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The Charolais Connection 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Ph. (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Home Page: http://www.charolaisbanner.com charolaisbanner@gmail.com ISSN 0824-1767 Manager/Publisher Helge By Managing Editor Candace By charolaisbanner@gmail.com @ByCandace

FALL 2017 • VOL. XXXIV, NO. 3

From the Field ..........................................................................................8

Production/Graphic Design Susan Penner charolais.susan@sasktel.net Web Design Dalyse Robertson pdmrobertson@gmail.com

Canadian Charolais Association ............................................................14

FIELDMEN:

De L’Association de Charolais Canadien ................................................16

Alberta & British Columbia

Herd Health ............................................................................................20 Profile – Lady Fane Charolais ................................................................25 CCYA News ..............................................................................................38 Controlling Pond Algae ..........................................................................40 Industry Info ............................................................................................41 Charolais Success ....................................................................................44 du champ ................................................................................................53 Calendar of Events ..................................................................................60 Index of Advertisers ................................................................................62

Craig Scott 5107 Shannon Drive, Olds, AB T4H 1X3 Res. (403) 507-2258 Fax (403) 507-2268 Cell (403) 651-9441 sbanner@telusplanet.net @craigscott222 Saskatchewan, Manitoba, USA & Eastern Canada Helge By 124 Shannon Road, Regina, SK S4S 5B1 (306) 584-7937 Fax (306) 546-3942 Cell (306) 536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com @CharolaisBanner SUBSCRIPTIONS: $9.45 per year $25.20 – 3 years (Prices include 5% GST) The Charolais Connection is mailed to over 13,000 cattlemen nationwide. Those cattlemen include all purebred Charolais breeders, buyers of purebred Charolais bulls from the past six years and all subscribers to the Charolais Banner. No material contained in the Charolais Connection may be reprinted without the permission of the Charolais Banner. The publishers reserve the right to refuse any advertisements. The material produced in this publication is done so with the highest integrity, however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. We are responsible for only the value of the advertisement. Animals in the photographs in the Connection have not been altered by computer enhancement or mechanical methods according to the knowledge of the publisher.

Printed by Print West, Regina, Saskatchewan Publications Mail Agreement No. 40047726 Postage paid at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

On the cover… is a great set of silver steers on feed at Coyote Flats Charolais. Photo: Craig Scott Design: Susan Penner

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Postmaster: Please return undeliverable publications (covers only) to: Charolais Banner, 124 Shannon Road, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1, Canada. Published by the Charolais Banner, Regina, SK (3 times per year - February, March and Fall)


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POINTS TO PONDER

From the Field Helge By

Here is hoping that everyone’s summer and breeding went well this year. The Charolais bull market was very strong this spring and when we did the final results of all the sales across Canada it showed us that the Charolais industry is gaining strength. For the past 36 years we have done a Sale Trends chart in the May Charolais Banner. This table shows you how the number of bull sales and averages have fluctuated over the past three and a half decades. This year we were able to acquire information on the most sales ever. In 2017 there were the most Charolais bulls ever sold in sales in Canada with 6% more bulls selling this year over last year. The overall average was down 8% which I find very good considering the feeder calf market was down last fall, at times of up to 40% over the previous year. So overall, the total gross dollars of sales were only down 3%. Yes, Canadian Charolais breeders are picking up market share and it shows in these numbers. In retrospect, this is the third highest average we have ever had and the 2nd highest gross dollars in the bull sales. The point I want to make here is there is room for more Charolais breeders and the need for more Charolais bulls is coming as more and more commercial producers realize that you need to crossbreed. There are a tremendous amount of straight bred females in the commercial herds that can utilize the hybrid vigor, added performance and identifiability that a Charolais bull will give them. Check out www.charolaisbanner.com

for sales happening across the country and if you have ever thought about becoming a Charolais breeder, I believe that the time is right to develop a profitable operation. There are a lot of people who will celebrate when this year is over. While some areas across the country had a great year with record yields and lots of feed, there were parts of Canada that had too much rain (making haying very difficult) and parts that were in severe drought (with very little feed). The fires also affected a lot of cattle producers in some regions. The cattle market from late spring to fall was also very shocking in both directions. In April/May/June the market was higher than anyone expected and then retraced to lower than necessary considering the packer profit margins and the beef demand at the retail level. In the three months from the middle of June with the drop in the fat market and the rise in the Canadian dollar, a finished steer was worth about $800 less. Beef demand has definitely been a savior to keep the prices from eroding even more with the increased production in North America. With the drought in parts of Western Canada and the shortage of feed, I think we will see more calves go to town this fall than normal. Some who normally would background and grow their calves out until February may opt to sell the calves and keep the feed for the cows. You will be seeing and hearing more about the Canadian Beef Sustainability project in which Cargill, Beef InfoXchange System (BIXS) and Verified Beef Production Plus (VBP+) combine for a pilot

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project this fall to produce the first verified sustainable supply chain for beef in the world. All Canadian cow-calf, backgrounder and feedlot operations are eligible to participate with sign up and auditing being done at each level of the chain. McDonalds and Swiss Chalet are the two retailers who have signed on at this time and it will be interesting how the consumer embraces this as well as those in the beef production chain. Later in this issue you will see many of the youth that showed Charolais influence animals and won this past season. There is a definite increase in winners across the country. Congratulations to all of them and thank you for showing Charolais. The Charcross steers and Charolais heifers have been very popular winning many shows across North American so don’t be afraid to encourage your children to take one for their next project. There are a number of sales that will have some show quality heifer calves available this fall. Come check it out. At www.charolaisbanner.com you can subscribe to our email list from a link on our home page. We occasionally send out emails with Charolais updates and if you want to receive these please add your name to our list. You can unsubscribe at any time, if you don’t find this information beneficial. May this issue find you finishing harvest and getting your fall work wrapped up. I wish you all the best in your marketing this fall and winter and look forward to seeing many of you down the trail. Until next time, Helge


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FROM THE CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

Dates to Remember CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais www.facebook.com/cdncharolais

PROVINCIAL REPRESENTATIVES: ALBERTA President: Stephen Cholak, Lamont Secretary: Jocelyn O’Neill, Innisfail SASKATCHEWAN President: Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw Secretary: Dave Blechinger, Rosetown MANITOBA President: Hans Myrhe, Dauphin Secretary: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie ONTARIO President: Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton Secretary: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC President: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secretary: Chantal Raymond, Sainte-Eulalie MARITIMES President: Ricky Milton, Cornwall, PE Secretary: Jennifer MacDonald, St. Mary’s, Kent Co., NB STAFF: General Manager: MEL REEKIE Registry Manager: LOIS CHIVILO Registry: JUDY CUMMER; PIPER WHELAN French Membership: Bernard Dore 514-910-4935 • bernarddore@videotron.ca EXECUTIVE: PRESIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net 1st VICE-PRESIDENT: ALLAN MARSHALL 35266 Rg Rd 33, Red Deer County, AB T4G 0N3 403.277.2594 C403.588.5282 allan@futurefarms.ca 2nd VICE-PRES: MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net PAST PRESIDENT: BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 613.646.9741 C613.312.0270 bh.cornerview@gmail.com DIRECTORS: BRENT SAUNDERS RR 3, Markdale, ON N0C 1H0 519.986.4165 C519-372-6196 F519.986.4273 saunders@bmts.com MATHIEU PALERME 814 Pink Rd., Gatineau, QC J9J 3N3 819.682.2723 C819.213.3143 matpalerme@yahoo.ca SHAWN AIREY Box 639, Rivers, MB R0K 1X0 204.328.7704 C 204.724.8823 htacharolais@hotmail.com JIM OLSON Box 882, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 3C3 204.252.3115 C204.856.6357 lejcharolais@gmail.com KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca

Mel Reekie, General Manager

Given the continued demand for Charolais bulls, it’s no secret they add to your bottom line. Charolais will improve your weaning weights and performance, feed efficiency and lean meat yield all while expanding your profit; more pounds is more profit. However, maybe sometimes we’re so focused on the terminal cross that Charolais offers, we forget about that cow. The cows with the maternal strength and structural integrity that are producing these powerhouse bulls. There are plenty of opportunities at various sales throughout fall to capture those standout females. The National Sale, Dispersals and Production sales through December offer not only quantity, but also quality. Place your confidence and trust in the diverse and knowledgeable breeders from across Canada as you add to your own foundation females. Sale catalogues can be viewed online at www.charolaisbanner.com under Events. The second annual Canadian Beef Industry Conference was held mid August where every facet of our beef industry was in attendance and concentrated on the theme, Sharing Common Ground. “With over 700 attendees for the program and 825 for the main banquet, along with the delivery of many well received sessions and forums for discussion, the 2nd annual Canadian Beef Industry Conference has succeeded in building upon the success of last year’s inaugural event. It has also created excellent momentum to further propel our National Beef Strategy forward as we look toward another exceptional conference planned for London, Ont., in 2018,” states 2017 CBIC Chair Virgil Lowe. As stated in their press release, “The 2017 CBIC was a joint collaboration by the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC), Canada Beef, the Canadian Beef Breeds Council (CBBC) and

www.charolais.com

LORNE LAKUSTA Box 37, Andrew, AB T0B 0C0 780.365.2079 C780.719.0264 spruceviewcharolais@gmail.com

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the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). Over 30 formal meetings among industry organizations were conducted around the main agenda, along with countless informal meetings. The conference raised over $20,000 for the Canadian Cattlemen’s Foundation. Overall attendance was 10% higher than in 2016.” To compliment your own commitment to our strong and competitive beef industry, consider attending the 2018 Canadian Beef Industry Conference in London, ON. Further details to come. We’ve seen some tough conditions across the country, too wet in Ontario and extremely dry through the prairies while the resilient cattle producers in BC continue to deal with wildfires. Mother Nature is not controllable but you can count on the comradery of our Charolais breeders. Accept this as your invitation to join us as Manitoba hosts the National Show and Sale on October 26 & 27 during AG EX in Brandon. People’s Choice will determine the Champions for the Wheat King Jackpot Bull Show with $6000 up for grabs – don’t miss the action on October 26 at 3:00 pm CDT. To support the 2018 CCYA being held in Brandon, Manitoba, there will be a Heifer Raffle during the National Sale that takes place at 7:00 pm CDT the evening of October 26. The Canadian National Charolais Show is scheduled for October 27 @ 2:00 pm CDT. CCA Scholarship Deadline – October 31 annually. Are you or do you know someone involved in agriculture and are registered in a post-secondary education program? Do you or your family use Charolais bulls? Submit your completed application to the CCA office by October 31 to be considered for one of three available scholarships totaling $3500; application forms are available at www. charolais.com/association/scholarships.

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DE LA CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE

Dates à retenir CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais www.facebook.com/cdncharolais

PROVINCIAUX REPRÉSENTANTS: ALBERTA Président: Stephen Cholak, Lamont Secrétaire: Jocelyn O’Neill, Innisfail SASKATCHEWAN Président: Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw Secrétaire: Dave Blechinger, Rosetown MANITOBA Président: Hans Myrhe, Dauphin Secrétaire: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie ONTARIO Président: Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton Secrétaire: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC Président: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secrétaire: Chantal Raymond, Sainte-Eulalie MARITIMES Président: Ricky Milton, Cornwall, PE Secrétaire: Jennifer MacDonald, St. Mary’s, Kent Co., NB PERSONNEL: Directeur général: MEL REEKIE Registry Manager: LOIS CHIVILO Registry: JUDY CUMMER; PIPER WHELAN Composition française: BERNARD DORE bernarddore@videotron.ca EXÉCUTIF: PRÉSIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 • 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net 1er VICE- PRÉSIDENT: ALLAN MARSHALL 35266 Rg Rd 33, Red Deer County, AB T4G 0N3 • 403.277.2594 C403.588.5282 allan@futurefarms.ca 2e VICE- PRÉSIDENT: MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net ANCIEN PRÉSIDENT: BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 • 613.646.9741 C613.312.0270 bh.cornerview@gmail.com ADMINISTRATION: BRENT SAUNDERS RR 3, Markdale, ON N0C 1H0 519.986.4165 C519-372-6196 F519.986.4273 saunders@bmts.com MATHIEU PALERME 814 Pink Rd., Gatineau, QC J9J 3N3 819.682.2723 C819.213.3143 matpalerme@yahoo.ca SHAWN AIREY Box 639, Rivers, MB R0K 1X0 204.328.7704 C 204.724.8823 htacharolais@hotmail.com JIM OLSON Box 882, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 3C3 204.252.3115 C204.856.6357 lejcharolais@gmail.com KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca LORNE LAKUSTA Box 37, Andrew, AB T0B 0C0 780.365.2079 C780.719.0264 spruceviewcharolais@gmail.com

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Mel Reekie, directeur général

Compte tenu de la demande soutenue pour les taureaux Charolais, ce n’est pas un secret qu'ils contribuent à vos profits. La génétique Charolaise améliorera vospoids sevrage et la performance, l’efficacité alimentaire et le rendement en viande maigre; tous des facteurs qui ajoutent du poids donc plus de livres se traduit en plus de profit. Cependant, peut-être nous sommes trop concentrés sur lecroisement terminal qu’offre le Charolais, et on oublie le côté de la vache. La force maternelle de ces vaches et leur intégrité structurale produisent ces taureaux à haute performance. Les différentes ventes au cours de l’automne représententde nombreuses opportunitéspour capturer la chance de s’approvisionner d’excellentes femelles. La vente nationale, les dispersions et les ventes de production cédulées au mois de décembre offrent non seulement de la quantité, mais aussi de la qualité. Fiezvous aux éleveurs réputés et bien informés de partout au Canada lorsque vous ajoutez à des femelles fondation a votre troupeau. Tous les catalogues de vente peuvent être consultés en ligne à www.charolaisbanner. comsous la rubrique événements. À la mi-août, tous les segments de l’industrie bovine se sont rassemblés à Calgary pour la deuxième Conférence annuelle sous le thème; « Partager un terrain d’entente. Le président de la conférence, Virgil Lowe a résumé l’évènement ainsi: Avec plus de 700 participants au programme et 825 pour le banquet principal, ainsi que de nombreuses séances et forums de discussion qui ont été bien reçues, la 2e Conférence annuelle canadienne de l’industrie bovine a réussi à exploiter le succès de l’édition inaugurale de l’année dernière. Elle a également créé l’élan nécessaire pour propulser davantage notre stratégie nationale pour la production de viande bovine tout en nous préparant pour la prochaine conférence prévue à London, en Ontario, en 2018. Tel qu’indiqué dans leur communiqué de presse, la conférence canadienne de l’industrie de la viande bovine est une collaboration entre le Conseil de recherche Charolais Connection • Fall 2017

des bovins de boucherie (BCRC), Canada Beef, le Comité conjoint des races (CBBC) et l’Association canadienne des producteurs de bœuf (CCA). Plus de 30 réunions formelles entre les organisations de l’industrie ont été menées autour de l’ordre du jour principal, ainsi que d’innombrables réunions informelles. La Conférence a recueilli plus de $ 20 000 pour la Fondation canadienne du bœuf. Dans l’ensemble il y avait 10 % de plus de participants qu’en 2016. Nous vous prions de considérer d’être présent à la Conférence de 2018 à London, en Ontario. Restez à l’écoute pour les détails à venir. Nous avons vu certaines conditions difficiles partout au pays, trop humide en Ontario et extrêmement sec à travers les prairies, tandis que les éleveurs résilients de la Colombie-Britannique continuent à faire face à des incendies de forêt. Mère Nature n’est pas contrôlable, mais vous pouvez compter sur la camaraderie de nos éleveurs de Charolais. Je vous invite à nous joindre au Manitoba lorsque nous serons accueillispour l’exposition et la vente nationale le 26 octobre & 27 pendant AG EX à Brandon. Le choix des spectateurs déterminera les Champions pour le concours jackpot de taureaux avec 6000 $ à gagner - ne manquez pas l’action le 26 octobre à 15h00. Aussi en but de ramasser des fonds pour la conférence junior de 2018, il y aura une tombola pour une génisse lors de la vente nationale qui aura lieu à 19h00 le 26 octobre. Le jugement Charolais est prévu pour le 27 octobre @ 14h00 heure centrale. C’est à ne pas manquer! Date d’inscription pour une bourses d’études offertes par l’Association Canadienne Charolais – 31 octobre Êtes-vous ou vous connaissez quelqu'un impliqué en l’agriculture et qui est inscrit à un programme d’études postsecondaires ? Est-ce que votre ferme familiale utilise des taureaux Charolais ? Si oui, nous vous invitons à soumettre votre demande dûment remplie au bureau de l’ACC au plus tard le 31 octobre. Vous serez considérés pour une de trois bourses disponibles pour un total de 3 500 $. Le formulaire de demande sont disponibles au site www.charolais.com/association/ scholarships


