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The Charolais Connection 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Ph. (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Home Page: http://www.charolaisbanner.com email: charolaisbanner@gmail.com ISSN 0824-1767 Manager/Publisher Helge By Managing Editor Candace By charolaisbanner@gmail.com @ByCandace

MARCH 2019 • VOL. XXXVI, NO. 2

Production/Graphic Design Susan Penner charolais.susan@sasktel.net Web Design Dalyse Robertson pdmrobertson@gmail.com

From the Field ..........................................................................................8 Dans nos champs ....................................................................................10 Canadian Charolais Association ............................................................14 De L’Association de Charolais Canadien ................................................14 Profile – Blanchette Ranch ....................................................................19 Photosensitization in Cattle ..................................................................36 Crossbreeding Systems for Beef Production..........................................40 Herd Health ............................................................................................46 CCYA News ..............................................................................................53 Low Stress Weaning Methods Ensure Healthier Calves ........................54 Calendar of Events ..................................................................................65

FIELDMEN: Alberta & British Columbia Craig Scott 14 Keown Close, Olds, AB T4H 0E7 Res. (403) 507-2258 • Fax (403) 507-2268 Cell (403) 651-9441 sbanner@telusplanet.net @craigscott222 Saskatchewan, Manitoba, USA & Eastern Canada Helge By 124 Shannon Rd., Regina, SK S4S 5B1 (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Cell (306) 536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com @CharolaisBanner

Index of Advertisers ................................................................................70

Jon Wright Cell (306) 807-8424 SUBSCRIPTIONS: $9.45 per year $25.20 – 3 years (Prices include 5% GST) The Charolais Connection is mailed to over 8,000 cattlemen nationwide. Those cattlemen include all purebred Charolais breeders, buyers of purebred Charolais bulls from the past six years and all subscribers to the Charolais Banner. No material contained in the Charolais Connection may be reprinted without the permission of the Charolais Banner. The publishers reserve the right to refuse any advertisements. The material produced in this publication is done so with the highest integrity, however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. We are responsible for only the value of the advertisement. Animals in the photographs in the Connection have not been altered by computer enhancement or mechanical methods according to the knowledge of the publisher.

On the cover… Charolais are adaptable – this photos was taken at -35°C at Cedarlea Farms, Hodgeville, SK Photo: Helge By Design: Susan Penner

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Printed by Print West, Regina, Saskatchewan Publications Mail Agreement No. 40047726 Postage paid at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada Postmaster: Please return undeliverable publications (covers only) to: Charolais Banner, 124 Shannon Road, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1, Canada. Published by the Charolais Banner, Regina, SK (3 times per year - February, March and Fall)

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POINTS TO PONDER

From the Field Helge By

Picturing for bull sale catalogues and advertising is nearly wrapped up for another spring and it was a trying one with the weather in February across most of Canada. From big snows in areas to extremely cold temperatures that hung on for an extended period, it was challenging. The producers that calve in January and February had their facilities taxed to the max in many cases, as it was hard to get the barns emptied out to make room for the new calves coming. Last spring in the west, it was the early April time frame that caught many producers who calve at that time and don’t have the necessary facilities for extreme weather. Many calves were lost in some parts and cattle producers were pushed to the limit with trying to save them. In January I attended part of the Saskatchewan Beef Industry Conference which included some impressive speakers on some relevant topics. A couple I thought I would share with you. Dr. Sylvain Charlebois from Dalhousie University; “The rise of the conscious carnivore? The good, the bad and the awfully ugly.” His talk focused on the new food guide that was recently released and how animal protein producers need to find ways to work with other food groups to promote the consumption and overcome the negative tone towards meat. For example, team up with pulse producers and push recipes that include both pulse and meat for a more nutritional meal such as chili or burritos, etc. He was a very knowledgeable speaker on the food trends in Canada and around the world. I was visiting with a beef producer friend in Norway who sits on their

national all breeds board and they are in the same struggle to overcome the negative thoughts about meat and how it hurts the environment and the push to vegetarianism by so many. We really live in a global community now and there are many pushing that direction. The final speaker was Timothy Caulfied, author, professor and realist: When Celebrity Culture and Science Collide. If you have Netflix, you can find some of his talks there or on YouTube. Well worth the viewing of how celebrities are beating out science in the food debate. Although the Saskatchewan’s Johne’s Surveillance Program is a provincial one, it is being renewed for another five years. It is administered by the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association (SSGA) but receives funding from the Canadian Agricultural Partnership (CAP) program. Started in the fall of 2013 it was initially for purebred cattle but was expanded to include commercial operation in 2014. 15,283 cattle in 106 herds were tested in the first five years and it was found that 500 head or 3.3 per cent, tested positive. Some herds tested up to a quarter positive. It should be noted that these probably aren’t a true representation as most of the producers who signed up to participate suspected they had Johne’s in their herds. Johne’s is a debilitating bacterial disease affecting the intestines of cattle, sheep and goats. The long incubation period makes it difficult to detect and prevent. Many animals within a herd may be infected before any clinical signs are observed. There is no treatment. When a herd is tested, animals testing positive are usually culled, while recommendations are made

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related to the use of colostrum and exposure to manure. The Johne’s Disease Surveillance Program is open to all Saskatchewan beef producers. Under the program, mature cows and bulls receive a blood test for Johne’s. If the disease is found in a herd, a Johne’s disease risk assessment management plan (RAMP) must be completed. The program covers 100 per cent of the costs for testing herds of up to 250 head. New under CAP, the program will cover half of the costs for producers who wish to test a subsequent time. More information about the program can be found at the SSGA website. The Canadian Agricultural Partnership is a 60:40 cost-shared funding agreement between the federal and provincial and territorial governments. I am not sure if there are programs like this in other provinces but if you suspect you have Johne’s, get it checked out. It really is a costly, almost silent thief. So as we get into more of the bull sales, if Craig Scott, Jon Wright or I can be of any assistance, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. We are always happy to help in any way we can. A reminder too, that all our Charolais Banner and Charolais Connection magazines are online for free at charolaisbanner.com – if you want to go back to past issues or show your neighbours past articles, please do. We also try to keep the sale news very current on our homepage, so you can check out the latest results usually within a day of the sale. We wish everyone a great calving season with nice weather and may the moisture conditions this summer be favourable. Until next time, Helge

@CharolaisBanner

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POINT A SURVEILLER

Dans nos champs Helge By

Les multiples séances de photos pour les catalogues de vente de taureaux tire bientôt à sa fin. La compilation de ces plusieurs visites n’a pas été facile avec la vague de grand froid du mois de février qui s’est répandue à travers presque tout le pays. À certains endroits, nous étions entouré de neige ou bien, forcés de travailler avec des températures glaciales. Ce fut tout un défi. Les étables et abris ont été mis à l’épreuve pour les éleveurs qui attendent la majeure partie de leurs vêlages dans le mois de janvier et février. Il était difficile de fournir à la demande et de s’assurer que les veaux naissant étaient prêt pour les froids extrêmes. On se rappelle qu’en avril passé, plusieurs éleveurs qui attendaient la plupart de leurs mises bas pendant ce temps, ont été surpris par une vague de froid tardive en saison. La plupart d’entre eux ne possèdent pas les installations pour affronter ces températures. La patience de plusieurs éleveurs a été éprouvé à essayer de garder les veaux en vie et de retrouver ceux qui s’étaient égarés. En janvier, j’ai participé à la conférence de l’industrie du boeuf en Saskatchewan. Plusieurs conférenciers ont abordés des sujets très intéressants et pertinent à l’industrie. Je vous fait part de deux de ces conférences. Le Dr. Sylvain Charlebois de l’université Dalhousie nous a présenté sa conférence: ‘La hausse des carnivore sensibles? Le bon, moins bon et le vachement laid’. Cette présentation ciblait le tout nouveau guide alimentaire et comment les producteurs de protéines animales et les autres groupes doivent promouvoir la consommation de protéines animales et surmonter les idéologies négatives envers la viande. Par example, développer des recettes avec des producteurs légumineuses qui incluent les deux éléments pour un repas encore plus nutritif comme 10

