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Charolais Connection • February 2020

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contents

The Charolais Connection 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Ph. (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Home Page: http://www.charolaisbanner.com email: charolaisbanner@gmail.com ISSN 0824-1767 Helge By, Manager/Publisher Candace By, Managing Editor charolaisbanner@gmail.com Cell 306-536-3374 @ByCandace Susan Penner, Production/Design charolais.susan@sasktel.net

FEBRUARY 2020 • VOL. XXXVII, NO. 1

Dalyse Robertson, Web Design pdmrobertson@gmail.com Sarah Wright, Admin Cell (306) 831-6332 charolaisbanner2@gmail.com

From the Field ..........................................................................................8 dans nos champs ....................................................................................10 Canadian Charolais Association ............................................................14

FIELDMEN: Helge By Res (306) 584-7937 • Cell (306) 536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com @CharolaisBanner

De L’Association de Charolais Canadien ................................................20 Profile – Tom & Jack Collins ....................................................................31 Herd Health ............................................................................................42 Surprise: Meat and Dairy Are Irrelevant to Climate ............................44

Jon Wright Cell (306) 807-8424 charolaisbanner2@gmail.com

Antibiotic Free Meat Unappetizing ......................................................50 Cattle and Cold Temperatures................................................................54

Robbie Chomik Cell (780) 336-6424 charolaisbanner3@gmail.com

Charolais Success ....................................................................................58 Industry Info ............................................................................................58 CCYA News ..............................................................................................60 Successful Calving Starts with Nutrition ................................................62 Calendar of Events ..................................................................................73 Index of Advertisers ................................................................................78

SUBSCRIPTIONS: $9.45 per year $25.20 – 3 years (Prices include 5% GST) The Charolais Connection is mailed to over 8,000 cattlemen nationwide. Those cattlemen include all purebred Charolais breeders, buyers of purebred Charolais bulls from the past six years and all subscribers to the Charolais Banner. No material contained in the Charolais Connection may be reprinted without the permission of the Charolais Banner. The publishers reserve the right to refuse any advertisements. The material produced in this publication is done so with the highest integrity, however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. We are responsible for only the value of the advertisement. Animals in the photographs in the Connection have not been altered by computer enhancement or mechanical methods according to the knowledge of the publisher.

On the cover… A buckskin calf from our Profile article, starting on page 31. Photo: Helge By Design: Susan Penner

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Printed by Print West, Regina, Saskatchewan Publications Mail Agreement No. 40047726 Postage paid at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada Postmaster: Please return undeliverable publications (covers only) to: Charolais Banner, 124 Shannon Road, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1, Canada. Published by the Charolais Banner, Regina, SK (3 times per year - February, March and Fall)

Charolais Connection • February 2020


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POINTS TO PONDER

From the Field Helge By

What is going on in the world with the agenda push that fossil fuels and cattle are the biggest problems with climate change? The earth’s climate is continually changing but is C02 the main factor causing it today? I am old enough to remember when some scientists were predicting a mini ice age and then the hole in the ozone was going to destroy us all. Yesterday, Greenland recorded the coldest day in its history. Not global warming? Is this angle simply to tax us and shift the wealth in the world? I don’t like to get political in my editorials, but the climate bed wetters are going overboard. Right now, Australia is burning up with fires and they suspect many were started by climate arsonists. Why? To try to make people believe that it is climate change that is causing all the problems. I really feel sorry for the Australian cattlemen who are just like us, trying to earn a living with cows and grass, whose industry will be affected for many years because of this combination of drought and fire. The cow numbers will decrease, and it will take time to rebuild the herd and the forages to feed them. My rant for the day. On a brighter note, here in North America the large supply of beef is being eaten up and the market has not sunk to the levels that many expected with the high volume of production. It is unfortunate that the profit in the industry hasn’t been spread around more. Packers and retailers have had

record profits for a couple of years at the expense of the feedlot operator. The tides will turn as they always do and the other sectors will hopefully gain back some of the lost equity. On the Charolais front, last fall I had a very interesting visit with a commercial producer who had just bought 11 Charolais bulls. They run 3,000 predominately black cows and are switching their bull battery from black to white. He said they have been working at it for a few years, as it is too expensive to do all at once. So, as the black bulls exit out, they are replaced by Charolais. I asked why he was doing it. Simple he stated. The biggest advantage is at the auction mart on the silver heifer calves over the black heifers. He said this fall it was a $100/head more. He said the steer calves also had added weight and a 5-cent premium for him in his eastern Alberta market. I then asked if there was any downside and he said no, at birth the silvers get up and go as well as any. They aren’t the big dumb calves that guys remember from 30 to 40 years ago. This was one guy, but I know the switch is coming and I am excited for the Charolais bull market in the next few years as this trend develops and grows. In this issue, you will see many advertisements for some of the spring bulls sales. Again, I encourage you to replace any bulls that aren’t doing a great job for you with the best bulls you can afford. Half of the genetics of your calf crop is from the bulls, so don’t scrimp on what can add so

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Charolais Connection • February 2020

much value. You know what your cows are worth and what the good bred heifers cost last fall, so continue to improve the genetics that you are taking to town with good bulls. I liked the quote in the Connection producer profile last fall that stated, “only a rich man can afford a poor bull.” I always enjoy touring cattle operations and I have always said you can learn something at every place you visit. It may be a gate latch, but if you are looking and paying attention you will probably learn something. One thing I saw this fall that I know some of you have been doing for awhile is feeding on alkali patches of soil. If you are bale grazing or whatever, doing this will improve the land immensely. The added fibre and nutrients worked into these patches will help make them productive again. Now off to do some more picturing for the spring bull sales. As we get into the bull sales, if Jon Wright, Robbie Chomik or I can be of any assistance, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. We are always happy to help in any way we can. All our Charolais Banner and Charolais Connection magazines are online for free at charolaisbanner.com if you want to go back to past issues. We also try to keep the sale news very current on our homepage, so check it out. Until next time, Helge


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POINT A SURVEILLER

Dans nos champs Helge By

Qui donc pousse cet agenda mondial contre les combustibles fossiles et qui blâme les émissions de carbone sur le bétail comme étant la problématique majeure au réchauffement de la planète? Le climat de la planète est constamment en évolution mais est-ce que les émissions de carbones sont le principe coupable? Je suis assez âgé pour me souvenir des scientifiques qui prévoyais une mini ère glaciaire et que les trous dans l’ozone nous détruirais tous. Hier, le Groenland a enregistré une température la plus froide de son histoire. Est-ce du réchauffement? Est-ce seulement une tactique pour nous imposer plus de taxes et enrichir certains de ce monde? J’aime pas débattre des sujets politiques dans mon éditorial mais je crois que les manifestants climatiques vont trop loin. En ce moment, l’Australie est en flamme et certains suspecte qu’une partie de ces feux auraient été déclenché par des activistes dénonçant le réchauffement de la planète. Pourquoi? Pour convaincre plusieurs d’entre nous que le réchauffement de la planète est à la source du problème. Je suis triste pour nos éleveurs Australiens qui, comme nous, essaient de vivre de l’agriculture et qui vont souffrir les répercussions du manque de ressources pour des années à venir. Le nombre de bétail va diminuer les troupeaux et les forages nécessaires vont prendre quelque temps avant de pouvoir se rétablir. C’était ma montée de lait. Sur une note plus positive, l’approvisionnement de boeuf consommé en Amérique du Nord a gardé sa constance même si plusieurs s’attendaient à une baisse avec le haut volume de production en vigueur. C’est dommage que les profits dans l’industrie ne soient pas redistribués équitablement. Les emballeurs et les détaillants enregistrent des profits

record au depend des opérateurs des parcs d’engraissements. Les rôles devraient s’inverser comme ils le font dans la plupart des secteurs et on espère reprendre du capital perdu à ce moment. Revenons aux Charolais. L’automne passé, j’ai une une conversation intéressante avec un éleveur commercial qui a acheté 11 taureaux Charolais. Son entreprise comprend un élevage de 3000 têtes dont la majeure partie est composée de femelles noires. Il dit faire un changement progressif de taureaux noirs aux blancs sur une durée de quelques années pour amorcer les coûts. De peu en peu, les taureaux Charolais remplacent les noirs. Je lui ai demandé la raison de cette décision. Facile, dit-il. L’avantage est à l’encan. Les taures grises se vendent toujours mieux que les noires. Il me dit qu’à l’automne, la différence était de 100$ par tête. Il ajoute que ses bouvillons étaient plus gros et ont rapportés 5 cents de plus la livre dans son marché de l’est de l’Alberta. Je lui ai demandé s’il y avait des désavantages. Il me répond que non. À la naissance, les veaux gris se lèvent et se portent aussi bien que les autres races. On ne parle plus des gros veaux un peu dinguent d’il y a 30 ou 40 ans passé. Cet éleveur en représente plusieurs et je suis certain que le retour du marché des taureaux Charolais est près. J’espère que vous partagerez mon enthousiasme dans les prochaines années à venir en observant cette tendance. Vous trouverez dans ce numéro plusieurs annonces de ventes de taureaux du printemps. Encore une fois, je vous encourage à remplacer votre taureau qui ne performe pas pour votre élevage pour le meilleur taureau dont vous pouvez vous permettre. La moitié de votre progéniture est reliée au taureau alors ne soyez pas Séraphin sur ce qui

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Charolais Connection • February 2020

pourrait vous rapporter gros. Vous connaissez la valeur des femelles de votre troupeau et vous avez vu les prix de l’automne passé pour remplacer celles-ci. Continuez d’améliorer la génétique que vous apporter lors des encans en investissant dans un bon taureau. J’aime l’énoncé fait par un d’éleveur lors d’un interview dans le magazine Charolais Connection qui a dit: ‘Seule un homme riche peut se permettre d’avoir un mauvais taureau.’ J’ai toujours aimé faire le tour des fermes bovines et j’ai toujours dit qu’il y avait quelque chose à apprendre à chaque visite. Peut-être que ce sera seulement un loquet de clôture mais si vous chercher, vous trouverez. Une trouvaille de l’automne passé pour moi, mais une pratique commune de certains d’entre vous, est de nourrir vos têtes sur des parcelles de sol alcali. Si vous nourrissez vos animaux avec des balles de foins aux pacage, vous améliorerez votre champ. Les fibres ajoutées et les nutriments hausseront le rendement de votre champ à la prochaine récolte. Je me déplace pour compléter des séances de photos pour les ventes de taureaux du printemps. Nous arrivons bientôt dans la haute saison des ventes de taureaux et comme toujours, Jon Wright, Robbie Choix et moi offrons notre assistance dans vos démarches. N’hésitez pas à nous appeler. Nous nous ferons un plaisir de vous aider de la meilleure façon possible. Toute la gamme des magazines Charolais Banner et Charolais Connection se retrouvent gratuitement en ligne au charolaisbanner.com et peuvent être consulté à votre guise. Vous y retrouverez tous les résultats des ventes les plus à jours sur notre page d’accueil. Allez-y faire un tour. À la prochaine, Helge


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FROM THE CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

EPD – Back to Basics Sean McGrath, P.Ag.

CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais www.facebook.com/cdncharolais

PROVINCIAL REPRESENTATIVES: ALBERTA President: Stephen Cholak, Lamont Secretary: Deb Cholak, Lamont, AB SASKATCHEWAN President: Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw Secretary: Saskatchewan Livestock Assoc., Regina MANITOBA President: Jeff Cavers, La Riviere Secretary: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie

EPD are a selection tool that allow us to change a trait of interest. Note the use of the word change. EPD help describe an animal’s DNA for a trait in more/less type of

relationships. As such the EPD do not describe optimal levels for a trait. The Canadian Charolais Association calculates and publishes EPD for several traits as shown in Table 1.

Table 1. CCA EPD Abbreviations and Descriptions Trait

Trait

Description

Units

BW

Birth Weight

Describes genetic differences for progeny birth weight. A larger number indicates heavier calves at birth.

Lbs

WW

Weaning Weight

Genetic difference for progeny weaning weight.A larger number indicates heavier calves at weaning.

Lbs

YW

Yearling Weight

Genetic difference for progeny yearling weight. A larger number indicates heavier calves at one year of age.

Lbs

MILK

Milk

Genetic difference for daughters’ progeny weaning weight due to their milk production (grandprogeny). A larger number indicates heavier calves from daughters at weaning.

Lbs

TM

Total Maternal

Lbs

1st VICE-PRESIDENT: KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C 780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca

Genetic difference for daughters’ progeny weaning weight due to their genes for milk and growth (grandprogeny). A larger number indicates heavier calves at weaning.

CE

Calving Ease

Genetic difference for unassisted calving of progeny. A larger number indicates easier calving (less assistance).

Unassisted

2nd VICE-PRES: SHAWN AIREY Box 639, Rivers, MB R0K 1X0 204.328.7704 C 204.724.8823 htacharolais@hotmail.com

CWT

Carcass Weight

Genetic difference for progeny carcass weight in pounds. A larger number indicates heavier carcasses.

Lbs

PAST PRESIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 • 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net

REA

Rib-Eye Area

Genetic difference for progeny Rib-Eye area in square inches. A larger number indicates bigger rib-eye muscle.

Sq. In.

FAT

Fat Thickness

Genetic difference for progeny backfat thickness at 12/13 rib. A larger value indicates fatter carcasses.

mm

MARB

Marbling

Genetic difference for progeny marbling score (quality grade) in marbling score units. A larger number indicates more marbling.

MSU

LY

Lean Yield

Genetic difference for progeny lean meat yield. A larger number indicates more lean meat in the carcass and more yield grade 1 carcasses.

%

ONTARIO President: Josh Taylor, Dunsford Secretary: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC President: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secretary: Chantal Raymond, Sainte-Eulalie MARITIMES President: Jason Ringuette, Bridgetown, NS Secretary: Nancy Milton, Nine Mile Creek, PEI STAFF: General Manager: Craig Scott Registry: Lois Chivilo Registry/Member Services: Haylea Jones French Membership: Bernard Dore 514-910-4935 • bernarddore@videotron.ca EXECUTIVE: PRESIDENT: MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C 306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net

DIRECTORS: ROGER MALONEY 2420 Jermyn Line Indian River, ON K0L 2B0 705.295.6439 C 705.761.7316 malrog64@hotmail.com MATHIEU PALERME 814 Pink Rd., Gatineau, QC J9J 3N2 819.682.2723 C 819.213.3143 matpalerme@yahoo.ca JIM OLSON Box 882, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 3C3 204.252.3115 C 204.856.6357 lejcharolais@gmail.com LORNE LAKUSTA Box 37, Andrew, AB T0B 0C0 780.365.2079 C 780.719.0264 spruceviewcharolais@gmail.com RYAN NESBITT 17100 Cedardale Rd, Nestleton, ON L0B 1L0 905.242.2046 ryan@cedardalefarms.ca ROD MCLEOD 293113 Twnshp Rd 263, Rocky View County, AB T4A 0N5 403.540.7986 rodmcl@telus.net

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These EPD are calculated using pedigree, performance, ultrasound, carcass and DNA information collected by Charolais members and their association. Currently there are over 1.3 million animals with information in the CCA evaluation. This

means there is tremendous information available for the prediction of what DNA the latest generation of calves contains. The average EPD for Canadian Charolais calves born in the last 2 years (2018-2019) are shown in Table 2. continued on page 16

Charolais Connection • February 2020


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Table 2. Breed Average EPD for Calves Born in 2018/2019 BW

WW

YW

MILK

TM

CE

CW

REA

Fat

LY

Marb

0.9

44.1

84.8

21.5

43.5

5.0

17.6

0.44

0.57

1.03

0.13

These values tell us what an average Charolais yearling or 2 year old bull might have for EPD. A higher value indicates more of a trait, and a lower value indicates less of a trait. Very few animals will be average, above average or below average for all traits. For example, cattle that tend towards below average birthweights, may also tend towards lower growth rates. Cattle that tend toward more fat and marbling will tend to have smaller rib-eyes and less lean yield. Some cattle will bend these relationships (eg: CE and Growth), and in many cases a curve bender may not even be the best option. The EPD are simply a tool to allow us to objectively identify and sort through these traits by removing environmental effects and showing a prediction of differences in genetic merit. Let’s look at a simple example of 2 bulls. The bulls have weaning weight EPD of +75 vs. +45 respectively. This means that we would expect offspring of the +75 animal to be 30 pounds heavier at weaning than the calves from the +45 bull. This does not mean that every calf from +75 will be heavier than every calf from +45, rather that on average, across a similar group of cows we will see that difference. In an environment that is challenging or limiting to calf nutrition, we may not see the full expression of this difference.

has a good reputation. Customer service is important and cows being cows, there will eventually be a problem that a good supplier can help you solve, such as an injured bull, a short notice need for extra sire power or other unforeseen circumstance. Secondly, we need to think about how we are using the bull. A good example is calving ease. If we are using Charolais bulls on first calf heifers we might want to select a bull in the top 20% of the breed for calving ease. This means the bull would have a calving ease EPD of 8.4 or higher. If we are only breeding cows, putting that much pressure on Calving Ease will likely come at the cost of added growth. We may be able to use a bull with an average or slightly below average Calving Ease EPD perfectly fine, while gaining added growth and maybe paying a lower price for the bull.

Some Basic Guidelines First select a supplier you trust that

Another good example would be if we are choosing to retain ownership on our calves through the feedlot. In this case we would likely want to look at bulls with a spread between their weaning and yearling weight EPD. The larger this spread, the more postweaning or feedlot growth calves should have. This matters as generally calves on feed are not limited by environment in expressing growth. If calves are sold on the rail, an above average Carcass Weight EPD may also be important. Care should be taken if used on large framed cows, as high carcass weights may create discounts for carcass weight if calves are too heavy at finish. If the cattle are being sold on a grid, then the Lean Yield and marbling may also come into the picture. Emphasis on each of these will depend both on the grid premium, but also on the cows to be mated. On continental cows, more emphasis may need to be placed on marbling and slightly less on yield. On British cows with higher marbling

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Again, it is highly unlikely that a bull will be “above average” for every trait, and in fact it may not even be desirable to be above average. For example, if we retain replacement heifers but have a tough environment, we may want Milk EPD to be average or below in order to help reduce cow maintenance costs. Conversely, if we sell all of our Char-cross calves as feeders, we should not pay any attention to Milk EPD at all.

levels, yield may be of more importance than selection for marbling. Retaining heifers, means that we likely need to look at Milk and determine what level of the trait best fits our environment and management. Beyond EPD animals should also be fit, structurally correct, have appropriate health status and fit the bill phenotypically. Most of us are comfortable looking at actual performance data, however EPD are a much more effective selection tool (research has shown in excess of 9 times more effective). If we choose to use EPD values, we do not and should not use the actual performance data in our selection process as well, since the EPD already includes the animal’s performance. Using the performance data actually reduces the effectiveness of the EPD to create change. Because of this power it is important to familiarize ourselves a bit with the EPD traits, but also to identify our goals so our decisions help us improve our operations instead of just changing them. Finally, if something is important to you or your customer, it is OK to ask for it. EPD are calculated using pedigree, performance, ultrasound and DNA data. If you need information to make better decisions don’t be scared to ask your seedstock supplier for the information. They may not collect it currently (eg: ultrasound), but the vast majority are concerned with helping to build their customers’ businesses and will work with you. For seedstock producers, the challenge is to identify where the proverbial puck is headed so that they can have the information available by the time it is needed.

continued on page 18


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Percentile Pctl Avg Min Max SD 1 2 3 4 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100

BW 0.9 -10.9 11.3 2.31 -5.3 -4.4 -3.9 -3.5 -3.2 -2.1 -1.4 -0.9 -0.5 -0.1 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.0 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.1 3.6 4.4 11.3

WW 44.1 -1.5 78.6 7.64 63.0 60.6 59.1 57.9 57.0 54.0 52.0 50.4 49.2 48.0 46.9 45.8 44.9 44.0 43.1 42.1 41.2 40.2 39.1 37.9 36.5 34.7 32.1 -1.5

YW 84.8 8.7 137.1 13.71 117.6 114.0 111.6 109.5 108.0 102.6 98.9 96.1 93.7 91.7 89.7 87.9 86.2 84.4 82.7 81.0 79.3 77.4 75.5 73.4 70.8 67.5 62.7 8.7

MILK 21.5 3.8 35.8 4.03 30.8 29.7 29.1 28.5 28.1 26.7 25.7 24.8 24.1 23.5 23.0 22.4 22.0 21.4 20.9 20.4 19.9 19.4 18.8 18.1 17.4 16.4 14.8 3.8