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HERD HEALTH

Determining Risk Level of Feeder Calves Roy Lewis, DVM

There are many factors one must consider when bringing in calves to feed to minimize BRD (bovine respiratory disease) that is still the number one cause of morbidity and often mortality in our feedlots or after weaning our calves. Knowing the history of the calves regarding weaning time, distance transported, vaccination and health history, as well as upcoming weather conditions, will help you determine level of risk. Independently, each pen or group of calves needs to have a risk category ranging from low risk to ultra-high risk in order to determine how they could be handled. The overall goal is to prevent disease outbreak and high death loss by implementing management changes, so you will get top performance from your calves. If we can determine risk level ahead of time that gives us hands up on battling the respiratory and other pathogens, we know the calves may be exposed to. The final step is making the economic calculation of preventative cost in terms of vaccines, labor, or metaphylactic antibiotics versus treatment and potentially higher death loss. As with most things in farming this is a gamble and of course there are always unknowns that can blindside us. In bringing in calves, or for that matter feeding your own calves, there have been many factors which increase risk and we need to manage or handle these as best as we can. Try and ask your self the question ahead of time. What is the risk level of this group of calves to developing respiratory disease and are there any management changes I need to do to mitigate or minimize this risk. High-risk calves for developing BRD are generally considered those presenting one or more of these points. 1. They have been co-mingled because auction market derived or mixed at home. Once a group has 20

settled, avoid adding in more calves and the quicker a pen is filled from as minimal a number of original owners the better. 2. Extended transport times where calves become stressed and dehydrated. The loading and unloading are more where the stresses come in, but if huge distances are transported, such as bringing in cattle from a province or more away trips, these calves in my opinion are ultra-high risk. The more local we can derive cattle the better, but that is not possible very often, as where calves are raised and fed can be two totally different areas of the country. Think of using electrolytes solutions such as ”destress” before transporting long distances. 3. Bad weather or wide temperature swings can create severe stress. Watchingthe weather channel may help, but you need to buy when you can. The further the distance travelled the more likely these temperature fluctuations are going to happen. 4. The on arrival procedures such as castration, dehorning and branding all have their stressors. The cattle industry is always under scrutiny from an animal welfare perspective for these procedures and in the majority of cases castration is done way ahead of weaning. Polled bulls are eliminating horns or the calves are dehorned early. Dehorning in the feedlot these days generally involves tipping the few horns that are left. If financial institutions and feeder associations or grazing reserves did not require branding there would be little done anymore. If you need to brand, minimize size and number of characters as much as possible. Better analgesics (pain killers) and anti-inflammatory drugs are being commonly administered that will help minimize stress in these painful situations. 5. Calves recently weaned with no or a poor (unknown) vaccination history. The old preconditioned Charolais Connection • Fall 2017

programs where calves have already been weaned a month is ideal. The greater the respiratory pathogens we have some protection for the better. This would include the viral as well as the bacterial components of the BRD complex. Don’t forget the clostridials and histophilus in your vaccination protocols. 6. Light weight calves or nutritionally compromised or parasitized (internal parasites suppress the immune system) may also carry an additional level or risk with them. To me calves under 400 pounds would be considered ultra-high risk. For the four to five weight calves high risk and above 600 pounds it depends on the other categories above as to how their risk was assessed. Veterinarians will vary in their opinions here. If calves fall into any one of the above categories they are considered high risk. Low risk are essentially your own calves preimmunized, weaned at home into a situation where they know where feed and water are. Weaning in older heavier calves and weaning in good weather with either fence line or some other type of soft weaning is considered low risk. This is most commonly exactly what most purebred producers do. It is ideal to remove the cows from the calves and that they are used to the ration they will be fed. Even in these situations pulls for respiratory disease can climb and you reach a point where treating them with antibiotics may become necessary to thwart an outbreak. With high-risk calves then the dilemma is what to do when you get them. Your herd veterinarian will have a protocol for what they believe is best and again it may vary pen to pen. Most would consider giving the necessary vaccinations and processing and covering with metaphylactic antibiotics. The newer macrolide antibiotics last a long time in the continued on page 21


HERD HEALTH, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 lungs and they are a completely different family to our treatment antibiotics. Usually the label states for the control of BRD or to use in cattle at high risk of developing BRD. This is where knowing the risk level of the calves coming into your feeding pen is critical in deciding which ones to treat. In the past, antibiotics were given in the feed but they needed to

be given for a long period of time and are hard to manage in large feedlots in order to avoid residues. The macrolide antibiotics come with a cost so this is where the risk benefit comes in and labor has to be factored in to the equation as well. Our experience has shown us that feedlot veterinarians by assessing the pens and using the appropriate vaccination, Charolais Connection • Fall 2017

deworming and metaphylactic treatment protocols BRD can be drastically reduced. In the future, other antimicrobial treatments as well as earlier detection of BRD and even more comprehensive vaccine programs will hopefully reduce mortality and morbidity even further.

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Aerial photo of terraces, grass waterways and berms. This was the first project David did in 1991.

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he Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) was pleased to announce The David Francis Farm, of Lady Fane, Prince Edward Island as the recipient of the 2017 The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA). The seventh-generation farm is operated by father and son team David and Brett Francis and families. David and Vicki Francis along with their five children have been farming for 36 years, on their seventh generation farm in Lady Fane, Prince Edward Island. The family farm has been designated as a Century Farm, tracing its beginnings back to 1844. Their son Brett recently joined the successful potato and beef operation. Upon receiving a degree in Agriculture from MacDonald College, David Francis spent 16 years with the Department of Agriculture in roles of Farm Management Rep, Ag Rep and Potato Disease Control Officer and in 1993, he returned to the farm full time. Brett Francis graduated from Nova Scotia Agricultural College in 2008 with a Diploma in Enterprise Management. He continued to work off the farm between the end of harvest and the beginning of the calving season, until 2015 when he returned home fulltime.

Today, the farm consists of an 80 cow/calf beef operation and 475 acres of Elite seed potatoes and potatoes for Frito Lay potato chips. They also grow barley, oats, corn and hay for rotational crops. The beef herd is made up of

David, Vicki, Keshia and Brett Francis at the Awards Banquet at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference

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Aerial photo of the farm taken from the northwest side of the property in early spring

Aerial photo of farm taken from the southeast side of the property, behind the barn. You will see the watering trough at the axis of the rotational grazing, sectioned pasture. The pasture is divided into three sections. The one closest to the barn provided access since the cattle were turned out of the barn after winter. You will notice the three degrees of grazing in the sections. There are round bale feeders in the closest pasture to supplement the feed until the pasture matures and the other fields dry up. The section with the heaviest forage is still inaccessible to the cattle.

Aerial photo taken from the west side of the property that includes the potato storage buildings. In this photo. You will notice hedgerows as well as headlands on the potato fields and strip cropping at the rear of the property.

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purebred Charolais and commercial cattle. The commercial calves are sold at 850 lb. as feeders, while the remaining purebreds are sold as breeding stock. Prince Edward Island has extremely sandy soil and is very susceptible to soil erosion. Sudden rainfall events can have devastating effects on farmland and can cause soil erosion resulting in washouts or runoff. The rainwater can carry topsoil into streams and wetlands. Extreme weather events are becoming more common in the Atlantic Provinces. Due to the nature of this weather, the Francises try to take more precautions and are constantly looking at ways to avoid as much damage as possible. Given the area’s rolling topography, soil conservation is a primary concern on the Francis farm. They assessed the holdings for environmental risks and challenges and in 1991 became one of the first farms in PEI to install an integrated soil conservation system. Grassed waterways and buffer zones, are natural filters that help slow down and filter runoff before it leaves the field. Terraces and berms allow production to occur on gradually sloped land by reducing the length of uninterrupted furrow. All of these measures reduce soil erosion and help safeguard the health of the adjacent streams and wetlands. To reduce erosion potential, the farm has invested heavily into soil conservation practices aimed at reducing water velocities leaving fields. The farm has installed 3,800 feet of farmable berms, 23,000 feet of grass waterways, and 12,500 feet of diversion terraces on 1,000 acres of arable crop land. Some properties are also strip cropped to reduce the run-off potential. In addition, through the PEI Alternative Land Use Services (ALUS) program, they have retired 35 acres of high slope land and have 1.5 acres of voluntary expanded buffer zones above and beyond the regulated 15 meters. Due to the nature of potato production on Prince Edward Island and particularly some late season potato varieties, it is very difficult to establish cover crops on fields after harvest. This results in exposed topsoil in fields at the end of the growing season and over the winter months that can be highly susceptible to erosion. To combat this, the farm routinely protects post-harvest potato fields by establishing cover crops or bale busting hay to cover up the bare land and reduce the potential for soil erosion. In a typical year, the farm will apply 200 bales of hay to 70 acres of potato land, and mixed grain will be broadcast seeded on another 300 acres. They have maintained and improved hedgerows on their farm, and have only done selective cutting of their 100-acre wood lot. All of these steps are taken to help prevent the wind and water erosion of topsoil throughout the winter months. David and his son Brett have been steadily improving their soil conservation measures year-over-year for many years now. For tillage they still use the roll over plow in sloped areas but for tender ground they have adopted the European technology in the Pottinger Syncro chissle plow. They work over half their potato acres in the spring and fall. This practice results in 20 to 30% crop residue on the