du chili ou des burritos. M. Charlebois était très bien informés sur les tendances alimentaires au Canada et dans le reste du monde. Lors d’une visite avec un ami qui est producteur en Norvège, aussi membre d’un comité bovin national regroupant toutes les races, il m’a fait part de la nouvelle négativité entourant la consommation de viande et comment cette tendance endommage l’environnement si le végétarisme continu d’être poussé dans cette direction. Une deuxième conférence qui a retenu mon attention était l’auteur, professeur et réaliste Timothy Caulfied avec sa présentation intitulée: ‘Collision parmi les célébrités, la culture et la science’. Certaines de ses présentations de retrouve même sur Netflix et Youtube. Ce visionnement nous montre comment les célébrités corrigent la science dans le grand débat alimentaire. À voir! Le programme provincial Saskatchewannais de surveillance de paratuberculose (Johne’s disease) a été renouvelé pour un autre mandat de cinq ans. Celui-ci est administré par l’association des éleveurs de bétail de la Saskatchewan (Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association) et en partie financé par le Partenariat Canadien pour l’Agriculture. Ce programme a fait ses débuts à l’automne 2003 et était initialement visé aux éleveurs pur sang pour ensuite inclure les élevages commerciaux en 2004. En tout, 15 283 têtes parmi 106 troupeaux ont été analysées dans le courant des cinq premières années du programme. Sur ce nombre de prélèvements, 500 têtes, ou 3.3% ont testées positives. Jusqu’au quart d’un troupeau entier fut identifié avec cette maladie. Il faut noter que cette statistique ne reflète pas la majorité des producteurs car ceux qui se sont volontairement offert soupçonnait la présence du virus parmi leur troupeau. La paratuberculose est une maladie Charolais Connection • March 2019

incapacitante qui affecte les intestins des bovins, des moutons et des chèvres. À cause de la période d’incubation prolongée du virus, elle rend la détection et la prévention de cette maladie très difficile. Plusieurs sujets peuvent être affectés avant qu’une manifestation clinique soit observée. Aucune cure est disponible. Lorsqu’un troupeau est analysé et que certains sujets sont détectées, ils deviennent généralement du bétail de réforme. Certaines recommendations sont faites face aux veaux et on conseille à diminuer l’exposition au colostrum et au fumier des sujets infectés. Le programme de surveillance de la paratuberculose est offert à tous les producteurs de bétail en Saskatchewan. Ce programme inclus une analyse sanguine pour les vaches et taureaux matures. Lorsqu’un sujet est affecté dans un troupeau, une évaluation approfondie et un plan de gestion du risque doit être complété. Aucun frais pour ce programme est déversé de la part du producteur pour les troupeaux de moins de 250 têtes. Avec le Partenariat Canadien pour l’Agriculture, les éleveurs qui souhaitent participer à une deuxième analyse verront les frais réduits de moitié. Vous trouverez plus d’information sur le programme sur le site www.skstockgrowers.com. Le Partenariat Canadien pour l’Agriculture est financé à 60% de la part du gouvernement fédéral et 40% reçu au niveau provincial ou territorial. Je me questionne si un programme semblable est disponible dans d’autres provinces. Si vous soupçonner cette maladie parmi votre troupeau, agissez vite. La paratuberculose est un tueur dispendieux et presque silencieux. Maintenant que nous nous approchons des nombreuses ventes de taureaux, Craig Scott, Jon Wright et moi-même, vous offrent nos services. N’hésitez pas à nous lâchez un coup de fil. Nous sommes heureux d’avoir suite à la page 12


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DANS NOS CHAMPS, SUITE DE LA PAGE 10

la chance de vous aider du mieux que nous pouvons. Je vous rappelle aussi que tous les articles déjà parus dans le Charolais Banner ou Charolais Connection sont disponibles en tout temps et

gratuitement au charolaisbanner.com. Vous pouvez même montrer ces articles à vos voisins! Nous affichons les résultats des ventes sur notre site. Ceux-ci apparaissent en moyenne une journée après la vente.

Suivez, moi sur Twitter! @CharolaisBanner 12

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Nous vous souhaitons une excellente saison de vêlage avec une bonne température ainsi que l’humidité nécessaire pour la saison estivale. À la prochaine, Helge


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FROM THE CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

Why Use A Charolais Bull? CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais www.facebook.com/cdncharolais

PROVINCIAL REPRESENTATIVES: ALBERTA President: Stephen Cholak, Lamont Secretary: Jocelyn O’Neill, Innisfail SASKATCHEWAN President: Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw Secretary: Saskatchewan Livestock Assoc., Regina MANITOBA President: Hans Myrhe, Dauphin Secretary: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie ONTARIO President: Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton Secretary: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC President: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secretary: Chantal Raymond, Sainte-Eulalie MARITIMES President: Jason Ringuette, Bridgetown, NS Secretary: Nancy Milton, Nine Mile Creek, PEI STAFF: Registry: Lori Connelly, Lois Chivilo French Membership: Bernard Dore 514-910-4935 • bernarddore@videotron.ca EXECUTIVE: PRESIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 • 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net 1st VICE-PRESIDENT: MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C 306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net 2nd VICE-PRES: KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C 780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca PAST PRESIDENT: BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 • 613.646.9741 C 613.312.0270 bh.cornerview@gmail.com DIRECTORS: MATHIEU PALERME 814 Pink Rd., Gatineau, QC J9J 3N2 819.682.2723 C 819.213.3143 matpalerme@yahoo.ca ROGER MALONEY 2420 Jermyn Line Indian River, ON K0L 2B0 705.295.6439 C 705.761.7316 roger@mlcattleco.com SHAWN AIREY Box 639, Rivers, MB R0K 1X0 204.328.7704 C 204.724.8823 htacharolais@hotmail.com JIM OLSON Box 882, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 3C3 204.252.3115 C 204.856.6357 lejcharolais@gmail.com ALLAN MARSHALL 65266 RG RD 33 Red Deer County, AB T4G 0N3 403.227.2594 C 403.588.5282 allan@futurefarms.ca LORNE LAKUSTA Box 37, Andrew, AB T0B 0C0 780.365.2079 C780.719.0264 spruceviewcharolais@gmail.com

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Why use a Charolais bull? The question is rather, why not? The benefits of using a Charolais bull are limitless. Two of the most obvious reasons for using a white bull is the power they pass onto their calf crop and then quite simply, their colour. The Charolais bull can be laid over any cross of cow; they’re versatile and provide punch to those calves. The calves gain and have the size and structure to weigh in at weaningthat adds up to more pounds and ultimately more money improving your bottom line. The calf crop produced from a white bull is distinctive – no tag required. The dominant white gene leaves no question what the calves are from, they’re naturally identifiable. The buyer knows what kind of product he’s getting, there is no mistaking. In addition to the obvious, the Canadian Charolais Association has been led by a progressive Board of breeders since inception that has focused on genetic improvements. As a result, we have a healthy foundation of 1.2 Million pedigree records and over 1 Million performance records. Through various programs, including our current Whole Herd Enrollment and the ongoing research at Kinsella, Charolais breeders are continually submitting valuable data. Over the years, the birth weights have dropped, while calving ease, weaning and yearling weights have all improved. When the data is pooled together and evaluated, we have a scientifically sound and very powerful

selection tool available for use. If you’re not sure about the use of EPDs, consider this statement from Sean McGrath of Ranching Systems: “As with all breeds, the cattle are built by the breeders and their decisions. The current EPD are the result of a long evolution and they will continue to evolve and improve. Certainly, there can be arguments made about the direction breeders have chosen over time but there can be no argument about the effectiveness of EPD for ranking animals for a trait of interest. The biggest number often gets confused with the best number which is unfortunate, but the EPD ranking tool is still nine times more effective than an in-herd index or adjusted weight for determining the correct genetic placing of animals for a trait.” Before upgrading your bull battery this spring, discuss your needs with your fellow breeders, your neighbours, and check out the prices in the auction yards for those buckskins and smokies.Find what fits your program, there’s something for everyone. Plan to join us for herd tours and field days across the country, in addition to our consistent, profitable product, our people are some of our highest assets. The Association’s Annual Meeting is June 10 in Saskatoon, SK; attend and network with the foundation of the breed. Check www.charolais.com for upcoming dates and sales. Charolais offers Proven Performance. Be Identifiable. USE CHAROLAIS.

