (1991). The Visual Object and Space Perception battery (VOSP). London: Pearson Assessment. Wilson, B. A., Alderman, N., Burgess, P. W., Emslie, H., & Evans, J. J. (1996). Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS). London: Pearson Assessment.

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Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales - Second Edition (Vineland-II)

Overview The Vineland-II is a measure of adaptive behaviour from Birth to Adulthood. The key areas that the VinelandII assess are: Communication; Daily living skills; Social; Motor Skills; and Maladaptive behaviour.

Features The Vineland-II is appropriate for use in many areas. It is especially useful when looking at independent living skills therefore pertinent to rehabilitation settings. The assessment is available to Occupational Therapists and Psychologists. The Vineland-II helps to measure the adaptive behaviour of individuals with brain injuries, developmental delay and mental disability. The flexibility of this tool enables you to use it in many ways, such as: ►► plan rehabilitation and intervention programs ►► monitor and assess progress ►► Provide a perspective on an individual’s behaviour from those who interact with the person on a daily basis ►► Determine eligibility for qualification for special services

Organisation Table illustrating the Domains and Sub-domains on Vineland-II Survey and Expanded Interview Forms Domains & Index Communication Daily Living Skills Socialisation Motor Skills Maladaptive Behaviour Index (optional) Adaptive Behaviour Composite

Sub-domains Receptive, Expressive, Written Personal, Domestic, Community Interpersonal Relationships, Play and Leisure Time, Coping Skills Fine, Gross Internalising, Externalising, Other

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Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales - Second Edition (Vineland-II)

Scores and Interpretation ►► Domains and Adaptive Behaviour Composite: ►► Standard scores ►► Percentile ranks ►► Adaptive levels ►► Sub-domains: ►► V-scale scores ►► Adaptive levels ►► Age equivalents ►► On Survey and Expanded Interview Forms: ►► V-scale scores ►► Maladaptive levels for the optional Maladaptive Behaviour Index

Enhancements ►► ►► ►► ►► ►► ►►

New norms Expanded age ranges encompassing birth to age 90 for the Survey and the Expanded Interview Forms Updated content reflects tasks and daily living skills that are much more useful, relevant and ecologically valid More complete coverage of adult adaptive behaviour to better inform rehabilitation programmes and detect decline in older adults Semi structured interview format now lists items by sub-domain, making test administration easier New Parent/Caregiver Rating Form that provides a simple rating scale for obtaining the basic information derived from the semi structured interview.

Technical information The Survey Forms normative sample consists of over 3,500 individuals and the Expanded Interview Forms normative sample consists of over 2,000. Scores are provided for 94 age groups. All samples were stratified by race, mother’s education, geographic region, and special education placement and were matched to the U.S. census.

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Overview of Assessments for Rehabilitation

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*All catalogue page references are for the 2012 Health and Psychology Catalogue. For further details visit www.pearsonclinical.co.uk or call us on 0845 630 8888. Test type/name General Screening Cognitive Assessment of Minnesota, 978 0 761647 45 4

Age Range

Purpose

For use by

Cat’ page*

Price (exc VAT)

Adult

Measure the cognitive abilities of adults with neurological impairment

Allied Health Therapists, 78 Psychologists

£150.00

The Functional Living Scale - UK Version (TFLS UK)

16 years to 90 years 11 months

Asses competency in instrumental activities of daily living

Allied Health Therapists, 94 Psychologists

£310.00

Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) Primary Form A 978 0 749123 45 1 Alternate Form B 978 0 749123 46 8

20 to 89 yrs

Detect and characterise cognitive Allied Health Therapists, 79 decline Psychologists

£178.50 £178.50

Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT) 978 0 158328 00 3

18 to 89 yrs

Quickly severity ratings for 5 cognitive domains

Allied Health Therapists, See website Psychologists

£209.50

Wessex Head Injury Matrix (WHIM) 978 0 749133 13 9

16 years and older

Assess and monitor recovery of cognitive function after severe head injury

Allied Health Therapists, See website Psychologists

£88.00

Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE) 978 0 749162 24 5

16 years and older

Assess cognitive abilities quickly and reliably

Allied Health Therapists, 77 Psychologists

£130.00

General Ability Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Fourth UK Edition (WAIS-IV UK) 978 0 749150 00 6

