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Charolais Banner • February 2017

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February 2017 VOL. 51, NO. 1 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Ph. (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Home Page: http://www.charolaisbanner.com email: charolaisbanner@gmail.com

Features

ISSN 0824-1767

CCA Hires Whelan ........................................................................14 Polled, Horned, Scurred… How does it all work? ......................30 Acère, Corne, Cornillon, Démystification ....................................32 Obituary – Sharon Burgomaster ..................................................38 Obituary – Henry Bowers..............................................................38 Sales in Brief ..................................................................................38 15 Secrets from Top Social Media Experts ..................................40 CharMaine Ranching Heart of the White Herd Sale ................42 Alberta Charolais Association AGM ............................................44 Alberta Select Bull Show ..............................................................44 Alberta Select Sale ........................................................................45 Sterling Collection Sale ................................................................46 M & L Cattle Co. Sale ....................................................................47 No Borders Select Sale ..................................................................48 Steppler Piece of the Program Sale ............................................49 Banner of Show Sires Report........................................................50 Howe Family Sharing the Herd Sale ............................................53 Female Sale Summary ..................................................................55 CCYA Winning Essays....................................................................58

Departments From the Field ................................................................................6 Du Champ........................................................................................8 Canadian Charolais Association ..................................................10 De l’Association de Charolais Canadien ......................................12 Profile – Palmer Charolais ............................................................17 Herd Health ..................................................................................28 Charolais Life ................................................................................36 Canadian Beef Breeds Council Report ........................................41 Road Tales......................................................................................43 Magazine Rates and Deadlines ....................................................57 Canadian Charolais Youth Association News ..............................64 Calendar of Events ........................................................................71 Index of Advertisers ......................................................................74

On the cover… B.O.S.S. Show Female and Show Bull of 2016. See the full report on page 50

Helge By, Manager/Publisher Candace By, Managing Editor charolaisbanner@gmail.com Cell 306-536-3374 @ByCandace Susan Penner, Production/Design charolais.susan@sasktel.net Dalyse Robertson, Web Design Box 2458, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0 Ph/Fax (204) 476-8856 pdmrobertson@gmail.com FIELDMEN: Alberta & British Columbia Craig Scott 5107 Shannon Drive, Olds, AB T4H 1X3 Res. (403) 507-2258 • Fax (403) 507-2268 Cell (403) 651-9441 sbanner@telusplanet.net @craigscott222 Saskatchewan, Manitoba, USA & Eastern Canada Helge By 124 Shannon Rd., Regina, SK S4S 5B1 (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Cell (306) 536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com @CharolaisBanner

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Payable by credit card at www.charolaisbanner.com

All Rates Are Listed In Canadian Funds Canada (Canadian prices include 5% GST) 1 yr. - $52.50 3 yrs. - $136.50 USA 1 yr. - $80, 1st class (2 week delivery) - $140 3 yrs. - $215, 1st class (2 week deliver) - $395 Overseas 1 yr. - $85, 1st class (2 week delivery)- $150 3 yrs. - $225, 1st class (2 week delivery)- $420 Animals in the photographs in the Banner have not been altered by computer enhancement or mechanical methods according to the knowledge of the publisher. The material produced in this publication is done so with the highest integrity, however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. We are responsible for only the value of the advertisement. Charolais Banner (ISSN 0824-1767) is published 5 times per year (February, May, Aug, Oct and December) by Charolais Banner Inc., Regina, SK. Postage paid at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Printed by: Western Litho Printers Ltd. Publication No. 40047726

Photos: Show Champions GRP Ltd. Design: Susan Penner

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Registration No. 9810 Return undeliverable addresses (covers only) to: Charolais Banner 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Canada charolaisbanner@gmail.com