DE LA CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE

Pourquoi utiliser un taureau Charolais? Pourquoi utiliser un taureau Charolais ? La question est plutôt, pourquoi pas ? Les avantages d’utiliser un taureau Charolais sont illimitées. Deux des raisons les plus évidentes d’utiliser un taureau blanc est en premier, la puissance qu’il passeà leur progéniture et de deux, tout simplement la couleur. Le taureau Charolais peut être croiséà n’importe quelle vache commerciale car ils sont polyvalents et ajoutent toujours de la puissance aux

veaux. Au sevrage, les veaux possèdent la taille et la structure désirées pour supporter du poids supplémentaire et ainsi contribuer à un plus grand profit. Les veaux issus d’un taureau blanc se distinguent naturellement sans l’aide d’une étiquette d’oreille. Le gène blanc dominant ne laisse aucun doute sur l’origine des animaux. L’acheteur connait bien le produit qu’il achète, sans avoir

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DE LA CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE, SUITE DE LA PAGE 14

de doute. En plus ce qui est évident au regard, l’Associationcanadienne Charolais est dirigée par un Conseil d’éleveurs progressifs depuis sa créationqui a toujours mis l’accent sur l’amélioration génétique. En conséquence, nous avons une base saine de 1,2 millions de généalogies et plus de 1 million de données de performance. Par le biais de divers programmes, y compris notre enrôlement complet de troupeauactuel et la recherche en cours à Kinsella, les éleveurs de Charolais soumettent continuellement des données précieuses. Au cours des années, les poids à la naissance ont baissé, tandis que la facilité au vêlage, le poids au sevrage et le poids à un an sesont tous améliorés. Lorsque les données sont regroupées ensemble et évaluées, nous avons un outil de sélection très puissant et scientifiquement utilisables. Si vous avez toujours des

hésitations au sujet de l’utilisation des EPD, considérez cette mise à point de Sean McGrath, de RanchingSystems: « pour toutes les races, les bovins sont bâtis par les éleveurs et par leurs décisions. Les EPD actuels sont le résultat d’une longue évolution et ils vont continuer à évoluer et à s’améliorer. Certes, il peut y avoir des arguments concernant la direction queles éleveurs ont choisi au fil du temps, mais il ne peut y avoir aucun argument au sujet de l’efficacité des EPD pour classer les animaux pour un caractère spécifique. Les plus groschiffres sont souvent confondus avec les meilleurs chiffres, ce qui est regrettable, mais le EPD entant qu’outil de classement est toutefois neuf fois plus efficace qu’un indicede troupeau ou un poids ajusté pour identifier le classement génétique correcte des animaux pour un caractère. Avant d’ajouter des nouveaux membres à votre équipe de taureaux Charolais Connection • March 2019

ce printemps, discuter de vos besoins avec vos collègues éleveurs, vos voisins et prenez le temps de découvrir les prix aux encans pour les veaux beiges ou les veaux gris. Identifiez ce qui convient à votre programme, il y en a pour tous les goûts. Planifiez de vous joindre à nous pour des visites de troupeau et des journées champêtres qui se déroulent partout au pays. Vous verrez que non seulement notre produit est consistant et rentable, mais les éleveurs qui sont derrières le bétail, sont parmi nos atouts les plus indispensables. L’assemblée générale annuelle de l’Association est le 10 juin à Saskatoon (Saskatchewan) ; prenez-s ’y part et rencontrer ceux qui forment la fondation de la race. Consultez le site www.charolais.com pour les ventes et les évènements à venir. La race Charolais offre des performances éprouvées. Distinguezvous. UTILISEZ CHAROLAIS. 15


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MANAGEMENT

Photosensitization in Cattle Heather Smith Thomas

Caused by reaction to certain plants eaten by cattle, Photosensitization is a serious skin disease. Dermatitis (inflammation of the skin) develops when the animal is exposed to sunlight. The damage is due to sensitization of unpigmented skin, which is unprotected from ultraviolet rays, according to Stan W. Casteel, DVM, PhD, veterinary toxicologist at University of Missouri. “The skin sensitivity can also be caused by any plants or fungi that create liver damage,” says Robert Cope, veterinarian at Salmon, Idaho. “When the liver malfunctions, toxins build up instead of being filtered out, and get into the blood.” Certain plants contain substances that intensify or induce reaction to sunlight—and can cause photosensitization when they reach the skin. Pink (unpigmented) skin is the most severely affected. “The easiest way to diagnose photosensitization and differentiate it from other skin problems is to see if there’s a pattern to the lesions, since dark skin is unaffected. There’s abrupt difference where light and dark skin meet,” explains Cope. The problem is most common in white-faced or white animals but he’s also seen it in a red bull. “That bull was moving slowly and in pain, but the cause of his problem wasn’t obvious until I felt his back and discovered swollen skin,” says Cope. Photosensitization has also been seen on the muzzles of Limousin cattle, where skin is lighter. This problem is most common in summer when sunlight is intense and animals are eating green plants. “There is more ultraviolet light penetrating the atmosphere in summer,” says Cope. Some cases occur in early spring when grass is short and animals are hungry for something green, eating strange plants they might otherwise avoid. Several plants contain 36

photodynamic agents that are absorbed by the blood after cattle eat them, and travel to the skin. These chemicals are light-activated, sensitizing skin cells to effects of ultraviolet radiation. Patricia Talcott, Washington State University, says plants causing photosensitization directly include St. Johnswort, buckwheat, giant rain lily and smartweed. These plants contain the photo-active compounds. Secondary photosensitization, due to liver damage, is more common. Casteel says 90% of cases in cattle are due to liver damage. “In some regions ryegrass is associated with photosensitization, but we don’t know if it’s a primary cause or due to liver damage,” he says. Plants that cause liver damage include tansy ragwort or groundsel, rattlebox, fiddleneck, heliotrope, comfrey, hounds-tongue, blue thistle, paintbrush, cocklebur, sneezeweed, bitterweed, birdsfoot trefoil, Kochia or fireweed, mushrooms, rapeseed, tarbush, mustard, horsebrush, panic grasses, puncture vine, sacahulste, agava, bog asphodel, signal grass, bermudagrass, alalfa, buttercup, bishop’s weed, spring parsley and lantana. Poisonous plants often damage the liver (the body’s main filter, screening out harmful substances). In an animal with damaged liver, normal body metabolism may cause photosensitization because byproducts of plant digestion accumulate in skin tissues instead of being cleared through the liver. Casteel says that in the normal cow eating green plants, one of the rumen metabolites of chlorophyl is phylloerythrin, a photosensitizing agent. “If the liver is doing its job, it filters out and excretes this material in bile, into the intestines; it never gets into peripheral circulation.” When liver function is impaired, by-products of chlorophyll Charolais Connection • March 2019

spill into the blood, reaching small vessels in the skin. “When too much phylloerythrin moves into the skin, photosensitization occurs when sunshine hits the skin. This type of photosensitization is most common when grazing green pastures, but can also occur in animals fed hay,” says Casteel. There is enough chlorophyll (the green matter in plants that accomplishes photosynthesis) in some hay or hay pellets to produce critical levels of phylloerythrin in tissues of animals suffering from liver malfunction. Impaired liver can be due to toxic plants, molds, leptospirosis, or obstruction of bile ducts by flukes, tapeworm cysts or tumors. Many liver problems are caused by fluke damage. Talcott says that anything affecting the liver’s ability to metabolize or excrete harmful compounds through the bile system predisposes the animal to photosensitivity. Symptoms Unpigmented skin is most affected, especially if hair is short, wherever it is exposed to sunlight, such as on the face, back and sides, or on the udder when the animal is lying down. If the condition is severe, you’ll see changes in pigmented areas as well, but it affects unpigmented skin first. Penetration of light rays into sensitized tissue causes cell death, swelling and itching. “It first looks like sunburn but gets worse, becoming red and swollen, continued on page 38