TM 43.5 23.8 65.0 4.81 54.9 53.6 52.7 52.1 51.5 49.8 48.6 47.6 46.7 45.9 45.3 44.7 44.1 43.4 42.8 42.2 41.6 41.0 40.3 39.5 38.6 37.4 35.8 23.8

CE 5.0 -14.9 20.0 4.01 14.5 13.4 12.7 12.1 11.7 10.3 9.2 8.4 7.7 7.0 6.5 5.9 5.5 5.0 4.5 4.0 3.5 3.0 2.5 1.8 1.1 0.1 -1.4 -14.9

CWT 17.6 -17.6 46.4 6.41 32.4 30.4 29.4 28.4 28.4 25.4 24.4 22.4 21.4 20.4 20.4 19.4 18.4 17.4 16.4 16.4 15.4 14.4 13.4 12.4 11.4 9.4 7.4 -17.6

REA 0.44 -0.29 1.14 0.132 0.80 0.74 0.70 0.68 0.66 0.60 0.56 0.54 0.52 0.50 0.48 0.47 0.45 0.43 0.42 0.40 0.39 0.37 0.36 0.34 0.31 0.28 0.24 -0.29

FAT 0.57 -1.78 4.70 0.607 -0.94 -0.76 -0.63 -0.53 -0.43 -0.15 0.00 0.10 0.18 0.28 0.36 0.41 0.49 0.56 0.61 0.69 0.76 0.84 0.94 1.04 1.17 1.35 1.58 4.70

LY 1.03 -0.20 2.24 0.244 1.66 1.57 1.52 1.47 1.44 1.33 1.27 1.22 1.18 1.15 1.12 1.09 1.06 1.03 1.00 0.97 0.94 0.91 0.88 0.84 0.80 0.74 0.64 -0.20

MARB 0.13 -2.72 2.91 0.473 1.37 1.17 1.07 0.99 0.93 0.71 0.60 0.51 0.43 0.35 0.29 0.23 0.17 0.12 0.07 0.01 -0.05 -0.11 -0.17 -0.24 -0.33 -0.44 -0.61 -2.72

N

27086

27086

27086

27086

27086

23228

27086

27086

27086

27086

27086

Percentiles are based on Current Calves – all calves born in the last 2 years (2018 – 2019)

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DE LA CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE

CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais

Les EPD – De retour à l'essentiel Sean McGrath, P.Ag.

www.facebook.com/cdncharolais

PROVINCIAUX REPRÉSENTANTS: ALBERTA Président: Stephen Cholak, Lamont Secrétaire: Deb Cholak, Lamont, AB SASKATCHEWAN Président: Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw Secrétaire: Sask. Livestock Assoc., Regina MANITOBA Président: Jeff Cavers, La Riviere Secrétaire: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie

Les EPD sont un outil de sélection qui nous permet de changer un caractère d'intérêt. Notez l'utilisation du mot changement. Les EPD aident à décrire l'ADN d'un animal pour un caractère en contexte de plus élevé / ou moins élevé

que la moyenne. En tant que tel, les EPD ne décrivent pas les niveaux optimaux pour un caractère. L'Association canadienne Charolais (ACC) calcule et publie les EPD pour plusieurs caractères comme le démontre le tableau 1.

Table 1. CCA EPD Abbreviations and Descriptions

ONTARIO Président: Josh Taylor, Dunsford Secrétaire: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC Président: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secrétaire: Chantal Raymond, Sainte-Eulalie MARITIMES Président: Jason Ringuette, Bridgetown, NS Secrétaire: Nancy Milton, Nine Mile Creek, PEI PERSONNEL: Directeur général: Craig Scott Registry: Lois Chivilo Registre/Services aux membres: Haylea Jones Composition française: Bernard Dore 514.910.4935 • bernarddore@videotron.ca EXÉCUTIF: PRÉSIDENT: MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C 306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net 1er VICE- PRÉSIDENT: KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C 780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca 2e VICE- PRÉSIDENT: SHAWN AIREY Box 639, Rivers, MB R0K 1X0 204.328.7704 C 204.724.8823 htacharolais@hotmail.com ANCIEN PRÉSIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 • 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net ADMINISTRATION:ROGER MALONEY 2420 Jermyn Line Indian River, ON K0L 2B0 705.295.6439 C 705.761.7316 malrog64@hotmail.com MATHIEU PALERME 814 Pink Rd., Gatineau, QC J9J 3N2 819.682.2723 C 819.213.3143 matpalerme@yahoo.ca JIM OLSON Box 882, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 3C3 204.252.3115 C 204.856.6357 lejcharolais@gmail.com LORNE LAKUSTA Box 37, Andrew, AB T0B 0C0 780.365.2079 C 780.719.0264 spruceviewcharolais@gmail.com RYAN NESBITT 17100 Cedardale Rd, Nestleton, ON L0B 1L0 905.242.2046 ryan@cedardalefarms.ca ROD MCLEOD 293113 Twnshp Rd 263, Rocky View County, AB T4A 0N5 403.540.7986 rodmcl@telus.net

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Ces EPD sont calculés à partir des informations provenant de la généalogie (pedigree), de la performance, des tests d’échographie (ultrason), des données de carcasse et de l'ADN collectées par les éleveurs Charolais et leur association. Actuellement, plus de 1,3 million d'animaux ont contribué des morceaux d’information envers l'évaluation de l’association Charolais. Cela signifie qu'il existe une banque d’informations solide pour prédire ce contenu de l'ADN de la prochaine génération de veaux. Les moyennes pour chaque EPD parmi les veaux Charolais canadiens nés au cours des 2 dernières années (2018-2019) est indiqué dans le tableau 2. suite à la page 22 Charolais Connection • February 2020


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Ces valeurs nous indiquent ce qu'un taureau Charolais d’un an ou un taureau de 2 ans peut avoir en moyenne pour EPD. Une valeur plus élevée que la moyenne indique un plus grand potentiel génétique pour un caractère et l’inverse si le chiffre est plus bas que la moyenne. Très peu d'animaux seront moyens, supérieurs à la moyenne et inférieurs à la moyenne en même temps pour l’ensemble de leurs caractères. Par exemple, les bovins dont le poids à la naissance est inférieur à la moyenne ont tendance envers des taux de croissance plus faibles. Les bovins qui tendent vers plus de gras et de persillage auront tendance à avoir un plus petit œil de longe et un rendement de viande plus petit. Certains bovins défieront ces relations (par exemple : facilite au vêlage et croissance), et dans de nombreux cas, un cintreur de courbe n’est pas la meilleure option. Les EPD sont simplement un outil pour nous permettre d'identifier et de trier objectivement ces traits en supprimant les effets environnementaux et en montrant une prédiction des différences de mérite génétique. Regardons un exemple simple de 2 taureaux. Les taureaux ont respectivement un EPD poids au sevrage de +75 et l’autre de +45. Cela signifie que nous nous attendons à ce que l’ensemble de la progéniture de l'animal à +75 soit 30 lbs plus lourde au sevrage que les veaux du taureau à +45. Ça ne veut pas dire que chaque veau du taureau à +75 sera plus lourd que chaque veau de celui à+45, mais qu'en moyenne, à travers un groupe similaire de vaches, nous verrons cette différence. Dans un environnement difficile ou limité pour la nutrition des veaux, il est possible que les différences ne soient pas complètement exprimées. Encore une fois, il est très peu probable qu'un taureau soit «supérieur à la moyenne» pour tous caractères, et en fait, il n’est pas toujours souhaitable d'être supérieur à

la moyenne. Par exemple, si nous conservons des génisses de remplacement, mais que notre environnement est difficile, nous souhaitons peut-être que le EPD pour le lait soit moyen ou inférieur afin de réduire les coûts d'entretien des vaches. Inversement, si nous vendons tous nos veaux Charolais croisés au sevrage, nous porterons peu d’attention au EPD pour le lait. Quelques directives de base Sélectionnez d'abord un fournisseur de confiance qui jouit d'une bonne réputation. Le service à la clientèle est important et les vaches étant des vaches, il y aura éventuellement un problème qu'un bon fournisseur peut vous aider à résoudre, comme un taureau blessé, un besoin d’un taureau de remplacement sans préavis pour une ou toute autre circonstance imprévue. Deuxièmement, nous devons réfléchir à la façon dont nous utilisons le taureau. Un bon exemple est la facilité de vêlage. Si nous utilisons des taureaux Charolais sur des taures au premier veau, notre sélection de taureau devrait être parmi les 20% supérieurs de la race pour la facilité de vêlage. Dans ce cas, ça signifie que le taureau aurait un EPD de facilité de vêlage de 8,4 ou plus haut. Si nous cherchons un géniteur uniquement que pour des vaches matures, et si on met autant d’emphase sur la facilité de vêlage se fera probablement au dépriment d'une performance supérieure à la moyenne de la race. En considérant un taureau avec un EPD de facilite au vêlage moyen ou légèrement inférieur à la moyenne, il y a plus de chance qu’il sera supérieur en croissance et possiblement moins dispendieux qu’un taureau qui offre les deux. Un autre bon exemple serait si nous choisissons de conserver la propriété de nos veaux durant l'engraissement. Dans ce cas, les taureaux avec un bon écart entre leur EPD pour le poids au sevrage et leur EPD de poids d'un an seront plus importants. Plus cet écart

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est grand, plus les veaux auront de la performance durant leur engraissement. Cela est important car généralement les veaux en engraissement ne sont pas limités par l'environnement et peuvent atteindre leur potentiel de croissance. Si vous êtes payés à l’abatage, un EPD de poids de carcasse supérieur à la moyenne peut également être important. Dans ce cas, des précautions doivent être prises si le taureau est utilisé sur de grandes vaches, car les carcasses trop lourdes peuvent être pénalisées. Si le bétail est vendu sur une grille de prix, le rendement maigre et le persillage peuvent également avoir une certaine importance. L'accent mis sur chacun de ces éléments dépendra à la fois des primes offertes, mais aussi des vaches à accoupler. Sur les vaches de type continental, il faudra peut-être mettre davantage l'accent sur le persillage et un peu moins sur le rendement. Sur les vaches de races anglaises avec des niveaux de persillage plus élevés, le rendement peut être plus important que la sélection pour le persillage. La rétention des génisses signifie que nous devons probablement examiner le lait et déterminer le meilleur équilibre qui correspond le mieux à notre environnement et à notre gestion. Au-delà de l'EPD, les animaux doivent également avoir une structure solide, être en bonne santé tout en offrant un une conformation désirée. La plupart des gens sont à l'aise avec l’analyse des données de performances réelles, mais les EPD sont un outil de sélection beaucoup plus efficace (la recherche a prouvé qu’ils sont 9 fois plus efficaces). Si nous choisissons d'utiliser les valeurs EPD, il est préférable de pas utiliser les données de performances réelles dans notre processus de sélection, car les EPD incluent déjà les performances de l'animal. L'utilisation des données de performances réduit en fait l'efficacité des EPD envers les changements désirés. En raison de ce suite à la page 24


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pouvoir, il est important de nous familiariser un peu avec les caractéristiques EPD, mais aussi d'identifier nos objectifs afin que nos décisions nous aident à améliorer nos opérations au lieu de simplement les changer. Enfin, si un élément est important pour vous ou votre client, vous pouvez l’exiger. Les EPD sont calculés

en utilisant le pedigree, les performances, les ultrasons et les données ADN. Si vous avez besoin d'informations supplémentaires pour prendre de meilleures décisions, n'hésitez pas à demander ces informations à votre fournisseur de génétiques. Il est possible que votre fournisseur n’ait pas une réponse immédiate à toutes vos demandes

(par exemple, les ultrasons), mais la grande majorité des éleveurs sont soucieuses d'aider à prendre de l’avant. Pour les éleveurs pur-sang, le défi consiste à identifier où se dirige la rondelle proverbiale afin qu'ils puissent disposer des informations au moment voulu avant qu’il soit trop tard.

