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The Charolais Connection 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Ph. (306) 546-3940 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Home Page: http://www.charolaisbanner.com charolaisbanner@gmail.com ISSN 0824-1767 Manager/Publisher Helge By Managing Editor Candace By charolaisbanner@gmail.com @ByCandace

FALL 2016 • VOL. XXXIII, NO. 3 From the Field ........................................................................................8 du champ ..............................................................................................10

Production/Graphic Design Susan Penner charolais.susan@sasktel.net Web Design Dalyse Robertson pdmrobertson@gmail.com

Canadian Charolais Association ..........................................................14

FIELDMEN:

De L’Association de Charolais Canadien ..............................................16

Alberta & British Columbia

Birth Weight’s Effect on Profit ............................................................20 Profile – Panylyk Farms ........................................................................29 It’s Time to Beef Up the Conversation ................................................40 Letter to the Editor ..............................................................................40 Herd Health: Needling – the Do’s and Don’t’s ....................................42 Verification of GMO..............................................................................44 Shrink and Its Impact On Your Operation ..........................................49 Canadian Charolais Youth Association News ......................................50 A Scale Can Be a Useful Tool on a Livestock Operation ....................52 Industry Info ..........................................................................................52 Garrison Creeping Meadow Foxtail ....................................................53 Quadruplets Doing Well ......................................................................54 Canadian Charolais Association Whole Herd Enrollment ..................55 Charolais Success ..................................................................................61 Calendar of Events ................................................................................69 Index of Advertisers ..............................................................................70

Craig Scott 5107 Shannon Drive, Olds, AB T4H 1X3 Res. (403) 507-2258 Fax (403) 507-2268 Cell (403) 651-9441 sbanner@telusplanet.net @craigscott222 Saskatchewan, Manitoba, USA & Eastern Canada Helge By 124 Shannon Rd., Regina, SK S4S 5B1 Office (306) 546-3940 Fax (306) 546-3942 Res. (306) 584-7937 Cell (306) 536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com @CharolaisBanner SUBSCRIPTIONS: $9.45 per year $25.20 – 3 years (Prices include 5% GST) The Charolais Connection is mailed to over 13,000 cattlemen nationwide. Those cattlemen include all purebred Charolais breeders, buyers of purebred Charolais bulls from the past six years and all subscribers to the Charolais Banner. No material contained in the Charolais Connection may be reprinted without the permission of the Charolais Banner. The publishers reserve the right to refuse any advertisements. The material produced in this publication is done so with the highest integrity, however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. We are responsible for only the value of the advertisement. Animals in the photographs in the Connection have not been altered by computer enhancement or mechanical methods according to the knowledge of the publisher.

Printed by Print West, Regina, Saskatchewan Publications Mail Agreement No. 40047726 Postage paid at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

On the cover… Panylyk Farms are featured in this issue’s Profile, see page 29. Photo: Helge By Design: Susan Penner

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Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

Postmaster: Please return undeliverable publications (covers only) to: Charolais Banner, 124 Shannon Road, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1, Canada. Published by the Charolais Banner, Regina, SK (3 times per year - February, March and Fall)


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POINTS TO PONDER

From the Field Helge By

Congratulations to those that are selling Charcross calves this fall and winter. I am sure you will once again see a substantial premium for the added pounds and identifiable Charolais genetics when you sell your production. The spread was very visible this past year and when you get in a tougher market, the premium definitely pays. Unfortunately, the calf market looks to be off about 40% from last fall but will still be the third best fall ever. If 5 years ago you were quoted the prices you should receive this fall you would have thought it was great, but once you have had a taste of the good life, it is hard to give it up. Cheaper feed grain prices and the lower Canadian dollar will still buffer the cow/calf operator from some of the damage. But the cost of production has also risen and the need for higher prices are most certainly required and justified. There have been a few factors in the drop in prices that need to be noted. One, the futures market for both fat cattle and feeder cattle have become so volatile with only computer trading now and the wide use of algorithms that there is a disconnect to the real world. This has given the packers the upper hand and they have been in record profit territory at the expense of the feeders for the past year. In the USA since mid-2011 the cash fed cattle prices have only traded below $112 twice and that was in the last two weeks. With the feeders losing money in the past two turns in the lots, they need to buy in a profit to stay afloat. The other side that burns a cattleman is going into the supermarket and seeing the prices there haven’t dropped anywhere close to the market. Although in the U.S. especially, the stores are starting to use beef as an advertised item with some great sales. This kept the beef moving and the feedlots are finally current with the carcass weights coming back down to hopefully an 8

upward move. I am writing this in the middle of September and only time will tell if we have seen the bottom of the market for now. This summer we saw some interesting things happen through the purchasers of beef with Earls and A & W restaurants. In the case of Earls, I think a good lesson was learned that we need to be ahead of what the consumer wants and had to react to what they were looking for in humanely raised beef. We all know that we do a good job, but we will need to prove it to the consumers in the future. Earlier this summer the Verified Beef Production Plus (VBP+) program was launched and will help producers demonstrate that cattle are humanely raised and environmentally sound and sustainable. There is a growing trend especially among the millennial age group that are going to be more demanding of the transparency of how and where their food comes from. VBP+ is a national program administered by the province. It is an add-on to the former VBP program which can be taken online. There is a cost to the program which will basically cover the cost of the on-farm audit that needs to be performed. Will you see any direct benefit back? It is hard to say, but it is one of those things that may need to be done to continue building not only our local markets, but also our exports. Check it out, as we do need to be proactive as producers at all levels of the industry. The GMO debate continues on but I did find it interesting there wasn’t any backlash to the releasing of sterile GMO mosquitos in Florida this summer. If you hadn’t heard, the Zika virus has found its way to the south eastern United States and a plan was devised to release sterile males to control the mosquito population. Also of interest, I didn’t hear of any demonstrations to stop the spraying of mosquitos in South Carolina to control the population there, even though it was devastating to the bees and the many producers of honey. Funny how Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

some scream bloody murder when you are using GMO and chemicals to safely produce high quantities of food to feed the world, but nothing is said when it may affect them directly. Last topic that I found interesting is a recent study using cows in glass boxes to measure their emissions. It found that methane emissions can be linked to genotypes, which may allow scientists to speed up the breeding of more climate-friendly cows. Methane is a more powerful greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide, and one third of it is produced by the world's cattle, making it a key target for climate change mitigation. As part of a project named RuminOmics, led by the University of Aberdeen and funded by the EU, the Natural Resources Institute Finland, in collaboration with ten other European research institutes, investigated the interaction between a ruminant’s genotype, feed, and the microbial make-up of the rumen. The scientists examined the role these factors played in the energy-efficiency of dairy cattle and their methane emissions. One hundred Ayrshire cows visited a glass metabolic chamber, where their methane emissions were measured, as well as their digestion, production characteristics, energyefficiency and metabolism, and microbial make-up. Some cows with low emissions were found to be inefficient, due to their poor digestion of fodder, so the researchers said maintaining cows with better production in the herd for longer was a better solution to the problem of methane emissions than just breeding for low emission cows. However, the study did identify areas of genetic variation linked to the amount of methane produced per kilo of milk produced, which warrants further investigation. Californian cattle producers will be interested in this with the introduction of a bill that has been labeled the fart tax. Until next time, Helge


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POINT A SURVEILLER

Du champ Helge By

Tout d’abord, félicitations à ceux qui vendront des veaux croisés charolais (charcross) cet automne et cet hiver. Je suis certain que vous aurez à nouveau une prime substantielle pour les livres ajoutées, pour la génétique charolaise identifiable lorsque vous vendrez votre production. La différence a été très visible cette année, et quand vous arrivez dans un marché difficile, la prime fait vraiment la différence. Malheureusement cette année le marché du veau est 40% inférieur au prix de l’automne dernier. S’il y a 5 ans on vous avait cité le prix que vous devriez recevoir cet automne, vous auriez sûrement dit ce sont de bons prix. Mais quand on a eu un avantgoût des prix comme l’an passé, c’est difficile d’y renoncer. Le prix des céréales fourragères et la baisse du dollar canadien seront toujours néfastes pour le producteur vacheveau. Mais le coût de production a également augmenté et le besoin de prix plus élevés est très certainement nécessaire et justifié. Il y a quelques facteurs pour expliquer les prix à la baisse qui doivent être notés. Dans le marché à terme pour les bovins gras, et les bovins d’engraissement les prix sont devenus tellement volatiles, avec uniquement des échanges entre ordinateur et maintenant avec la large utilisation d’algorithmes qu’il y a un décalage avec le monde réel. Cela a donné aux emballeurs le dessus sur les engraisseurs pour l’année écoulée. Aux USA, depuis la mi 2011 le prix des bovins à l’engraissement ont seulement été sous les 112$ à deux reprises et qui a été au cours des deux dernières semaines. Ils ont perdu de l’argent avec les deux derniers lots qu’ils avaient à l’engraissement, et maintenant ils ont besoin de profit pour rester à flot. D’un autre côté ce qui fait mal au producteur, quand ce même producteur va au super marché et qu’il voit que les prix n’ont pas 10

baissés. Bien que les USA en particulier, les magasins commencent à utiliser le bœuf comme article dans leurs grandes ventes. Cela a gardé le bœuf en mouvement et les parcs d’engraissement ont l’espoir de voir un mouvement à la hausse. Je vous écris ceci à la mi- septembre, et seul le temps nous dira si nous avons atteint le fond du baril. Cet été nous avons vu des choses intéressantes se produire avec les acheteurs de bœuf, Earls et les restaurants A&W. Je pense que nous avons appris une bonne leçon, c’est d’être en avance sur ce que le consommateur veut, et réagir à ce qu’il cherche du bœuf élevé sans cruauté. Nous savons tous que nous faisons du bon travail, mais nous aurons à le prouver aux consommateurs à l’avenir. Plus tôt cet été, avec le programme verified beef production (VBP+) qui a été lancé, permettra aux producteurs de démontrer que les bovins sont élevés humainement durable et écologiquement rationnel. Il y a une tendance croissante en particulier parmi le groupe d’âge du millénaire, qui va être plus exigeant sur la transparence et la provenance de leur nourriture. VBP+ est un programme national administré par les provinces. Il est une addition à l’ancien programme VBP qui peut être consulté en ligne. Il y a un coût pour le programme, qui couvrira essentiellement le coût de contrôle à la ferme qui doit être effectué. Verrezvous un avantage directement en retour? Il est difficile de le dire, mais il servira sûrement pour continuer à construire non seulement nos marchés locaux, mais aussi nos exportations. Nous nous devons d’être pro actifs en tant que producteur à tous les niveaux de l’industrie. Le débat sur les OGM se poursuit, mais je suis surpris qu’il n’y a pas eu de réaction à la libération de moustiques OGM stériles en Floride cet été. Si vous n’étiez pas au courant Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

le virus ZIKA a réussi à se faufiler vers le sud-est des USA, et un plan a été conçu pour libérer des mâles stériles pour contrôler la population de moustiques. Également d’intérêt, je n’ai pas entendu parler de manifestation, pour arrêter la pulvérisation pour contrôler les moustiques en Caroline du Sud, même si elle a été néfaste pour les colonies d’abeilles et les nombreux producteurs de miel. Drôle comment certains manifestent et crient, quand vous utilisez des OGM ou des produits chimiques pour produire en toute sécurité de grandes quantité de nourriture pour nourrir le monde, mais rien n’est dit quand cela les touchent directement. Dernier sujet que je trouve intéressant, est une étude récente utilisant des vaches dans des boîtes en verre pour mesurer leurs émissions de méthane. Il est constaté que les émissions de méthane peuvent être liés à des génotypes , qui peuvent permettre aux scientifiques d’accélérer l’élevage de vaches plus respectueuses de l’environnement. Le méthane est un gaz à effet de serre plus puissant que le dioxide de carbone, et un tiers de celui-ci est produit par le bétail, ce qui en fait une cible clé, pour atténuer les changements climatiques. Dans le cadre d’un projet nommé RUMINOMICS, dirigé par l’université d’Aberdeen et financé par l’UE, l’institut des ressources naturelles en Finlande, en collaboration avec dix autres instituts de recherches européennes, a étudié l’interaction entre le génotype et l’alimentation d’un ruminant, et la masse microbienne jusqu’à la panse. Les scientifiques ont examiné le rôle que ces facteurs ont joué dans l’efficacité énergétique des bovins laitiers et de leurs émissions de méthane. Cent vaches Ayrshire ont visité une chambre en verre métabolique où les émissions de méthane ont été suite à la page 44


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FROM THE CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

Dates to Remember CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais www.facebook.com/cdncharolais PROVINCIAL REPRESENTATIVES: ALBERTA President: Stephen Cholak, Lamont SASKATCHEWAN President: Carey Weinbender, Canora Secretary: Dave Blechinger, Rosetown MANITOBA President: Shawn Airey, Rivers Secretary: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie ONTARIO President: Jim Baker, Stayner Secretary: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC President: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secretary: Chantal Raymond MARITIMES President: Ricky Milton, Cornwall Secretary: Jennifer MacDonald, St. Mary’s, Kent Co., NB STAFF: General Manager: MEL REEKIE Registry Manager: LOIS CHIVILO Registry: JUDY CUMMER French Membership: BERNARD DORE bernarddore@videotron.ca EXECUTIVE: PRESIDENT: BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 613.646.9741 C 613.312.0270 bh.cornerview@gmail.com

1st VICE-PRESIDENT: ANDRE STEPPLER Box 248, Miami, MB R0G1H0 204.435.2463 C 204.750.1951 F 204.435.2021 steppleran@hotmail.com

2nd VICE-PRES: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net PAST PRESIDENT: BRENT SAUNDERS RR 3, Markdale, ON N0C 1H0 519.986.4165 C 519.372.6196 F 519.986.4273 saunders@bmts.com

DIRECTORS: RICKY MILTON 4558 Route 19, Nine Mile Creek, PEI C0A 1H2 902.675.3091 C 902.393.8699 rmilton@upei.ca

MATHIEU PALERME 814 Ch. Pink, Gatineau, QC J9J 3N2 819.682.2723 matpalerme@yahoo.com ALLAN MARSHALL 35266 Rang Road 33 Red Deer County, AB T4G 0N3 allan@futurefarms.ca MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C 306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net

Mel Reekie, General Manager

Each summer, I’m reminded that “we’re better together” in part by the annual Canadian Charolais Youth Association Conference and Show. The event comes together with a planning committee comprised of youth, parents and breeders to provide a venue to gather as a collective whole – youth work together in their stalling groups, team projects, seniors take the juniors under their wings, provincial lines are blurred, everyone blends and works to the overall benefit of the individuals, the breed and the breed’s future. The life skills, encouragement and confidence that the CCYA Conference and Show builds for our future is invaluable. A highlight of the 2016 CCYA was quite possibly outside the show ring; Balzac Meats hosted our group for a hands-on look at the benefits of Charolais with respect to carcass. Charolais is a predominantly terminal sire breed, looking at a carcass, the cuts of meat and total saleable meat from a Charolais cross animal highlighted the advantages of our breed and easily justified our position within the entire beef industry. This full circle approach to breed significance was fun and educational for the youth and parents alike and an easy message for the cow calf producer to share with their bull buyers. As well this summer, a joint collaboration of the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC), Canada Beef, the Canadian Beef Breeds Council (CBBC) and the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA), held the inaugural Canadian Beef Industry Conference (CBIC) August 9-11, 2016 in Calgary, AB. The conference was a resounding success, exceeding expectations while hosting over 650 participants representing producers, industry representatives and youth. CBIC was a national meeting place to bring together all facets from the grass routes through to all parts of the supply

chain of the Canadian beef industry. Networking, brainstorming, sharing knowledge and ideas on how to move the industry forward was contagious. The impact of the industry meeting expanded much beyond the walls of the convention, the hashtag #CBIC2016 became a top trending Twitter topic in Canada. Keynote speakers addressed connectivity, productivity, beef demand and competitiveness, the four pillars of the National Beef Strategy and covered a wide range of developments, issues and hot topics. “We couldn’t have asked for a better first time experience delivering this new national conference for Canada’s beef and cattle industry,” says Rob Smith, Canadian Angus Association Chief Executive Officer and co-chair of the conference. “The theme was ‘Putting It Together…’ and that’s exactly what happened. The response has been absolutely amazing. It bodes well for making this an annual event and that’s what we’re talking about now.” The CBIC will be back in Calgary, AB for 2017 and it’s going to be an event you don’t want to miss out on, specific dates and location information to come. CCA Scholarship Deadline – October 31 annually. Are you or do you know someone involved in agriculture and are registered in a post-secondary education program? Do you or your family use Charolais bulls? Submit your completed application to the CCA office by October 31 to be considered for one of three available scholarships totaling $3500; application forms are available at www. charolais.com/association/sholarships The Canadian Charolais National Show and Sale is being hosted by the Ontario Charolais Association November 4, 2016 at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto, ON – if you haven’t already, make plans to attend!

KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C 780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca

TRAVIS FOOT Box 414, Esther, AB T0J 1H0

www.charolais.com

403.664.3167 C 403.664.0961 Travis@bigskyrealestate.ca

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Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

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DE LA CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE

Dates à retenir CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais www.facebook.com/cdncharolais PROVINCIAUX REPRÉSENTANTS: ALBERTA Président: Stephen Cholak, Lamont SASKATCHEWAN Président: Carey Weinbender, Canora Secrétaire: Dave Blechinger, Rosetown MANITOBA Président: Shawn Airey, Rivers Secrétaire: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie ONTARIO Président: Jim Baker, Stayner Secrétaire: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC Président: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secrétaire: Chantal Raymond MARITIMES Président: Ricky Milton, Cornwall Secrétaire: Jennifer MacDonald, St. Mary’s, Kent Co., NB PERSONNEL: Directeur général: MEL REEKIE Registry Manager: LOIS CHIVILO Registry: JUDY CUMMER Composition française: BERNARD DORE bernarddore@videotron.ca EXÉCUTIF: PRÉSIDENT: BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 613.646.9741 C 613.312.0270 bh.cornerview@gmail.com

1er VICE- PRÉSIDENT: ANDRE STEPPLER Box 248, Miami, MB R0G1H0 204.435.2463 C 204.750.1951 F 204.435.2021 steppleran@hotmail.com

2e VICE- PRÉSIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net ANCIEN PRÉSIDENT: BRENT SAUNDERS RR 3, Markdale, ON N0C 1H0 519.986.4165 C 519.372.6196 F 519.986.4273 saunders@bmts.com

ADMINISTRATION: RICKY MILTON 4558 Route 19, Nine Mile Creek, PEI C0A 1H2 902.675.3091 C 902.393.8699 rmilton@upei.ca

MATHIEU PALERME 814 Ch. Pink, Gatineau, QC J9J 3N2 819.682.2723 matpalerme@yahoo.com ALLAN MARSHALL 35266 Rang Road 33 Red Deer County, AB T4G 0N3 allan@futurefarms.ca MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C 306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C 780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca

TRAVIS FOOT Box 414, Esther, AB T0J 1H0 403.664.3167 C 403.664.0961 Travis@bigskyrealestate.ca

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Mel Reekie, General Manager

A chaque été, on me rappelle que « nous sommes mieux ensemble » en partie par le concours des jeunes éleveurs Charolais lors de leur conférence annuelle. L’événement est livré avec un Comité de planification composé de jeunes, de parents et d’éleveurs pour établir un lieu de rassemblement dans un ensemble collectif – les jeunes travaillent ensemble dans leurs groupes d’étable, aussi pour leurs projets d’équipe, tandis que les membres avec un peu plus d’expérience prennent les juniors sous leurs ailes, les frontières provinciales n’existent pas, tout le monde se mélange et travaille à la prestation globale des individus, de la race et de l’avenir de la race.Les compétences qui sont acquises par l’entremise de la conférence CCYA sont inestimables. Unpoint culminant de la conférence de 2016, en dehors de l’arène de jugement, a été très probablement la visite des Viandes de Balzac qui a accueilli notre groupe pour un regard pratique sur les avantages du Charolais à l’égard de carcasse. La race Charolais est principalement utilisée en production terminale, l’étude d’une carcasse, les coupes de viandes et le rendement d’un animal Charolais croisé a souligné les avantages de notre race et justifie facilement notre position au sein de l’industrie du bœuf. Cette visite éducative a certainement mis en perspective la signification de notre implication dans l’élevage, autant pour les jeunes que leurs parents et un message simple à partager avec les producteurs de vache-veau qui sont nos acheteurs de taureau. Ainsi cet été, une collaboration conjointe entre le Conseil de recherche de bovins de boucherie (BCRC), Bœuf du Canada, le Conseil canadien des races de boucherie (CBBC) et l’Association Canadienne des producteurs de bœuf (CCA), qui s’est tenue la première Conférence canadienne de l’industrie bœuf (CBIC) du 9 au 11 à Calgary, en Alberta. La Conférence a été un franc succès, dépassant les attentes en accueillant plus de 650 participants représentant les producteurs, les représentants de l’industrie et la relève. CBIC était un lieu de rencontre Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

nationale pour réunir toutes les facettes de la chaine de production et mise en marche du bœuf ; des éleveurs primaires jusqu’aux détaillants de viande. Le réseautage, les remue-méninges, le partage des connaissances et des idées sur la façon d’avancer l’industrie étaient contagieuses. L’impact de la rencontre de l’industrie étendu bien au-delà des murs de la convention, l’hashtag #CBIC2016 est devenu un sujet de haute tendance sur Twitter au Canada. Les conférenciers d’honneur ont adressé la connectivité, la productivité, la demande pour le bœuf et la compétitivité, les quatre piliers de la stratégie nationale de la viande bovine et couvrent une large gamme de développements, de questions et de sujets d’actualité. « Nous n’aurions pas pu rêver d’une meilleure première pour la mise en scène de cette nouvelle conférence nationale sur le bœuf », explique Rob Smith, le directeur général de l’association canadienne Angus et le coprésident de la Conférence. « Le thème était « Rassembler le tout » et c’est exactement ce qui s’est passé. La réaction a été absolument incroyable. Il est de bon augure pour ce qui en fait un événement annuel et c’est ce dont nous parlons maintenant. » La CBIC sera retour à Calgary, AB pour 2017 et ellesera un événement que vous ne voudrez pas manquer, des dates précises et informations d’emplacement sont à venir. Date limite pour les demandes de bourses d’études de l’Association canadienne Charolais –31 octobre. Êtesvous impliqués en agriculture et un étudiant au niveau collégial ? Est-ce que votre famille utilise des taureaux Charolais ? Si oui, faites parvenir votre demande de bourse a l’Association canadienne Charolais avant le 31 octobre. Il y a trois bourses qui seront offertes pour un total de $3500. Les formulaires d’application sont affichés à www. charolais.com/association/sholarships Le Concours et la Vente Nationale Charolais auront lieu le 4 novembre à la Royale de Toronto. L’Association de l’Ontario, les hôtes, vous attendent en grande nombre.


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MANAGEMENT

Birth Weight’s Effect on Profit – Part 1 Candace By I have been asked by the Canadian Beef Breeds Council to develop this article focusing on birth weights. I hope you find this panel discussion informative and thought provoking.

Kevin Woods, Westwood Land & Cattle, Moosomin, SK We run around 1650 Black Angus and Black Angus Simmental cross cows bred Charolais for terminal cross and Black Simmental or Black Angus for replacements.

Adam Doenz, Doenz Farms, Warner, AB The Doenz family operation runs 250 straight Hereford cows in a strictly commercial operation. They background their calves every year and either grass them or sell them in the spring, depending on the grass situation.

Andy Hofer, Spring Creek Colony, Walsh, AB We run around 1000 commercial cows. They are predominantly Simmental and Angus cows. We use Red and Black Angus bulls and Red Simmental and Fullblood Simmental bulls and we raise our own replacements.

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Why do you think some producers are selecting for smaller than average birth weights?

How does continued selection for smaller birth weight effect performance? (short term and long term)

It must have to do with what they call calving ease, that could be the only reason people would be selecting for lighter birth weights. It isn’t really my idea, but that is what I hear. From the olden days people were scared of some breeds with bigger than average birth weights and maybe it still haunts them a bit.

It negatively affects performance. Everybody starts chasing smaller birth weight and you breed lower performance into everything. It’s one thing in a heifer or where you are not retaining females, but if you are retaining the females as well, I think you are negatively affecting positive performance at the end of the day.

Calving ease is their concern. I don’t think people are having problems but labour is an issue and if you can ensure that calving will go well by selecting the right bulls, it is an important thing to do.

Smaller birth weight selection will give you smaller weaning weights in the fall and the size of your cowherd will get smaller over time unless you have a lot of growth from the lighter calf. A smaller calf in the fall is less profit. In the end your profit comes from the pounds of beef you have to market.

There are less producers out there raising more cows with less help and people are looking for calving ease.

I think a smaller calf at birth is going to be a smaller calf at weaning. I don’t think smaller cattle convert feed as well.

Charolais Connection • Fall 2016


Birth Weight’s Effect on Profit – Part 1 What effect does continued selection for lower birth weight have on a cowherd?

How does the structure/shape of the calf/sire effect calving ease?

As many cattlemen do not weigh their females, some seem to believe their cows are 1200-1400 pounds. Is this a misconception?

If you continue to bring the numbers down, it is going to bring the performance of the cow herd down and have a negative effect on the herd.

Structure still has a lot to do with calving ease. The smoother they are, the easier they calve. You can chase some pretty big birth weights if they are built right and not have problems. The longer and smoother they are, the bigger the birth weight you can chase and still get them out without problems. Bulls that are built wrong can have 80 lb. birth weights and at the end of the day, give you a lot of calving problems. They can’t have a huge square head and rough broad front shoulders.

I don’t think most commercial men have the ability to weigh their females on an individual basis so other than their cull weights, they really don’t know. Our cows are predominantly Angus and Angus cross so they aren’t going to be as big as some more exotic crossed herds. We average around 1450-1500 lb.

The size of the cowherd will shrink over time unless the calves have the ability to gain ground and match weaning weights of larger calves.

The structure is more important than the birth weight. The bull has to show a neat front end, as opposed to wide, blockier shoulders.

It is definitely a misconception. Before doing this interview, I would have told you our cows were 1350 lb. But I went back and checked the weights on the cows we have culled over the past few years and our average cow is 1500 lb.

I think if you keep getting smaller, your cows are going to get smaller pelvic areas and soon you won’t be able to calve even a normal sized calf.

Here is my analogy, a 50 lb. salt block or a 100 lb. snake, which one is going to come out easier? I have seen 100 lb. calves out of heifers and they have never been touched and I’ve had some 80 lb. calves with some real issues. Structure is very important.

I think it is a huge misconception. I believe 1200 lb. cows will produce smaller framed calves. We weigh every cow and calf at weaning and 90% of our calves are weighed at birth, that is the only way you can know what percentage of body weight is weaned off. I like a 1400-1600 lb. cow that is built right. If they look like a piece of plywood, it doesn’t matter what they weigh, they shouldn’t be cows.

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Birth Weight’s Effect on Profit – Part 1 What percentage of producers weigh their calves and accurately know their birth weights?

To be efficient, a cow should be able to calve 7% of her body weight. On a 1400 lb. cow, that is 98 lb., on a 1600 lb. cow, that is 112 lb. To what degree, do you feel producers are robbing themselves of profit by selecting too low of birth weight?

How many pounds are gained at weaning and at slaughter for every five pounds of birth weight?

Other than purebred breeders, I don’t think anybody weighs their calves. When you calve out in the field, I just don’t think it happens. If you are a small producers or calve in winter months they may weigh.

Probably I think everybody errs on the side of caution when it comes to birth weight, especially if you have a bad experience once. So many people in my area have gone to more cow numbers and less management and calve on grass. It is hard to manage your cows within a herd to accommodate the variance in cow size. To try to maximize the cows’ potential, they have to be sorted into frame score groups and bulls matched accordingly in pastures. You have to have the space and time to manage a herd that way.

I can’t really answer that because we don’t weigh, but generally the bigger calves at birth are the bigger calves at weaning. I still think you have to start out with something to end up with something.

I don’t think any commercial breeders weigh their calves, the purebred guys would be the only ones.

I do think there is definitely some truth to guys being cautious, but I think you are better off going for a little lighter weight and having more live calves to sell in the fall. A cow should be able to calve 7% of her weight, but it comes down to labour again. Guys just don’t want to deal with problems. There are breeding lines that will calve lighter birth weights and really perform to above average weaning weights. You just have to be selective about the bulls you buy.

I am not sure about that. I think you will notice more difference in weaning weights by spread out calving intervals. A month of age will show more dramatically than a few pounds of birth weight.

I would be surprised if 5% weigh their calves, I don’t think it would be very many. Until they start weighing their own calves, they have no idea what birth weight they should be looking for in a bull.

I agree with that 100%. I think producers are robbing themselves of big time profits by not knowing what their cows and calves actually weigh. If you’re not maximizing your birth weights, as heavy as your cows can handle, instead of weaning 600-700 lb. calves, you are going to have to keep those calves and feed them an extra four months to get the same weight.

I would say 20 lb. at weaning and 50 lb. at harvest and I think I am being very conservative in my estimate.

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Birth Weight’s Effect on Profit – Part 1 How important is the integrity of the purebred breeder in assisting with bull selection? If he knows his cowherd and bull battery well, should he be able to assist commercial producers with purchases and ensure calving?

Larger than average birth weight bulls were definitely less expensive this spring. Is there an opportunity here for commercial producers?

In summary, is there anything you would like to add to conclude your thoughts on this topic?

I think it is very important. At the end of the day if they want to sell bulls, they have to sell bulls that work. We have all heard stories about breeders in all breeds that maybe haven’t been as up front about things as they should have been, but it all catches up with them. From a commercial standpoint, you can sell a bull to us once that doesn’t work, but you won’t do it again, we just won’t go back. Things get around pretty quick in this industry. They want to sell you a good product because they want you to come back. It’s very important that they know their cow herd and they know their customers. It’s so important to deal with people that stand behind their cattle. We buy into a program, as opposed to just buying a bull, because it allows us peace of mind. If there is a problem, we pick up the phone and there is no problem. We pay more for a program, but it is worth it. They know their cattle and they work for their customers.