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developing blisters and cracks that ooze. Skin becomes scaly, or develops thick crusts and painful scabs. The animal is depressed, goes off feed, loses weight, and is in pain when in sunshine,” says Talcott. Affected animals try to stay in the shade. Teats may become cracked and painful; a cow may kick her calf when it tries to suckle. Mastitis may develop, from bacterial contamination. The animal may become sick, and patches of skin slough off. If the animal has a white face, eyelids may swell and eyes water. Breathing can be impaired by swelling around the face. If skin lesions become extensive or severe, temperature and pulse rate rise and in serious cases the animal may go into shock. Risk Factors Cases vary with weather and growing conditions. Talcott sees affected cattle every spring and summer, but generally only a small number in a group. “It can be a problem when livestock are first put on pasture. The liver may have difficulty metabolizing all that chlorophyll, especially if there’s impairment from previous injury,” she says. The problem can also be due to eating certain weeds, or alfalfa hay. “Toxicity of hay varies with growing conditions and stage of maturity at harvest. We see the most 38

problems in wet years or if hay is overly mature and put up in wet, humid conditions,” says Casteel. Photosensitization has been seen in cattle on wheat stubble, if they were on hay all winter and then turned in on a green field. “With the sudden change they don’t have a handle on excess chlorophyll. The photosensitization is due to over-supply of chlorophyll or poor metabolism of it. The ruminant animal needs time to adapt to the green feed.” In one situation, 35 Simmental heifers developed photosensitization and wouldn’t let their calves nurse because their udders were sore. Their white faces and udders were affected. Some wouldn’t eat. One 4-H show heifer sloughed off her two front teats. Genetics may be involved. Talcott tells of a Charolais cow sloughing skin off her face, and she was the only case in a group of 40 eating the same feed. “Historically, the only animals on that farm that have shown photosensitization were her mother and one of her own calves. There may be a genetic factor in how the liver metabolizes certain products,” explains Talcott. Treatment If an individual develops photosensitization, it should be removed from the pasture or feed that caused it, and put in a barn out of the Charolais Connection • March 2019

sunshine, to halt further reaction in the skin. That animal can be let out at nights to graze. “When treating an affected animal, steroids like dexamethasone can reduce inflammation, soreness and swelling, but should not be given to a pregnant animal in the last trimester of gestation, or it may cause abortion,” says Cope. Steroids should only be given if the animal has a lot of discomfort, since these drugs suppress the immune system. If a large area is affected and painful, Banamine can ease pain. Most veterinarians also recommend a systemic antibiotic such as LA-200 to combat infections in skin or liver. The need for antibiotics will depend on how sick the animal is. Photosensitization is like a massive burn. The animal should be treated with intravenous fluids if there is depression and shock. Soothing ointments can be applied to raw areas to help prevent itching and pain, and prevent infection. “Mild cases can be alleviated just by getting the animal out of the sun during the day, until healing is well begun,” says Cope. “Most affected animals make a complete recovery, except for residual scarring. If the problem is caused by liver damage, the animal may react to sunlight again in the future when eating certain plants.”


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MANAGEMENT

Crossbreeding systems for beef production Source: Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Fact Sheet written by: Joanne Handley – Beef Program Lead, Genetics/OMAFRA; Tom Hamilton – Beef Program Lead, Production Systems/OMAFRA; Stephen P. Miller – Animal and Poultry Science/University of Guelph

Commercial producers can improve productivity and efficiency by understanding and applying genetic principles. Improvement through genetics can be achieved using two different methods: 1. Selection 2. Crossbreeding In order for commercial producers raising straightbred, single breed cattle to make genetic improvement, they must utilize selection, and provide an optimal environment for those cattle selected to express their genetic potential. Selection is an excellent tool with traits of moderate to high heritability such as growth rate and carcass traits. However, some of the most important traits related to beef cattle production, such as reproductive rate and calf survival, are of low heritability. This means the success of selection programs for these traits will be very limited. Crossbreeding provides advantages from two main components, heterosis and complementarity. Heterosis (hybrid vigour) occurs when different breeds are mated together. One way to look at heterosis is that all purebred cattle are considered inbred as a result of breed formation and selection. Inbreeding leads to a reduction in performance, i.e. inbreeding depression. When different breeds are mated the crossbred progeny are less inbred than their parents. As a result the calves perform at a level above the average of their parents. This is heterosis, or hybrid vigour. Traits with lower heritability tend to exhibit high heterosis. Therefore, heterosis is more important for key traits relating to reproductive efficiency and calf survival, which have low heritabilities and do not respond well to selection (Table 1). Each breed has it strengths and weaknesses. Complementarity results when desirable characteristics from different breeds are combined into a crossbred. Crossbreeding achieves a higher frequency of desirable characteristics among crossbreds than that found in either single parent breed. An example of complementarity would be mating a Charolais bull (growth and retail yield) to a Gelbvieh Angus cross cow. The result — the cow has the milk and the fertility, and the calf has more growth/retail yield. The characteristics gained from the mating Table 1. Heritability and Heterosis (Hybrid Vigour) Comparison Traits

Heritability Heterosis

fertility, mothering ability, calf survival

low

high

birth and weaning weight, milking ability and feedlot gain

medium

medium

mature weight, carcass quality

high

low

complement each other. This effect of breed difference is powerful, but the choice of individuals from within a breed is also very important. Poor choices of breeds and animals from within a breed will have a lasting impact on the success of any crossbreeding plan(Table 1). Heterosis in a sound crossbreeding program can increase productivity in the beef cow herd by 20%–25% over a comparable straight breeding program. To fully utilize the potential of a crossbreeding program, the cows themselves must be crossbred. Crossbred cows, when compared with straightbred cows, make better mothers. Crossbred cows wean approximately 15% more pounds of calf/cow exposed than straightbreds (Table 2). Another advantage is longevity and lifetime production. Research in Nebraska shows lifetime production and longevity of Hereford X Angus cows (3,258 lbs. weaned over 11 years) and Angus X Hereford cows (3,514 lbs. weaned over 10.6 years) was significantly greater than straightbred Angus (2,837 lbs. weaned over 9.4 years) or Herefords (2,405 lbs. weaned over 8.4 years). The advantages of crossbred calves due to heterosis are also significant (Table 3). An optimum breeding system utilizes both methods of genetic improvement, with the mating of selected, genetically superior individuals in a well-planned crossbreeding program. This exploits both heterosis and complementarity. Table 2. Heterosis Boost with Crossbred Cows • 10% increase in conception rate • 10% improvement in calving ease • 7.5% increase in number of calves raised to weaning • 5–10% increase in milk yield Cumulative Effect = 15% increase in pounds weaned/cow exposed. Table 3. Heterosis Advantage of Crossbred Calves • 5% increase in number calves surviving to weaning. • 5% heavier weaning weights • 3% increase in postweaning gain Combined Advantage = 10% more pounds weaned/calf born

Herd Level Production Improvements From Selection Or Crossbreeding When calculating, at the herd level, the benefits from heterosis or selection over time, several factors have to be taken into account. Progress due to selection depends not only on the heritability of the trait, but also the intensity of selection, the genetic variation in the population, and the rate at which selected animals enter the herd (replacement rate). This makes the realization of benefits from selection a relatively slow process. continued on page 42

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In contrast, benefits from heterosis are expressed at maximum value in each crossbred animal. This means that the payback from starting a crossbreeding system occurs much more quickly than from starting a selection program. For calf traits, maximum herd level heterosis benefits can be realized in the first year of a crossbreeding program, if all calves are crosses. Figure 1 shows the expected economic benefits due to either selection or crossbreeding over a 5 year period, for the trait of calf livability (calves weaned/calves born). This trait has low heritability, but high heterosis potential. This example illustrates the difficulty in improving traits of low heritability through selection. Even after 5 years, the value of improvement from selection is very low (<$500 per herd), compared with benefits from heterosis (>$13,500). This represents a 34% increase in productivity due to heterosis, compared with the base straightbred herd. The economic benefit from increased calf livability in this case is 41 times greater for a crossbreeding program than for a selection program, over the first 5 years. Figure 2 shows the anticipated benefits over time when these two different genetic strategies are used to increase weaning weight. This trait has moderate heritability and moderate heterosis potential. It is typically featured in selection programs in the industry. Although improvement in weaning weight through selection is significant, crossbreeding will result in twice the amount of economic benefit over the initial 5 years.