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surface for the winter before potatoes. Prince Edward Island potato farmers are required by law to follow a minimum three year crop rotation. The Francis farm has implemented rotational crops for a three to four year rotation with back-to-back hay years on some properties, believing an appropriate crop rotation is paramount to maintaining productive soils. In the late 1990s the Federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) put the PEI livestock industry on notice that unrestricted livestock access to streams and wetlands would no longer be tolerated. This was done to protect water quality and aquatic life downstream. Ironically, DFO did not apply the same treatment to other Canadian provinces, only on PEI. After much deliberation of the costs and benefits, the PEI livestock industry embraced the restriction of livestock from streams and wetlands across PEI. On the Francis farm all pastured livestock are fenced from two streams running through the farm. One stream is fed from a fresh water spring located on the farm, while the other runs from a pond on adjacent land. In total, 8,600 feet of fencing along waterways has been installed. To replace this natural source of drinking water, 125 feet of poly pipe waterline carrying water and electricity was run from a well located on the farm. This line had to be buried two and a half feet deep and bored under a roadway to supply water to pasture on the north side of the roadway. David and Brett were early participants in the ALUS program. This program pays farmers an annual payment on a per/acre basis for conservation practices above and beyond legislated measures. Prince Edward Island is the first province in Canada to have a provincially supported, province–wide ALUS program. PEI’s ALUS program was launched in 2008 and today has more than 430 clients. The program assists farmers in reducing soil erosion, increasing wildlife habitat and reducing the impacts of climate change. Through the ALUS program they were able to access funding to help pay for conservation measures. In addition to the fencing from streams and waterways, the Francis family have made major investments in fencing for a rotational grazing system on 120 acres of pasture. They have three rotational pastures on the south side of the road near the farm and another five on the north side of the road. They are seeing positive results in weight gain and herd health for their animals since they incorporated rotational grazing. Prince Edward Island is known for its harsh winter storms that can deliver high winds and heavy snowfall. As a result, most beef operations have barns to house cattle from November to May. The Francis farm uses barns with a straw pack. Manure is removed from the barn in the spring and is allowed to compost for 1 to 2 years before applying it to the land. During the composting period, they often hire a dozer to turn it. Manure is applied to 150 acres of land each year, thus improving organic matter which in turn greatly improves continued on page 30

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Fenced waterway in the pasture

Part of a 70 acre block of strip cropped land. Recently cultivated potatoes on the right, barley crop on the left. Strip cropping in this section includes potatoes, grain and hay.

Two Louis cattle oilers that help to cut down on flies. Cows also enjoy the back scratcher and the mineral lick.

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Clear waterway with no access to livestock through pasture

Permanent water trough on concrete pad in high traffic area

the water-holding capacity and nutrient levels in soils. This father and son team are active participants in the PEI Environmental Farm Plan (EFP). This program assists farmers and landowners to identify and incorporate best environmental practices in their farming activities by developing a practical plan for operating their farm in a way that is environmentally sustainable, socially acceptable, and economically viable. This industry led initiative assists farmers in developing a strong

environmental awareness in all aspects of their farming operation. David and Brett have assessed all of their properties and maintain and update their EFP every five years. Whenever possible; the Francises use technology to mitigate risk on their farm. They use professional crop scouting for effective integrated pest management. They calibrate their sprayer every season, and manage the fertilizer requirements for optimum usage. With his smart phone, Brett follows weather patterns very closely during the growing season, with hopes of avoiding a rain storm when managing their potato, cereal and forage crops. The farm also has provincially approved pesticide and fuel storages. David and Brett continue to play a major role in public awareness with regard to sustainable agriculture practices. They have introduced the benefits of sustainable farm management to many farmers, encouraging participation in stewardship activities. David is a tireless promoter of the ALUS program, and through his advocacy; many farmers have joined the program. The David Francis Farm was the recipient of the PEI Soil and Crop Improvement Association 2014 Soil Conservationist of the year Award – Cash Crop Division. Each year this award is presented to a deserving farm business. It recognizes practices that conserve or protect continued on page 32

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soil and water resources. It is awarded by the PEI Soil and Crop Improvement Association. John Hooper, President of the PEI Soil and Crop Improvement Association said that “as a very successful small farm operation, they (David Francis Farm) are dedicated to growing economic opportunities in rural PEI in a sustainable fashion. They have served their community well, formally through public service and informally through local initiatives.” In February, 2017, the David Francis Farm was honoured as the recipient of the Gilbert R. Clements Award. This award, named after the late Environment Minister, is given annually to a farm that is economically viable, environmentally sound and socially responsible in the production and/or marketing of high quality food from a sustainable system. David Francis has a long history of incorporating land stewardship into his farming operation and as a result, he is frequently asked to speak on the topic. An engaging and entertaining public speaker; David recently spoke to the PEI Soil and Crop Improvement Association (PEISCA) conference about his involvement in the ALUS program. He has hosted tours at his farm; and when he can in casual situations, speaks to his peers about his experience of what works and what does not work for sustainable agriculture. David has served as a spokesperson for environmental stewardship in PEI agriculture since he began farming full time, over twenty-three years ago. Through his advocacy and his actions, David has introduced the benefits of sustainable management to many fellow farmers, encouraging the uptake of stewardship activities. These 6th and 7th generation farmers continue to prove that not only is environmental stewardship well established on Island farms, but that eco-friendly practices can be successfully integrated into any modern, thriving agri-business. David is a member of the PEI Federation of Agriculture, Director of the Maritime Bull Testing Station, Seed Rep for the Summerside District of the PEI Potato Board, long term Director for the Moncton Farm Machinery Show, and Director for the Maritime Charolais Association. Last year David accepted the

Blowing snow, this picture demonstrates the potential for significant water runoff in the spring.

continued on page 34

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request to represent the PEI Cattle Producers as a Director on Canada Beef. Brett and his wife Keshia keep busy at home on the farm with two children, Helene and Florence. They are expecting their third child in the fall. The farm has hosted many tours including the Canadian Charolais Association, the Annual Maritime Charolais Association summer picnic and tour, many Agriculture Certificate Programs from local high schools and has hosted a non-denomination community Christmas Service in their barn. They also welcome many visitors who have questions or interest in farming on PEI. David and Brett will be hosting a bus tour for the Dundas Soil and Crop Improvement Association of Ontario this summer. The farm is always happy to donate farm produce regularly to local community events and fundraisers such as church suppers and local school lunch programs. All five of David and Vicki’s children were involved in their local 4-H program and have shown their purebred Charolais cattle throughout the Maritimes and at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto. David and Brett would like to thank the PEI Cattle Producers for this nomination for the TESA Award, especially Rinnie Bradley for all her patience and time spent collecting and organizing the above information. The TESA award is presented annually. Nomination or application details can be found on the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association page: http://www.cattle.ca/sustainability/the-environmentalstewardship-award/how-to-nominate/

David with two of his granddaughters, Happy Harvest is complete!

Undisturbed waterway on the pasture on the east side of the property. This one is fed from a fresh water spring that starts on the farm.