Les rangs centiles sont basés sur les veaux actuels - tous les veaux nés au cours des 2 dernières années (2018-2019)

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B

rothers Tom and Jack Collins calve around 150 females each spring near McCord, Saskatchewan. The cow herd base is Red Angus x Simmental but there are quite a few tan cows, which are Red Angus x Charolais. Research shows using an F1 female and a terminal cross bull maximizes hybrid vigor and the Collins brothers have experienced this in their herd. “We try to not have any more than 50% of one breed in a cow. The 50% can be Red Angus, Charolais or Simmental. We try not to breed a tan cow white, or a red cow red. It doesn’t always work out with the field size and the bull battery, but it is what we prefer to do,” explains Tom. Like many people operating on a limited land base with capacity cow numbers, it is important to be aware of the income and expenses per female in the operation. “We breed our heifers to Red Angus and breed our red cows to Charolais. Just in the last little while we have bought a red Simmental bull to raise some more replacement females instead of buying them. The red calves just don’t sell as well as tans, even though they are good size, we don’t get the same dollar per pound or dollar per calf value as we do for the buckskins. It maybe doesn’t work for everybody, but they really work for us.” When they do buy replacement females, they like to buy red, blaze-faced females. “The Red Angus bull only gets used on heifers, as he is a heifer bull. I don’t like to breed cows to a heifer bull and we don’t keep a replacement from our two-year old first calvers. They were bred to a heifer bull and we feel it takes some of the bang out of the performance. It would have to be an extremely good heifer before we would consider it. The only way we have been getting Red Angus in our cow

herd is by buying replacements. We have been buying from a few different producers and have had pretty good luck, so we stick with it.” “We turn the bulls out June 1 and pick them up July 15th, six weeks later. We have been doing that for so long, we can’t remember not doing it. We do it because we are finished calving by the end of April and we can start seeding without having to come home to check cows.” It is a pattern that serves them well. They take their own bulls to the community pasture on June first. Most of the bulls in that pasture go out June 1. They don’t often sell a bull because of his age; they usually end up getting hurt before they get too old. The community pasture seems to be harder on bulls as they are intermingling with bulls from other programs. Tom and Jack each have an allocation of thirty females, so they take sixty pair to that pasture each year. “The pasture manager has been very helpful getting our bulls pulled by July 15th. There are other bulls left there after that date, so we get our females preg-tested by the vet and we get the expected birth day. Anything that is due to calve after the first of May, we usually sell. The ones we keep in our own pasture, we don’t have to worry about, as we know exactly when they were exposed to a bull. They are either dry or bred in the time frame. We don’t have to worry about any neighbour’s bull, as our pastures don’t border other people’s pastures.” “Our calves are born from the tenth of March to the thirtieth of April.” Calving all happens at Jack’s place. We watch our cows at calving time. If something needs help, we help it . Just like most producers. As they are born, we tag and sort them so the group that is having calves, does

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“We try to not have any more than 50% of one breed in a cow.” not have calves among them. We move them out to a bit larger area when they are about a day old. We feel it works better for us when tagging the calves, as there aren’t older calves running around. It also helps to keep the pen cleaner.” “We used to weigh more of our calves, but now we just weigh the extreme ones. We weigh anything that looks small, which is usually 75 lb or less. I don’t mind getting an 75 lb calf out of a heifer, but to get one out of a cow is pretty disappointing. On the large size, we think anything over 125 is large. We don’t have problems calving and our calves are commonly 110 to 115 lb and that isn’t a problem for these cows. Our mature cows are typically around 1600 pounds. We were surprised when we started

weighing calves. We really had not guessed their birth weights very accurately. We don’t keep our cows until they are really old. We allow them to calve at ten years of age, but usually not at eleven. We just find their production drops and they aren’t worth as much themselves when we sell them. We feel if you can sell them when they are still looking good, we will get more for them and have a younger cow herd.” “The calves are weaned and shipped from Jack’s place. After weaning the cows are preg checked and trailed to different fields for fall grazing eventualy ending up at Tom’s place for winter feeding which is ten miles away. Jack and I feel it works for us. This way there is a lot less manure around Jack’s come calving time.”

“A lot of people you talk to want smaller cows. In the end, maybe they eat less and they make more money. But the buckskin calf is going to make us more money than other calves. Normally, for the same weight of calf, we see a nice premium for the buckskin calf over the Red Angus or Simmental calf within our own herd. They can have the same breeding, but the tan calves definitely bring more. Sometimes we end up with tan heifers and red steers, which is exactly opposite of what we want,” he laughs. “But that is just part of the business.” Tom and Jack’s brother Paul works at a machine shop where they were putting a catwalk in a mine. Anything under four or five feet in length was being discarded, so he brought some home and used it to build a ramp for continued on page 34

Jack Collins

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Portable panels used when and where needed

crossing the fence with a quad. They also used it on their cattle handling system. About ten years ago they went to pipe corrals and they did it in three stages. “We have never regretted it. It makes it so easy for one guy to move stuff around. It was a fair bit of work to construct, but we feel it was worth it. We had to build a new barn for calving, the old hip roof one was just not worth repairing and really wasn’t very functional. During calving time, we set up some pens in the barn. We also have an insulated room in the barn with three pens in it. We have a heater in there, but have found that putting another cow or two in the room works better.” In the summer, they use it to store their water tanks and such. They seed about 3000 acres, half durum, a quarter canola and a quarter lentils and they put up all of their own hay. Tom and Debbie have three children

Quad ramp built by Jack to cross fence

and seven grandchildren. “We have a daughter, Laura, that is a journeyman plumber who is married to a geologist. They live in Martensville and they have two children. Our son Ryan is at Mankota and has two children. His partner also has a little boy so we have a bonus. Ryan is

…we don’t get the same dollar per pound or dollar per calf value as we do for the buckskins… farming with his partner’s family. Our daughter Amanda lives in Assiniboia and is married to Destin Ash and they have three children. If anyone decides they want to continue with the operation, it would probably be Ryan.” Jack is single and likes his work and his farming. They have

talked about expanding their operation, but don’t want to deal with employees. What they have now, is what they can manage well between them and they are content with that. They buy their Charolais bulls from sales and purchase performance bulls. If there is too much influence on calving ease, they don’t feel it will be beneficial for their herd. They like to deal with nice people. “I don’t believe the Charolais breed has an issue with calving problems or weak calves. When buying Charolais bulls, they have to be thick, they have to have good feet and the birth weight has to be 100 pounds plus. That is the way we like to have them. We only buy yearlings and I like them to have a minimum testicular measurement of 36 cm.” Helge and I were interested to hear what attracted this producer to sales specifically. It is something Helge has been telling seedstock producers for years. “I like to look at bull sale continued on page 36

Kade Collins’ 2019 4-H project

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Emily Collins’ 2019 4-H project

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“When buying Charolais bulls, they have to be thick, they have to have good feet and the birth weight has to be 100 pounds plus.” catalogues but I think no picture is better than a bad one. It turns me off. If I get a catalogue and most of the pictures are good, it still is a detriment if I go to the sale and find a calf I like, look in the catalogue and see a bad picture of him. I just won’t buy him.” Producers with good management look at all the angles and measure what they can to improve. A lot is learned through trial and error, but some is learned through research and willingness to learn. “When I go through a catalogue, I don’t have scrotal measurements, but I do have birth weights and weaning weights. I won’t buy a bull from a two-year-old. It would have to be an exceptional calf for me to consider it . I also won’t buy a twin. I know biologically or genetically it may not mean you will have any more twin calves but that is how I feel. We just don’t want them when we are calving. A lot of times it works out, but sometimes they are just more work than we need.” The brothers have discovered what

many producers are experiencing when searching for a bull, polled bulls do bring a premium. “Buying a polled bull is the most expensive way to dehorn a calf,” Tom laughs. “Often I feel I can get more for my money and a better bull, if I buy the horned ones.” “We keep 25-30 replacements heifers, everything else goes to Assiniboia to be sold. We always sell in a Charcross sale, sometimes it is a Charcross and Exotic cross sale, or a Charcross and Red Angus sale, but there is always a Charcross advertised component in the sale. We sell in the last week of October. The calves are always sorted by colour, weight and quality before the sale. Every year our tan calves sell better than our Simmental and Red Angus calves. Sometimes our white heifers will bring more than the tan ones. The steers usually make the 650 lb range and the heifers make 600 lb range. After the replacements are selected and a few steers for the grandchildren’s 4-H projects,

everything is sold. We don’t keep anything to background, partly because our hay has too much alfalfa in it, we need to be careful about bloat. For our replacement females, we have enough grass hay so this isn’t a problem. You also have to factor in the cost of losing one or two in the process, it really cuts into the profit.” “We sell at the Assiniboia Livestock Auction and have taken the overnight stand for a number of years now and have no complaints about how they have been sorted and mixed with other producers calves of similar type. We take them Sunday night for weighing on Monday and the sale is Tuesday. I think it is good because they can sell liner load after liner load of tan steers. I love to sit at the sale to see some of ours in those packages. We have been quite pleased that quite a high percentage of our calves can make those top-cut pens. I think that is all you can hope for. Everybody has a calf that isn’t as good as the rest for whatever reason, we never keep them at home. We sell them and take what we get. We don’t like to see a poorer quality animal around all winter. It is better to take your loss than invest more in it. You can’t expect it to sell in continued on page 38

Tom Collins

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the top cut pen because it is not. You can drive by anybody’s herd and see the odd poor calf, everybody has one, it isn’t breed specific, it is just part of the cattle business.” “The Assiniboia market works for us with the Charcross sales. We really have no reason to change. “Because these red calves sell for so much less, we are considering buying the right Charolais bull to put on our heifers. We aren’t concerned about increasing the weaning weight, we are concerned about getting a tan calf that will pay more for the same or marginally better weight. It hasn’t been easy to convince my brother of this, but I think the next time we buy a heifer bull, it will be Charolais. If we want Red Angus for replacements, we will buy a cow

bull for breeding or buy replacement females.” “There is no wrong breed or colour, but we have found we maximize our program with tan calves.” In the end, that is all everyone is trying to do, maximize their program to stay alive and thrive.