I don’t worry about birth weight too much as long as they are structurally built right. I take into account the Calving Ease and Birth Weight EPD, what sire they are coming out of and what cow family. Guys just have to know what their cows can handle according to their management practises.

I think a lot of the numbers come down to the management. Your system has to support your program.

The purebred breeder knows what the bulls are going to do on certain types of cows. He knows their structure and how it should affect calving ease. It isn’t all about birth weight, there are a lot of other factors involved.

I don’t think you should be selecting for smaller birth weights for your main cowherd all the time. You should know what your cows can handle and what fits into your program and what you are selecting for. If it is something you desire in your herd and has a bit more birth weight to make other people back off, I wouldn’t be afraid of it. We personally bought a bull last fall for our heifers, he was put together really well for heifers and his CE EPD and performance to weaning was what we wanted and his birth weight was a little bigger, but we bought him with confidence. We actually paid more than we normally would, just because he was a good bull.

A few years ago we were buying a silencer squeeze chute and considered buying it with the weigh bars underneath and the tag reader. It was kind of when that was all just starting and we just didn’t invest in it. I wish now we had and I priced out adding those features this spring. We only run our cows through a squeeze once a year to preg check, it would be easy to weigh them at the same time. We would be able to know what the cows are doing from year to year without one more labour intensive run through the chutes.

The integrity of the breeder is very important. It is up to the producer to develop a relationship with the purebred breeder. If the relationship is good, he should be able to lead you in the right direction. You will know after one or two bulls. If it isn’t a good relationship, you move on.

I think there is a big opportunity. Birth weight is a number and I think gestation is more useful. I also think knowing when the animal was born is important. A January or February calf will weigh 100 pounds, an April calf out of the same cow, same mating will weigh 90 lb. A lot of guys look at the birth weight, but I don’t really use it. Only if it is 150 lb. I probably wouldn’t look at the bull, but I would know the breeder actually weighs his calves. If I can ask the producer what the cow weighed and it goes within the 7% rule, that means more to me. I have bought bulls with a 120 lb. birth weight and never seen the cows calve. Birth weight also comes from how the cows are fed. If a guy feeds them until they grunt, as opposed to the guy that kind of starves them, there will be a difference in birth weight. Yes, it is an opportunity, but a lot of producers won’t go there.

How can you manage something if you don’t measure it? Producers need to start weighing their cows and calves. I think the purebred breeders need to do a better job of selling their birth weights. I am not afraid of birth weight to a point. If a breeder can tell me the gestation and the cow size, that means more to me. Some breeders know the gestation but they don’t put it in print, you have to ask for it.

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sing higher birth weight bulls and February calving has been a strategy for marketing success for Panylyk Farms, Rochester, Alberta. Dwayne and Kelly Panylyk are the third generation farmers on this family operation of 145 breeding females. The cowherd has been strongly Charolais influenced for thirty years and it was the buckskin calf that created the loyalty to the breed. The cowherd is white, red and tan in colour. “We like to use yellow coloured Simmental bulls on our white Charolais females to get a consistent calf colour. It also helps to keep crossbreeding in the herd. I never had a problem with big, dumb calves breeding Charolais to Charolais, but crossbreeding only makes sense. To find a good red Charolais bull isn’t always easy and we try to buy all of our bulls locally.” The bulls are pulled from the cowherd on August 1 and they pregnancy test in December. Anything open is put on feed for a month and sold in January. Calving starts on February 1, they have a 90 day calving interval but a high majority calve in 60 days. They market their steers in January at Clyde Auction Mart through a 1 Owner Show Pen held in conjunction with a pre-sort sale. The heifers sell in March in a Replacement Pen sale in

Clyde. “I pick my 10 for the Pen Show, then I pick my replacements. Since 2001, we have placed 3rd three times, 2nd once and the rest we won,” explains Dwayne. “It is actually kind of neat because the last two years both the first and second in the pen of five and the pen of ten were Charolais,” tells Kelly. “Years ago even if you

placed first, you didn’t get top seller, but that has changed lately. For the last three years we have also had a Pen of 5. The auction mart wanted to increase the number of pens on offer and found by adding the Pen of 5, their numbers increased. We have been fortunate to win both the Pen of 5 and 10 for the last three years.”

❝The cowherd has been strongly Charolais influenced for thirty years and it was the buckskin calf that created the loyalty to the breed.❞

The Pen of 10 replacement heifer winners for the third straight year at NCL was Panylyk Farms of Rochester. From left are Kelly, Dani and Dwayne Panylyk and far right, Jim Harbridge of Merial Canada. At the back is Garth Rogers of NCL.

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“My motto is: It’s better to lead them somewhere than chase them somewhere.”

This year our Pen of 10 brought $2250 each and the Pen of 5 brought $2200 each. There were 17 pens of 10 and 15 pens of 5. There were 245 heifers in the sale with an average weight of 889 lb. to average $1884. It is more than just a replacement sale, it is an event. It includes a customer appreciation event, lots of prizes, a pancake breakfast, a bison barbecue for lunch, etc. Kelly has worked at the auction mart office for ten years and also does some work for L.I.S. “We don’t weigh our calves. When we select a bull, we predominantly look for maternal traits and performance. We want good weaning weights and good yearling weights because I want pounds when we sell them. We have to see the cow. Birth weight doesn’t matter to me. We want at least a 100 lb. BW bull, but the

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biggest I have bought was 120 lb. and never had any problems. I like to have a little French influence, but they have to be good. It isn’t that easy to find. This last year I only helped

❝We want at least a 100 lb. BW bull, but the biggest I have bought was 120 lb. and never had any problems.❞ one cow and two heifers. I always insure my bulls and never buy bottom end bulls.” “I work pretty hard to save the ears in a bad winter. We check once a night if it isn’t cold, but if it’s really cold we check every hour or two. We have a calving barn but it just isn’t big

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enough,” says Dwayne. “It was built in 1993 and we didn’t think back then we would need a big barn,” explains Kelly. “We have a calf shelter where the calves can go after we turn them out of the barn.” “We used to calve in March-April in the 80s and have now backed it up to February so we have larger calves to market. We had to improve our system to handle that time of year, but it has been well worth it. It also helps noticably at the market. Our calves are so much quieter than ranch cattle (calves that have been born on grass and have never been through a barn). We have repeat buyers from the replacement sales, they call and are pleased with the product. It is working and it is getting our name out there.” They castrate, vaccinate and tag the continued on page 32


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calves at birth. Calves are tagged with the same number as their dam. If a calf ends up as a replacement in the herd, she will be renumbered. “We see these 650 pound replacement heifers come through the sale ring and they are so small. I guess we are used to them being big, so it is hard for us to justify those small calves. I think, how can you breed something that small? One of the guys

that has bought our heifers phones and tells us how they calve. He’ll say, ‘Kelly one of your cows calved, beautiful calf, nice udder, I love it.’ That is what I find really rewarding,” Kelly adds. “Yes, especially when you get a repeat buyer. That tells you the program is working,” says Dwayne. “We usually wean in November but it depends on the year. We haul the

❝We used to calve in March-April in the 80s and have now backed it up to February so we have larger calves to market. ❞

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calves home and leave the cows on pasture. The calves get a creep feeder and hay until we open the sileage pit. We usually have the calves weaned for 60 days before we sell them.” “As far as vaccination goes, this last year I did the works (Bovishield Gold, 8 Way, Safe Guard). Before that I really only did blackleg and Ivomec. The cows don’t get vaccinated for anything, just Scour Boss and Ivomec, as we have a closed herd. We only brought in a package of 20 replacements once for tax purposes.” “The vaccination program didn’t seem to help with the price of the continued on page 34


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calves as we have developed a strong market already. It was more important that they be Charcross calves. The reason I vaccinated this year was to prevent the cough that seemed to develop about a month after weaning. I would give them tetracycline powder on their sileage to get it under control. I tried the vaccine and they didn’t develop the cough.” “The calves did so well this year. I don’t know if it was the vaccination or

Much of the land is just suited for livestock production

the good quality feed, but they did really well. I always seem to underestimate their weight and when we go to sell them I am surprised they are heavier than I thought. We had one package of six steers and there was one in there that the Auction Mart owner guessed weighed 1350. He asked if it was a last year’s calf and I told him he hadn’t had a birthday yet. That’s how well they have done this year.” “I creep feed the calves but you don’t really notice them growing until about August when their stomachs are more developed. I use 3/4 oats, 1/4 barley and one bag of 10% beef supplement with Rumensin for one mixer mill batch.” This year they had a group of six steers that averaged 1156 lb. to sell for $1.94. 8 steers averaged 1019 lb. to bring $2.22 and 49 steers averaged 983 lb. to bring $2.2350 on January 12. They only kept back a couple of smaller ones that wouldn’t fit in the groups. Their prices were better last year, but that is how the market was. Their land base consists of 1900 acres of owned and rented land. They put in 600 acres of crop, have 200 acres of hay and about 400 acres of tame pasture. The rest is crown bush pasture which doesn’t handle many cattle. The cropland consists of barley for sileage, as well as some for grain to market.

Champion Pen of 10 Replacement Heifers

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❝I creep feed the calves but you don’t really notice them growing until about August when their stomachs are more developed.❞

continued on page 36

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“We kept feeding this year until June 10th just to empty the sileage pit. Then we rotate pastures to let it get ahead of them before it is grazed.” They don’t have too much trouble from predators in the area, although bears like to eat out of the creep feeder. There are wolves around but the only trouble they had was about 15 years ago when a pack took the heifers to the neighbours. A trapper in the area got a cougar last year, but they have never been bothered by them. The Panylyks were awarded the Commercial Charolais Breeder of the Year in 2008 by the Alberta Charolais Association.

Their daughter Dani has been actively helping on the farm. She has been in the 4-H program for three years and had the Champion Steer in 2011 in the Athabasca District. The steer weighed 1420 lb. and sold for $3.90/lb. The average price that year was $1.70 on 40 steers.

Kelly and Dwayne Panylyk were presented the Alberta Charolais Association's Commercial Producer of the Year Award in 2008 by David Prokuda

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She is in grade 12 now and plans to attend university to study science in the fall. By calving early with top management, good genetics and performace Charolais genetics, Panylyk Farms has found success and profit for their operation.


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AGVOCACY

It’s Time to Beef Up the Conversation Everyone in ag needs to work together to create a realistic perception of our industry. And we need to do it now. Lyndon Carlson

Agriculture and food are always popular discussion topics – online, in the media and at the dinner table. People are concerned about their health and making positive choices about what they eat. However, too often not enough of us in agriculture are part of these discussions. As a result, one negative story, left unchecked, can quickly become the perception of ‘that’s just the way it is’ in agriculture. This touches every sector in ag, including beef. From misperceptions about the sector’s environmental impact, to isolated stories of animal abuse, to online forums filled with nutritional and safety misinformation, the beef sector can be deeply affected by not being a voice in the conversation. All of these stories and perceptions, be them positive or negative, true or false, deeply affect our ability as an industry to not just thrive, but exist. It’s what’s known as our “social license”. Social license refers to an acceptance or approval of an organization or industry to operate by their

stakeholders, consumers or the general public. For ag, this includes trust of consumers regarding how their food is produced. Think of social license as a savings account – every effort we make to create a positive image of our industry puts a deposit in that account, while negative stories or unfounded attacks on our industry make withdrawals. If we work together to create a robust balance, it allows us to still be flush if withdrawals are made. It also allows us to address those withdrawals from a position of strength and authenticity because people believe what we say. This trust is created through transparency, responsible behaviour and a willingness to engage in positive dialogue that looks to inform and build bridges, not draw lines in the sand. By being open and proactively communicating with the public about how and why we operate in the ways we do, we can protect our social license to continue producing highquality, nutritious food in ways that are efficient and sustainable.

Maintaining our social license is a big, important job and it sounds intimidating. But it isn’t. Because while the job is big, the work is incremental; you can do what you’re comfortable with, whether it’s hosting a tour of your operation, or simply retweeting or sharing a positive post about our industry. You don’t have to lead the herd, just be a part of it, moving in one, positive direction. So let’s get to work. Together we can help shape people’s relationship with agriculture and the food they eat. Lyndon Carlson is a Former Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer at Farm Credit Canada, and a driving force behind Agriculture More Than Ever – a cause dedicated to empowering the industry to create positive dialogue and perceptions of Canadian ag. For more information, including free tips and resources to help you be an agvocate, visit AgMoreThanEver.ca.

SHOW NEWS

Letter to the Editor Canadian Western Agribition (CWA) 2016 is less than 100 days away and we are gearing up for another great show. We are excited about the new International Trade Centre that is under construction and is on schedule. We will be using the building for this year’s event and are looking forward to its Grand Opening in 2017 That project will mean a few changes 40

to Agribition 2016 but we assure all of our stakeholders that it is “business as usual”, and CWA will again be the world-class event our exhibitors and guests have grown to expect. We have also been upgrading our existing facilities to ensure that Agribition continues to be the “can’t miss” cattle show of the year. We look forward to seeing you here in November for another full slate of Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

shows, sales and entertainment. For an update on the programs and entry information, visit www.agribition.com or call our office at 306-565-0565. Follow us on Twitter: @Agribition and on Facebook: Canadian Western Agribition Stewart Stone, President Canadian Western Agribition


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HERD HEALTH

Needling – The Do’s and Don’ts Roy Lewis, DVM

There are a multitude of diseases to consider vaccinating for and these diseases come in a multitude of vaccine combinations with different types of administration routes (subcutaneous or intramuscular) as well as different dosage amounts (usually two- five cc). These possibilities should all be considered when choosing vaccines. First and foremost use the advice of your local veterinarian. He/she will have chosen the most appropriate vaccines for your geographic area in the best combinations available to minimize the amount of needles to be given. Veterinarians are an invaluable resource when it comes to vaccine selection a very critical point of biosecurity for your commercial or purebred operation. Fellow purebred breeders should also discuss vaccine protocols amongst themselves and this becomes extremely critical when purchases are made from each other. What are the incoming cattle protected against. Vaccine companies generally speaking are producing more and more vaccines in multiple combinations. This is because there are now several diseases, which are routinely, vaccinated for on most farms. By having less choice it is less confusing to producers, less needles are necessary and the cost per disease treated actually comes down. Veterinarians make the choices as to which vaccine lines to carry based on several things, effectiveness, diseases covered, route of administration, dosage amount and dose size per container. Availability, price, timing of administration and service given by the sales force are all considered when making the selection. All reputable companies have data to support the effectiveness of their vaccine over others. We are really almost comparing apples to apples when comparing the numerous vaccines available from the

reputable companies if they cover the same diseases. Make sure the vaccines you use cover the diseases you need to prevent. A few misconceptions are changing vaccine lines and the thought of needing to start the whole vaccine protocol over again. Different vaccine lines will booster the immune response from a previous vaccination from a different line of vaccines. Of course the diseases in the vaccines must be the same. The important thing to remember whether it be from previous vaccination or exposure to the real disease revaccination stimulates the bodies immune system to develop further protection from sickness. Generally speaking this is where the modified live vaccines (mixing the powder and the fluid together) will give longer lasting immunity than the killed viral vaccines. Certain geographic areas in Canada have a higher incidence of specific diseases and vaccination may be considered. An example of this would be Clostridium Hemolyticum in west central Alberta. Horses are vaccinated for rabies in certain regions of eastern Canada. Herds that have had prior history of leptospirosis may vaccinate and in outbreaks of Anthrax the contact herd as well as neighbouring herds may be vaccinated in the current year and forward in subsequent years. Other diseases, which are reportable in Canada such as, foot and mouth disease or brucellosis even though a vaccine exists for them they are not allowed to be used in Canada. That’s because we are free of these diseases and want to keep the disease out. If we were to vaccinate the protection the vaccine affords could mask symptoms and carrier animals might develop. Tests for disease exposure often cannot differentiate between exposure to the real disease or vaccination so eradication is therefore difficult. Now in most herds across western Canada vaccination for the diseases of