16 years to 90 years 11 months

Measure adult intellectual ability

Psychologists

£1,185.00

72


Test type/name

Memory Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test - Third Edition (RBMT-3) 978 0 749134 76 1

Age Range

Purpose

For use by

Cat’ page*

Price (exc VAT)

Adult

Assess everyday memory

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

84

£397.50

Doors and People* 978 0 749133 34 4

5 yrs 1 month to Adult

Assess long term memory

Psychologists

85

£314.00

Cambridge Prospective Memory Test (CAMPROMPT) 978 0 749133 37 5

16 yrs and older

Assess prospective memory

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

85

£220.00

Spot the Word, Second Edition (STW 2) 978 0 749162 40 5

16 years to 90 years

Rapidly assess premorbid cognitive abilities

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

80

£804.00

Wechsler Memory Scale - Fourth UK Edition (WMS-IV UK) 9780749150303

16 years to 90 years 11 months

Assess verbal and non-verbal memory abilities in adults

Psychologists

81

£100.00

Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS)* 978 0 749134 00 6

16 to 87 yrs

Predict everyday problems associated with the dsyexecutive syndrome

Psychologists

89

£409.00

Hayling and Brixton Tests 978 0 749133 80 1

18 to 80 yrs

Clinical assessment of executive functioning

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

89

£174.00

Test of Everyday Attention (TEA)* 978 0 749133 65 8

18 to 80 yrs

Measure selective attention, sustained attention and attentional switching

Psychologists

90

£344.00

Executive Function


Test type/name

Visual Perception Developmental Test of Visual Perception - Adolescent and Adult (DTVP-A) 978 0 749122 89 8

11 to 74 yrs 11 mths

Purpose

Measure visual-perceptual and visual-motor abilities

For use by

Cat’ page*

Price (exc VAT)

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

102

£229.50

Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of VisualMotor Integration, Sixth Edition (Beery VMI) 978 0 749160 27 2

2 years to 100 Assess visual-motor skills in years children and adults

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists, Specialist Teachers

101

£121.50

Behavioural Inattention Test (BIT) 978 0 749129 97 2

19 to 83 yrs

Predict everyday problems associated with unilateral neglect

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

90

£293.00

Visual Object and Space Perception Battery (VOSP) 978 0 749134 02 0

Adult

Assess object and space perception

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

102

£207.00

Cortical Vision Screening Test (CORVIST) 978 0 749130 12 1

Adult

Screen for cerebral disease affecting vision

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

102

£152.50

Adult

Assess basic cognitive functions essential for safe driving

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

94

£309.50

Driving Rookwood Driving Battery (RDB) 978 0 749144 39 5

Age Range

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Test type/name

Purpose

For use by

Cat’ page*

Price (exc VAT)

Functional Needs Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition Birth to 90 yrs Measure adaptive behaviour (Vineland-II) Survey Forms from birth to adulthood 978 0 749152 00 0

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

38 & 92

£132.00

Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System - Second Edition (ABAS) 978 0 158004 50 1

Birth to 89 yrs Assess the level of adaptive skills in children and adults

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists, Specialist Teachers

39 & 92

£199.50

Independent Living Scales (ILS) 978 0 158147 07 9

Adult

An ecologically valid, performance based measure of functional abilities with an emphasis on IADL skills

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists, Researchers

93

£180.00

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

50 & 100

£120.00

11 years and older

Identify sensory processing patterns and effects on functional performance

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

79

£167.00

Adult

Screen for gross impairment of cognitive skills in the elderly

Sensory Adolescent / Adult Sensory Profile™ 978 0 761649 70 0 Elderly Rehabilitation Middlesex Elderly Assessment of Mental State (MEAMS) 978 0 749134 85 3

Age Range

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Test type/name

Age Range

Purpose

For use by

Cat’ page*

Price (exc VAT)