“Because these red calves sell for so much less, we are considering buying the right Charolais bull to put on our heifers.”

Standing: Destin Ash, Kade Collins, Heather Lochart, Hunter Lochart, Ryan Collins, Emily Collins, Darren Slugoski Sitting: Amanda, Rowan and Liam Ash, Debbie Collins, Finley Ash, Tom Collins, Sawyer, Zoey and Laura Slugoski

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HERD HEALTH

Uterine Inertia Roy Lewis, DVM

There have been several instances over my practice career where an unexplained delay in calving has resulted in stillborn or weak calves because the calving process was too long. I would hazard a guess most producers have run into this problem at one time or another. Although not much research has been done on this subject and it is likely multifaceted, I will attempt to give some thoughts on causes or prevention and potentially what should be checked for if the incidence gets too high. I call this problem uterine inertia whereby a cow has gone through the initial stages of parturition her cervix has dilated yet there is very little contractility to the uterus. These are the cows where you may or may not have seen the waterbag yet one to two hours later the cow is still essentially chewing her cud not initiating the process. Hopefully you notice this but nowadays with less observance during calving season especially at night prevention is the key. There are many reasons for uterine inertia but I will highlight the common ones. Cows too fat or lacking exercise don’t develop the musculature to contract. If any of you have gone to prenatal classes, they stress the women practicing “keegles” which is working the musculature in the vaginal vault so childbirth is easier. The same theory applies to cattle. Bred show cattle once the show season is over need to have exercise. The best way is walking. Feeding out far from the yard making them walk in for water and having the minerals in a different location goes a long ways to decreasing abdominal fat and increasing muscle tone for

calving. Conversely too thin cattle have no muscle and uterine contractions are weak and parturition delayed. We need cattle in the 2.5-3.5 condition score at calving, getting as much exercise as possible to minimize calving issues. Minerals play a huge role in cattle health overall and that is no different at calving. We all know the deficiencies of Vit A and E or selenium have on the incidence of retained placentas. Macro minerals especially Calcium and Phosphorus play a huge role in the ability of the uterus to contract. We especially see this in milk cows where a full blown milk fever (ca deficiency) if it occurs before calving causes the cow to go down, delays calving and increases the incidence of a prolapsed uterus after calving. Giving the calcium intravenously in these instances will get the cow up and the uterus contracting. In several instances of uterine inertia, I have found the Calcium levels to be low normal. Extra supplementation has improved it somewhat but that would be a solution to discuss with both your veterinarian and herd nutritionist. Whenever you move calving cows into the barn, depending on the degree of nervousness in the cow, uterine contractions may stop. This is started by a complex interaction of hormones whereby one negates the effects of the other. I am talking about adrenaline (epinephrine) counteracting the effects of oxytocin which is one of the hormones necessary for uterine contractions and milk let down. This is why the more nervous the cow, the less likely she is to reinitiate uterine contractions and if being milked later, she will hold up her milk. As long as the cervix is totally open, small amounts of

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oxytocin can be given to start uterine contractions. This is a prescription drug and only small amounts are given so have your herd veterinarian prescribe some to have around. It is also a hormone which needs to be kept refrigerated. Tranquilization may also be effective in calming an excitable cow and allowing their own natural oxytocin to take over. We must realize whenever a cow is moved or brought into a strange environment right at calving that contractions may diminish. The question then becomes when do I intervene and the answer for me is if you are present and there has been no progress calving in one hour, check her out. Often by hooking up the chains to the feet and applying light traction and being patient contractions will start. If the feet are way down inside the uterus but the cervix is open that is when oxytocin may be helpful. We must have the cow’s uterus contracting when pulling a calf otherwise we have a forced extraction where the health of both the calf and cow are in jeopardy. With slight traction it is always amazing to me the force of the contractions. If a cow is more relaxed and down on her side in a more natural position she is more likely to push. As can be seen by this summary the cause of a lack of contractions is very variable so always evaluate this every time you are assisting. Also if recorded in the calving book look for repeat cows and eliminate them. As always it is very easy to miss these and may be the cause of stillborn calves we may have. If the cervix dilates and contractions dont start the result can be a stillborn calf that is easily deliverable. Here’s to a great calving season and if you have more than one stillborn without an obvious reason get it or the cow checked out.


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NEWS

Surprise: Meat and Dairy are Irrelevant to Climate Steve Milloy

Fake meat and veganism are making strides against the meat and dairy industry under the guise of global warming or climate change. This may be news to the meat and dairy industry, but there is absolutely no science to support blaming the meat and dairy industry for global warming. Yes, it’s true that livestock are sources of methane (natural gas). It’s also true that methane is a greenhouse gas that has about 20 times more heat trapping potential than carbon dioxide. But that’s about the end of the truth. There is no truth to the notion that livestock emissions of methane – or any emissions of methane at all – are warming the climate in any discernible way. So how can methane be 20 times more potent that carbon dioxide yet have no meaningful real-world warming potential? The physics are really pretty simple. Greenhouse gas theory holds that ultraviolet radiation from the Sun is absorbed by the Earth and then gets re-reradiated back to the atmosphere as infrared radiation. But before the infrared radiation can escape into space, it is temporarily captured or absorbed by various gases in the atmosphere including water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and – yes – methane. Here’s the rub, though.

There is only so much infrared radiation re-radiated back into the atmosphere, which makes sense since there is only so much ultraviolet radiation that reaches the Earth from the Sun. So the various greenhouse gases in the atmosphere “compete” to absorb the re-radiated infrared radiation. And some gases compete better than others based on their physical properties and quantities in the atmosphere. In that competition, methane is a loser. The chart below indicates the infrared absorption potential by the various greenhouse gases. Methane (CH4) looks like it has tremendous potential for infrared absorption – and it would in an atmosphere with water vapor or carbon dioxide.

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But the reality – and what climate alarmists don’t want to admit – is that water vapor and carbon dioxide

pretty much absorb all the infrared leaving none for methane to absorb. So while methane can absorb 20 times more infrared than carbon dioxide under laboratory conditions, in the real world, there is little to no infrared red leftover for methane to absorb. Not only does methane have a hard time competing against water vapor and carbon dioxide to absorb reradiatied infrared radiation, there is little methane in the atmosphere. Water vapor, clouds and carbon dioxide account for and estimated 95% of greenhouse gas warming. That doesn’t leave much room for methane. While carbon dioxide makes up about 0.04% (410 parts per million) of the Earth’s atmosphere, methane only amounts to about 0.00018% (1.8 parts per million). There’s not much methane in the atmosphere and there’s not much, if any, infrared radiation leftover for it to absorb. Methane may therefore be referred to as the “irrelevant greenhouse gas.” Why the meat and dairy industry is allowing itself to lose market share over this is beyond comprehension. Steve Milloy publishes JunkScience.com, served on the Trump EPA transition team and is the author of “Scare Pollution: What and How to Fix the EPA” (Bench Press, 2016). Follow Steve Milloy on Twitter @JunkScience


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NEWS

‘Antibiotic-Free’ Meat Unappetizing When It Comes To Animal Welfare Bev Betkowski, Folio, Univeristy of Alberta

Contrary to popular belief, consuming products from animals treated with antibiotics is not a threat to human health Is your ‘antibiotic-free’ burger really a good thing? Not necessarily, says a University of Alberta agri-food expert. While companies like food giant Tyson are rushing to market their products as free of antibiotics and therefore safer for humans, consumers may find it less appetizing when they realize what it means for the animal at the other end of the food chain. “It can be a negative for animal welfare,” said Ellen Goddard, a food economist in the Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences. “What happens if a dairy cow gets mastitis, or an animal gets an infected cut?” Research conducted by Goddard jointly with the University of Bonn in Germany shows that consumers have a limited understanding of the connection between antibiotic use and livestock production. Of the Canadians surveyed in the study, 43 per cent said they’d be willing to eat meat from an animal that had received antibiotics, but at the same time, 55 per cent said it was important that the resulting food products came from a humanely treated animal. “We are not getting a balanced view. I’m worried that people are equating judicious use of antibiotics with zero use, and there’s a lack of understanding that zero use may not be good for animal welfare,” Goddard said. In fact, she added, the vast majority of people are eating products from animals given antibiotics over their lifespans, but may not know it. Real threat is bacteria from over-use of antibiotics There’s a growing belief that consuming meat, milk, cheese and other products from livestock treated

with antibiotics could reduce disease-resistance in humans, but the actual threat to human health is the increasingly potent bacteria, Goddard said. “I don’t think anything is going to happen to us because we eat meat from animals treated with antibiotics.” Industry regulations require that antibiotics be out of an animal’s system well before slaughter, she noted. “The real problem is that with overuse of antibiotics, bacteria are constantly evolving and developing resistance to treatment. That bacteria can affect us, but not likely through properly cooked meat. It could be spread to humans through air and water, by birds and animal waste, or through an infected cut, but it’s the bacteria that is the culprit.” Eliminating the use of antibiotics would cause unnecessary suffering for the animal, Goddard said. “We could make their lives worse or very short. Untreated animals have to be shifted out of the ‘antibiotic-free’ supply chain, which means early slaughter.”