IBR, BVD (type 1 and 2), PI3, clostridials (blackleg group 7 or 8 way or now 9 way), histophilus( the former hemophilus), and BRSV are pretty much commonplace. For young calves up to and past weaning the two respiratory pathogens Pasteurella and Mannheimia are becoming commonplace as well. With some companies vaccines all these organisms are protected for in two needles. Some other products even come as intranasal vaccines which offer quick protection and no needles. Intranasal technology is becoming more common even in very young calves. Scours vaccination is becoming commonplace for the breeding animals in especially the larger herds. A multitude of other vacccines, foot rot especially in the breeding bulls, pinkeye vaccines and leptospirosis vaccines are being more commonly used if necessary. Vaccines are a form of biosecurity for your cattle. Also storage of vaccines (almost all need to be refrigerated) and handling when administered are critical to getting the maximum effect. Freezing or overheating of the vaccine before administration cannot be tolerated. Label your syringes so as not to mix different vaccines and make sure and give the vaccines a handbreadth apart preferably on opposite sides of the neck. Only mix up enough of the modified live vaccines to use in one hour. Take your time and administer the vaccines properly. They are insurance against the calves not getting sick, so take your time and insure the best immunity. Make sure your cattle are also treated for worms and lice to minimize these parasites. With parasites removed the calves will develop that much better protection from the vaccines. The fall is the ideal time to totally review your vaccination program so you can add in further protection if it is available. If selling purebred or commercial cattle especially out of area make sure continued on page 50

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NEWS

Verification of Non-GMO Products Shamefully Ignores What They Actually Are Karen Daynard, KD Communications

I’ve been in the marketing end of agriculture for the past 25 years and have done a lot of work on branding, including developing logos. Logos have a great deal of power, and we in Ontario have some strong ones – especially Foodland Ontario. I’m sure the majority of us can still even sing their jingle. There’s one logo that’s becoming more prevalent in stores though which infuriates me – that of the Non GMO Project. According to their website (http://www.nongmoproject.org), “The Non-GMO Project is a non-profit organization committed to preserving and building the non-GMO food supply, educating consumers, and providing verified non-GMO choices. We believe that everyone deserves an informed choice about whether or not to consume genetically modified organisms.” While that description is fine for the most part, the problem for me lies in the wording ‘informed choice’. The products they label have nothing to do with providing information on genetically engineered (GE) products, but rather the opposite. In fact, what is scary is they have verified over 35,000 products worth over $16 Billion in sales across North America. They do this by completely ignoring what a GE product actually is. A quick search of their approved products include, insanely enough, everything from water, maple syrup,

coffee, honey, and organic rose petal spread to pure vitamins (iron, B12, C etc.), kitty litter, pink Himalayanrock salt, equine shampoo, toilet paper and my favourite, condoms (in the heat of the moment, do couples really care if their condoms are GE?!) Oddly enough, as taken directly from their website, “the Non-GMO Project’s verification seal is not a “GMO free” claim, it is trustworthy, defensible, transparent, and North America’s only independent verification for products made according to best practices for GMO avoidance.” They even know that their claims aren’t necessarily true. While I haven’t investigated the US regulations, the labeling laws in Canada are quite clear. The Government of Canada’s Canadian General Standards Board under their Voluntary Labelling and Advertising of Foods that are and are not Products of Genetic Engineering section actually states: “6.1.4 Claims that a singleingredient food is not a product of genetic engineering shall not be made for a single ingredient food of which no genetically engineered strains have been offered for sale, unless accompanied by an explanatory statement, for example, like all other oranges, these oranges are not a product of genetic engineering.” The same rule applies to multiingredient foods where no GE

alternative exists. Therefore all of this labelling is illegal in Canada – so why is it proliferating? That answer takes me on a tangent about the lack of science knowledge in society and the misunderstanding of what a chemical, or even DNA is. And that’s something for another column. A better question is how we, as the farming community, address this, besides investigating possible legal action (some Canadian companies, including some farmers in Ontario have shamefully bought into this scam)? In my opinion, we need to be vocal and take every possible opportunity to talk to people about what we do on the farm, and the multitude of benefits (especially environmental) that GE crops provide. We also need to combat the messages about these falsely labelled products. Look what happened with French’s ketchup being pulled out of Loblaws. A loud protest was launched, mainly on social media – and it was successful. Can we do the same for these products? It’s one thing to boycott the products (how many farmers buy Pink Himalayan Salt anyways?) but another thing completely to publicly call out the manufacturers and retailers. It may feel like you, as one individual isn’t making any impact, but together we can. Let’s work together to denounce these false labels.

avec une meilleure production dans le troupeau plus longtemps a été une meilleure solution au problème des émissions de méthane que de l’élevage pour les faibles émissions. Toutefois, l’étude a permis d’identifier les zones de variation génétique liée à la quantité de méthane produite par kilo de lait produit, ce qui justifie une

enquête plus approfondie. Les producteurs de bovins de Californie seront intéressés par cette étude, avec l’introduction d’un projet de loi voulant taxer l’émission de pète. À la prochaine, Helge

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mesurés, ainsi que leur digestion, les caractéristiques de production, le rendement énergétique et le métabolisme microbien. Certaines vaches avaient de faibles émissions ont été jugé inefficaces en raison de leur mauvaise digestion des fourrages, de sorte que les chercheurs ont trouvé que le maintien des vaches 44

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MANAGEMENT

Shrink and Its Impact on Your Operation Natasha Wilkie, PAg, Regional Livestock Specialist, Weyburn, Regional Services Branch Agriview, Ministry of Agriculture, Government of Sasaktchewan

Shrink is yet another factor for livestock producers to consider when determining how to maximize their operations’ profits. Shrink is the amount of weight an animal loses from the time it is initially handled for transport until the net sale weight is taken. During this time, the animal has been sorted, transported, perhaps left to stand for a period of time and finally weighed. There are two types of shrink to consider: excretory shrink and tissue shrink. Excretory shrink can quickly be recovered once an animal is back on feed; however, recovery from tissue shrink can take much longer, with estimates ranging from 10 to 36 days. There are a few ways a livestock producer can minimize shrink loss. The method of handling and the

handling facilities both affect how much weight an animal loses, as well as weather, livestock temperament, the number of animals on the truck and a host of other factors. Losses can be minimized by management practices such as using experienced cow hands when sorting and loading/ unloading or not overloading the livestock carrier during transport. Calf weight and diet also play a role in how much weight livestock will lose during stressful times. Younger calves, particularly unweaned calves, are more susceptible to shrinkage than older, heavier feeder cattle. Providing animals with dry feed before handling them can also slightly decrease shrinkage. Producers can also minimize their economic losses from shrink by Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

determining a third type of shrink: the amount of ”pencil shrink” a buyer will deduct. When selling calves, there are times when shrink is negotiable and it can affect the bottom line. For example, selling 700 pound calves at $2.05 per pound with four per cent pencil shrink can result in lower returns than taking an offer of $2.00 per pound and zero per cent shrink (700 lb x 96% x 2.05/lb = $1,378/calf, while 700 lb x 100% x $2.00/lb = $1,400/calf). This difference can add up when selling the entire calf crop. Producers can market their animals a number of ways and it never hurts to inquire with the buyer if shrink is negotiable. If the answer is yes, a little more money can end up in the seller’s pocket book. 49


CANADIAN CHAROLAIS YOUTH ASSOCIATION NEWS

CCYA Conference a Success Aiden Jamieson, Director

The 2016 CCYA has come and gone in the flash of an eye; however, the Charolais group made their presence noticed. During the “Beefin’ it Up” conference, $23,000 of Summer Synergy scholarships were awarded to participants of CCYA. The conference was held in Olds, Alberta from July 12-15th in conjunction with Summery Synergy. With 51 participants attending this year, we saw youth from Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario as well as Quebec. As per CCYA tradition, the show started off with the crowd favourite mixer. Luckily for the group, the rain was able to quickly wash away all the mess that was made. Keep and Cull was held by the Marshall family of Future Farms. A tough class of pairs was presented to the group and the night ended up with

the fun of a mechanical bull. The educational portion was held at Balzac Meats and was hosted by the McLeod family. We were taught about the anatomy of a carcass, as well as the efficiency between breeds of market animals. Showmanship was judged by Joe Barnett and Aaron Birch. Conformation was judged by Dawn and Lee Wilson of Miller Wilson Angus. The week ended with the anticipated banquet, where all members of CCYA did exceptionally well. Neil and Laurie Jamieson of Dalemead, Alberta received the 2016 Honouree Award for their work during the 2016 show. A special thanks to all the volunteers, sponsors and participants for making the 2016 show another great success. Without the support from the Charolais community, this conference would not have been the great show that it was.

CCYA NATIONAL BOARD charolaisyouth@gmail.com President: Shae-Lynn Evans evans32s@uregina.ca Vice-President: Wyatt Ching gw.ching@sasktel.net Treasurer: Courtney Black petunia-101@hotmail.com Secretary: Tomina Jackson tomi_j_@hotmail.com Director: Aidan Jamieson awjamieson@gmail.com Director: Megan McLeod rmeganmcleod@rvschools.ab.ca Director: Shelby Evans sle379@mail.usask.ca Director: Keegan Blehm keegb34@yahoo.ca 2016 CCYA Conference & Show Executive President: Megan McLeod rmeganmcleod@rvschools.ab.ca Vice-President: Luke Marshall lsm742@mail.usask.ca Secretary: Jade Marshall Treasurer: Aidan Jamieson CCYA Provincial Advisors SK: Suzanne Smyth | suzannetylersmyth@gmail.com ON: Billie-Jo Saunders |dbjsaunders@gmail.com MB: Donna Jackson | Jackson7@mymts.net AB: Kasey Phillips | kphillips@mcsnet.ca Youth Coordinator: Kirstin Sparrow kp.sparrow@hotmail.com

HERD HEALTH, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 42

the purchaser indicates if there is anything specific to vaccinate for. If selling cattle for that matter pass on their vaccination, parasite control and nutritional information to the new owner. That will start the discussion about vaccination programs. Vaccination programs vary slightly across the country and this is good information to know so you can vaccinate the cattle before they go. Eastern Canada often will vaccinate for leptospirosis but it is very rare in the west. This process is called preimmunization which is vaccinating before exposure to allow maximum protection to develop. This generally will take ten days to two weeks. There are no magic bullets of vaccination replacing good management. Proper nutrition, parasite control and sanitation go a long way to preventing disease itself. All this augmented with a properly thought out and implemented vaccination program will severely reduce the incidence of those diseases on your farm. Talk to your veterinarian as new products and ways of administration are coming out all the time.

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Charolais Connection • Fall 2016


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Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

51


MANAGEMENT

A Scale Can Be a Useful Tool on a Livestock Operation Colby Elford, BSc, PAg, Regional Livestock Specialist, Regional Services Branch, Agriview, Saskatchewan Department of Agriculture

Producers have heard it said thousands of times: “You can’t manage what you don’t measure”. Two commonly estimated values on cattle operations are animal weight and bale weight. If these values are known rather than estimated, producers can manage their resources much better and hopefully improve their net returns. Now is the time to consider investing in a scale. Animal Weight We know that mature cows will eat approximately 2.5 per cent of their body weight. Underestimating the animal’s weight means it may not be getting enough feed. The opposite is also true. If animals are much lighter than estimated, producers may be generating more feed waste than necessary, leading to increased costs. A scale is also very useful in setting and achieving growth targets for animals. Producers are well aware of the size their heifers need to be at breeding and at calving. Measuring the weight of these animals throughout the feeding period will help producers know if they are reaching their targets adequately. For a backgrounding operation, weighing calves regularly allows producers to adjust the diet to ensure that growth is maximized.

Bale Weight Bale weight should also be a known quantity. When bale weight is underestimated, producers may find they are underfeeding their animals, or—worse yet—not having enough feed for the winter. When feed is purchased, it can be weighed on the truck at or before delivery. If the feed is produced at home, a sample of bales from each field can be weighed to get an average weight for that type of feed. Knowing how much feed is in

each bale, as well as the quality of that feed, makes planning for the winter feeding season much easier. There are many scale options and styles available to producers, ranging from simple load bars and scale head, to more complex systems that work seamlessly with livestock traceability equipment. Producers considering the purchase of a scale need to decide what that scale is going to be used for and what features are important to them.

Digital scales like the one pictured above allow producers to get very accurate readings on their animals.

NEWS

Industry Info Freezing Improves Tenderness Many people find it appealing to take a fresh steak from the store right home to their grill, but research continues to show that freezing the steak and cooking it later improves the tenderness of certain cuts. Kansas State University (KSU) meat scientists report they have confirmed previous findings about the impact of

freezing strip loin and inside round steaks. In a recent study, KSU tested six major muscles from the hind quarter and found those cuts were as much as 10% more tender after freezing. High Protein Diet Helps Sleep Overweight and obese adults who are using a high-protein diet to lose weight, are more likely to sleep better, according to a research report from

Purdue University, which was funded by the Beef Checkoff. While consuming a lower calorie diet with a higher amount of protein, sleep quality improved for middle-age adults. The researchers concluded that “this sleep quality is better, compared to those who lost the same amount of weight while consuming a normal amount of protein.” continued on page 53

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Charolais Connection • Fall 2016


MANAGEMENT

Garrison Creeping Meadow Foxtail Helge By

When touring this summer, we saw an interesting grass that isn’t very common but has proven to be a great asset for Diamond K Cattle Co. Ltd, Maple Creek, SK. They found and imported the seed from the USA about 30 years ago to seed in a flat that floods every spring and had some alkali tendencies. This grass, that at first glance looks like a rank Timothy, got established and has produced excellently ever since. The seed is very small so it had to be floated on in the spring after the water had receded. It produces about 2 to 3 tons an acre and responds very well to fertilizer. It has good digestibility with protein levels up to 17% depending when grazed or hayed. It also produces higher levels of minerals when compared to other grasses. This is very useable in some saline soils that tend to flood for extended periods every spring.