David Francis harvesting potatoes with hauler beside

David and Vicki Francis

Potato harvest 2016, Keshia, their children and niece

Brett, Florence, Helene and Keshia

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Helene checking the bull pen

Inside view of barn

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CANADIAN CHAROLAIS YOUTH ASSOCIATION NEWS

2017 Show News Raelynne Rosso, National Secretary

Hi Everyone, On August 2-5, 2017, in Barrie, Ontario, we held another successful CCYA Conference and Show. There were 59 exhibiters, from Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. To begin the week we started with a quiz on the cattle industry, and then of course everyone’s favorite – the mixer, which once again was a blast. Thursday was judging day, where we had to judge three classes: bred heifer, heifer calf and bull calves. The CCYA NATIONAL BOARD charolaisyouth@gmail.com President: Shelby Evans sle379@mail.usask.ca Vice-President: Wyatt Ching w.ching476@gmail.com Treasurer: Aidan Jamieson awjamieson@gmail.com Secretary: Raelynne Rosso littlerosso@hotmail.ca

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senior and intermediates gave oral reasons on all three classes and the juniors gave just one set on the heifer calves. The other half of the day we had Team Judging and Marketing. In the evening, we went to Sunrise Charolais for the Keep and Cull competition and had a delicious beef on a bun supper. Friday everyone had their game faces on for Showmanship and Team Grooming. On Saturday, the final day started with our AGM, and after lunch we had the closing ceremony to start our Director: Bret Marshall bret@futurefarms.ca Director: Keegan Blehm keegb34@yahoo.ca Director: Tyson Black blackbern@hotmail.com Director: Bradley Fergus bradleyfergus3@gmail.com Ex-Officio: Shae-Lynn Evans evans32s@uregina.ca

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Conformation classes. When it was time to get cattle ready for the show, it was awesome to see all the kids helping each other with such great teamwork. To end the week off, we had our Awards Banquet, where lots of dancing, laughs and memories were shared with new and old friends! Thank you to the sponsors, volunteers, and parents that helped us put on our successful CCYA 2017 Conference. Can’t wait to see everyone next summer in Brandon, Manitoba! 2018 CCYA Conference & Show Executive President: Lindsay Verwey Vice-President: Keegan Blehm Treas: Randi Verwey Secretary: Kiernan Olson CCYA Provincial Advisors SK: Suzanne Smyth | suzannetylersmyth@gmail.com ON: Billie-Jo Saunders | dbjsaunders@gmail.com MB: Donna Jackson | Jackson7@mymts.net AB: Kasey Phillips | kphillips@mcsnet.ca Youth Coordinator: Kirstin Sparrow kp.sparrow@hotmail.com


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MANAGEMENT

Controlling Pond Algae with Barley Straw John C. Holz, Water Quality Specialist, School of Natural Resource Sciences, University of Nebraska

Algae are microscopic, free-floating plants which comprise a critical component of a lake's food web. They are fed upon by tiny animals called zooplankton which are an important food source for fish. Algae color the water green or brown, and uncontrolled growth can lead to nuisance surface scums, poor water clarity, noxious odors and an overall reduction in the lake's recreational value. Excessive levels or "blooms" of algae occur when nutrients, especially phosphorus, are abundant. After taking steps to reduce the amount of phosphorus entering a lake, it may be desirable to control the algae growth directly. Typically this is accomplished by treating the lake with copper-containing compounds such as Cutrine Plusr or copper sulfate. These treatments are effective short-term controls of algae, but they are also toxic to nontarget organisms that are important food sources for fish such as zooplankton and insect larvae. Re-application of these chemicals is usually necessary several times each year and the long-term buildup of copper in the lake sediments is an environmental and health concern. The Centre for Aquatic Plant Management (CAPM) in the United Kingdom is promoting a method of controlling algae that involves the application of barley straw to lakes. As the straw decomposes in the lake, it releases a chemical which inhibits algal growth. This method may be a good alternative to using coppercontaining compounds since it is not known to have toxic effects on rooted aquatic plants, zooplankton, insect larvae or fish. It appears to be a costeffective and environmentally acceptable way to control algae in ponds and lakes. When to Apply the Straw The decomposition process is temperature dependent and occurs faster in warmer water. When the 40

water temperature is below 50oF, it takes approximately six to eight weeks for the decomposing straw to produce enough of the growth inhibiting chemical to effectively control algae. However, it only takes one to two weeks when the water temperature is above 68oF. Once the straw begins to produce sufficient amounts of the chemical, it is likely to control algae for four to six months. Therefore, straw should be applied in mid-late April in order to control summer algal growth in Nebraska ponds and lakes. Amount of Straw to Apply The amount of straw required to control algal growth depends on the surface area of the lake. Lakes with a history of algae problems should be treated at a rate of 225 pounds of barley straw per surface acre. This rate is equivalent to about 0.8 ounces of straw per 10 square feet of surface area. Lower doses can be tried, but should not fall below 90 pounds of straw per acre or 0.3 ounces per 10 square feet. The effectiveness of the straw is reduced by sediments suspended in the water (i.e. “muddy” water). Therefore, a higher dose may be required in "muddy" lakes or lakes with extremely severe algae problems. In these types of lakes, apply 450 pounds per acre (1.7 oz per 10 square feet), but do not exceed 900 pounds per acre (3.3 oz per 10 square feet). The decomposition of the straw requires oxygen, and applying excessive amounts (greater than 900 lb per acre) of straw could reduce the oxygen content of the water to levels that stress or kill fish. Example: Determining the amount of straw required to treat a 5-acre pond. 1. The surface area of the pond is 5 acres. 2. The selected dose is 225 pounds of straw per acre. 3. Multiply the area of the pond (in Charolais Connection • Fall 2017

acres) by the amount of straw required per acre to calculate the total amount of straw required to treat the whole pond (5 acres x 225 lbs/acre = 1125 lb). 4. To calculate the number to bales needed to treat the pond, divide the total amount of straw required to treat the whole pond by the weight of a single bale of barley straw. For this example, assume one bale weighs 45 pounds. However, the size and weight of bales can be highly variable. It is recommended that the approximate weight of the bales be determined at the time of purchase (1125 lb, 45 lb/bale = 25 bales). How to Apply the Straw 1. The straw bales must first be broken apart. Bales are packed too tightly and do not allow adequate water movement through the straw. 2. The loose straw should be placed in some form of netting. In larger lakes and ponds, CAPM suggests wrapping the straw in the cylindrical netting commonly used for wrapping Christmas trees. This netting can be used to construct straw-filled tubes up to 65 feet long which contain about 110 pounds of straw. Loose woven sacks (e.g., onion sacks) can be used in small ponds that require low doses. 3. Use floats to suspend the strawfilled netting in the upper 3 to 4 feet of the pond. The straw will lose its effectiveness if it sinks below this depth. Water movement near the surface will keep the straw well oxygenated and distribute the growth inhibiting chemical throughout the upper portion of the pond. This ensures that the chemical is produced where the majority of the algae are growing and away from the bottom sediments which will inactivate the chemical. Therefore, it is recommended that floats be inserted inside the netting at the same time the netting is filled with straw. The netting is then anchored into place continued on page 41


NEWS

Industry Info Eskimos Open Reindeer Slaughterhouse A new $1.8 million slaughterhouse in the City of Merkoryuk on Nunivak island, 40 miles off the mainland coast of Alaska in the Bering Sea, is expected to produce meat from its 2,500 head herd of reindeer. It is the largest source of reindeer meat sold commercially in the state. The local government plans to reduce unemployment by producing cuts of reindeer, selling product in urban parts of Alaska such as Anchorage and ultimately the continental 48 states. The carcasses are sent in halves to Anchorage, where they are processed and packaged by Alaska Commercial Company. University Opens Purebred Unit Kansas State University (KSU) has dedicated a new purebred beef unit at its Stanley Stout Center to expand the research capability of the department. The new $6 million unit replaced an adjacent unit originally built in 1957. One building will host classes and serve as space for management and research. A processing facility will be used for hay storage; and a feed intake research facility will be used to research feed efficiency, according to the article.

India Issues Cattle ID Cards Cattle and buffalo in India will soon have unique ID numbers, or “animal health cards.” India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi has initiated a plan to assign unique 12-digit identification numbers attached to ear tags of 88 million cattle in India by the end of 2017. The ID card will track activities and provide information to ensure vaccinations, monitor breeding cycles and increase scientific data, resulting in better breeding and an increase in quality milk production. In 2007, cows were issued ID cards by Indian border guards to reportedly try to stop cattle smuggling in villages from West Bengal to Bangladesh. Cuba to Foster Animal Ag Representatives of Cuba and the UN International Fund of Agricultural Development (IFAD) has signed onto a project, several years in development, to promote the growth of the livestock sector in the central part of the island country. The project is designed to benefit 11,500 families in a rural province.

The livestock center, which was once flourishing in the area, has been declining since the 1990s due to a lack of investments. It is the second project the IFAD has launched into Cuba, the first focusing on crop production. Cargill Expands Plant in Canada Cargill, Inc. said that it plans to spend $2.7 million to expand and upgrade its beef facility in Guelph, Ontario, where the company processes 1500 head of cattle each day. The Ontario Government will supplement the cost of the expansion project by contributing $442,000. The company is expected to install value-added protein process technology at the facility that will allow for the manufacture of protein-rich animal feeds, while also reducing the plant’s impact on the local environment.