Severe Impairment Battery (SIB) Kit 978 0 749134 05 1

51 to 91 yrs

Assess severe dementia in the elderly

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

See website

£255.50

Severe Impairment Battery - Short Form (SIB-S) 978 0 749144 44 9

Older Adults

Assess people with very severe dementia

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists

See website

£85.00

13 to 80 yrs

Asses the severity of depression

Allied Health Therapists Psychologists

106/107

£86.50

Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) 978 0 158018 40 9

17 to Adult

Evaluate the severity of anxiety in adults

Allied Health Therapists Psychologists

106/107

£87.00

Self Image Profile for Adults (SIP-Adult) 978 0 749134 95 2

17 to 65 yrs

Quickly assess self image and self esteem in adults

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists, Specialist Teachers

109

£80.00

Wellbeing Evaluation Scale (WES) 978 0 749162 14 6

55 years and older

Profile wellbeing in older people

Allied Health Therapists, Psychologists, Specialist Teachers

104

£150.00

N/A

Online training that enables professional therapists to use certain neuropsychological assessments usually restricted to psychologists

Allied Health Therapists

86

£170.00

Mental Health Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) 978 0 158018 37 9

Online Training Cognitive Assessment Training - Online (CAT Online) 978 0 7491 3494 5

*Certain CL1 tests are available to professionals other than psychologists, however further training will be required. Visit www.psychcorp.co.uk/cognitivetraining for details.

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Order Form Product Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System - Second Edition (ABAS), 978 0 158004 50 1 Complete kit: Includes manual (infant and preschool, school and adult), 5 parent/primary caregiver forms (ages 0-5), 5 teacher/daycare provider forms (ages 2-5), 5 parent forms (ages 5-21), 5 teacher forms (ages 5-21) and 5 adult forms (ages 16 to 89) Adolescent / Adult Sensory Profile™, 978 0 761649 70 0 Complete kit: Includes user’s manual and 25 self-questionnaire/summary reports Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), 978 0 158018 40 9 Complete kit: Includes manual and 25 record forms Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), 978 0 158018 37 9 Complete kit: Includes manual and 25 record forms Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration, Sixth Edition (Beery VMI), 978 0 749160 27 2 Starter Kit: Includes manual, 10 full forms, 10 short forms, 10 visual perception forms and 10 motor co-ordination forms Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS), 978 0 749134 00 6 Complete kit: Includes manual (including new downwards extension), 25 scoring sheets, stimulus cards, three-dimensional plastic materials, timer, 25 DEX-C independent rater questionnaires, beads, nuts, bolts and washers in a bag Behavioural Inattention Test (BIT), 978 0 749129 97 2 Complete kit: Includes manual, pack of 25 scoring sheets, various stimulus, test and playing cards and clock face Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE), 978 0 749162 24 5 Complete kit: Includes 25 UK record forms, notes for UK user, manual and WMS-IV scoring template Cambridge Prospective Memory Test (CAMPROMPT), 978 0 749133 37 5 Complete kit: Includes manual, pack of 25 record forms, quiz question cards, puzzle cards, message card, clock and 2 timers in a bag Cognitive Assessment of Minnesota, 978 0 761647 45 4 Complete kit: Includes manual, 8 test cards, 25 score booklets in vinyl case Cognitive Assessment Training - Online (CAT Online), 978 0 7491 3494 5 Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT), 978 0 158328 00 3 Complete kit: Includes examiner’s manual, stimulus manual, 15 response booklets and 15 record forms Cortical Vision Screening Test (CORVIST), 978 0 749130 12 1 Complete kit: Includes manual/stimulus book and pack of 25 scoring sheets Developmental Test of Visual Perception - Adolescent and Adult (DTVP-A), 978 0 749122 89 8 Complete Kit: Includes examiner’s manual, picture book, 25 profile/examiner record forms. 25 response booklets in a box Doors and People, 978 0 749133 34 4 Complete Kit: Includes manual, 25 scoring sheets and 3 stimulus books in a bag Hayling and Brixton Tests, 978 0 749133 80 1 Complete kit: Includes manual, stimulus book and a pack of 25 scoring sheets in a bag Independent Living Scales (ILS), 978 0 158147 07 9 Complete kit: Includes manual, stimulus booklet, 25 record forms, and facsmile driver’s license, credit card, and key in a storage pouch