Very small seeds

Candace and Bryce Weiss standing in the hay crop the middle of July

The head looks like a Timothy plant

INDUSTRY INFO, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 52

Salvaged Pumpkins for Cattle Salvaged produce can be beneficial for both cattle producers and owners of that commodity that is no longer worth its original value. Cattle producers looking to reduce feed costs use commodities including pumpkins at salvage value. Pumpkins are a commodity with a limited window for optimal value and typically get discarded if not used for fall decorative purposes. At a lowered cost, cattle producers can use a good supplimental protein and energy source and the commodity producer receives returns on salvage pumpkins.

Imbibing Vegetarians Eat Meat A study conducted in the United Kingdom has found that over a third of vegetarians eat meat when they are under the influence of alcohol. One in three of these vegetarians revealed that they did so every time they were consuming alcohol. The top five meats for vegetarians to consume when under the influence are: kebabs (39%), beef burgers (34%), bacon (27%), fried chicken (19%) and pork sausage (14%). Lower Cost for Sex-sorted Semen Researchers at Texas Tech University’s Health Sciences Center have developed Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

a new technology for sorting semen to produce offspring of the desired sex through artificial insemination. The new technology, called semen selection chamber (SSC), uses a chemical process called chemotaxis to create a trail for sperm cells bearing the Y chromosome to follow. Another method for sex-sorting semen, known as cytometri sorting, has been available for some time. Researchers say the SSC method could reduce the cost of sorting and further work with SSC will determine if it can increase the birth rates in the selected sex as well. 53


UPDATE

Quadruplets Doing Well Back in March the Calvin Lamport Family with children Layne, Cole & Kayla of Alida, Saskatchewan, had a Charcross cow give them a set of healthy, live quadruplets. The chances of a cow having live quadruplets are 1 in 11.2 million. The two bull calves and two heifer calves ranged in weight from 46 to 50 pounds for a combined weight of 189 pounds. The cow had twins the two previous years, so when she had triplets they thought that was it, but then a half hour later she had another calf that was in a sack of its own. They purchased a Holstein cow to aid the mother in raising the four calves. The Lamports run an 80 head Charcross operation.

Doing well on pasture this summer

Above: Feeding time Left: Quadruplets and their mother

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Charolais Connection • Fall 2016


THE FOLLOWING IS AN ALPHABETICAL LIST BY FAMILY NAME, THEN FARM NAME OF ALL CURRENT MEMBERS WHO HAVE COWS ENROLLED IN THE WHOLE HERD ENROLLMENT (WHE) PROGRAM OF THE CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION. THE LIST IS DIVIDED BY PROVINCE ALPHABETICALLY, SO YOU CAN USE IT TO SOURCE REGISTERED CHAROLAIS BULLS IN YOUR AREA. IF YOUR CURRENT BULL SUPPLIER IS NOT ON THIS LIST, YOU MAY NOT BE PURCHASING REGISTERED CHAROLAIS BULLS.

ALBERTA ACADIA COLONY FARMING CO. LTD. 154 OYEN 4036642406 ALTA PRIDE CHAROLAIS 28 DALE & DARCIE GIBB CHAUVIN 7808582241 BE-RICH FARMS 103 RICHARD G. SMITH KITSCOTY 7808462643 BIG JOHNSON CHAROLAIS 65 BYRON & BERNICE JOHNSON AMISK 7808562175 BORDER RIDGE FARMS 22 K. GOMKE HILDA 4038382505 BRIAR RIDGE CHAROLAIS 17 C & R HADDOW BAY TREE 2507865048 BUFFALO LAKE CHAROLAIS 107 LYLE & KENDALL BIGNELL STETTLER 4037426792 CANADA/ALTA LVST RESEARCH TRUST INC 146 LYNDA BAKER LACOMBE 4033920670 CASTINE CATTLE CO 8 DOUG & TRACY HAYDUK CALMAR 7804465268 CENTRAL ALBERTA CHAROLAIS 9 RON & JOAN PREDIGER PONOKA 4037832773 CHAR-LEW RANCH 34 SHELDON & BRANT LEWIS PINCHER CREEK 4036273558 CHARLITE FARMS 10 QUINTIN & KELSY BARNES AMISK 7808562476 CHAR-MAINE RANCHING 251 S. QUINTON CARDSTON 4036533914 CHARMARK RANCHES 102 LEIGH & LYNNE MARQUESS GEM 4036412592 CHOMIAK CHAROLAIS 83 JOHN & CATHIE CHOMIAK MUNDARE 7806327108 CHRISP, BRIAN 152 VERMILION 7808532648 CIRCLE CEE CHAROLAIS 42 LAMONT 7807962108 COYNE, RUSSELL & CHARLENE 23 RAINIER 4037935996 COYOTE FLATS CHAROLAIS 233 G. M. LOHUES COALDALE 4033452988 CW FARMS 17 CODY WARREN DELBURNE 4037492489 DAINES, WYATT 4 RED DEER COUNTY 4033489753 DAVIDSON, TIM 8 RED DEER 403596 3484 DEMARAH FARM 33 MARK & DEBORAH KENDZE BOWDEN 4035567110 DESERTLAND CATTLE COMPANY LTD 71 QUINN WAGSTAFF SEDALIA 4033263333

DIAMOND ZEE RANCHES LTD 69 J SPROULE RAYMOND 4036276662 DOWELL CHAROLAIS 12 DIDSBURY 4037108651 EZ RANCH 52 EVERETT LABOUCAN BOX 89, DRIFTPILE T0G 0V0 7803552179 FANKHANEL, CANDACE 7 FERINTOSH 7808772598 FANKHANEL, COLIN 2 FERINTOSH 7808772598 FLAT VALLEY CATTLE CO. 35 JAMIE EHRET HILDA 4035046265 FOAT VALLEY STOCK FARM 144 GENE & MIKE FOAT CARSTAIRS 4033372192 FOOTPRINT FARMS 225 TRAVIS FOOT ESTHER 4036643167 FORD, BLAIR & THURSTON, COLETTE 13 IRMA 7808064074 FUTURE FARMS 261 ALLAN MARSHALL RED DEER COUNTY 4032272594 GALLELLI CHAROLAIS 10 RUSSELL GALLELLI CROSSFIELD 4039465953 GERRARD CATTLE COMPANY INC 28 DAVE, TERRY & DORY GERRARD RED DEER COUNTY 4032272503 GOLD IN BOULDERS FARMS 156 G.A. & CAROL GIBBS ST LINA 7807262579 GOOD ANCHOR CHAROLAIS 75 DON GOOD VERMILION 7808532220 HARVIE RANCHING CO 83 IAN HARVIE OLDS 4033354180 HATCH, KEVIN 6 CALGARY 4038295032 HAWK VIEW CHAROLAIS 98 BRUCE & MARY BAMFORD/TIM & BETH RILEY CALGARY 4032565674 HEJ CHAROLAIS 132 HENRIK & JERALYN RASMUSSEN RED DEER COUNTY 4032272824 HIGH RIVER COLONY FARMING CO 15 EDWARD HOFER HIGH RIVER 4033335950 HIRCH, REINHOLD & SHEILA 20 ROLLING HILLS 4039642202 HOPP, WINSTON 1 BEAVERLODGE 7802282966 HUBER, BENJAMIN 51 REDCLIFF 4039520187 JAY DAWN FARMS 29 JASON & NIKKI MCQUAIG SEXSMITH 7805682647 JAY DAWN FARMS 7 JORDAN MCQUAIG SEXSMITH 7805682647 JENSEN, SVEN 29 WARBURG 7803607836 JOHNSON, HERB 74 BARRHEAD 7806745957

Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

JUST EZ CHAROLAIS 57 EVERETT LABOUCAN & GARTH ROGERS DRIFTPILE 7803552179 KAPTEYN, RALPH 17 DRAYTON VALLEY 7807272960 KAY-R CHAROLAIS 129 KASEY PHILLIPS WASKATENAU 7803582360 K-COW RANCH 44 JANICE & KEVIN WIRSTA ELK POINT 7807242789 KEY FARMS 12 D. & D. MAETCHE OLDS 4035562803 KING, JARET 8 DAPP 7809542290 KLASSEN, BRUCE & TINA 11 DEWBERRY 7802053780 LAKEVIEW RANCH 100 ROBERT MURRAY MARWAYNE 7808750218 LAZY P STOCK FARM 35 PETER WYATT ARROWWOOD 4034852246 LAZY S CATTLE CO 25 STAN SKEELS & VYKKI JOHNS RIMBEY 4038436801 LAZY S CHAROLAIS 157 R. SCHWEITZER BEAVERLODGE 7803563611 LEEMAR CHAROLAIS 13 LEROY MARTIN THORSBY 7803893314 LEGACY CHAROLAIS 91 RHONDA,TROY & DIANNA WALGENBACH BOTHA 4037424265 LEITCH, GLENNY & EASTMAN, DARCY 5 BERWYN 7803382959 LETNIAKS CHAROLAIS 86 CONSORT 4035750214 LITTLE VALLEY VIEW RANCH 52 WARREN HENDERSON FORESTBURG 7805822254 M C QUANTOCK LIVESTOCK CORP 45 CODY CREECH LLOYDMINSTER 7808758167 MAPLE LEAF CHAROLAIS 69 TOM E & CAREY L STEWART MILLET 7803875110 MAPLE LEAF RANCH 92 GEORGE W STEWART FALUN 7803524817 MCKEARY CHAROLAIS 169 R & M MCKEARY/KAREN & CHAD BOUCHARD COMPEER 3068342938 MCLEOD, ALLEN 102 CLARESHOLM 4036252047 MCLEOD LIVESTOCK 40 ROD MCLEOD ROCKY VIEW COUNTY 4039324622 MULKAY CATTLE CO. 83 ROY & MARIE MULKAY SPEDDEN 7806363598 MURPHY, RAY 38 BONNYVILLE 7808265477 NISH CHAROLAIS 228 WAYNE NISH CARDSTON 4036532114

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O'NEILL LIVESTOCK DEER COUNTY OSSIM LIVESTOCK KRISTEN EDMUNDS OLDS P & H RANCHING CO LTD ARLANE M PARSONAGE RED DEER COUNTY PARKLANE CHAROLAIS THREE HILLS PLEASANT VIEW FARMS G FISCHER IRMA POPLAR BLUFF STOCK FARM HAROLD & GEORGINA TAYLOR CHAUVIN POPLAR BLUFF STOCK FARM JOHN TAYLOR CHAUVIN PRAIRIE COVE FARM TIM BULLICK BOWDEN PRATT RANCHES LTD. FRANK & RUTH PRATT HIGH PRAIRIE PRO-CHAR DAVID & KRISTINA PROKUDA GLENEVIS R J LIVESTOCK JUSTIN PITTMAN & RICKI FLEMING GRANUM RANAMAN RANCH RANDY WUNSCH TROCHU RASMUSSEN, MARINA RED DEER COUNTY RAWES RANCHES LTD. JOHN & MYRNA RAWE STROME REESE CATTLE CO. BARRY & SIMONE REESE DIDSBURY ROCKY CREEK CHAROLAIS WELSH STRATHMORE ROSS LAKE CHAROLAIS BYRON WILKIE STETTLER SADDLERIDGE LAND & CATTLE LTD RALPH RETZLAFF ROSEMARY SAN DAN CHAROLAIS FARMS GEORGE & URSULA CORPATAUX ERSKINE 7-F CHAROLAIS LORI MURRAY LLOYDMINSTER 7 PILLARS RANCH LTD SHANE & PRISCILLA QUIST ELK POINT SHUTTLEWORTH, AMBER AIRDIRE SHUTTLEWORTH, DARRYL G AIRDRIE SHUTTLEWORTH, GRANT ROCKY VIEW COUNTY SHUTTLEWORTH, WAYNE ROCKY VIEW COUNTY SILVER SHADOW CHAROLAIS RALPH & DENISE JONAS VERMILION SIXTYLINE CHAROLAIS CLIFF SUTHERLAND BARRHEAD

56

13 4038772615 24 4035596633 197 4032272348 59 4034422504 89 7807542382 21 7808582234 60 7808582435 16 4032243341 43 7805239850 134 7809321654 25 4066872245 36 4034422504 49 4032272824 521 7803762241 146 4033359807 16 4039010783 44 4037428993 58 4033784480 62 4037423337 8 7807452466 80 7806466333 1 4038317873 74 4032260541 36 4032260056 9 4032260813 69 7808532587 2 780 2681792

SIXTYLINE CHAROLAIS JENNIFER SUTHERLAND BARRHEAD SIXTYLINE CHAROLAIS JONATHAN SUTHERLAND BARRHEAD SNAKE TRAIL CHAROLAIS K. MAUFORT PINCHER CREEK SNAKE VALLEY FARM LTD DARREL, ALVIN & MARV VAAGE CHAMPION SODERGLEN RANCHES LTD AIRDRIE SPRING VALLEY HOLDINGS LTD GARY FOLSOM HILL SPRING SPRINGSIDE FARMS AIRDRIE SPRUCE VIEW CHAROLAIS LORNE LAKUSTA ANDREW STACH FARMS LAMONT STEEVES FARM LAVERNE & DEB, MIKE, KEVIN STEEVES BLUFFTON STONE CREEK FARMS RUSSELL LITTLE ROCKY MTN HOUSE SUGAR LOAF CHAROLAIS ERIC SHERYLE & SCOTT ANDERSON MINBURN SWENSON, BILL RAINIER TELLIER BAR LD RANCH LUC TELLIER BONNYVILLE THISTLE RIDGE RANCH BEN AND CAROL TAMS TABER THURSTON, GORDON & LEONE IRMA TURNBULL CHAROLAIS CURTIS R TURNBULL PINCHER CREEK TWIN ANCHOR CHAROLAIS BRIAN WEEKS CASTOR TWIN ANCHOR CHAROLAIS CLIFFORD WEEKS CASTOR VALANJOU CHAROLAIS RANCH PHILIPPE LUSSON CLYDE VAN OOSTROM FARMS RIMBEY VIKSE FAMILY FARM DAVE & TRACEE VIKSE DONALDA VINCENT LAKE CHAROLAIS D. & L. HARABA ST PAUL VOSSLER LIVESTOCK CRAIG VOSSLER IRVINE WENDT & MURRAY FARMS LTD. GRANT MURRAY LLOYDMINSTER WHITE LAKE COLONY NOBLEFORD WILKIE CHAROLAIS CASEY WILKIE BIG VALLEY

2 7802681792 4 7802681792 24 4036282108 55 4038972135 91 4039486734 14 4036263623 122 2505178521 89 7803652079 15 7808957589 44 4038436924 4 4037292529 70 7805932153 37 4033627671 118 7808264596 145 4032234118 89 7807542176 173 4036274535 26 4038823807 16 4038822571 75 7803485683 15 4038430028 99 4038832461 40 7806454104 17

WILKIE, CLIFFORD ENDIANG WILKIE, DON & WANDA BIG VALLEY WINSNES, WILLIAM & CHRISTA RYLEY WRANGLER CHAROLAIS FARM W. MEAKIN WESTLOCK WYATT, JESSICA P. ARROWWOOD XXX FARMS LTD. DEAN DAVIDSON KITSCOTY