POND ALGAE, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 40 using rope attached to bricks or concrete-filled buckets. Where to Apply the Straw In order to improve the distribution of the growth inhibiting chemical, CAPM recommends placing several small quantities of straw around a pond. Place each net of straw roughly equidistant from other nearby nets and the shore. The placement of the nets does not need to be exact and practical considerations such as corridors for boating and angling may influence the location of the nets. In small ponds where only one net of straw is required, place the net of straw in the center of the water body. Acknowledgments Much of information in this barley straw management guide was obtained from the Centre for Aquatic Plant Management's website. For further information contact: Lake Water Quality Extension Program, University of Nebraska, (402) 472-7783. Charolais Connection • Fall 2017

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CHAROLAIS

Success

Porter Fox, Eddystone, MB, won Reserve Grand Champion Steer competing against 31 steers at the Dauphin Regional 4-H show. The show and sale on June 29th was judged by Chad Hollinger. His steer weighed 1,393 lb and sold to Horse Hill Land and Cattle for $1.80/lb.

Gwyn Beatty, Chauvin, had Reserve Grand Champion Steer at the Wainwright, AB 4-H Regional Show June 7th competing against 20 steers. The judges were Ryley & Toby Noble. The steer weighed 1,422 lb and sold for $2.20/lb to Repso Oil & Gas.

Grand Champion Steer at the Carman (MB) 4-H Regional Show on July 13th was won by Michael Steppler, Miami, topping 40 steers judged by Kelly Ferris. The steer weighed 1,480 lb and sold for $2.95/lb to Loadline Manufacturing, Winkler. The Reserve Grand Champion Steer was won by April Steppler, Miami. Her steer weighed 1,465 lb and sold for $2.65/lb to SJ Agronomy, Miami.

Above: Reegan McLeod, Claresholm, AB, had a great day, July 12th at the Alberta 4-H Provincial Heifer show. She won Grand Champion Charolais Female and was overall Reserve Champion Female of the entire show, with CML Firefly 502C by CML Encore 4Y and her MVY All Shook Up 18C heifer calf. The Judge was Kurt Pedersen. Two days later in the Alberta Summer Synergy Show, Reegan and her pair won Reserve Champion Charolais Female, judged by Dr. Scott Schaake. Left: Shae Noble of Pierceland, SK, won Grand Champion at both the local 4-H club show and the District 36 Regional 4-H Show in Meadow Lake judged by Jim Grant with her Charolais influence steer. At the regional on June 6th the steer weighed 1,525 lb and sold for $3.10/lb to Meadow Lake Power and Equipment. Bottom right: Allyson Tezlaff, Viscount, SK had Reserve Grand Champion Female at the Saskatoon 4H Regional Show, July 9th. There were 110 females shown and the judge was Claude Wasden.

Calina Evans, Kenaston, SK, had a great day, July 9th at the Saskatoon 4-H Regional Show. She won Champion Yearling Heifer, with Steppler Miss 6213D (above by Sparrows Copenhagen, and Champion Continuation Female, with LAE Calypso 555C (right) by Circle Cee Legend and her HRJ Maverick bull calf, that won Grand Overall. The Judge was Claude Wasden.

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Meagan Perih, Dauphin, MB won Champion Continuation Female and overall Grand Champion Female at the Dauphin Regional 4-H Show on June 30th. The judge was Chad Hollinger. Brett Grieve, Fillmore, SK, won Grand Champion Female, with SKW Popcorn 109C, in the Mixed Breed Class at the Manitoba Youth Beef Roundup held Aug. 4th to 6th in Neepawa, MB. 69 youth from Manitoba and Saskatchewan attended the 10th annual event with 78 head of cattle plus calves shown.

Koryn Duncan, Coronation, AB, won Reserve Grand Champion Steer with a Charcross at the Coronation District 4H Beef Show and Sale June 7th. The judge of the 56 steers was Tyson Bieleny. The steer weighed 1,482 lb and sold for $2.55/lb to Coronation Seed Cleaning Co-op.

A silver steer weighing 1,190 lb from Kayden Englot of Candiac, SK was Reserve Grand Champion at the Candiac 4-H Show on July 6th. The judges for this first time club show were Shelby King & Ryley Gutzke. The steer sold for $2.60/lb to Candiac Auction Market.

Will Banford, Eastend had Grand Champion Steer at the Maple Creek, SK 4-H Regional Show June 13th, judged by Jamie Rae Pittman. His steer competed against 50 steers, weighed 1,480 lb and sold for $4.25/lb to Instow Reclamation, Shaunavon and Rick Peterson, Climax. This is the third year in a row that the Banfords have had a Champion here.

A Charcross heifer from Katelyn Harrison, Rorketon, MB, won the yearling heifer division of the Dauphin 4-H Regional Show on June 30th.

Jessica Gomke, Medicine Hat, AB, won Champion Yearling Heifer and Reserve Supreme Purebred Champion at the Medicine Hat & District 4-H show June 10th.

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Mick Davies, Medicine Hat, AB, won Grand Champion steer out of 41 steers at the Medicine Hat & District 4-H Show and Sale June 10th with judge Darby Delorme. The steer weighed 1,742 lb and also won the Highest Rate of Gain with a 4.37 ADG over 212 days. With shrink the steer sold weighing 1,690 lb for $4.20/lb to Rocky Mountain Equipment to net Mick $7,098.

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Rylan MacGillivray, of Kinistino, had Reserve Grand Champion Female at the Prince Albert (SK) Regional 4-H Show on June 11th with Cays Rosey 13D by PCC Rome 437B. There were 52 females in the show and the judge was Rob Voice.

Kateri Blair won Reserve Grand Champion Steer at the Willow Creek District 4-H Show in Claresholm, AB and was Grand Champion at the Claresholm Club level. Sir Loin’s starting weight was 807 lb, finished weight of 1,509 lb, sale weight was 1,464 lb and sold for $3/lb to Earl & Diane Hemmaway. Mike Munton was the district judge of the 30 steers.

Kamryn Gilliland, Carievale, SK won the Champion Continuation Female at the Alameda Regional 4-H Show, June 10th. Jeff Lees judged.

Left: Elsie Rawlings, Armstrong, BC won Grand Champion Steer at the Okanagan 4-H Stock Show and Sale held July 4-8th in Armstrong. The 25 steers were judged by Kevin & Kailey Wirsta. The steer weighed 1,470 lb and sold for $3.75 /lb to Beachcomber Home and Leisure, Vernon. The steer was purchased from Kay-R Charolais.

Kord Phillips, of Waskatenau, AB, won Grand Champion Steer at the Fort Saskatchewan 4-H Beef Show on May 29th. The steer, judged by Robert Dixon, weighed 1,396 lb and sold for $3/lb to Tailor Made Insurance. Below: Addison Charbonneau from the Byemoor, AB, 4-H Beef Club won Grand Champion of the Byemoor Club and Res. Grand Champion at the Stettler Regional Show with her steer Traveller. The show on May 23rd was judged by Bill Dietrich. The steer weighing 1,262 lb sold for $3.15/lb to Springside Farms, Airdrie.

Right: The Reserve Grand Champion steer was won by Mariah Mitchell, Armstrong with a 1,430 lb steer purchased from Squaw Valley Ranch, Lumby, that sold for $4.30/lb to Associated Ready-Mix, Armstrong. The sale continued to strengthen and averaged a record $5 plus/lb with an high of over $7.