Figure 1. Value of Additional Production Due to Selection or Crossbreeding to I mprove Calf Livability(1,2,3)

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1 Accounts for heritability, selection intensity, genetic variation, cow replacement rate (20%), and parental contributions of sires and dams. Sires selected from top 10 % of population and replacement females from top 40% of heifer calves, for the trait of interest. 2 Heterosis from implementation of a 3 breed rotational crossing program in a straightbred herd. Combination of heterosis due to crossbred calves and retention of crossbred replacement heifers in the herd 3 Calves valued at $1.00/lb, base straightbred herd of 100 cows with 90% conception rate, 90% calf liveability and 500lb weaning weight. Base herd production value of $40,500 per year.

purchasing hybrid females as a means of initiating a crossbreeding program were considered, the benefits from heterosis would accumulate even more quickly. It is important to note that both selection and crossbreeding may be practiced at the same time. A strategic plan which utilized both crossbreeding and selection would optimize the use of genetics in the beef herd. Crossbreeding Systems Crossbreeding is an effective method of improving efficiency of production in commercial cow-calf herds. However, commercial cattle producers should study crossbreeding systems and evaluate them before deciding which one is suitable for their environment and resources. Table 4 outlines basic properties of crossbreeding systems to keep in mind when considering a program. Table 4. Criteria for Evaluating Crossbreeding Systems • Level of hybrid vigour (heterosis) • Merit of component breeds • Complementarity • Consistency of performance

Figure 2. Value of Additional Weaning Weight Due to Selection or Crossbreeding (1)

Accounts for heritability, selection intensity, genetic variation, cow replacement rate (20%), and parental contributions of sires and dams. Sires selected from top 10 % of population and replacement females from top 40% of heifer calves, for the trait of interest. Three of the key production traits in cow-calf systems are conception rate, calf livability and weaning weight. The cumulative combined impact of heterosis for these traits, over an initial 5–year period, would be an improvement of 16% in value of production, relative to a base straightbred herd. In contrast, a selection program would be expected to increase value of production by only 3%, relative to the base herd (assuming that selection for multiple traits was as efficient as for a single trait). This demonstrates the very large potential benefits of crossbreeding in cow-calf production. If the option of 1

Charolais Connection • March 2019

• Deals with genetic antagonisms • Meets end-product target

In general, crossbreeding systems fall into 2 categories, those that produce replacement females as well as market cattle (rotational & composite systems), and those that produce only market cattle (terminal cross). In rotational (or composite) systems, bulls must be selected with maternal traits in mind as well as growth and carcass traits, since replacement heifers are retained from within the herd. Terminal systems allow for greater emphasis on selection for growth and carcass traits in bulls since female replacements are supplied from outside the herd. The genetic merit of a terminal bull for maternal traits is of no consequence since his female progeny will not be bred. Calving ease must be considered regardless of the type of crossing system.


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HERD HEALTH

Dart Guns – Advantages and Disadvantages Roy Lewis, DVM

Remote drug delivery devices (RDD) are becoming more commonly used in some modern day cow/calf operations. The older style capture guns used in the past were generally used by veterinarians to tranquilize and “capture“ cattle that needed further treatment. They could then be loaded and transported if that was necessary or put in a smaller compound if further treatment was necessary. Capture guns have also been used by veterinarians no capture escaped stock in areas where there are no collection corrals. Wildlife officers also use these same capture guns with potent capture drugs to catch and relocate wildlife. This article will go over the advantages and disadvantages or relying on these RDD for treating cattle. This primarily pertains to cattle on large pastures where the ability to restrain and examine cattle is limited. Strong, elusive or fractious bulls may even see these devices used on them. ` Initially the older capture guns were cumbersome and had hard metal darts that could inflict lots of damage. Today’s modern RDD (capture rifles and handguns) shoot lightweight darts that are loaded easily and are very accurate to shoot. The two I am most familiar with are the Dan-Inject system and the Pneu-Dart system. Both have darts that can take up to 10 cc of product each and have projection systems that accurately deliver product up to 20-30 meters away. Wind must be taken into account when firing these. The greatest issue with these RDD devices: is the diagnosis made properly from a distance. There is no close examination and identification of the animal may be difficult. Also does the delivery device put the product where it needs to go from a Verified Beef Production standpoint? Can we get the proper dosage delivered? 46

If you are going to use products especially prescription in these devices your veterinarian should work out the protocols for the specific conditions you can treat with these remote devices. The beauty with today’s modern medicines are a number of the products have low dosages, long lasting capabilities and most are approved subcutaneously. The darts can be used with shorter needles so although not a guarantee, most of the product can get delivered subcutaneously. Shooting from the side on mature animals the neck or shoulder area is a decent target with these accurate rifles. One must take into account whether darting a calf, yearling, cow or bull realizing the skin thickness is very different between these groups. Be ever cognizant of where the jugular vein is. Some products, if given intravenously, are most likely to cause a severe allergic reaction. Always have epinephrine on hand any time antibiotics or anything is being injected. If hit up over the shoulder I have seen instances where animals limp for a few days. Here the shoulder blade may have been hit. Never dart cattle on the run if possible. From our producers and ranchers viewpoints these dart guns offer easy and timely treatments: labor savings and very minimal stress on the cattle that are darted. If the right treatment is given even one day or several hours earlier than it would normally be, treatment response is improved. Fewer treatments may be necessary and it can be much less stressful than roping and stretching the cattle out in order to treat. The darts come out shortly after contact so can be gathered up. Some darts are one time usage others are reusable. They are colorful so seldom are lost. One needs to work out with your veterinarian standard SOPs for common pasture conditions with prescriptions as necessary. Charolais Connection • March 2019

A couple of worries as a veterinarian are that we might have some cattle treated unnecessarily and a lack of prudent usage of antimicrobials. Since looking from a distance the wrong diagnosis could be made. We are also limited to the low dosage long acting antimicrobials that will fit into one dart. The beauty here is on lameness, so we can watch a couple days for natural improvement and then treat if necessary. Carry a good set of binoculars so you can at least make a good visual exam. One person does all the locating, identifying, diagnosing and treating in a cost effective manner. If a serious ailment and one that requires further testing or diagnosing, then it is advisable to catch and remove to a treatment area. That is the sort of decision you as the person in charge of animal health must deal with on a case-by-case, dayby-day basis. I would advise if one treatment does not show improvement that cattle get removed or caught so a proper diagnosis and complete treatment can be given. Lots of potential use and labor savings for you producers with some negatives such, as over treatment or product not delivered where it should be. All these negatives deserve consideration. Although you don’t need a firearms safety course be careful because they are like a real gun. If never handled guns before a firearms safety course may be a good idea. It is imperative you get the ID of the animals and record the treatment and also record where the animal was hit. Have very legible ear tags and the binoculars will help with identification. Try to retrieve all the used darts so watch closely after the dart is in. Darts will generally fall out after a few steps and they have very visible tails. I would say understand the labels, withdrawals of product, don’t over continued on page 48


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HERD HEALTH, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 46

treat or treat unnecessarily and work with your veterinarian. The RDDs may have more of a role into the future as they may be used for vaccinations or giving nutritive supplements in some instances and even some dewormers or painkillers

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on an emergency basis. Again your veterinarian does the SOPs. If necessary to treat and timeliness is of the essence the RDD may be able to help you out but proceed with caution and know your equipment. A treatment(dart) gun is a tool to be

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2019

used at the appropriate time and for appropriate conditions. Really try to avoid using the rump wherever possible. Lots of things to consider before pulling out the dart gun but it is a tool on remote large pastures, or pastures with no handling facilities.


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CANADIAN CHAROLAIS YOUTH ASSOCIATION NEWS

CCYA 2019 to Host International Youth Shelby Evans, President

Hey everyone, hopefully you are all doing your best in this cold weather and busy calving season! Just to get you thinking more about summer, the CCYA has some very exciting news about the upcoming conference in Weyburn, SK this year we would like to share! Due to the drought conditions in Australia, they are unable to host the Charolais International Youth Program this year. This means Canada will once again be hosting Charolais CCYA NATIONAL BOARD charolaisyouth@gmail.com President: Shelby Evans sle379@mail.usask.ca Vice-President: Keegan Blehm keegb34@yahoo.ca Treasurer: Tyson Black blackbern@hotmail.com Secretary: Raelynne Rosso littlerosso@hotmail.ca

youth members from around the world at our conference this summer! This was an incredible experience for both the International members last year, as well as for us Canadians. I’m sure all of our members learned as much from the other country’s representatives as they did from us. It will be very exciting to have many new perspectives on fitting, judging, showing, and the Charolais breed at our National Junior show once again! The conference in Weyburn will also have a “Little Char” program, similar

Director: Bret Marshall blm5012@cesd73.ca Director: Lindsay Verwey Lindsay.verwey16@gmail.com Director: Reegan McLeod Reeganmc11@gmail.com Director: Bradley Fergus bradleyfergus3@gmail.com Ex-Officio: Shae-Lynn Evans evans32s@uregina.ca

to last year. This program gives our younger Junior aged members an opportunity to learn the basics and have some extra fun! So make sure to mark July 24th – 27th on your calendar because Weyburn, SK will be the place to be. It is going to be one you do not want to miss! I hope to see you around at bull sales this spring and definitely in Weyburn this summer! For more information on CCYA and our programs, check out our website at youth.charolais.com or find us on Facebook and Twitter@charolaisyouth!