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That, she added, also translates into economic loss. It also goes against the grain of basic beliefs the public holds about how food animals should be cared for, Goddard suggested. “There’s a public push for enhancing animal welfare and a huge sense of outrage when negative animal welfare hits the news. People are appalled. And many of us are willing to admit we don’t know how animals are cared for on the farm. We can say yes, we have no idea how livestock is kept, but it’s important that their quality of life is good. That’s the kind of person who feels strongly about how we should respect animals – whether they are the same people who demand antibiotic-free production, I don’t know, but our research is showing there is not a lot of understanding that the two are linked.” Goddard is concerned that could translate into “standards in livestock production that might be negative for the welfare of the animals.” continued on page 54

While food producers are rushing to supply a growing demand for the unclear promise of antibiotic-free meat and dairy products, consumers may not realize that the trade-off is a deterioration in animal welfare. (Photo - Richard Siemens)


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MANAGEMENT

Cattle and Cold Temperatures Agri-News, Alberta Ministry of Agriculture & Forestry

Ways to Lessen the Stress Created by the Latest Cold Snap on Livestock Barry Yaremcio, beef and forage specialist at the Alberta Ag-Info Centre, says to start by adjusting rations to meet requirements, as there is a limit to the amount of heat cattle can produce by digesting feed. “Cattle can stay warm down to -20C without wind chill, and the heat from digestion when they consume their feed will keep them warm. I am referring specifically to cattle, but these principles apply to other animals that are staying outside.” It is a natural response for animals to eat more feed when it gets cold. Provide extra hay or silage along with extra grain. Feed intake changes when the temperature drops below -20C. “You can’t just let them pick extra hay or pick straw off the bedding pack to make up the intake differential,” he adds. “Straw is a low protein, high fibre, low energy feed that takes a long time for the animals to digest. If they eat extra straw, the total protein content in the ration goes down, and bacteria can’t digest the fibre. In reality, their feed intake may drop 2, 3 or 4 pounds a day, and the animals will drop condition by eating only extra straw.” “At -30C, increase grain intake by an extra 2 lb of grain per head per day over and above what was previously being fed at -20C. If temperatures

drop to -40C, 4 lb of extra grain per head per day needs to be added.” Thin animals get cold faster than those that are in good shape, as they do not have the fat layer that provides insulation. “The recommendation of 4 lb of additional grain during the cold weather might have to be stepped up to 6 or 7 lb to maintain their body weight or hopefully get them to gain a little bit,” he explains. “It is difficult to do in cold weather but it is possible.” Next, producers need to be concerned with the protein content of the ration. “If the ration’s protein content is not adequate, the microbial populations cannot reproduce efficiently, as some of those microbes are needed to digeset the fibre in the feeds. If the fibre is not digested efficiently, feed intake will be reduced, restricting the amount of nutrients the animal is getting.” He says that one way to evaluate the protein content of the ration is to look at the manure. “If the ration contains adequate amounts of protein for proper rumen function, the ‘pats’ will be flat and appear normal. If the ration is deficient in protein, the pats will be more pyramid shaped and be rough in appearance.” Providing shelter behind a wind fence and providing a lot of bedding helps reduce the amount of energy needed for an animal to keep warm. If possible, move the thinnest animals

into a barn to protect them from the weather. “A cow laying on snow could potentially lose 25% of her body heat, especially if that snow is wet or the animal has a dirty hair coat.” He adds that the implications of not lessening the stress from cold temperatures could compromise the animals. “During cold weather, cows can lose anywhere between 1 to 3 lb a day. If the cow is losing weight in the last trimester of pregnancy, there could be more calving difficulties because the cow’s muscles are not as strong as they should be. Nutrient requirements for a lactating cow increase by 25% compared to one in late pregnancy. That is when the large weight losses can occur.” “Colostrum quantity – and possibly quality – will be compromised if the cow is losing weight prior to calving. The calf may not be as healthy or get up as rapidly after birth if the cow has lost weight in the cold weather. You could have a few more problems with disease. A cow with very little fat reserve will not be able to produce as much milk as one that is in good condition. The growth rate of the calf could probably reduce as well. Long term, if that cow stays skinny all the way through lactation, reproductive efficiency can be reduced by 20 to 30%.”

ANTIBIOTIC FREE…, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 50

Finding the right balance Livestock producers, government and the pharmaceutical industry are currently hashing out guidelines to strike a needed balance in antibiotic use, she added. Right now producers have discretionary use and many are administering the drugs as both a widespread preventive measure against disease and in some industries, to promote growth. “Industry could be using them more selectively in terms of how often

and what kinds they use, some are critical to human health, but as with people, antibiotics need to be used for livestock when medically necessary,” said Goddard. Educating the public should also be part of that strategy, she added. “We need to be more transparent about the nature of livestock production and why antibiotics are used. Right now, we don’t really know what the public understands about usage.”

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Adding to that confusion is a movement to use more vaccination of food animals as a way to avoid antibiotic use, she noted. That’s also clouded by uncertainty, as a percolating anti-vaccine movement raises similar doubts among consumers, Goddard noted. “We could see a backlash in five years for vaccine-free livestock, and so both issues are something we need to talk about now with the public.”


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CHAROLAI S Charolais Bull Wins Supreme

Success

Charolais Heifer Wins Reserve Champion Overall at Masterfeeds Junior Show

OBR OUTBACK DAKOTA 2D, sired by TR PZC Mr Turton 0794 ET, exhibited by Outback Ranch Land & Cattle, Simonds, NB was selected Grand Champion Charolais and Supreme Champion Bull of all breeds at New Brunswick Beef Expo, September 20th in Sussex, judged by Andre Steppler, Miami, MB.

WSS FERRIS WHEEL 855F, sired by SOS Hooey PLD 127D, exhibited by Zach Hammill of Badjeros, ON, was slapped Reserve Champion Female Overall at the Masterfeeds Junior Beef Show at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto, ON.

Prairie Cove/Cay’s Cattle and Serhienko/Hertz Top Ten Finalist in RBC Beef Supreme

BRCHE BERKLY ANN 8507 PLD ET, sired by M&M Outsider 4003 PLD, exhibited by Prairie Cove Charolais, Bowden, AB and Cay’s Cattle, Kinistino was a top ten finalist in the RBC Beef Supreme Challenge at Canadian Western Agribition in Regina.

SVY STARSTRUCK 712E, sired by HRJ Crowd Favourite 515C, with calf at side, SVY STARSTRUCK 938G, sired by D R Revelation 467, exhibited by Serhienko Cattle Co., Maymont and Brandon Hertz, Saskatoon, was also a top ten finalist in the RBC Beef Supreme Challenge.

NEWS

Industry Info Link Between Red Meat, Lower MS Risk Australian researchers have found there may be a connection between the consumption of unprocessed red meat as part of a regular diet and a lower risk of having a condition that can lead to Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Scientists studied subjects who showed signs of central nervous

system dymyelination which other research says leads to full-blown MS 83% of the time 10 years after diagnosis. The team discovered that subjects who ate more unprocessed red meat than the group that ate much less were between 37% and 52% less likely to be at risk for MS. Millennials Willing to Pay More Quality drives millennial food

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shopping and they are willing to pay more for it. According to a new survey, 80% of millenials value quality when it comes to food shopping, and nearly 70% are willing to spend more money on high-quality food. A majority of millennials want to know where their food comes from and how it is sourced. Transparency in food sourcing is important to continued on page 60


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CANADIAN CHAROLAIS YOUTH ASSOCIATION NEWS

Benefits of Participating in the CCYA Program Calina Evans, Director

Being a member of the Canadian Charolais Youth Association program comes with many benefits and opportunities. In order to become a member, anyone ages 21 and under can purchase an annual membership that allows access to everything CCYA has to offer. Some of the opportunities that are available from the CCYA program are scholarships, the Genetics Program and the Travel Program. These programs can be found on the Canadian Charolais Youth Association website and have forms for members to fill out if they want to participate in these programs. Some other benefits that CCYA provides are confidence, teamwork, leadership and friendships. Youth become more confident as they

develop skills under the guidance of older members and alongside peers. Public speaking is one skill that many members improve on as they practice it in competitions such as judging. CCYA members also work in teams throughout the week of the conference. By having to work with other youth members, participants gain the ability to work as a team with several others. Throughout the week, youth are placed in a variety of groups of different sizes. This also allows for members to meet new people and build friendships. If you asked any CCYA member about the friends they made at the conferences they would be able to go on and on about all the people they now know or have great friendships with. The program also teaches

CCYA NATIONAL BOARD charolaisyouth@gmail.com President: Keegan Blehm keegb34@yahoo.ca Vice-President: Reegan McLeod Reeganmc11@gmail.com Treasurer: Tyson Black blackbern@hotmail.com Secretary: Haley Rosso hrosso25@gmail.com

leadership skills. By working in herdsman groups with members of all ages, the younger members are mentored by the older members. Many of the members who are the oldest now were also mentored by members older than them. This type of leadership is beneficial to all participants of CCYA. One of the final benefits I will share about CCYA is the opportunity to travel around the four provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario, to attend conferences. The experiences in these new locations are unforgettable and unique. The CCYA program works hard to ensure there are many benefits and opportunities for youth members to take advantage of throughout the year.

Director: Evan Jamieson evanjamieson31@gmail.com Director: Megan Perih perihmegan@yahoo.ca Director: Calina Evans calinae13@gmail.com Director: Bradley Fergus bradleyfergus3@gmail.com

Vice-President: Logan Jamieson Treasurer: Robyn Young Secretary: Evan Jamieson CCYA Provincial Advisors SK: Jill Debenham kidsandcows@sasktel.net ON: Karen Black blackbern@hotmail.com MB: Jeff & Jackie Cavers tobbagirl@yahoo.ca AB: Kasey Phillips | kphillips@mcsnet.ca

2020 CCYA Conference & Show Executive President: Reegan McLeod

Youth Coordinator: Shae-Lynn Evans shaelynnevans03@gmail.com

INDUSTRY INFO, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 58

more than 65% of those surveyed, particularly for fresh meat and seafood. More than half of millennials will pay more for products that have adopted animal welfare standards and prefer to buy those responsibly sourced. Researchers Identify Promising New Gene Markers Feed efficiency improvements through genetic selection could significantly reduce production costs and benefit sustainability of beef production. Scientists at the University of Alberta have identified 19 genes that could serve as key markers for feed efficiency in cattle. The Alberta researchers examined genome-wide gene expression of

rumen, liver, muscle and back fat tissues - key tissues involved in energy metabolism. Of about 20,000 genes expressed in those tissues, the researchers identified 19 genes that are common to all four tissues and appear to be associated with feed efficiency. “The 19 overlapped genes identified from the strongest module trait relationships in four tissues are potential generic gene markers for feed efficiency,” the researchers say. Tool May Speed-Up Bovine TB Detection A new tuberculosis (TB) screening tool developed by researchers at Iowa State University and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA)

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can dramatically reduce the time to detect strains of Mycobacterium Bovis, the bacteria that causes Bovine Tuberculosis (TB), a serious livestock disease that affects the health of millions of animals and people worldwide. The new tool collects extremely low levels of volatile organic compounds emitted by the bacteria, making it possible to differentiate between disease causing and non-diseasecausing strains. The device can be used to collect and analyze samples within hours – much more quickly than current methods, which often take up to eight weeks, the university said in an announcement.