Charolais Banner • February 2017


Charolais Banner • February 2017

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POINTS TO PONDER

From the Field Helge By

Be sure to read the Canadian Charolais Association’s article this month as Sean does a great job explaining the history of performance testing of Charolais in Canada. Charolais have always prided themselves as being the first in many categories. There are a few points that I know will still be in question, such as why are we combining our genomic data with the American International Charolais Association. In layman terms, the reason for this is to get enough DNA markers to be able to develop a genomically enchanced EPD or GE EPD. I have stated many times that I wish we were moving quicker on this, as I see a big advantage in increasing the accuracy of an animal’s EPDs at a younger age. Have a new born calf with the accuracy of a sire, with 10 daughters in production as is seen in the dairy industry. We are a long way off this scenario with less numbers and we don’t want to get it wrong, but there is hope this will become a reality before too long. Now with the American Angus Genetics Inc or AGI moving to the one step process, and they are who we are consulting with on our Genomic information, this could help move things along more quickly and accurately. The other question and rumour out there is, if we do this, are we going back to a North American EPD. The answer as explained at the Alberta Charolais Association Annual General Meeting in December and to me by

the Canadian Charolais President is, “no we are not going back to a North American EPD.” We are doing a Genomic run with them but the information will be separated and we will still have a Canadian only EPD. When we have several people ask the same question we feel there is the need for education, thus the article in the December issue with the discussion from the three former CCA presidents. Who better to explain about the time when we had a North American EPD and why we went away from it than three of the presidents who were there when it happened. We thank all of you for the feedback on this article with comments like “Good article, I didn’t know why this happened” and “there was some of that stuff I sure didn’t know” and “I thought it was a good read.” If there are other topics that you have questions about or think we should write about, please let us know. We are all about educating breeders and empowering them to become better at what they do. This ultimately leads to everyone becoming better breeders and better marketers in both the Charolais world and beyond. As an example, in this issue I have tried to explain the polled, horned and scurred genetic situation as I have found that many breeders have never been exposed to the science behind this. I hope this and other topics in the future will help. It was a great fall female sale season with great enthusiasm and stronger prices than I think most anticipated. Check out the fall female sale

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Charolais Banner • February 2017

summary at the back of this issue. There are 23 years of comparison for you to peruse. It shows last fall had the third highest average in history at over $5,400 per lot and the second highest gross up nearly 1.7 million dollars from 2015. The only gross that was higher was the first year we started the chart in 1994 and there were 42 sales not the 17 we had this past fall. Not included in these numbers, which would push them even higher, were a couple sales that had more than 10 bulls on offer that will be included in the spring bull sale summaries. I also think that the spring Charolais bull sales will be very good, if the late fall sales with bull calves offered is any indication. Charolais in Canada are on the move and I am glad that you are a part of it. I said this last year as well and it proved to be very accurate. If you think you want to sell some females in sales this fall, start planning now to make sure you have them bred to what will make them sell the best, with observed breeding dates and no exposures. Feed is still your cheapest commodity in the purebred business so don’t be shy with it. Having your herd look it’s best at all times will pay dividends when potential customers stop by. Also, make sure your bull battery is as good as it can be to position yourself for the great times ahead in the Charolais industry. And as always, if Craig or I can be of any assistance this spring, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. Until next time, Helge


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POINTS À RÉFLÉCHIR

Du Champ Helge By

N’oubliez pas de lire l’article du Directeur Général, Mel a fait du bon travail en expliquant l’historique de la performance testée sur le Charolais au Canada. Charolais a toujours été fier et a été premier dans plusieurs catégories. Il y aura toujours quelques points qui seront questionnables, tel que pourquoi avoir combiné nos données génomique avec l’Association Charolaise Américaine. Comme dirait le profane, la raison est simple, c’est que nous n’avions pas assez de marqueur génétique d’ADN, pour être capable génétiquement de développer des EPD ou GE EPD. J’ai formulé à plusieurs reprises le souhait de converger le plus vite possible vers cela. Je voyais un gros avantage pour augmenter la précision au plus jeune âge des EPD d’un animal. Avoir un veau naissant avec la précision d’un taureau, avec 10 filles en production, comme on voit en production laitière. Nous sommes loin de ce scénario, avec le petit nombre que nous avons, et nous ne voulons pas que ce soit faux, mais il y a un espoir, et qui deviendra une réalité avant longtemps. Maintenant avec la génétique américaine angus ou AGI, nous faisons un grand pas, et c’est ce que nous consultons pour l’information sur la génétique, ceci nous aidera à la longue plus précisément et plus vite. L’autre question et rumeur qui en ressort, si nous travaillons avec cela, nous retournons aux EPD nordaméricain. La réponse a été expliquée à l’assemblée annuelle de l’Alberta en décembre et à moi-même par le président de l’association charolaise, non nous ne retournons pas avec les