2019 CCYA Conference & Show Exec. President: Dale Weinbender Vice-President: Shelby Evans Treasurer: Raelynne Rosso Secretary: Kylie Beck CCYA Provincial Advisors SK: Jill Debenham kidsandcows@sasktel.net ON: Karen Black blackbern@hotmail.com MB: Jeff & Jackie Cavers tobbagirl@yahoo.ca AB: Kasey Phillips | kphillips@mcsnet.ca Youth Coordinator: Kirstin Sparrow kp.sparrow@hotmail.com

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MANAGEMENT

Low Stress Weaning Methods Ensure Healthier Calves Heather Smith Thomas

Weaning is often traumatic for calves and their mamas, but in the past 25 years, many stockmen have found better ways to wean than putting calves in a corral and taking their mothers away. Weaning creates physical and emotional (insecurity) stress for the calf, and the emotional stress is harder on him than suddenly being deprived of milk. A big calf doesn’t need milk, but still feels dependent on mama, and insecure without her. If confined in a weaning pen, calves pace the fence and bawl, often running frantically back and forth. If corrals are dry, this churns up dust that can irritate respiratory passages and open the way for respiratory infections. The calf is doubly susceptible to respiratory problems at this time because stress hinders the immune system. Ron Gill, Texas A&M, says weaning methods make a big difference in calves’ future health and performance. “If breeders use two-stage weaning (with nose flaps), which many smaller operators can readily do, this is the least stressful way to wean—for both the calves and cows. More people ought to try this. Next best is fenceline weaning. You can keep the cows and calves on pasture with just have a fence between them,” says Gill. “If you have to wean in a corral, the third best way is to have the cows through the corral fence from the calves. Some people just haul the calves somewhere to a better set of corrals and put them on feed. If those calves aren’t accustomed to eating the new feed it can be a challenge. They’re not used to the feed, the strange environment, and the sudden emotional stress (loss of mom), and this puts them more at risk for respiratory issues.” Nose Flaps A dozen years ago an innovative 54

anti-sucking device was created to make weaning easier. The plastic nose flaps, or nose paddles can be installed in seconds, with calves restrained in a chute, then the calves are returned to their mothers. The flap hangs down over the nose and mouth, preventing the calf from getting a teat into his mouth, but does not hinder eating grass/hay or drinking water. The calf can’t suckle, but is not emotionally upset because he’s still with mama. He has her companionship and protection during the weaning process. She starts to dry up, and the calf adjusts to not having milk. About 5 days later the cows and calves can be completely separated from one another and the flaps removed. Studies at University of Saskatchewan and Montana State University in 2005 showed that this 2-step weaning process resulted in much less stress than traditional weaning methods. Dr. Joseph Stookey (Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan) was one of the people who invented this device. He says that when the study compared the two methods there was a huge difference between the two groups in how they handled weaning. Two-step weaning works well because of the way cattle are biologically programmed. “Mammals readily adjust to the milk being shut off, but are not prepared for mom and milk to disappear at the same time,” says Stookey. Cattle are herd animals, and calves look to adults for security. If a calf can stay with mama and Charolais Connection • March 2019

the social group through weaning, he is not stressed. In nature, calves are weaned when the cow kicks them off before the next calf is born, and the weanling tags along with mom and the herd. “There’s always the occasional smart calf who can figure out the nose flap and still get a teat in his mouth— but the vast majority don’t. You only need to leave the flaps in the nose for 4 to 7 days. Then when you separate the pairs it is unbelievable how at ease they are. They go about their business without worrying where mama is or baby is,” says Stookey. “Our research with nose flaps was dramatic. One of our students had asked a simple question: what does the calf miss most—the milk or the mother? When we did the study and took away the milk, none of the calves were very upset. Then when we took away the mother a few days later they didn’t miss her either, and we realized we’d already weaned the calves, in the presence of the mother; that was the big difference. This was an amazing revelation about the weaning process,” he says. Pasture Weaning On green pasture calves do better than in a corral, since they are accustomed to eating grass and don’t go off feed as much as when changed to hay and concentrates. Jim Gerrish, continued on page 56


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a grazing consultant in Idaho and former specialist with University of Missouri’s Forage Systems Research Center, pasture-weaned calves for more than 15 years in Missouri. Calves were put in a pasture with woven wire fence they could not crawl through, and kept there 2 or 3 days after being taken from their mothers. “They did a bit of walking, but when we put them out on better pasture after the second or third day they went right to grazing. We weaned about 200 calves each year this way and had no sick calves,” says Gerrish. The calves gained, on average, 1.6 pounds per day during the pasture-weaning period, with no supplemental feeds. Fenceline Weaning Fenceline weaning, especially at pasture, helps minimize emotional stress because calves can be next to their mothers, even though they can’t nurse. This involves putting cows and calves in separate but adjacent pastures for a few days, so calves can still see their mothers (next to them through the fence). There isn’t as much frantic pacing and bawling as in corral weaning, and the calves have green pasture when they got hungry. By the third or fourth day, after the pairs are not so eager to get back together, you can move the cows farther away. The calves weaned on pasture never quit gaining. They also have less stress and health problems. With this weaning method (as with nose-flap weaning), you can vaccinate calves the same day you wean, since there is less risk of sickness and less failure to build good immune response due to stress. By contrast, corral weaning programs sometimes experience a standstill in weight for a few days (even while being fed expensive feeds). Also, the calves need to be vaccinated a couple weeks ahead of weaning to have good immunity by the time they are stressed. Fenceline weaning works well if fencing is secure enough to keep animals from going through it. A pole fence, or netting that’s tall 56

enough the cows can’t reach over to mash it down, portable panels, or several strands of hot wire, will generally work. Kit Pharo, at Cheyenne Wells, Colorado, has been using fenceline weaning for many years. “We move pairs into the pasture a few days ahead, so the calves will be staying in familiar surroundings. They locate the water sources and perimeter fences while still with their mothers,” he says. The primary water source should be near the fence, close to the adjacent pasture where their mothers will be after separation. Don’t have corners in the dividing fence where animals could bunch up. “On weaning day we allow pairs to finish their morning grazing. Then we slowly bring them to our sorting corral and leave them awhile to let them mother up and nurse one last time. When we come back, we quietly sort the cows out one gate into their pasture and calves out the other gate into theirs. Most cows are ready to file out when you open their gate, knowing they are going to fresh pasture. If you are patient the herd will essentially sort itself. Calves are easy to hold back and let out the other gate,” explains Pharo. “We leave 2 or 3 dry cows with the calves to provide reassurance and leadership. Since the calves are returning to the same pasture they came from, they usually aren’t bothered and it may take a couple hours before cows and calves go searching for one another. As soon as they meet at the fence, their anxiety disappears. Often you’ll see a cow and her calf lying on opposite sides of the fence, chewing their cud,” he says. They go graze, and come back periodically to check on one another. “After 3 days, fewer cows come back to the fence. They know were their calves are, but are less concerned about them. Likewise, calves begin to realize they don’t need their mothers anymore. We wait at least 4 days before we move the cows clear away. By this time they are usually so eager to go to fresh pasture that all we have to do is open the gates ahead of them. Very few want to turn back for their Charolais Connection • March 2019

calves. If the cows are not ready, we leave them another day or two,” says Pharo. Minimize Stress When Corral Weaning “Whatever you can do to reduce stress and risk for disease is helpful,” says Gill. “When weaning in a corral, I recommend creep feeding ahead of time, for the last 30 days—or have some kind of feed the calves are accustomed to eating before you separate them from their mothers. Even if you put some feed out and let the cows eat some of it, this pays off because the calves learn to eat it,” he says. They mimic their mothers. “Another thing you can do is spend time with those calves in the corrals or pastures. This gets them accustomed to seeing people, and is also distracting. Calves are curious about the person and not just focusing on mom across the fence or worrying about where she is. You become the surrogate for mom. The calves start looking to you for comfort. This calms them down a lot quicker,” says Gill. “It always helps to infuse yourself into the weaning process. You become the caregiver and the calves focus on you. You simply walk through them quietly every day after you get them in for weaning. They are in panic mode and looking for guidance. When you give them something to focus on, you can stop all the walking and bawling; you can get those calves to stop pacing the fence and respond to you, which takes a lot of stress away from them.” It takes a little time, but it pays big dividends in less sickness. Most of the calves that get sick are getting sick because they are not eating or drinking enough. “The interaction with people calms them enough that they will then eat and drink. Anyone who is calm around cattle can do this. You just need someone who will spend a little time. It could be a spouse, young family members, just someone who enjoys being with cattle. If you send someone who doesn’t enjoy it, the calves won’t respond as well. They are good at ‘reading’ people.”