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MANAGEMENT

Successful Calving Seasons Start With Balanced Nutrition Lana Haight, Outreach & Engagement Specialist, University of Saskatchewan, Livestock & Forage Centre

The 2019 calving season at the Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence began long before the first calf hit the ground this spring. “We had a really good spring with calving,” said Krystal Savenkoff, facilitator for the cow-calf and forage program at the LFCE. “It was so exciting. In the first cycle, it was bang, bang, bang. By the time we got to the third cycle, we weren’t having to check for calves very often. With your calf crop, you always want them uniform. You can see a huge difference from your first cycle calves to your third cycle calves, just in pure production. You get more pounds per gain the older the calf.” At Termuende Ranch, the first calf was born on March 22, a couple of weeks before the herd’s “due date” of April 7. Savenkoff says her experience suggests that it is not unusual for Black Angus cows to calve a week early. When calving got into full swing, more than 84 per cent of the cows calved in their first cycle. Having 270 out of 220 cows and 100 heifers calve in that one month kept the Termuende crew busier than usual. “It’s what you’re aiming for. The more uniformity, the better.” This was a banner year for the Termuende after Savenkoff made some critical decisions months earlier in response to a lower-than-ideal conception rate the previous year. “We monitor mineral intake. We feed test. We weigh our cows so we know their body condition score. We annually test water and pastures. We know what we are putting into our cows. And they are checked regularly by a veterinarian. We do everything by the book. So, when we should be having good conception rates and didn’t, I just thought that we could do better,” said Savenkoff referring to the 2018 calving season. After talking to another producer in the Lanigan area, she decided to change the animals’ mineral regime. Starting in March of 2018, the animals at Termuende were provided chelated minerals in lick tubs that included molasses instead of loose mineral they were receiving. The molasses increased their mineral intake. As a research facility, the cow herd is divided into different feeding trials. “Their type of feed is always changing. Trying to correlate the type of feed to the reproductive results is 62

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hard. One year, those cows might be on swath grazing. One year, they might be on polycrops for part of the year. Another year, they might be on corn grazing.” In addition to the variety of feeding regimes, the animals at Termuende are also drinking water that contain sulphates. Sulphates in drinking water are known to bind trace minterals, including copper, magnesium and zinc, resulting in those minerals passing through the body without being absorbed. The reproductive system may be negatively affected when those minerals aren’t available to be absorbed through the rumen. For example, copper, magnesium and zinc are essential for cattle reproduction. This summer, the cow herds at Termuende Ranch and Goodale Farm were combined. On June 26 and 27, they along with 22 bulls were divided up and were moved to five pasture locations. The higher numbers are needed at the LFCE because the cow-calf pairs and the heifers are often in small paddocks for various research trials “I like to have enough bull power to make sure everyone gets covered in the first cycle,” said Savenkoff. She will pull one bull from a pasture after the first cycle because she wants to reduce the competition between the bulls on the second and third cycle

when there are fewer females to breed. Managing the cow herd from Goodale has worked slightly different because so many of the females are in projects involving artificial insemination (AI) research versus natural breeding. Of the 112 cows bred, 59 were by AI, and of the 39 heifers, 19 were by AI. The first calf was born on March 6, with the last one arriving on May 16. This year, regardless of research

trial, all the animals were fed chelated minerals in lick tubs from the end of March to pasture turn-out on June 28, later than other years due to the AI research projects. The LFCE will continue to use chelated minerals for both Termuende and Goodale herds, assuring a more balanced approach to total nutrition. As always, producers should consult with their nutritional professional for developing well balanced nutritional programs for their own herds.

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Krystal Savenkoff, forage and cow-calf program facilitator at the Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence. Photo: Gord Waldner


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Alberta Breeders

Barry & Lee-Ann Kaiser & family 403.787.2489 Box 209, Hussar, AB T0J 1S0 Barry 403.334.2489 Lee-Ann 403.334.2155 kaiserbarry@gmail.com

Kasey, Arlana, Kord & Peri Phillips Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0

T 780.358.2360 • C 780.656.6400 • kphillips@mcsnet.ca KREATING KONFIDENCE

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caught you looking! Your ad should be here. 306.584.7937

British Columbia Breeders

Manitoba Breeders SADDLERIDGE CHAROLAIS

Ralph Retzlaff 403.793.0794 Leonard Retzlaff 403.501.9333 Rosemary, AB • www.saddleridgecharolais.com

Charolais Connection • February 2020

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Ontario Breeders

Kevin, Crystal, Kory & Shaylin Stebeleski P/F 204.234.5425 Cell 204.365.6010 Box 266, Oakburn, MB R0J 1L0 | happyhavencharolais@gmail.com

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Quebec Breeders

Rollin’ Acres Charolais Full French Charolais 598516 2nd Line, Mulmur, ON L9V 0B6 chester.tupling@premierequipment.ca Chester Tupling 519.925.2938 C 705.627.0672

“Breeding the Cattle that Work in Both Rings.”

Charolais Connection • February 2020

Saskatchewan Breeders

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Wendall & Leanne Weston Box 206, Maidstone, SK S0M 1M0 • wlweston@sasktel.net

Tel 306.893.4510 • Cell 306.893.7801

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IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES IN OUR INDUSTRY

Calendar of Events February 15 P & H Ranching 10th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart

February 28 HEJ Charolais 15th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart

February 15 Saint Martin Test Station Sale, Saint Martin, QC

February 29 Winsnes Farms Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Viking (AB) Auction Mart

February 18 Rawes Ranches 37th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the ranch, Strome, AB

February 29 RRTS Charolais Bull Sale, 12:30 p.m., BC Livestock Co-op, Kamloops, BC

February 19 McLeod Livestock & Kay-R Land & Livestock Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Olds (AB) Cow Palace

March 1 Legacy Charolais 3rd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Botha, AB

February 20 Prairie Cove Charolais Bull and Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the ranch, Bashaw, AB February 21 “Muscle Up” at Stephen Charolais and Guests Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart February 22 SanDan Charolais/Springside Farms 23rd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Erskine, AB February 22 Myhre Land & Cattle Co./Bar J Charolais Bull Sale (Denbie Ranch & Guests) Ste. Rose du Lac, MB February 22 Quebec Select Bull Sale, Danville, QC

USA Breeders

February 23 Pro-Char Charolais 9th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Glenevis, AB February 24 “Bring on the Bulls” BOB Charolais Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m, Stettler (AB) Agriculture Society

March 1-2 100th Pride of the Prairies Bull Show & Sale, Lloydminster (SK) Exhibition Grounds March 3 Acadia Colony Charolais, Angus & Red Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Dryland Trading Corp., Veteran, AB March 5 Buffalo Lake Charolais 14th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Stettler (AB) Auction Mart March 6 M & L Cattle Company Bull & Female Sale, 7:00 p.m., at the farm, Indian River, ON March 6 39th Annual Select Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart March 7 High Country 46th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Pincher Creek (AB) Ag Grounds March 7 Wrangler Made 8th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Westlock, AB

February 26 Beck Farms & McCoy Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Milestone, SK

March 7 Ferme Louber Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Ste-Marie de Beauce, QC

February 26 Saddleridge Charolais with Kaiser Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping, Brooks, AB

March 8 Steppler Farms 9th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m. DST, Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB

February 28 Maple Leaf Charolais & Guests 16th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Calnash Ag Events Centre, Ponoka, AB

March 9 Palmer Charolais 9th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Bladworth, SK

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Calendar of Events March 10 Harvie Ranching Bull Sale, at the ranch, Olds, AB March 10 Built Right 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Provost (AB) Livestock Exchange March 12 McKeary Charolais Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping, Brooks, AB March 12 Wilkie Charolais & Cutbank Cattle Co. Red Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Stettler (AB) Auction Mart March 13 CK Sparrow Farms Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Vanscoy, SK March 13 16th Annual Northern Classic Bull Sale, Grand Prairie, AB March 13 Meridian Agriculture Co. Charolais & Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Acadia Valley, AB 74

March 14 Horseshoe E Charolais Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Kenaston, SK March 14 Blackbern, Whitewater & Kirlene Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Renfrew Pontiac Livestock Facility, Cobden, ON March 16 Flat Valley Cattle Co. & K Lazy T Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Medicine Hat (AB) Feeding Company March 16 Grassroots Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Dryland Trading Corp, Veteran, AB March 16 North West Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Kramer’s Big Bid Barn, North Battleford, SK March 19 Creek’s Edge Land & Cattle Co. 2nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Yellow Creek, SK

Charolais Connection • February 2020

March 19 Footprint Farms Bull Sale, 3:30 p.m., at the ranch, Esther, AB March 19 Lazy S Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., VJV Auction Mart, Beaverlodge, AB March 20 High Bluff Stock Farm Charolais & Simmental Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Inglis, MB March 20 Reese Cattle Co. 11th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart March 21 Pleasant Dawn Charolais 17th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Oak Lake, MB March 21 Rollin’ Acres/Whiskey Hollow & Guests 9th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Maple Hill Auctions, Hanover, ON March 21 Northern Impact VII Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., North Central Livestock, Clyde, AB


Calendar of Events March 21 Select Genetics Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at Forsyth Angus, Herbert, SK

March 25 HTA Charolais & Guest Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Rivers, MB

March 21 Canada’s Red, White & Black Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK

March 26 Elder Charolais 10th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coronach, SK

March 23 TRI-N Charolais Farms & Guests Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Lenore, MB March 23 Neilson Cattle Co. 30th Annual Bull Sale, at the farm, Willowbrook, SK March 24 Diamond W Charolais, Red & Black Angus 17th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Minitonas, MB March 24 Poplar Bluff Stock Farm & Twin Anchor Charolais 4th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Dryland Trading Corp., Veteran, AB