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POINT A SURVEILLER

Du champ Helge By

J’espère que tout le monde a passé un bel été ainsi qu’une bonne saison de reproduction. Le marché du bœuf Charolais a été très fort ce printemps et lorsque nous avons reçu le résultat final des ventes à travers le Canada, cela nous a prouvé que l’industrie du Charolais prend de la force. Depuis les 36 dernières années, nous avons réalisé un graphique des tendances de ventes dans le catalogue Charolais du mois de mai. Ce tableau nous montre de quelle façon le nombre de ventes de taureaux et les moyennes ont fluctué depuis 3 décennies et demie. Cette année, nous avons pu obtenir de l’information sur le plus grand nombre de ventes jamais effectuées. En 2017, selon les ventes, il y a eu le plus grand nombre de taureaux Charolais vendus, soit 6% de plus que l’année précédente. La moyenne globale a baissée de 8%, ce qui me semble très bon, considérant que le marché des veaux de lait était en baisse l’automne dernier, jusqu’à 40% par rapport à l’an dernier. Donc, dans l’ensemble, le total des dollars bruts de ventes n’a baissé que de 3%. Oui les éleveurs Charolais prennent des parts de marché et les chiffres le démontrent bien. En rétrospective, c’est la 3e moyenne la plus élevée que nous ayons jamais eu et le 2e dollar brut le plus élevé pour les ventes de taureaux. Mon point est qu’il y a de la place pour plus d’éleveurs de Charolais et le besoin d’avoir plus de taureaux Charolais augmente car davantage de producteurs commerciaux réalisent qu’ils ont besoin de faire des croisements. Il existe une énorme quantité de femelles pure race dans les cheptels commerciaux qui peuvent utiliser la vigueur du côté hybride, ajouter à la performance et l’identification qu’un taureau Charolais leur rapportera. Visitez le site Internet

www.charolaisbanner.com pour consulter les ventes à travers le Canada et si vous avez pensé devenir un éleveur de Charolais, je constate que le temps est bon pour développer une opération rentable. Beaucoup de gens vont se réjouir à la fin de cette année. Bien que certaines régions du pays aient une excellente année avec des rendements records et beaucoup de nourriture, d’autres parties du Canada ont eu trop de pluie (rendant les foins difficiles) et d’autres de sévères sécheresses (avec très peu de nourriture). Les incendies ont également affecté beaucoup de producteurs de bétail dans certaines régions. Le marché du bétail de la fin du printemps à l’automne était également très choquant dans les deux sens. En avril, mai, juin, le marché était plus élevé que prévu puis a redescendu considérant les marges de profit de l’emballeur et la demande de bœuf au niveau du commerce de détail. Dans les 3 mois suivant la mi-juin, avec la chute du marché des matières grasses et l’augmentation du dollar canadien, un bœuf prêt à la vente vaut environ 800$ de moins. La demande de bœuf a certainement été un sauveur pour éviter que les prix ne s’érodent encore plus avec la production accrue en Amérique du Nord. Avec la sécheresse dans certaines parties de l’Ouest canadien et la pénurie de nourriture, je pense que nous verrons plus de veaux qu’à l’habitude se rendre à la vente. Certaines personnes qui normalement engraissent leurs veaux jusqu’en février pourrait décider de les vendre et de garder la nourriture pour les vaches. Vous verrez et entendrez davantage parler du projet de développement durable du boeuf canadien Cargill, Beef InfoXchange System (BIXS) et Verified Beef Production Plus (VBP+) puisqu’ils s’allieront pour former un projet pilote cet automne afin de

Charolais Connection • Fall 2017

produire la première chaîne d’approvisionnement durable pour le boeuf dans le monde. Tous les éleveurs de veaux-vaches sont éligibles et doivent s’enregistrer pour participer. Des auditions seront faites pour chaque niveau de la chaîne. McDonald et Swiss Chalet sont les deux détaillants qui ont signé jusqu’à maintenant. Il sera intéressant de voir la réaction du consommateur ainsi que celle de la chaîne de production de boeuf. Plus tard dans ce numéro, vous verrez qu’il y a beaucoup de jeunes qui ont présenté des veaux à influence Charolais et qui ont gagné. Il y a une augmentation définitive de gagnants à travers le pays. Félicitations à tous et merci d’avoir montré vos Charolais. Les bouvillons Charcross et les génisses Charolais ont été très populaires en gagnant de nombreuses compétitons en Amérique du Nord. Alors, n’ayez pas peur d’encourager vos enfants à en prendre un pour leur prochain projet. Il y a un certain nombre de ventes qui auront des gènisses de qualitè pour faire de l'exposition disponible cet automne. Venez faire un tour! En visitant www.charolaisbanner.com, vous pouvez vous abonner à notre liste d’emails à partir d’un lien sur notre page d’accueil. Nous envoyons occasionnellement des courriels avec des mises à jour Charolais. Si vous souhaitez les recevoir, veuillez ajouter votre nom à notre liste. Vous pouvez vous désabonner à tout moment si vous trouvez les informations non bénéfiques. En espérant que cette revue vous retrouvera à la fin de vos travaux d’automne. Je vous souhaite tout ce qu’il y a de mieux pour vos marchés cet automne et cet hiver. Nous espérons rencontrer plusieurs d’entre-vous sur la route. À la prochaine, Helge 53


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Services

Your ad should be here. 306.584.7937 54

Charolais Connection • Fall 2017


GOOD ANCHOR CHAROLAIS HOME OF “GOOD” CATTLE! Don Good and Marion Smyth Box 3261, Vermilion, AB T9X 2B2 780.853.2220 • Don.marion.good@gmail.com

Alberta Breeders

Barry & Lee-Ann Kaiser & family 403.787.2489 Box 209, Hussar, AB T0J 1S0 Barry 403.334.2489 Lee-Ann 403.334.2155 kaiserbarry@gmail.com

Kasey, Arlana, Kord & Peri Phillips Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0

T 780.358.2360 • C 780.656.6400 • kphillips@mcsnet.ca KREATING KONFIDENCE

Charolais Connection • Fall 2017

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British Columbia Breeders

Manitoba Breeders

Your ad should be here Call today! 306.546.3940 56

Charolais Connection • Fall 2017


Ontario Breeders

Charolais Connection • Fall 2017

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Saskatchewan Breeders

Quebec Breeders

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USA Breeders IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES IN OUR INDUSTRY

Calendar of Events September 30 Mack’s Charolais “Heart of the Herd Sale”, 7:00 p.m., Hoard’s Station Sale Barn, Campbellford, ON

November 11 Farmfair Alberta Supreme Show of Champions, 4:00 p.m., Hall D, Northlands Park, Edmonton, AB

October 7 Hunt Charolais Dispersal Sale, 1:00 p.m., Hoard’s Station Sale Barn, Campbellford, ON

November 11 Atlantic Elite Sale, 1:00 p.m., Atlantic Stockyards, Truro, NS

October 14 Autumn Prestige Sale, 6:30 p.m., Hoard’s Station Sale Barn, Campbellford, ON October 21 Uppin’ the Ante Sale, 2:00 p.m., Maple Hill Auction, Hanover, ON October 26 Wheat King Jackpot Bull Show, 3:00 p.m, Keystone Centre, Brandon, MB Canadian National Charolais Sale, 7:00 p.m., Keystone Centre October 27 Canadian National Charolais Show, 2:00 p.m., Keystone Centre, Brandon, MB November 1-4 Lloydminster (SK) Stockade Roundup November 3 Toronto Royal Charolais Show, Exhibition Place, Toronto, ON November 4 Nelson Hirsche Purebreds Bull & Female Sale, at the ranch, Del Bonita, AB November 10 FarmFair International Charolais Show, 1:30 p.m., Hall B, Northlands Park, Edmonton, AB 60

November 18 Tee M Jay Farms Dispersal Sale, 11:00 a.m., Ashern (MB) Auction Market November 23 Canadian Western Agribition Charolais Sale, 3:30 p.m., Sales Arena, Regina, SK November 24 Canadian Western Agribition Charolais Show, 2:00 p.m., Regina, SK November 25 Canadian Western Agribition RBC Beef Supreme Challenge, 4:00 p.m., Regina, SK November 29 Acadia Colony Charolais and Angus Bull Sale, at the farm, Oyen, AB December 1 Sterling Collection Sale, 1:30 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales December 5 No Borders Select Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB December 7 Alberta Charolais Associations Annual Meeting & Alberta Select Single Bull Show, Red Deer (AB) Westerner Park Charolais Connection • Fall 2017

December 8 Alberta Charolais Select Sale, 1:30 p.m., Red Deer (AB) Westerner Park December 9 Tully & Arlene Hatch, Pleasant Dawn Charolais, Dispersal Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Brandon, MB December 9 Working Girls Female Sale, Innisfail (AB) Auction Market December 11 Wilgenbusch Charolais Volume II Biennial Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Halbrite, SK December 11 Rock Solid Bred Heifer Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the Bircham Ranch, Piapot, SK December 13 Steppler Farms “A Piece of the Program” Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB December 14 Gerrard Cattle Co. Complete Charolais Herd Dispersal, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Innisfail, AB December 15 Char-Maine Ranching 13th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange, Fort McLeod, AB

2018 February 16 Stephen Charolais and Guests Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart February 20 Rawes Ranches 35th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the ranch, Strome, AB


February 24 SanDan Charolais/Springside Farms 21st Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Erskine, AB

