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Facts on Canadian Energy Production, Efficiency, and Initiatives Canada is a world leader in the production and use of renewable energy.

Electricity  

Canada already boasts one of the cleanest electricity systems in the world, with more than 77 per cent of our electricity supply from non-greenhouse gas emitting sources. Canada is the world’s third largest producer of hydroelectricity, making up more than 10 per cent of the world’s total hydropower generation. Hydroelectricity generation makes up about 60 per cent of Canada’s domestic electricity supply. Nuclear electricity generation supplies about 14 per cent of Canada’s total electricity supply, which avoids about 90 megatonnes of greenhouse gases per year compared to coal-fired electricity generation.

Alternative Energy Sources 

Alternative renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, hydro, biomass and geothermal currently provide 18 per cent of Canada’s total primary energy supply. o Wind energy in Canada accounts for about 1.6 per cent of total electricity generation; ninth in the world in terms of installed capacity. The National Energy Board forecasted in 2011 that wind capacity would grow to 15,200 megawatts by 2020, which could supply approximately 5 per cent of Canada’s electricity demand. o In 2011, bioenergy (energy from plants or plant material, animal waste or any product made of these) represented 4.8 per cent of Canada’s total primary energy supply. Biomass also accounts for about 1.4 per cent of Canada’s total electricity generation. o As of December 31, 2010, there were over 95,000 ground source heat pumps (GSHPs), a source of geothermal energy, in operation in Canada. These pumps produce an estimated 1420 GW of thermal energy annually. o As of December 31, 2012, Canada’s solar PV (photovoltaics) capacity was estimated at 765 MW—over 23 times the solar PV capacity in 2008. In fact, solar PV, along with wind power, is the fastest growing source of electricity in Canada.

Energy Use and Energy Efficiency  

Nationally, Canada realized a 25 per cent improvement in energy efficiency between 1990 and 2010, saving Canadians $32 billion in 2010. We are pleased that the International Energy Agency (IEA) has once again recognized Canada as a world leader in energy efficiency. In fact, the IEA ranks Canada second, tied with the United Kingdom, in energy efficiency improvements among 15 countries between 1990 and 2010.


Energy efficiency measures are saving Canadians energy and contributing to Canada’s decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. For example: o Minimum energy performance standards for more than 40 appliances and equipment deliver lower energy costs and emissions for Canadians. o More than 50 products have an Energy Star label which allows consumers to quickly identify an energy efficient product. o Over 200,000 students annually follow Auto$mart Driver Education material, which educates young drivers on fuel efficiency and equips them to save 10 million liters of fuel per year. o All Canadian provinces and territories are adopting, or adapting the 2011 National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings, which is 25 per cent more stringent than the previous code. This Code is expected to save $350 million dollars per year in energy costs in 2020. o Canada was the first country to adopt the ISO 50001 Energy Management Systems standard as a national standard. Recent experience in Canada and in the United States indicates that large industrial companies can expect energy intensity improvements of at least of 20 per cent over 10 years through its use. o More than 640,000 homes were retrofitted through collaborative federal, provincial, and territorial programs, saving participants more than $400 million in energy costs per year.

United States – Canada Clean Energy Dialogue 

The United States–Canada Clean Energy Dialogue (CED) was launched by President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Stephen Harper in February, 2009, to enhance bilateral collaboration on clean energy science and technologies that will reduce greenhouse gases and combat climate change. Given our close energy relationship, integrated markets and shared greenhouse gas reduction target, the CED is an important mechanism for the United States and Canada to share expertise and align our efforts to combat climate change. Our governments’ commitment to collaborate on clean energy research, development, and deployment initiatives strengthens our respective climate change policies, enhances our energy security, and advances our collective progress towards a clean energy future. Work under the CED is guided by negotiated Action Plans. Currently, officials on both sides of the border are implementing initiatives outlined in Action Plan II. This plan includes work in the areas of: o Carbon capture and storage; o Electricity Providers; o Clean energy research and development; and o Energy efficiency.


International support Internationally, Canada supports a broad portfolio of clean energy projects in developing countries. Key investments include:  

$351 million to the International Finance Corporation for innovative private sector climate change projects, notably in the clean energy sector; $250 million to the Inter-American Development Bank, to support projects across Latin America and the Caribbean that focus on renewable energy, energy efficiency, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and climate resilience; $82 million to the Asian Development Bank to establish a fund which encourages private investment in climate change projects in low, low-middle income and small island developing states in Asia related to renewable energy, energy efficiency, sustainable transportation and infrastructure, and climate resilience; $200 million to the Clean Technology Fund (CTF), which provides middle income countries with resources to scale up the demonstration, deployment, and transfer of low-carbon, clean technologies.

Facts on Canadian Energy Production, Efficiency, and Initiatives  

Canada is the world’s third largest producer of hydroelectricity, making up more than 10 per cent of the world’s total hydropower generation...

Facts on Canadian Energy Production, Efficiency, and Initiatives  

Canada is the world’s third largest producer of hydroelectricity, making up more than 10 per cent of the world’s total hydropower generation...

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