MANITOBA

7807452429 215 4038243686 57

AUSTIN CHAROLAIS JUBA, PETER FOXWARREN BAR J CHAROLAIS JACK & JUSTIN ROBERTSON AMARANTH

Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

7803492982 27 4034850237 260 7808462452

BRITISH COLUMBIA ANCHOR RANCH ROBERT L & E A WILLIS CLINTON BAR B CHAROLAIS G & L BOLIN CECIL LAKE DRY CREEK RANCH CECIL LAKE DUNBAR, DARWIN & EILEEN & SONS GROUNDBIRCH 8 WAY CHAROLAIS DRSCHIWISKI CECIL LAKE GIDDINGS BROS TELKWA HERRICK, AARON & KRYSTAL WILLIAMS LAKE HOLLAUS, ADOLF LANGLEY KCH CHAROLAIS KEN & KERRI HINSBURG OLIVER MILES, ROBERT JR WILLIAMS LAKE PALMER, BEE & LARRY BURNS LAKE REMPEL FARMS LTD JAKOB & VIKTOR REMPEL GROUNDBIRCH RILEY, AUSTIN ARRAS RILEY, CONOR ARRAS RILEY, TIM, BETH, CONOR & A ARRAS SEVEN QUARTER CIRCLE CHAROLAIS ROBERT MILES WILLIAMS LAKE SOUTHSIDE CHAROLAIS KEN & KATHY, ROSE & SHANE BURNS LAKE TK CATTLE CO TATE & KOLBY PAGE VANDERHOOF TRIPLE AAA CHAROLAIS RAWE, DANIEL W SURREY WILLIS, JEREMY CLINTON

4038932411 88

4038762138

57 4035792109 35 4038762596 68 7806632343 182

10 2504592282 8 2507855325 55 2507813443 47 2507802372 51 2507856362 24 2508465628 2 2503925677 5 6048886118 4 7013318825 1 7805229448 11 2506956361 33 2507802230 3 2 10 2508437462 100

19 2506943500 20 2505674157 45 604 372 3116 4 2504592282 10 2048472262 24 2048432246


BREMNER CHAROLAIS FARM JACK BREMNER DAUPHIN BULLIED, JACK & SONS HOLLAND CATTLE LAC CHAROLAIS TYLER WILKINSON EDDYSTONE CHEREPAK, KEN & LINDA ARBORG CLINE CATTLE COMPANY BRAD AND JUANITA CLINE BELMONT C-2 CHAROLAIS JEFF CAVERS LA RIVIERE DAYBREAK CHAROLAIS MILTON PETRE WOODMORE DEFOORT STOCK FARM GORD & SUE DEFOORT CYPRESS RIVER DMG CHAROLAIS DALE & MELODY GAUDRY BIRCH RIVER F & F HUDON FARMS COLIN & DAWN HUDON ROSSER GERVIN CHAROLAIS ALLAN & MICHELLE GERVIN VIRDEN HAPPY HAVEN CHAROLAIS DON & LILLIAN STEBELESKI OAKBURN HATCH, ASHLEY OAK LAKE HATCH, TRENT OAK LAKE HIGH BLUFF STOCK FARM CARMAN & DONNA JACKSON INGLIS HINSBURG, EDWARD RAPID CITY HTA CHAROLAIS SHAWN & TANYA/HARRY & JOAN AIREY RIVERS HUNTER CHAROLAIS DOUG & MARIANNE HUNTER ROBLIN JACKSON, GLEN SINCLAIR JMB CHAROLAIS BERT & JUDY MCDONALD BROOKDALE JOHNSTON CHAROLAIS SCOTT JOHNSTON RATHWELL K E H CHAROLAIS K. HAGAN VIRDEN KERR CHAROLAIS ROBERT KERR VIRDEN KRAUSE CHAROLAIS ROYCE, NOREEN, DARRY KRAUSE PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE L E J CHAROLAIS JIM OLSON PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE L E J CHAROLAIS RAE TRIMBLEOLSON PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE MARTENS CHAROLAIS B & E MARTENS BOISSEVAIN

51 2046387268 18 2045262857 44 2044482181 3 2043762418 67 2045372367 96 2042423467 48 2044273732 119 2047432109 10 2042364490 5 2047222283 8 2047483595 30 2042345480 9 2048553078 125 2048553078 136 2045642547 2 2048262114 135 2043287704 155 2049372531 9 2048512607 16 2043542267 55 2047492247 11 2047481024 40 2047486355 39 2048578056 68 2042523115 6 2042523115 143

MYHRE LAND AND CATTLE HANS MYHRE DAUPHIN OLSON, KIERNAN PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE PLEASANT DAWN FARM TULLY J HATCH OAK LAKE PRAIRIE VIEW CHAROLAIS DARREN ODOWICHUK SHORTDALE PRESTON, JARED STE. ROSE DU LAC R & G MCDONALD LIVESTOCK RON MCDONALD SIDNEY RAMMER CHAROLAIS MATTHEW, SARAH,WAYNE RAMSEY STRATHCLAIR RED DIAMOND CHAROLAIS M. & D. BECKER WHITEMOUTH SCARTH CATTLE COMPANY ROB GILLILAND VIRDEN SCISSORS CREEK CHAROLAIS KEVIN CAREFOOT MCAULEY STEPPLER CHAROLAIS DAN STEPPLER MIAMI STEBELESKI, KEVIN OAKBURN STEBELESKI, KORY OAKBURN SUN DANCE CHAROLAIS DONALD TOMS AMARANTH SUNNY RIDGE STOCK FARM KEN & VONDA HOPCRAFT WAWANESA TEE M JAY FARMS T & M JOHNSON ASHERN TRI-N CHAROLAIS MERVIN & JESSE NYKOLIATION LENORE TRI-N CHAROLAIS FARMS JESSE NYKOLIATION LENORE TRIPLE C CHAROLAIS D. COOK STEEP ROCK VAN BUUREN CHAROLAIS JENNA VAN BUUREN PIPESTONE WALKING PLOW CHAROLAIS CLIFFORD W. GRAYDON WOODMORE WHITE MEADOW CHAROLAIS MIKE BERTHOLET PIPESTONE WALWIN, CHRISTOPHER & SARAH HAMIOTA ZAMRYKUT, KAYLA RORKETON

58 2046385664 1 2042523115 94 2048552402 24 2045462995 53 2047322054 82 2044662883 56 2043652729 41 2043482464 11 2047482000 34 2047222165 445 2044352463 68 2042345425 3 2042345425 61 2048432917 16 2048242115 128 2047682819 71 2048382107 29 2048513391 221 2044492288 95 2048542902 157 2044272589 79 2045225469 12 2045623633 11 2047322748

NEW BRUNSWICK COUNTY LINE CHAROLAIS KENDALL CHARTERS RUSAGONIS D AND J CHAROLAIS DANA CHASE UPPER SALMON CREEK

4 5064611796 7 5063395806

DOWNEAST ROBERT EASTWOOD BELLEISLE CREEK HARMINREST JARVIS, ROYDEN E APOHAQUI LXL CHAROLAIS FARM LOUIS LEBLANC HAUTE ABOUJAGANE MCAFFEE, JACK LOWER KNOXFORD MCAFFEE, JACOB LOWER KNOXFORD

23 5064852634 8 5064332396 7 5065324028 86 5062763664 1

NOVA SCOTIA BALAMORE FARM LIMITED COOPER, JOSEPH GREAT VILLAGE CROUSE, BOYD R. LUNENBURG CO. FUNDY CHAROLAIS FARM THE MCINNIS FAMILY NAPPAN KNOWLES BROS CHAROLAIS RYAN & DAVID KNOWLES HANTS COUNTY L.J. CROOKER FOREST & FARM LTD. L. JAMES CROOKER SOUTH BROOKFIELD OLD MILL CHAROLAIS COOPER, ROBERT GREAT VILLAGE PROSPECT CHAROLAIS FARM JOSH REDDEN WINDSOR RODNEY HILLTOP CHAROLAIS ALLAN & INEZ BOSS SPRING HILL

16 9026682005 7 9026343468 12 9026678018 9 9023060278 1 9026822211 1 9028900663 3 9026705919 1 9025972379

ONTARIO A AND D CHAROLAIS ALAN & DERRICK LORD CODRINGTON A-J'S ACRES A. AITCHISON NEW LISKEARD ALL GIRL ACRES NESTLETON ALTON CENTURY FARMS LTD. LUCKNOW AMABEC CHAROLAIS IVAN HUTCHINSON WARKWORTH ANCAR LIVESTOCK ANDREW & CARLIE HAYWOOD BRIGDEN ANNUROC CHAROLAIS MARK DEGURSE MOORETOWN ARMSVIEW DONALD ARMSTRONG NEWBURGH B BAR D CHAROLAIS BEV & DONNA RAE MOUNT FOREST BAKER FARMS KEVIN & SHERRY BAKER MADOC BEACH VALLEY FARMS ERIC REGIER PEMBROKE BELLHAVEN FARMS COLDWATER

11 6134752023 8 7055632478 7 7053410553 5 5195293195 25 7059242936 1 5198641914 14 5198645876 16 6135615820 29 5193231270 30 6134732452 4 6137320726 13 7058356675

2045346952

Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

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BLACKBERN FARM 52 K. BLACK FORESTERS FALLS 6136462673 BLACKBERN FARM 2 TYSON BLACK FORESTER'S FALLS 6136462673 BLUE MOUNTAINS CHAROLAIS 16 HARVIE & JOHN REEKIE CLARKSBURG 5195993229 BRIDOR 44 BRIAN AITKEN MOUNT FOREST 5193232538 BRI-NAN FARMS 30 BRIAN STEAD ALMONTE 6132563067 BROWN, CARMAN 37 LINDSAY 7053246509 CHARLTON, KENT 19 HANOVER 5193695946 CADILLAC STOCK FARMS 3 ROBERT I. PERRATT MATHESON 7052732206 CEDARDALE CHAROLAIS 129 TREVOR, SCOTT, RYAN NESBITT NESTLETON 9059864608 CENTRE HASTINGS 8 JOSEPH PRESTON MADOC 6134732088 CHARDYCE CHAROLAIS 4 JOHN & PENNY DYCE & FAMILY ARTHUR 5198483941 CIMETTA LA GRANDE CHAROLAIS 1 CIMETTA, SEBASTIAN V. COLBORNE 9053553996 C M CATTLE COMPANY 6 MONTROY, COLIN MULMUR 5199390561 COCKBURN FARMS 5 COCKBURN, DAVE & SONYA IROQUOIS FALLS 7052888013 COOPER CHAROLAIS 47 DYLAN TROTTER MADOC 6134732444 CONNELL, CHARLES & MARY JO 12 OMEMEE 7057996389 CORNERVIEW CHAROLAIS 36 BRIAN COUGHLIN COBDEN 6136469741 CORNERVIEW CHAROLAIS 22 BRETT COUGHLIN HALEY STATION 6133121378 CREEKSIDE FARMS 17 VAN CAMPEN, JEFF & LAURIE UTOPIA 7054244780 CRISTAL PINE FARM 23 ELLERTON, KRYSTAL & PETER ENGLEHART 7055442856 CUSHENDALL CHAROLAIS 96 G. GORDON GANANOQUE 6133827807 D & G CHAROLAIS 19 DEREK R. DEKEYSER COLBORNE 9053553337 DALRYMPLE CHAROLAIS 17 TOM FELTIS & SHEILA BLACK SEBRIGHT 7052387309 DANALEE FARMS 2 HAGERSVILLE 9057685548 DEGURSE FARMS 2 FRANK & CATHY DEGURSE KOMOKA 5196573602 DUDGEON-SNOBELEN LAND & CATTLE 87 WANDA & SAM SNOBELEN RIPLEY 5193950150

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ECHO SPRING CHAROLAIS DOUG, EARL, CORY, RYAN BRIGGS HAWKESTONE EMB CHAROLAIS ERIN BRIGGS HAWKESTONE FLEGUEL, JAMES & GINGER PALMER RAPIDS FONDOAK FARM EMILY BROMLEY RENFREW FOURTHLANE FARMS WAYNE & SCOTT COLTON CONSECON GOLD-BAR LIVESTOCK BRAD & SARAH BUCHANAN VICTORIA HARBOUR GOLDEN MEADOW FARMS BARRY POTTER EARLTON GREENLY, DOUGLAS HASTINGS HARBOUR HILL CHAROLAIS WILLIAM O’ROURKE FITZROY HARBOUR HEFFERNAN, ALBERT DOURODUMMER HICKEY CHAROLAIS ENNISMORE HICKS CHAROLAIS DR. R. BRYAN HICKS ARTHUR HIGH ROCK FARMS JASON & CHRISTINE VAN TOL PETERBOROUGH HIGHLAND CREST FARMS FRED DEBOER LUCKNOW HOGS BACK CHAROLAIS PHIL WICKLAM MARLBANK HOLLIDAY CHAROLAIS RAE HOLLIDAY WOODVILLE HOLMESTEADER FARMS TERRY & STUART HOLMES OSGOODE HUNT CHAROLAIS FARMS JOHN & LINDA HUNT TWEED JENNRHON CHAROLAIS RON CLANCY STIRLING KIRLENE CATTLE K HAKKESTEEGT BRIGHTON LACKLUSTER CHAROLAIS KEVIN MCFADDEN GANANOGUE LAND O'LAKES CHAROLAIS BOB & ARLENE BATEMAN MADOC LANGSTAFF, W. KELLY WALLACEBURG LINKAT LINDSAY DYCE ARTHUR LITTLE BITTY LIVESTOCK DOWSON, NANCY OAKWOOD M & L CATTLE CO ROGER MALONEY INDIAN RIVER

72 7054875840 10

5 6137582917 8 6134337637 12 6138278109 1 7055340137 30 7055632752 5 9053967134 20 6136233854 13 7056523758 12 7052928049 36 5197662816 2 7057614057 41 5193955902 6 6134781420 12 7053744182 16 6138262261 48 6134783924 12 6133955351 2834 6134753532 8 6133822642 55 6134734743 23 5196273464 30 5198485102 4 7059283595 98 7052956439

Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

MACKAY, STEVE DOBBINTON MACKS CHAROLAIS CAMPBELLFORD MATTHEWS, ROBERT YARKER MCCASKIE, PATRICK & ROSEMARY HOLLAND CENTRE MEDONTE CHAROLAIS SHANE & ALLISON CRAMP HILLSDALE MEDONTE CHAROLAIS A. MILLER HILLSDALE MELBAR FARMS BARRY BALDWIN AMELIASBURG MILE LANE FARM MIKE ZUFELT NORWOOD MILLER LAND & LIVESTOCK LTD GEORGE & DWAYNE MILLER JARVIS MOYER CATTLE CO EVAN & MELANIE MOYER ARTHUR NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SCI & TECH. CENTRAL EXPERIMENTAL OTTAWA OATTES CHAROLAIS CRAIG OATTES COBDEN OATTES, JACK COBDEN ORMISTON, MATTHEW OMEMEE O’ROURKE, J. BARKLEY FITZROY HARBOUR OVER THE TOP CATTLE CO SUTCLIFFE, TYLER HASTINGS PACKER CHAROLAIS JEFF PACKER CHATSWORTH PATTON CHAROLAIS FARMS CHESTER PATTON MELANCTHON PLUMTON, ALLAN & TEENY BRIGHTON POTTER, EMILY EARLTON RAILHAVEN FARM CAROLIN & RODNEY TURNER GANANOQUE RAILWAY CREEK FARMS GRANT BLANCHARD MADOC RODRIGUES RANCH RODRIGUES, A ODDESSA ROLLIN ACRES CHAROLAIS CHESTER & MICHAEL TUPLING SHELBURNE SALMON PARK RANCH SAMMON, PAUL ROBLIN SAUNDERS CHAROLAIS BRENT, JOHN, DARRELL SAUNDERS MARKDALE SCOTTSLEA FARMS RALPH SCOTT BLYTH SHARODON DONALD & SHARON BURGOMASTER OMEMEE