March 26 RanAMan Ranch 5th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Olds (AB) Auction Mart March 27 McTavish Farms & Guest 9th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Moosomin, SK March 27 Thistle Ridge Ranch Bull Sale, Taber (AB) Agriplex March 28 K-Cow Ranch Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the ranch, Elk Point, AB March 28 Coyote Flats Charolais 5th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coaldale, AB Charolais Connection • February 2020

March 28 Impact Angus & Charolais Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales March 28 Lazy S Cattle Co. Limousin & Charolais Bull Sale, 6:00 p.m., VJV Auction Mart, Rimbey, AB March 28 Borderland Cattle Company Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the ranch, Rockglen, SK March 28 Cornerview Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Cobden, ON March 28 Alameda Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Alameda (SK) Auction Mart March 28 8th Annual “Thickness Sells” Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Atlantic Stockyards, Truro, NS

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Calendar of Events March 28 High Point Charolais Bull Sale, 12:00 p.m., at Sunrise Charolais, Stayner, ON

April 2 Hunter Charolais 8th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Roblin, MB

March 28 Chomiak Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Viking (AB) Auction Market

April 2 C2 Charolais Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Killarney (MB) Auction Market

March 28 Candiac Choice Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Candiac (SK) Auction Mart

April 3 Fleming Stock Farm & RJ Livestock Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Foothills Auctioneers Inc., Stavely, AB

March 29 Best of the Breeds Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Yorkton, SK March 31 Prairie Distinction Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB March 31 White Lake Colony Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Balog Auction, Lethbridge, AB April 1 White Cap/Rosso Charolais & Howe Red Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the Howe Family Farm, Moose Jaw, SK 76

April 4 Vermilion Charolais Group 34th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., North Central Livestock, Vermilion, AB April 4 Maritime Bull Test Station Sale, at the test station, Nappan, NS April 4 Saunders Charolais 15th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Keady (ON) Livestock Market

Charolais Connection • February 2020

April 4 Transcon’s 24th Annual Advantage Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales April 4 JTA Diamond Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Courval, SK April 4 Acadia Ranching Charolais & Angus Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping, Brooks, AB April 6 North of the 49 th 17th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at Wilgenbusch Charolais, Halbrite, SK April 7 Cedarlea Farms “Git ‘R Done” Bull Sale, at Windy Willows Angus, Hodgeville, SK April 7 Gilliland Bros. Charolais 8th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at Chopper K Auction Mart, Alameda, SK


Calendar of Events April 9 Sliding Hills Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Canora, SK April 9 Daines Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart April 10 Spirit of the North Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Spiritwood (SK) Auction Mart April 11 Eastern Select Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Hoards Station Sale Barn, Campbellford, ON April 13 Cattle Capital Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Ste. Rose (MB) Auction Mart April 14 Top Cut Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Stockman’s Weigh Co., Mankota, SK April 18 Brimner Cattle Co., Cornerstone Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart

April 18 Cedardale Charolais 17th Annual Bull & Select Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Nestleton, ON April 18 Lindskov-Thiel Bull Sale, at the ranch, Isabel, SD April 27 Cassity Charolais Dispersal Sale, 1:00 p.m., VJV Auctions, Beaverlodge, AB June 18 – 20 Canadian Charolais Association AGM & 60th Anniversay Celebration, Russell, MB July 5 – 10 Canadian Charolais Youth Association Conference & Show, Olds, AB August 5 – 15 Charolais World Congress in Australia

Charolais Connection • February 2020

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Advertisers Index Alta Genetics Inc. .............................................67 Amabec Charolais ............................................70 Annuroc Charolais............................................70 B Bar D Charolais .............................................70 Baker Farms .....................................................70 Balamore Farm Ltd. ..........................................40 Bar H Charolais ......................................21,46,71 Beck Farms.............................................28,29,71 BeRich Farms...................................................68 Big Johnson Charolais ......................................43 Blackbern Charolais.....................................55,70 Bob Charolais..............................................25,68 BoJan Enterprises ............................................71 Borderland Cattle Co........................................72 Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. ..................................67 Bricney Stock Farms..........................................72 Bridor Charolais...........................................46,70 Brimner Cattle Company ..................................72 Buffalo Lake Charolais ................................48,68 By Livestock ........6,7,9,1113,21,33,39,47,57,IBC Campbells Charolais.........................................72 Carey, Brent .....................................................67 Cedardale Charolais .........................................70 Cedarlea Farms .............................................7,72 Charla Moore Farms.........................................72 CharLew Ranch...............................................68 CharMaine Ranching.......................................68 Charolais Journal..............................................67 Chartop Charolais ............................................72 Charworth Charolais Farms ..............................68 Chomiak Charolais ..........................................68 Circle Cee Charolais Farms ...............................68 Circle G Simmentals & Angus ...........................15 Cline Cattle Co.................................................69 Cockburn Farms ...............................................71 Cornerview Charolais .......................................40 Cougar Hill Ranch ............................................70 Coyote Flats Charolais ......................................68 Creek's Edge Land & Cattle Co....................49,72 C2 Charolais ...............................................62,70 DavisRairdan ...................................................67 Demarah Farms ................................................72 Diamond W Charolais ......................................72 Dorran, Ryan ....................................................67 Double P Stock Farms.......................................70 Dowell Charolais ..............................................68 DRD Charolais .............................................21,44 Dubuc Charolais...............................................71 DudgeonSnobelen Land & Cattle ....................71 Eaton Charolais ................................................73 Echo Spring Charolais..................................46,71 Edge, Dean ......................................................67 Elder Charolais Farms ....................................9,72 Fergus Family Charolais ....................................71 Fischer Charolais ..............................................68 Flat Valley Cattle Co. ...................................57,68 Fleury, Michael .................................................67 Flewelling, Craig...............................................67 Footprint Farms ...............................................68

Future Farms ....................................................68 Gilliland Bros. Charolais....................................72 Good Anchor Charolais ....................................68 H.S. Knill Company Ltd.....................................67 Happy Haven Charolais ....................................70 Harcourt Charolais ...........................................72 Hard Rock Land & Cattle Co.............................70 Harvie Ranching .........................................52,68 HEJ Charolais .............................................35,68 Hicks Charolais.................................................71 High Bluff Stock Farm....................................5,70 Holk Charolais..................................................68 Hopewell Charolais ..........................................72 Horseshoe E Charolais .................................45,72 Howe Family Farm............................................72 HTA Charolais Farm ......................................3,70 Hunter Charolais .......................................70,IBC JMB Charolais .................................................70 Johnson Charolais .......................................59,68 Johnstone Auction ...........................................67 June Rose Charolais..........................................72 K Lazy T Cattle Co............................................57 Kaiser Cattle Co. .........................................30,68 KayR Land & Cattle Ltd. .............................19,68 KCH Charolais..................................................69 Kirlene Cattle ..............................................55,71 La Ferme Patry de Weedon...............................71 Lakeview Charolais...........................................68 Land O' Lakes Charolais ...................................71 Langstaff Charolais...........................................71 Leemar Charolais..............................................68 Legacy Charolais .........................................39,68 LEJ Charolais ....................................................70 LindskovThiel Charolais Ranch.........................73 Louber Farm.....................................................41 M&L Cattle Co. ...........................................47,71 Mack's Charolais ..............................................71 Maple Leaf Charolais...................................33,68 Martens Cattle Co............................................72 Martens Charolais ............................................70 McAvoy Charolais Farm....................................72 McKay Charolais ..............................................70 McKeary Charolais ...........................................69 McLeod Livestock ........................................19,67 McTavish Farms................................................72 Medonte Charolais...........................................71 Meridian Agriculture Co. Ltd. ...........................64 Miller Land & Livestock.....................................71 Moyer Cattle Co...............................................46 Mutrie Farms....................................................72 Myhre Land and Cattle.....................................70 Nahachewsky Charolais....................................72 Norheim Ranching............................................67 Norway Valley Farms ........................................33 P & H Ranching Co......................................15,69 Packer Charolais...............................................71 Palmer Charolais .........................................11,72 Parklane Charolais............................................69 Phillips Farms...............................................72,75

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Charolais Connection • February 2020

Pine Bluff Farm.................................................74 Pleasant Dawn Charolais ...............................6,70 Potter Charolais................................................71 Prairie Cove Charolais.......................................69 Prairie Gold Charolais .......................................72 ProChar Charolais ......................................23,69 Qualman Charolais ..........................................72 R & G McDonald Livestock ...............................70 Raffan, Don......................................................67 Rawes Ranches............................................17,69 Reeleder, Andrew.............................................67 Reese Cattle Co................................................56 Rollin' Acres Charolais ......................................71 Ross Lake Charolais .....................................33,69 Rosso Charolais ................................................72 Royale Charolais...............................................71 RRTS Charolais .................................................69 Saddleridge Farming Co. .............................30,69 SanDan Charolais Farms .........................26,27,69 Saunders Charolais...........................................71 Serhienko/Voegeli Cattle Co.............................73 Sharodon Farms ...............................................71 Skeels, Danny...................................................67 Sliding Hills Charolais .......................................73 Snake Valley Farm ............................................56 Southside Charolais.....................................33,69 Southview Farms ..............................................71 CK Sparrow Farms...........................................IFC Springside Farms ....................................26,27,69 Spruce View Charolais......................................69 Stach Farms Charolais ......................................69 Stephen Charolais Farm...............................21,73 Steppler Farms Ltd. ................................12,13,70 Stock, Mark......................................................67 Sugarloaf Charolais .....................................61,69 Sunrise Charolais..............................................46 Sunrise II Charolais ...........................................46 Sunshine Oak Charolais....................................70 T Bar C Cattle Co. .........2629,35,37,62,64,67,77 Temple Farms...................................................73 Thistle Ridge Ranch ..........................................69 Transcon Livestock Corp..............................67,76 TRIN Charolais.................................................70 Turnbull Charolais .......................................51,69 Twin Anchor Charolais .....................................69 Wendt & Murray Farms Ltd. ........................64,69 Western Litho Printers ......................................67 White Lake Colony ......................................63,69 White Meadow Charolais Ltd. ..........................70 WhiteWater Livestock..................................55,71 Wilgenbusch Charolais .............................73,OBC Wilkie Ranch ...............................................65,69 Winsnes Farms .................................................37 WJ Simmentals.................................................43 Wood River Charolais ......................................73 Wrangler Charolais......................................53,69


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February 2020 Charolais Connection  

February 2020 Charolais Connection