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Ralph Retzlaff 403.793.0794 Leonard Retzlaff 403.501.9333 Rosemary, AB • www.saddleridgecharolais.com

Charolais Connection • March 2019

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Ontario Breeders

Kevin, Crystal, Kory & Shaylin Stebeleski P/F 204.234.5425 Cell 204.365.6010 Box 266, Oakburn, MB R0J 1L0 | happyhavencharolais@gmail.com

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Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2019


Quebec Breeders

Rollin’ Acres Charolais Full French Charolais 598516 2nd Line, Mulmur, ON L9V 0B6 chester.tupling@premierequipment.ca Chester Tupling 519.925.2938 C 705.627.0672

“Breeding the Cattle that Work in Both Rings.”

Saskatchewan Breeders

Charolais Connection • March 2019

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Wendall & Leanne Weston Box 206, Maidstone, SK S0M 1M0 • wlweston@sasktel.net

Tel 306.893.4510 • Cell 306.893.7801

Be Wise. Advertise. Your ad should be here. 306.584.7937 64

Charolais Connection • March 2019


USA Breeders

Advertise your program here. Call today! 306.584.7937 IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES IN OUR INDUSTRY

Calendar of Events February 27 Beck Farms & McCoy Cattle Co. 10th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Milestone, SK

March 2 Chomiak Charolais 15th Annual Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Viking (AB) Auction Market

March 7 Buffalo Lake Charolais 13th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Stettler (AB) Auction Mart

February 27 Saddleridge Charolais with Kaiser Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping, Brooks, AB

March 3 ”The Legacy Bull Sale” Legacy Charolais with BOB Charolais 2nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Botha, AB

March 8 15th Annual Northern Classic Bull Sale, Grand Prairie, AB

March 1 M & L Cattle Company Bull Sale, 7:00 p.m., at the farm, Indian River, ON March 1 38th Annual Select Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart March 2 Ferme Louber 15th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Ste-Marie de Beauce, QC March 2 High Country 45th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Pincher Creek (AB) Ag Grounds March 2 Wrangler Made 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Westlock, AB

March 3-4 100th Pride of the Prairies Bull Show & Sale, Lloydminster (SK) Exhibition Grounds March 4 Acadia Colony Charolais & Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Dryland Trading Corp, Veteran, AB March 5 Built Right 6th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Provost (AB) Livestock Exchange March 5 RRTS Charolais Bull Sale, 12:30 p.m., BC Livestock Co-op, Kamloops, BC

Charolais Connection • March 2019

March 8 CK Sparrow Farms Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Vanscoy, SK March 8 Meridian Agriculture Co. Ltd Charolais & Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Acadia Valley, AB March 9 Horseshoe E Charolais Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Kenaston, SK March 9 Blackbern, WhiteWater & Kirlene Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Renfrew Pontiac Livestock Facility, Cobden, ON March 9 Source for Success Bull Sale, at Elmlodge Herefords, Indian River, ON 65


March 10 Steppler Farms 8th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m. DST, Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB March 11 Palmer Charolais with Nielson Land & Cattle Co. 8th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Bladworth, SK March 12 Harvie Ranching Bull Sale, at the ranch, Olds, AB March 14 Creek’s Edge Land & Cattle Co. 2nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Yellow Creek, SK March 14 McKeary Charolais Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping , Brooks, AB March 14 Lazy S Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., VJV Auction Mart, Beaverlodge, AB March 15 High Bluff Stock Farm Charolais & Simmental Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Inglis, MB 66

March 15 Reese Cattle Co. 10th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart March 15-17 Cody Sibbald Legacy Classic Junior Show, Medicine Hat, AB March 16 Northern Impact VI, North Central Livestock Exchange, Clyde, AB March 16 Pleasant Dawn Charolais 17th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB March 16 Rollin’ Acres/Whiskey Hollow & Guests 9th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Maple Hill Auctions, Hanover, ON March 16 Ferme Palerme Charolais Bull Sale, Vinoy Test Station, 1:00 p.m., at Ferme Gagnon, Cheneville, QC March 16 Select Genetics Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at Forsyth Angus, Herbert, SK

Charolais Connection • March 2019

March 16 Canada’s Red, White & Black Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK March 18 North West Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Kramer’s Big Bid Barn, North Battleford, SK March 18 Neilson Cattle Co. 29th Annual Bull Sale, at the farm, Willowbrook, SK March 18 Grassroots Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Dryland Trading Corp, Veteran, AB March 19 Diamond W Charolais, Red & Black Angus 17th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Minitonas, MB March 20 HTA Charolais & Guest Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB March 21 Elder Charolais 9th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coronach, SK


March 21 Footprint Farms Bull Sale, 3:30 p.m, at the ranch, Esther, AB

March 23 K-Cow Ranch Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the ranch, Elk Point, AB

March 28 RanAMan Ranch 4th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Olds (AB) Auction Mart

March 22 McTavish Farms and Guest 8th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Moosomin, SK

March 23 Tee M Jay Farms 15th Annual Bull Sale, 1 PM, Ashern (MB) Auction Mart

March 28 C2 Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Killarney (MB) Auction Mart

March 24 Best of the Breeds 15th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Yorkton, SK

March 30 Tri-N Charolais Farms 4th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Lenore, MB

March 25 Allanville Farms Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Tisdale, SK

March 30 High Point Charolais Bull Sale, 6:00 p.m., at Sunrise Charolais, Stayner, ON

March 26 Prairie Distinction Charolais 5th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB

March 30 Transcon’s 23rd Annual Advantage Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales

March 26 Poplar Bluff Stock Farm & Twin Anchor Charolais 3rd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Dryland Trading Corp, Veteran, AB

March 30 Alameda Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Alameda (SK) Auction Mart

March 22 Thistle Ridge Ranch Bull Sale, Taber (AB) Agriplex March 23 Impact Angus & Charolais 11th Annual Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales March 23 Cornerview Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Cobden, ON March 23 7th Annual “Thickness Sells” Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Atlantic Stockyards, Truro, NS March 23 Lazy S Cattle Co. Limousin & Charolais Bull Sale, 6:00 p.m., VJV Auction Mart, Rimbey, AB

March 28 Coyote Flats Charolais 4th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coaldale, AB

Charolais Connection • March 2019

March 30 Borderland Cattle Company Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the ranch, Rockglen, SK March 30 Candiac Choice Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Candiac (SK) Auction Mart

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April 1 North of the 49th 16th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at Wilgenbusch Charolais, Halbrite, SK April 2 Cedarlea Farms “Git ‘R Done” Bull Sale, at Windy Willows Angus, Hodgeville, SK April 2 Gilliland Bros. Charolais 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at Chopper K Auction Mart, Alameda, SK April 2 White Lake Colony Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Balog Auction, Lethbridge, AB April 3 White Cap/Rosso Charolais & Howe Red Angus 29th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the Howe Family Farm, Moose Jaw, SK April 4 Hunter Charolais 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Roblin, MB April 4 Ringuette Charolais Annual Bull Sale, 12:00 noon, Atlantic Stock Yards, Truro, NS April 6 Vermilion Charolais Group 33rd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., North Central Livestock, Vermilion, AB 68

April 6 Maritime Bull Test Station Sale, at the test station, Nappan, NS April 6 Saunders Charolais 14th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Keady (ON) Livestock Market April 6 JTA Diamond Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Courval, SK April 8 Cattle Capital Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Ste. Rose (MB) Auction Mart April 9 Top Cut 29th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Stockman’s Weigh Co., Mankota, SK April 11 Sliding Hills Charolais 13th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Canora, SK April 11 Daines Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart April 13 Eastern Select Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Hoards Station Sale Barn, Campbellford, ON

Charolais Connection • March 2019

April 13 Acadia Ranching Charolais & Angus Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping Association, Brooks, AB April 20 Brimner Cattle Co., Cornerstone Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart April 20 Cedardale Charolais 16th Annual Bull & Select Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Nestleton, ON April 20 Lindskov-Thiel Bull Sale, at the ranch, Isabel, SD June 5-9 Canadian Charolais Association Annual General Meeting and Tour, NB, PE, NS June 6 Canadian Charolais Association Annual General Meeting, Moncton, NB June 29 ACA Tour, Vermilion, AB July 24-27 Canadian Charolais Youth Association Conference and Show, Weyburn, SK August 4-12 World Charolais Technical Conference, Republic of Ireland


Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2019

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LOOKING TO FIND SOMEONE?