4 5193535540 37 7056533221 3 6133782233 16 5197943722 1 7058357665 24 7058353310 11 6139670075 3 7056392815 72 5195872755 4 5198485294 1 6139913036 11 6136467988 1 7 7058798275 15 6136236404 2 7058796288 10

118 5199255243 6 6134751606 1 7056502820 51 6133822874 2 6138270463 34 6133867566 52 5199252938 2 6133966900 142 5199864165 31 5195239528 15 7057424062


SOUTHVIEW FARM LTD BRIAN & TERRY ORMISTON COURTICE STEVENSON SHOW STOCK KYLE STEVENSON ACTON SUNNY MEADOWS ANDREW MILLAR FENELON FALLS SUNRISE CHAROLAIS JIM & SUSAN BAKER STAYNER TAYLOR, MARK & SARAH KEMBLE TAYLOR FARMS JOSH TAYLOR DUNSFORD THE MAPLES CHAROLAIS EVERETT & LENORA LEEDER FRANKVILLE TRIPLE K CHAROLAIS BRIAN KELLY NAPANEE VAN DEN HOEK, CORNELIA ELMWOOD WAGAR ROCK FARM JAMES WAGAR LANSDOWNE WHISKEY HOLLOW CATTLE CO. GORD TOMLINSON NORWOOD WHITE WATER LIVESTOCK KURTIS & CHELSEA BLACK HALEY STATION WINDY LANE FARM ARMSTRONG, BRUCE J CAYUGA WINDYVIEW FARM MICHAEL KEITH ORMISTON OMEMEE WINDYVIEW FARM PAUL ORMISTON ROCKWOOD WY-FI CATTLE CO. BURGOMASTER, WYATT OMEMEE

37 9054394235 6 2899240752 17 7058875142 52 7054283205 1 5193714881 38 7057932576 27 6132752930 29 6133782533 6 5198892496 11 6136593315 15 7059303320 17 6135853873 7 9057720472 7 7057996357 5 5198248457 1 7053132524

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND CORNERSTONE CHAROLAIS RICKY & NANCY MILTON CORNWALL HUNTER ACRES CHAROLAIS GRANT & DONNIE MCCAFFREY HUNTER RIVER MOURNEFIELD FARM CHAROLAIS R & V EDGAR VERNON RIVER

16 9023938699 9 9029642580 18 9026512399

QUEBEC BLONDIN, YVES STESOPHIE BRETON, RAYMOND INVERNESS DOYON, GERALD DRUMMONDVILLE DUBUC CHAROLAIS SENC STEEULALIE FERME A. R. F. CHAMPAGNE ANDRE CHAMPAGNE STSYLVESTRE FERME BERNIER/FRERES ENR JACQUES BERNIER STEUGENE

4 4508205106 9 4184532360 5 8193987564 128 8192254298 65 4185962404 22 4182475626

FERME CARDIN CHAROLAIS INC 52 FELICIEN/ J FRANCOIS CARDIN ST BONAVENTURE 8193961968 FERME C M ROY SENC 6 ST PATRICE DE BEAVRI 4185962643 FERME COUJO CHAROLAIS 20 NOTREDAMEDUBONCO 8193362511 FERME DALMAS ENRG 33 STPIERRE STAUGUSTIN 4185152916 FERME HMP BAILLARGEON 69 MARTINVILLE 8198355761 FERME JANICK BOUFFARD 9 STANSTEAD  EST 8198381398 FERME LEVESQUE CHAROLAIS ENR 24 BERTRAND,LUC & MARIO LEVESQUE KAMOURASKA 4184983485 FERME LOUBER ENR 118 STEMARIE 4183877514 FERME PALERME SENC 12 ETIENNE PALERME GATINEAU 8192107210 FROST, MARK 63 KINGSEYFALLS 8198391433 LA FERME KIRK 8 NORMAND KIRK STESOPHIE 4504364928 LA FERME PATRY DE WEEDON 96 JEANPIERRE PATRY WEEDON 8198772450 LAROSE, RICHARD 3 STISIDORE DE CLIFTO 8196581029 LEMAY, CLAUDE 53 DESLAUREN 8195397616 MANNINGHAM, ERIC 18 LAURIERVILLE 8193654895 MANNINGHAM, JEAN-CLAUDE 16 LAURIERVILLE 8193654759 MARENGER, STEPHANE & CHRISTIAN 55 GATINEAU 8196633783 MCNEIL CHAROLAIS 24 RÉJEAN MCNEIL FIGUERY 8197320241 MERCIER, JEAN 21 L’ANGEGARDIEN 8192814110 MORIN, RICHER 6 EPIPHANIE 5149440536 PEE VEE CHAROLAIS 20 PHIL HARDY MANSONVILLE 4502430249 PONTBRIAND, REJEAN 30 ROXTON FALLS 4503725382 PROULX, PATRICK 7 ST ISIDORE DE CLIFTON 8196581098 RABY, LEO 14 THURSO 8199852407 RANCH DU COYOTE SNC. 26 YVES MARCOUX/SOPHIE FOSTER NEDELEC 8197843287 RANCH OSTIGUY CHAROLAIS 24 STCESAIRE 4504694472 ROYALE CHAROLAIS 6 STBERNARD LACOLLE 4502468799 TELLIER, PASCAL 5 STCONSTANT 4506323870

SASKATCHEWAN A SPARROW FARMS LTD. C. SPARROW VANSCOY ALLANVILLE FARMS LTD MARK & ERIN VAN HAASTERT TISDALE

179 3066684218 62 3068735288

Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

AM SUNRISE FARM MICHELLE BOMOK BATTLEFORD ANGLE H STOCK FARM ISAAC HILDEBRAND DEBDEN BAR “H” CHAROLAIS KEVIN HAYLOCK GRENFELL BECK FARMS LANG BLUE SKY CHAROLAIS JACK GOOHSEN GULL LAKE BORDERLAND CATTLE COMPANY GLENN & WENDY CHING ROCKGLEN BOX J RANCH CRAIG & SHELLY JONES COCHIN BRICNEY STOCK FARM LTD. WENDALL W WESTON MAIDSTONE BRIMNER CATTLE CO. MANOR CAMPBELLS CHAROLAIS JANELLE CAMPBELL GRIFFIN CASBAR FARMS L. CASAVANT BLAINE LAKE CAY’S CATTLE CAY, LAYNE & JUSTIN KINISTINO CEDARLEA FARMS GARNER & LORI DEOBALD HODGEVILLE CHARBURG CHAROLAIS HERBERT HINSBURG SILTON CHARROW CHAROLAIS WILLIAM L. ROW MARSHALL CHARTOP CHAROLAIS GLEN & LYN SAUDER GULL LAKE CK STOCK FARMS CODY & KAYLA ENGLOT CANDIAC CLIPPER CATTLE CO GRIEVE, DYLAN FILLMORE CMT FARMS CHAD AND MICHELLE TUCK NORTH BATTLEFORD COUGAR HILL RANCH NEILSON, WILF & RUTH MELVILLE CRAIG CHAROLAIS CRAIG, KENNETH MOSSBANK CREEK’S EDGE LAND & CATTLE STEPHEN & KRISTIN WIELGOSZ YELLOW CREEK CSS CHAROLAIS CAMERON STEWART & SONS PAYNTON DIAMOND W CHAROLAIS IVAN WALKER HUDSON BAY DIAMOND W CHAROLAIS ORLAND WALKER HUDSON BAY

47 3064416865 87 3067244907 57 3066972901 190 3064364600 79 3066724217 64 3064762439 78 3063862728 64 3068934510 91 3064482028 63 3068426231 33 3064972265 15 3068647307 180 3066772589 11 3067313667 63 3063878011 24 3066723979 9 3067369666 6 3067227437 11 3063862471 7 3067282800 3 3063547431 189 3062792033 13 3068954316 75 3068653953 85 3068653953

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DM LIVESTOCK 7 DARRYL & MARIA FRIESEN CARROT RIVER 3067683605 DOGPATCH ACRES 84 MICHAEL & ANNETTE ZENTNER LEROY 3062874008 DONMOORE FARMS 3 ADAM WINDER NEUDORF ELDER CHAROLAIS FARM 159 R & L ELDER CORONACH 3062674986 FERN CREEK CHAROLAIS 2 COREY PASCHKE LOVE 3062765976 FLAT-TOP CATTLE CO. 8 SUZANNE & TYLER SMYTH HERBERT 3067508423 GILLILAND BROS CHAROLAIS 108 GREG GILLILAND CARIEVALE 3069284841 GILLILAND BROS. 88 RON/CODY GILLILAND CARIEVALE 3069282118 GRAYCHAR CHAROLAIS CATTLE BREEDERS 72 D. A. GRAJCZYK MORTLACH 3063552229 GUTEK, JEFFREY 3 HENDON 3063382112 HARCOURT CHAROLAIS 41 D & G HARCOURT QUILL LAKE 3063832346 HOPEWELL CHAROLAIS FARM 14 T. & S. & KODY MEIER KERROBERT 3068342440 HORSESHOE E CHAROLAIS 17 BROCK EVANS SASKATOON 3069551135 HORSESHOE E CHAROLAIS 185 LAYNE EVANS KENASTON 3062522246 HORSESHOE E CHAROLAIS 1 MARVIN N. EVANS KENASTON 3062522852 HOWE, KELLY 45 MOOSE JAW HOWE, MICHAEL 18 MOOSE JAW HUB CHAROLAIS 11 TREVOR & STEPHANIE HUBER ASQUITH 3063294418 HUMEN, JUSTIN 22 HAFFORD 3062464470 JOHNSTON, DOUG 15 NEILBURG 3068234771 JONES CHAROLAIS 49 MATT JONES GULL LAKE 3066717820 JONESY FARM INC 13 GORDON & KATHY JONES UNITY 3062283692 JORDAN RIVER CHAROLAIS 3 GLEN & LORI MANGELS CARROT RIVER 3067694132 KING, ALDYN 34 ROCANVILLE 3066454383 KING, ALEX B 28 ROCANVILLE 3066452955 KORMOS, CLAYTON 2 YORKTON 3067825852 MACMILLAN CHAROLAIS 25 SASKATOON 3069312893 MARTENS CATTLE CO. 98 SYLVAN MARTENS GLENBUSH 3063422099

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MCAVOY CHAROLAIS 117 MICHAEL MCAVOY ARELEE 3062374464 MCCAW LIVESTOCK 17 COLIN MCCAW WHITEWOOD 3067357020 MCTAVISH CHAROLAIS 131 BETTY MCTAVISH MOOSOMIN 3064354125 MIDNIGHT LAKE CHAROLAIS 32 D W HICKS & SONS GLASLYN 3063424517 MOORE, DOUGLAS 38 REDVERS 3064523708 MOOSE CREEK CATTLE 13 DARREN IPPOLITO KISBEY SK 3064622060 MUTRIE FARMS 90 RICHARD & WADE SYDORKO GLENAVON 3064292215 NAHACHEWSKY CHAROLAIS 66 NORQUAY 3065942627 NEILSON CATTLE COMPANY 120 MIKE NEILSON WILLOWBROOK 3067830331 NORHEIM RANCHING 46 SASKATOON 3062274503 NOSTADT, DELBERT 16 KENDAL 3064242178 PALMER CHAROLAIS LAND & CATTLE CO LTD 95 VELON HERBACK BLADWORTH 3065675545 PALMER, ROBERT G 58 BLADWORTH 3065675460 PAYNE LIVESTOCK 51 DEBRA & ROCKY PAYNE LLOYDMINSTER 3068254056 PENO VALLEY CHAROLAIS 55 PIERCELAND 3068394710 PERROT, JOHN V & ROSEMARIE 20 NAICAM 3068745496 PHILLIPS FARMS 23 KURTIS PHILLIPS ESTEVAN 3066362213 PINE BLUFF FARM 48 RAY & BEATRICE PASCHKE LOVE 3062765976 PLEWIS, DARWIN T 64 SWIFT CURRENT 3067738181 PRAIRIE GOLD CHAROLAIS 61 D. J. BLECHINGER ROSETOWN 3068824081 PREDINCHUK, ANITA 19 FOAM LAKE 3062727324 PROUSE RANCH 19 PROUSE, BUDDY INVERMAY 3068494647 QUALMAN, KELSEY 4 DUNDURN 3064924634 QUALMAN, KEN & LORRAINE 18 DUNDURN 3064924634 QUALMAN, LORRAINE K 4 DUNDURN 3064924634 RADCHENKO CHAROLAIS FARMS 26 BATTLEFORD 3069372704 RAILTON, DON R 19 SINTALUTA 3067274927 RIDGE ROAD CHAROLAIS 22 R., B. & L. INGLIS YORKTON 3067820554 ROBERTSON, HOWARD 13 WELDON 3068874308 ROSS CHAROLAIS 24 MAC AND HELEN ROSS YOUNG 3069177801 / 7802

Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

ROSSO CHAROLAIS DARWIN & KEVIN ROSSO MOOSE JAW SLIDING HILLS CHAROLAIS CAREY & LEEANN WEINBENDER CANORA SOUTHRIDGE CHAROLAIS EUGENE & LORNE CASAT CLAYDON SPEIR, JAMES S ROSETOWN STEPHEN CHAROLAIS FARM KELLY STEPHEN MOOSOMIN STEWART, PETER H SIMPSON STEWART, SHANNON T SIMPSON STEWART, TREVOR L SIMPSON SUNDERLAND CHAROLAIS FARM SCOTT SUNDERLAND SAINT FRONT SWISTUN, DONNIE NORTH BATTLEFORD TEMPLE FARMS BRIAN & DENISE TEMPLE CARROT RIVER TRADEWINDS CHAROLAIS B. SPRAY LINTLAW TREMBLAY, JEROME COURVAL VALLEYS END RANCH MARK ORAM CENTRAL BUTTE VEE R BAR CHAROLAIS VERMEULEN, R. CEYLON VOEGELI BROS CHAROLAIS MAYMONT VOEGELI BROS CHAROLAIS DARLENE VOEGELI MAYMONT WALDE, BLAKE NEILBURG WALDNER JOHN, COURVAL WHEATHEART CHAROLAIS DELORES IRENE SIMPSON ROSETOWN WHITE CAP CHAROLAIS DOUG, DALE & LOIS HOWE MOOSE JAW WIENS, LEROY DALMENY WILGENBUSCH CHAROLAIS JOHN WILGENBUSCH HALBRITE WOOD RIVER CHAROLAIS MURRAY AND NICOLE BLAKE MCCORD WPLB CHAROLAIS WALTER PALASCHUK RAYMORE

158 3066932384 80 3065636678 7 3062964770 16 3068826444 43 3064352087 26 3068364613 22 32 3068364613 85 3063234625 42 3064459868 43 3067683218 47 3063254582 113 3063944406 47 3067964651 38 3064542634 26 3063894605 32 3063894605 5 7802059906 7 32 3068826444 44 3066932127 4 3062544255 320 3064582688 107 3064782520 20 3068352612

UNITEDSTATES LAUE CHAROLAIS HANOVER, KS RAFTER C CATTLE LLC EL CAMPO, TX

1 7853372600 16 9795783658


CHAROLAIS

Success Left: Emily Potter, Earlton, Ontario, exhibited the Grand Champion Female at the 2016 New Liskeard Fall Fair Temiskaming 4-H Show, September 17th, with her Charolais heifer, Potters C’est Tres Bien 18C by Kirlene Dockage 58X.