www.pearsonclinical.co.uk

Price (ex VAT) £199.50

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Middlesex Elderly Assessment of Mental State (MEAMS), 978 0 749134 85 3 Complete kit: Includes manual, 2 stimulus books and 25 scoring sheets in a bag Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), 978 0 749123 45 1 Primary Form A: Includes manual, stimulus book A, 25 record forms A and coding scoring template A Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), 978 0 749123 46 8 Alternate form kit B: Includes manual, 25 record forms B, stimulus book B and coding scoring template B Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT-3), 978 0 749134 76 1 Complete Kit: includes manual, 25 record forms, 2 stimulus books, novel task stimulus material, storycard, message envelope, alarm, timer Rookwood Driving Battery, 978 0 749144 39 5 Complete Kit: includes manual, stimulus book, story CD, 25 record forms and set of manipulatives Severe Impairment Battery (SIB), 978 0 749134 05 1 Complete kit: Includes manual, 25 scoring sheets, stimulus cards, plastic shapes, spoon, cup, full distractor pack in a bag Severe Impairment Battery - Short Form (SIB-S), 978 0 749144 44 9 SIB-S Supplemental Kit: includes manual and pack of 25 record forms Self Image Profile for Adults (SIP-Adult), 978 0 749134 95 2 Complete kit: Includes manual and pack of 25 record forms Spot the Word, Second Edition (STW 2), 9780749162405 Complete kit: Includes manual, record forms (25), reading card and bag Test of Everyday Attention (TEA), 978 0 749133 65 8 Complete kit: Includes manual, pack of 25 scoring sheets, cue book, stimulus cards and maps, 3 CDs and 1 DVD in a bag The Functional Living Scale - UK Version (TFLS UK), 9780749162726 Complete kit: Includes manual, record forms (25), response sheets (25), stimulus cards, phone book (5), bag Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition (Vineland-II), 978 0 749152 00 0 Survey Forms Starter Kit: Includes manual, 10 survey interview forms, 10 parent/caregiver rating forms, 10 survey interview report to parents and 10 survey forms report to caregivers Visual Object and Space Perception Battery (VOSP), 978 0 749134 02 0 Complete kit: Includes manual, pack of 25 scoring sheets and 3 stimulus books in a bag Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Fourth UK Edition (WAIS-IV UK), 978 0 749150 00 6 Complete kit: Includes admin manual, stimulus books 1 and 2, response books 1 and 2, pack of 25 record forms, symbol search key in envelope, coding search key in envelope, cancel scoring template in envelope, WAIS-IV/WMS-IV online training, WAIS-IV US technical manual and block design set in a backpack. Wechsler Memory Scale - Fourth UK Edition (WMS-IV UK), 978 0 749150 30 3 Complete kit: Includes admin manual, stimulus books 1 and 2, adult battery record forms (25), older adult battery record forms (25), response booklets (25), memory grid, scoring template in envelope, designs and spatial addition cards, WAIS-IV/WMS-IV online training and WMS-IV US technical manual in a backpack Wellbeing Evaluation Scale (WES), 978 0 749162 14 6 Complete kit: Includes manual, 25 long form record forms, 50 short form record forms in a small case Wessex Head Injury Matrix (WHIM), 978 0 749133 13 9 Complete kit: Includes manual and pack of 25 scoring sheets

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Rehabilitation Information Pack A range of products from Pearson Assessment for professionals working in the area of rehabilitation For further information • Please visit our website www.pearsonclinical.co.uk • Call Customer Services on 0845 630 88 88 • Email us via info@pearsonclinical.co.uk • Sign up to our enewsletter www.pearsonclinical.co.uk/enewsletters Any questions? • Our sales consultants offer free, no obligation product • demonstrations. Find your nearest sales consultant at www.pearsonclinical.co.uk/salesconsultants You can now also find PsychCorpUK on Facebook and Twitter.

Dr Carol A Ireland, School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, on Doors and People

Maxine Bell, Occupational Therapist, Portland College on Rookwood Driving Battery

“One of the real strengths of this tool is its accessibility to the client...[it] can offer a wealth of information for the clinician, and be a real asset to understanding a client’s long-term memory.”

“This assessment always makes a difference to how we work with our students...I found that the different types of assessments in the RDB make it a varied experience for the students...I have recommended this assessment in the past to fellow OT’s at other colleges..”

Rehabilitation Information Pack  

A range of products from Pearson Assessment for professionals working in the area of rehabilitation

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