Advertisers Index Alta Custom Programs .................................59 Amabec Charolais ........................................62 Annuroc Charolais........................................62 B Bar D Charolais..........................................62 Baker Farms ..................................................62 Bar H Charolais .............................................63 Beck Farms....................................................63 BeRich Farms ...............................................60 Blackbern Charolais .....................................62 Bob Charolais ...............................................60 BoJan Enterprises ........................................63 Borderland Cattle Co. .............................39,64 Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. .............................59 Bricney Stock Farms .....................................64 Bridor Charolais............................................62 Brimner Cattle Company ...................26,27,64 Buffalo Lake Charolais ................................60 By Livestock ..3,6,7,9,11,15,26,27,31,34,49,IBC Campbells Charolais .....................................64 Canadian Beef Industry Conference ...........58 Carey, Brent ..................................................59 Cas Bar Farms ...............................................66 Cattle Lac Charolais.................................34,35 Cedardale Charolais ................................55,62 Cedarlea Farms..........................................7,64 Charla Moore Farms................................18,64 CharLew Ranch ...........................................60 CharMaine Ranching ..................................60 Charolais Journal..........................................59 Chartop Charolais ........................................64 Charworth Charolais Farms .........................60 Chomiak Charolais ......................................60 Circle Cee Charolais Farms ...........................60 Cline Cattle Co.........................................37,61 Cockburn Farms............................................62 Cougar Hill Ranch ........................................62 Coyote Flats Charolais.............................31,60 Creek's Edge Land & Cattle Co. ..............11,64 C2 Charolais.............................................29,62 DavisRairdan ...............................................59 Demarah Farms ............................................64 Diamond W Charolais .............................15,64 Dog Patch Acres ...........................................33 Dorran, Ryan ................................................59 Double P Stock Farms .............................34,62 Dowell Charolais ..........................................60 Dubuc Charolais ...........................................63 DudgeonSnobelen Land & Cattle ..............63 Eaton Charolais ............................................65 Echo Spring Charolais ..................................63 Edge, Dean ...................................................59 Elder Charolais Farms................................6,64 Fergus Family Charolais ...............................63 Fischer Charolais...........................................60 Flat Valley Cattle Co................................48,60 Fleury, Michael .............................................59 Flewelling, Craig ..........................................59 Footprint Farms ......................................21,60 Future Farms.................................................60 Gilliland Bros. Charolais ..........................50,64

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Good Anchor Charolais...........................52,60 H.S. Knill Company Ltd. ...............................59 Happy Haven Charolais................................62 Harcourt Charolais .......................................64 Hard Rock Land & Cattle Co. .......................62 Harvie Ranching ..........................................60 HEJ Charolais ...............................................60 Hicks Charolais .............................................63 High Bluff Stock Farm ...............................5,62 Holk Charolais ..............................................60 Hopewell Charolais .................................64,68 Horseshoe E Charolais.............................25,64 Howe Family Farm ..................................43,64 HTA Charolais Farm ..................................3,62 Hunter Charolais ...................................62,IBC JMB Charolais ..............................................62 Johnson Charolais ........................................60 Johnston Charolais .......................................34 Johnstone Auction .......................................59 June Rose Charolais ................................44,64 Kaiser Cattle Co............................................60 KayR Land & Cattle Ltd...............................60 KCH Charolais ...............................................61 Kirlene Cattle ...............................................63 La Ferme Patry de Weedon .........................63 Lakeview Charolais .................................52,53 Land O' Lakes Charolais ...............................63 Langstaff Charolais ......................................63 Lazy S Limousin & Charolais ........................23 Leemar Charolais..........................................60 Legacy Charolais...........................................60 LEJ Charolais.......................................34,38,62 LindskovThiel Charolais Ranch ...................65 M & L Cattle Co. ...........................................63 Mack's Charolais...........................................63 Maple Leaf Charolais ...................................60 Martens Cattle Co. .......................................64 Martens Charolais ........................................62 McAvoy Charolais Farm ..........................17,64 McKay Charolais ...........................................62 McKeary Charolais .......................................60 McLeod Livestock .........................................59 McTavish Farms........................................16,64 Medonte Charolais.......................................63 Miller Land & Livestock...........................48,63 Mission Ridge Herefords..............................51 Misty Hills Charolais .....................................52 Murphy Livestock .........................................61 Mutrie Farms ...........................................44,64 Myhre Land and Cattle ................................62 Nahachewsky Charolais ...............................64 Neilson Cattle Co..........................................57 Norheim Ranching .......................................59 P & H Ranching Co. ......................................61 Packer Charolais ...........................................63 Palmer Charolais ..........................................64 Parklane Charolais .......................................61 Phillips Farms...........................................18,64 Pleasant Dawn Charolais ..........................9,62 Poplar Bluff Stock Farm ...............................37

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2019

Potter Charolais............................................63 Prairie Cove Charolais ..................................61 Prairie Gold Charolais .............................64,67 ProChar Charolais .......................................61 Qualman Charolais ......................................64 R & G McDonald Livestock......................34,35 Raffan, Don ..................................................59 Rammer Charolais ..........................................3 Rawes Ranches .............................................61 Rebuild with Steel ........................................59 Reeleder, Andrew.........................................59 Reese Cattle Co. ...........................................13 Rollin' Acres Charolais .................................63 Ross Lake Charolais ......................................61 Rosso Charolais........................................43,65 Royale Charolais ...........................................63 RRTS Charolais ..............................................61 Runaway Ranch ............................................23 Saddleridge Farming Co. .............................61 SanDan Charolais Farms ..............................61 Saunders Charolais ..................................41,63 Serhienko/Voegeli Cattle Co........................65 Sharodon Farms ...........................................63 Silver Creek Farms ........................................49 Skeels, Danny ...............................................59 Sliding Hills Charolais..............................51,65 Southside Charolais......................................61 Southview Farms ..........................................63 CK Sparrow Farms .......................................IFC Springside Farms ..........................................61 Spruce View Charolais.............................12,61 Stach Farms Charolais ..................................61 Stephen Charolais Farm ...............................65 Steppler Farms Ltd. .....................................62 Stock, Mark...................................................59 Sugarloaf Charolais ......................................61 Sunblade Charolais ......................................34 Sunshine Oak Charolais ...............................62 T Bar C Cattle Co. ...........17,29,33,57,59,66,69 Temple Farms................................................65 Thistle Ridge Ranch......................................61 Transcon Livestock Corp..........................50,59 TriN Charolais .........................................49,62 Turnbull Charolais ........................................61 Twin Anchor Charolais ............................37,61 Valanjou Charolais .......................................12 Wendt & Murray Farms Ltd. ........................61 Western Litho ...............................................59 White Lake Colony ..................................45,61 White Meadow Charolais Ltd......................62 WhiteWater Livestock..................................63 Wilgenbusch Charolais ........................65,OBC Wilkie Ranch.................................................61 Windy Willows Farms.....................................7 Wood River Charolais .............................47,65 Wrangler Charolais ......................................61 WRAZ Red Angus ....................................26,27 XXX Farms ....................................................52


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march 2019 Charolais Connection  

march 2019 Charolais Connection