A 1,460 lb. Charcross steer won the Maple Creek, Saskatchewan, 4-H Regional Show on June 14th. Shown by Will Banford, Eastend he was the top of 45 steers judged by Shae-Lynn and Shelby Evans, Kenaston. The steer sold for $3.30/lb. to Hidden Valley Agra, Eastend.

Baker Farms Con Artist 3C (far left) sired by Baker Farms Absolute from Baker Farms, Madoc, Ontario, won Supreme Champion Male of all Breeds at the Prince Edward County Fair, September 10th in Picton. BF Cinderella Z 14C by D R Revelation also from Baker Farms won Supreme Female of all Breeds.

Siblings Hayden and Carenna Haw of Stratton, Ontario, had Grand and Reserve Grand Champion Steers, out of 29, at the Rainy River 4-H Regional Show at Emo judged by Amy Bonchuk. Hayden’s Grand Champion weighed 1,500 lb. and sold to Cloverleaf Grocery, Emo for $6.05/lb. He graded AAA with a 56% LMY and a 877.5 lb. carcass weight. Carenna’s Reserve Grand Champion weighed 1,485 lb. and was sold to Norbord Inc., Barwick for $5.90/lb. He graded AAA with a 61% LMY and a 890 lb. carcass weight.

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A Charolais steer was Reserve Grand Champion at the Prince Edward County Steer show, September 10th, Picton, Ontario. Shown by Fourthlane Farms, Consecon, he weighed 1,375 lb. and sold for $2.54 a pound to Deerhaven Farm and Garden, Belleville.

Hudson Davies, Medicine Hat, Alberta, won the Overall Highest Rate of Gain over 60 steers at the Borderline 4-H Regional Show in Medicine Hat with a silver Charcross. The steer weighed in on November 11, 2015, at 645 lb. and on June 11, 2016, his steer weighed 1,530 lb. for an ADG of 4.14 lb/day

Taya Lusson of Clyde, Alberta, won 1st in the Regional 4-H carcass competition with a Full French sired Charcross steer. Weighing 1,640 lb. at the end he had gained 4.01 lb/day, had a warm carcass weight of 1,000 lb, dressing 60.98%, was a Yield Grade 1, with 4 mm of backfat and marbling AAA 85 for at total of 98 points.

Danielle Meier, Kerrobert, Saskatchewan, won Supreme Champion Female at the 70th Annual Kerrobert and District Agricultural Society, Regional 4-H Show and Sale on June 1st, with SOS Hot Mess 50B with Hopewell No Chill 4D at side. Judge Brennan Schachtel also made Danielle’s yearling heifer LAE Carmelita 564C Reserve Champion Heifer.

April Steppler, Miami, Manitoba, had Grand Champion Steer at the Carman 4-H Interclub Show with her 1,560 lb. purebred Charolais steer. Judge Chad Haaland, Hanley, Saskatchewan, placed him over 25 steers and the steer later sold for $4/lb. to Gilbraith Farm Services, St. Claude.

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Justin Cay, Kinistino, Saskatchewan, won Grand Champion Female at the Melfort 4-H Regional Show on July 10th, for the second year in a row with Prairie Cove Miss 309A, sired by HTA Vegas 134Y and her PCC Rome 437B heifer calf. The judge was Kurtis Reid.

Charolais Connection • Fall 2016


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Charolais Connection • Fall 2016


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Charolais Connection • Fall 2016


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Charolais Connection • Fall 2016


IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES IN OUR INDUSTRY

Calendar of Events October 8 Expo Boeuf Charolais Show, Victoriaville, QC (A BOSS Show) October 15 Autumn Prestige Sale, 6:30 p.m., Hoard’s Station, Campbellford, ON October 17 George Stewart’s Maple Leaf Ranch Major Herd Reduction Sale, 1:00 p.m., VJV Auction Mart, Ponoka, AB October 22 Uppin’ the Ante Sale, 2:00 p.m., Maple Hill Auction, Hanover, ON October 27 Manitoba Ag-Ex Charolais Show, 1:00 p.m., Keystone Centre, Brandon, MB (A BOSS Show) November 4 Canadian National Charolais Show, 2:00 p.m., Exhibition Place, Royal Agriculture Winter Fair, Toronto, ON (A BOSS Show) November 4 Canadian National Charolais Sale, 7:30 p.m., Exhibition Place, Royal Agriculture Winter Fair, Toronto, ON November 11 FarmFair International Charolais Show, 2:30 p.m., Northlands Park, Edmonton, AB (A BOSS Show) November 24 Canadian Western Agribition Charolais Sale, 3:30 p.m., Sales Arena, Regina, SK November 25 Canadian Western Agribition Charolais Show, 2:30 p.m., Stadium, Regina, SK (A BOSS Show) November 25 & 26 Hicken Ranch Dispersal, Perlich Bros. Auction Mart, Lethbridge, AB November 26 Canadian Western Agribition RBC Beef Supreme, 4:00 p.m., Stadium, Regina, SK November 30 Acadia Colony Bull Sale, at the farm, Oyen, AB December 2 Sterling Collection Sale, 1:30 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales December 6 No Borders Select Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB

December 8 Alberta Charolais Association Annual General Meeting, 4:00 p.m., Red Deer (AB) Westerner Park December 8 Alberta Select Single Bull Show 7:30 p.m., Red Deer (AB) Westerner Park December 9 Alberta Select Pen Bull Show, 11:00 a.m., Red Deer (AB) Westerner Park December 9 Alberta Charolais Select Sale, 1:30 p.m., Red Deer (AB) Westerner Park December 10 M & L Cattle Co. & Guests Production Sale, 1:00p.m., Hoards Station Sale Barn, Campbellford, ON December 12 Steppler Farms “A Piece of the Program” Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB December 12 Diamond K Cattle Co. Bred Heifer Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Swift Current, SK December 14 White Cap Charolais/Howe Red Angus “Sharing the Herd” Sale, 1:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK December 15 Foat Valley Stock Farm Complete Charolais Herd Dispersal, Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart December 16 Char-Maine Ranching “Heart of the White Herd” Female Sale and 12th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange, Fort MacLeod, AB December 29 Rainalta Simmental & Charolais Total Herd Dispersal & Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Bow Slope Auction, Brooks, AB 2017 February 22 Rawe Ranches 34th Annual Performance Tested Charolais Bull Sale, at the ranch, Strome, AB February 22 Beck Farms & McCoy Cattle Co. Bull Sale, at the farm, Milestone, SK February 26 Pro-Char and Guests 6th Annual Bull Sale, at the farm, Glenevis, AB Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

March 6 Coyote Flats Charolais 2nd Annual Bull Sale, at the farm, Coaldale, AB March 10 A. Sparrow Farms Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., on the farm, Vanscoy, SK March 12 Steppler Farms 6th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Miami, MB March 13 Palmer Charolais 6th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Bladworth, SK March 14 McTavish and Guest 6th Annual Charolais & Red Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Moosomin, SK March 17 14th Annual Family Tradition Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at Rolling D Charolais, Dropmore, MB March 18 Springside Farms at 20th Annual SanDan Bull Sale, at the farm, Erskine, AB March 18 Pleasant Dawn Charolais 15th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock. Virden, MB March 22 HTA Charolais & Guest Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB March 23 Elder Charolais 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coronach, SK April 3 14th Annual North of the 49th Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at Wilgenbusch Charolais, Halbrite, SK April 4 Cedarlea Farms at Git ‘R Done Bull Sale, at Windy Willows, Hodgeville, SK April 6 Hunter Charolais 5th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Roblin, MB April 13 Sliding Hills Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Canora, SK April 15 Brimner Cattle Co. at Cornerstone Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart

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LOOKING TO FIND SOMEONE?

Advertisers Index Acadia Colony ................................................37

Flewelling, Craig ............................................63

Packer Charolais.............................................67

Alberta Charolais Association .......................47

Foat Valley Stock Farm ........................38,39,64

Palmer Charolais ..................................26,27,68

Amabec Charolais ..........................................66

Footprint Farms ............................................64

Parklane Charolais .........................................65

Annuroc Charolais .........................................66

Future Farms ..................................................64

Patton Charolais ............................................67

B Bar D Charolais ...........................................66

Gerrard Cattle Co...........................................64

Perlich Bros. Auction .....................................46

Baker Charolais ..............................................66

Gilliland Bros. Charolais ................................68

Phillips Farms .................................................68

Bar H Charolais ..............................................67

Good Anchor Charolais .................................64

Pleasant Dawn Charolais............................9,66

Bar Punch Ranch ............................................64

H.S. Knill Company Ltd..................................63

Potter Charolais .............................................67

Beck Farms ................................................18,67

Happy Haven Charolais .................................65

Prairie Cove Consulting .................................63

BeRich Farms.................................................64

Hard Rock Land & Cattle Co..........................65

Blackbern Charolais .......................................66

Harvie Ranching ............................................64

BoJan Enterprises .........................................67

HEJ Charolais .................................................64

Borderland Cattle Co.....................................67

Hicken Ranch .................................................46

Bouchard Livestock International.................45

Hicks Charolais ...............................................66

BovaTech Ltd.................................................63

High Bluff Stock Farm ................................5,65

Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. ...............................63

Holk Charolais................................................64

Bricney Stock Farms .......................................67

Hopewell Charolais........................................68

Bridor Charolais .............................................66

Horseshoe E Charolais ...................................68

Brimner Cattle Company..........................11,67

HTA Charolais Farm ...................................3,66

Buffalo Lake Charolais .................................64

Hunter Charolais ....................................66,IBC

Royale Charolais ............................................67

By Livestock..........................................24,41,51

JMB Charolais ................................................66

RRTS Charolais ...............................................65

Carey, Brent....................................................63

Johnson Charolais.....................................17,64

Saddleridge Charolais....................................65

Cedardale Charolais.......................................66

Johnstone Auction.........................................63

Sandan Charolais Farms ................................65

Cedarlea Farms ................................................7

Kaiser Charolais Farm ....................................64

Saskatchewan Charolais Association ............48

Charla Moore Farms ......................................67

Kanewischer, Jerry .........................................63

Saunders Charolais ........................................67

CharMaine Ranching...............................41,64

KayR Land & Cattle Ltd. ...............................64

Scarth Cattle Co. ............................................66

Charolais Journal ...........................................63

KCH Charolais ................................................65

Serhienko/Voegeli Cattle Co. ........................68

Charworth Charolais Farms...........................64

Kirlene Cattle .................................................66

Sharodon Farms .............................................67

Chomiak Charolais ........................................64

La Ferme Patry de Weedon ...........................67

Skeels, Danny .................................................63

Circle Cee Charolais Farms ............................64

Land O' Lakes Charolais ................................66

Sliding Hills Charolais ...............................31,68

Cline Cattle Co. ..............................................65

Langstaff Charolais........................................66

A. Sparrow Farms..........................................IFC

Cockburn Farms .............................................66

Laurel Creek Ranch........................................68

Springside Farms.......................................15,65

Cougar Hill Ranch ..........................................67

Leemar Charolais ...........................................64

Spruceview Charolais.....................................65

Coyote Flats Charolais ..............................25,64

LEJ Charolais .............................................35,66

Stephen Charolais Farm ...........................33,68

Creek's Edge Land & Cattle Co. ...............12,68

LindskovThiel Charolais Ranch ....................68

Steppler Farms Ltd. ....................................6,66

C2 Charolais ...................................................65

M & L Cattle Co.........................................49,66

DavisRairdan .................................................63

Mack's Charolais ............................................67

Defoort Stock Farm .......................................65

Maple Leaf Charolais................................24,65

Demarah Farms..............................................64

Martens Cattle Co..........................................68

Diamond K Cattle Co.....................................43

Martens Charolais..........................................66

Diamond W Charolais...............................37,68

McAvoy Charolais Farm.................................68

DLMS ..............................................................45

McKay Charolais ............................................66

Dorran, Ryan ..................................................63

McKeary Charolais .........................................65

Double L Ranch..............................................64

McLeod Livestock...........................................63

Double P Stock Farms ....................................65

McTavish Charolais ...................................13,68

Dubuc Charolais.............................................67

Medonte Charolais ........................................67

Turnbull Charolais..........................................65

DudgeonSnobelen Land & Cattle................66

Miller Land & Livestock .................................67

Western Litho ................................................64

Eaton Charolais..............................................68

Murphy Livestock...........................................65

Whiskey Hollow Cattle Company .................67

Edge, Dean.....................................................63

Mutrie Farms..................................................68

White Cap Charolais ......................................68

Elder Charolais Farms ...............................19,68

Myhre Land and Cattle..................................66

WhiteWater Livestock ...................................67

Ericson Livestock Services ..............................63

Nahachewsky Charolais.................................68

Wilgenbusch Charolais..........................68,OBC

Ferme Palerme ...............................................67

Norheim Ranching.........................................63

Wilkie Ranch ..................................................65

Fischer Charolais ............................................64

Northlands .....................................................50

Winters Charolais...........................................67

Fleury, Michael...............................................63

P & H Ranching Co.........................................65

Wrangler Charolais........................................65

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Charolais Connection • Fall 2016

Prairie Gold Charolais....................................68 ProChar Charolais ....................................17,65 Qualman Charolais .......................................68 Raffan, Don....................................................63 Rainalta Simmentals & Charolais ..................45 Rawes Ranches..........................................28,65 Rebuild with Steel .........................................63 Reykdal Farms Charolais................................66 Rollin' Acres Charolais ...................................67

Stock, Mark ....................................................63 Stockmen's Insurance ....................................63 Sugarloaf Charolais .......................................65 Sunrise Charolais............................................67 T Bar C Cattle Co..................................37,47,64 Temple Farms .................................................68 Thistle Ridge Ranch .......................................65 Transcon Livestock Corp. .....................38,39,64 TriN Charolais................................................66


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Fall 2016 charolais connection web  

Fall 2016 charolais connection web