March 17 Pleasant Dawn Charolais 16th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB

February 25 Pro-Char and Guests 6th Annual Bull Sale, at the farm, Glenevis, AB

March 20 Diamond W Charolais, Red & Black Angus 16th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Minitonas, MB

February 28 Beck Farms & McCoy Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Milestone, SK March 2 M & L Cattle Company Bull & Female Sale, 6:30 p.m., at the farm, Indian River, ON

March 21 HTA Charolais & Guest Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plans Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB March 22 Elder Charolais 8th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coronach, SK

March 5 Coyote Flats Charolais 3rd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coaldale, AB

March 27 Prairie Distinction Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB

March 9 A. Sparrow Farms Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Vanscoy, SK

April 2 North of the 49th 15th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at Wilgenbusch Charolais, Halbrite, SK

March 11 Steppler Farms 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB March 12 Palmer Charolais 7th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Bladworth, SK March 13 McTavish Farms and Guest 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Moosomin, SK

April 3 Cedarlea Farms at Git ‘R Done Bull Sale, at Windy Willows, Hodgeville, SK April 5 Hunter Charolais 6th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Roblin, MB April 12 Sliding Hills Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Canora, SK

March 15 Creek’s Edge Land & Cattle Co. 1st Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Yellow Creek, SK

April 21 Brimner Cattle Co., at Cornerstone Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart

March 16 Family Tradition Bull Sale 2:00 p.m., Inglis, MB

June 29-July 7 World Charolais Congress, Sweden

March 16-18 Cody Sibbald Legacy Classic Junior Show, Medicine Hat, AB

July 25- 28 Canadian Charolais Youth Association Conference and Show, Keystone Centre, Brandon, MB

CHAROLAIS HAPPENINGS ARE AVAILABLE BY EMAIL Sign up by following the “Join our emailing ist sign-up” link under our twitter feed on the www.charolaisbanner.com home page

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LOOKING TO FIND SOMEONE?

Advertisers Index Acadia Colony ..............................................39 Alberta Charolais Association .....................42 Amabec Charolais ...................................31,57 Annuroc Charolais........................................57 B Bar D Charolais..........................................57 Baker Farms ..................................................57 Bar H Charolais .............................................58 Bar Punch Ranch ..........................................55 Beck Farms...............................................18,58 BeRich Farms ...............................................55 Blackbern Charolais .....................................57 BoJan Enterprises ........................................58 Borderland Cattle Co. ..................................58 Bouchard Livestock .....................................50 BovaTech Ltd. ..............................................54 Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. .............................54 Bricney Stock Farms .....................................58 Bridor Charolais............................................57 Brimner Cattle Company ........................11,58 Buffalo Lake Charolais ................................55 By Livestock ........................................19,31,51 Carey, Brent ..................................................54 Cedardale Charolais .....................................57 Cedarlea Farms..........................................7,58 Charla Moore Farms.....................................59 CharMaine Ranching ..................................55 Charolais Journal..........................................54 Chartop Charolais ........................................59 Charworth Charolais Farms .........................55 Chomiak Charolais ......................................55 Circle Cee Charolais Farms ...........................55 Cline Cattle Co..............................................56 Cockburn Farms............................................57 Cody Sibbald Legacy Classic.........................52 Cougar Hill Ranch ........................................59 Coyote Flats Charolais.............................29,55 Creek's Edge Land & Cattle Co. ..............12,59 C2 Charolais.............................................21,56 DavisRairdan ...............................................54 Defoort Stock Farm ......................................56 Demarah Farms ............................................59 Diamond K Cattle Co. ..................................47 Diamond W Charolais .............................39,59 Dorran, Ryan ................................................54 Double P Stock Farms ..................................56 Dowell Charolais ..........................................55 Dubuc Charolais ...........................................58 DudgeonSnobelen Land & Cattle ..............57 Eaton Charolais ............................................60 Edge, Dean ...................................................54 Edmonton Northlands ............................21,41 Elder Charolais Farms..............................15,59 Ericson Livestock Services ............................54 Fergus Family Charolais ...............................57 Ferme Palerme .............................................58 Fischer Charolais...........................................55

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Flat Valley Cattle Co.....................................55 Fleury, Michael .............................................54 Flewelling, Craig ..........................................54 Footprint Farms ...........................................55 Future Farms.................................................55 Gerrard Cattle Co. ...................................50,55 Gilliland Bros. Charolais ...............................59 Good Anchor Charolais................................55 H.S. Knill Company Ltd. ...............................54 Happy Haven Charolais................................56 Harcourt Charolais .......................................59 Hard Rock Land & Cattle Co. .......................57 Harvie Ranching ..........................................55 HEJ Charolais ...............................................55 Hicks Charolais .............................................57 High Bluff Stock Farm ...............................5,57 Holk Charolais ..............................................55 Hopewell Charolais ......................................59 Horseshoe E Charolais..................................59 Howe Family Farm .......................................59 HTA Charolais Farm ..................................3,57 Hunter Charolais ...................................57,IBC JMB Charolais ..............................................57 Johnson Charolais ...................................17,55 Johnstone Auction .......................................54 June Rose Charolais .....................................59 Kaiser Cattle Co............................................55 Kanewischer, Jerry........................................54 KayR Land & Cattle Ltd...............................55 KCH Charolais ...............................................56 Kirlene Cattle ..........................................31,57 La Ferme Patry de Weedon .........................58 Land O' Lakes Charolais ..........................31,57 Langstaff Charolais ......................................58 Laurel Creek Ranch ......................................59 Leemar Charolais..........................................55 LEJ Charolais.................................................57 LindskovThiel Charolais Ranch ...................60 M & L Cattle Co. ......................................31,58 Mack’s Charolais ...........................................58 Manitoba Charolais Association..................45 Maple Leaf Charolais ...................................56 Martens Cattle Co. ..................................43,59 Martens Charolais ........................................57 McAvoy Charolais Farm ...............................59 McKay Charolais ...........................................57 McKeary Charolais .......................................56 McLeod Livestock .........................................54 McTavish Farms........................................13,59 Medonte Charolais.......................................58 Miller Land & Livestock................................58 Murphy Livestock .........................................56 Mutrie Farms ................................................59 Myhre Land and Cattle ................................57 Nahachewsky Charolais ...............................59 Nelson Hirsche Purebreds .......................36,37

Charolais Connection • Fall 2017

Norheim Ranching .......................................54 P & H Ranching Co. .................................35,56 Packer Charolais ...........................................58 Palmer Charolais ................................22,23,59 Parklane Charolais .......................................56 Phillips Farms................................................59 Pleasant Dawn Charolais .....................9,10,57 Potter Charolais.......................................31,58 Prairie Cove Consulting ...............................54 Prairie Gold Charolais ..................................59 ProChar Charolais ..................................17,56 Qualman Charolais ......................................59 Raffan, Don ..................................................54 Rawes Ranches ........................................27,56 Rebuild with Steel ........................................54 Reeleder, Andrew.........................................54 Rollin' Acres Charolais .................................58 Rosso Charolais.............................................59 Royale Charolais ...........................................58 RRTS Charolais ..............................................56 Saddleridge Farming Co. .............................56 SanDan Charolais Farms ..............................56 Saunders Charolais .......................................58 Scarth Cattle Co............................................57 Serhienko/Voegeli Cattle Co........................59 Sharodon Farms ...........................................58 Skeels, Danny ...............................................54 Sliding Hills Charolais..............................33,59 Southview Farms ..........................................58 A. Sparrow Farms ........................................IFC Springside Farms .....................................24,56 Spruce View Charolais..................................56 Stephen Charolais Farm ..........................19,59 Steppler Farms Ltd. ..................................6,57 Stock, Mark...................................................54 Stockmen's Insurance...................................55 Sugarloaf Charolais ......................................56 Sunrise Charolais .....................................38,58 T Bar C Cattle Co. ...............................39,55,61 Taylor Farms..................................................31 Tee M Jay Farms ...........................................49 Temple Farms................................................60 Thistle Ridge Ranch......................................56 Transcon Livestock Corp...............................55 TriN Charolais ..............................................57 Turnbull Charolais ........................................56 Western Litho ...............................................55 Whiskey Hollow Cattle Company................58 White Lake Colony .......................................56 WhiteWater Livestock..................................58 Wilgenbusch Charolais ........................60,OBC Wilkie Ranch.................................................56 Windyview Farm ..........................................31 Wood River Charolais ..................................60 Wrangler Charolais ......................................56


Fall 2017 charolais connection