EPD nord- américain. Nous marchons avec eux pour la génomique, mais les résultats sont séparés et nous aurons seulement les EPD canadiens. Quand plusieurs personnes nous posent la même question, nous pensons qu’il y a un besoin d’informer et c’est pourquoi qu’un article a été placé dans le numéro de décembre dernier des trois présidents charolais. Qui de mieux placé pour expliquer, quand nous avions les EPD nord- américain, et pourquoi nous les avons abandonnés, trois présidents qui étaient là à ce moment l’explique. Nous pensons tous qu’un retour sur cet article, qui en passant a connu de très bons commentaires et nous n’avions aucune idée pourquoi c’est arrivé, c’est que personne ne connaissaient ces choses, et j’ai pensé que ce serait intéressant à lire. Si vous avez des sujets qui vous intrigue, et que vous vous posé des questions, et que vous aimeriez qu’on traite, laissez-nous le savoir. Nous sommes tous intéressés à renseigner les éleveurs et leur en donner d’avantage, pour qu’ils deviennent meilleurs dans ce qu’ils font. C’est finalement pour que chacun devienne meilleur éleveur et meilleur dans leur mise en marché, au-delà du monde charolais. Un exemple dans ce numéro j’essaie d’expliquer la situation génétique pour le gène acère, à corne et à cornillon, j’ai remarqué que plusieurs éleveurs n’ont jamais été informés adéquatement de ce que la science a créé à cet égard. J’espère que ceci et les autres sujets seront aidés dans le futur. Quel automne pour les ventes de femelles, beaucoup d’enthousiasme et de forts prix, et plus que prévu. Vérifiez dans ce numéro le sommaire des ventes de femelles. À lire attentivement 23 ans

Suivez, moi sur Twitter! @CharolaisBanner 8

Charolais Banner • February 2017

de comparaison, il est montré que l’automne dernier a été une des plus grosses moyennes de l’histoire avec plus de $5400.00 de moyenne et la seconde plus grosse avec près de $1.7 millions de revenus. La seule plus grosse c’est quand nous avons commencé à compiler les résultats en 1994 avec 42 ventes 17 de l’automne dernier ne sont pas incluse ce qui remonterait la moyenne, ce sont des ventes avec plus de 10 taureaux ayant été offerts, incluant le sommaire des ventes de taureaux printaniers. Je pense aussi que les ventes de taureaux printanières ont été excellentes, même si les ventes de taurillons n’ont pas été compilées. Le Charolais au Canada est en mouvement et je suis heureux que vous en fassiez partie. Je l’ai mentionné l’année dernière c’est prouvé et très précis. Vous pensez vendre quelques femelles dans les ventes d’automne, commencez à planifier dès maintenant, pour être sûr qu’elle soit saillies avec les dates de saillies et les dates exposées aux taureaux pour en retirer le plus possible. La nourriture est ce qui est le moins dispendieux dans un élevage pur-sang, n’ayez pas peur d’en donner. Ayez toujours un troupeau qui reflète au maximum sa qualité, cela vous payera que des dividendes quand les acheteurs potentiels se présenteront pour vérifier ce qui les intéresse. Aussi soyez sûr que votre batterie de taureaux est bonne et qu’elle peut vous positionner avantageusement dans l’industrie du Charolais. Comme toujours si Craig et moi pouvons vous aider ce printemps, n’hésitez pas à communiquer avec nous. À la prochaine, Helge


Charolais Banner • February 2017

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FROM THE CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais

A History of Leadership Leads to the Future Sean McGrath, Ranching Systems

www.facebook.com/cdncharolais PROVINCIAL REPRESENTATIVES: ALBERTA President: Stephen Cholak, Lamont SASKATCHEWAN President: Carey Weinbender, Canora Secretary: Dave Blechinger, Rosetown MANITOBA President: Shawn Airey, Rivers Secretary: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie ONTARIO President: Jim Baker, Stayner Secretary: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC President: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secretary: Chantal Raymond MARITIMES President: Ricky Milton, Cornwall Secretary: Jennifer MacDonald, St. Mary’s, Kent Co., NB STAFF: General Manager: MEL REEKIE Registry Manager: LOIS CHIVILO Registry: JUDY CUMMER French Membership: BERNARD DORE bernarddore@videotron.ca EXECUTIVE: PRESIDENT: BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 613.646.9741 C 613.312.0270 bh.cornerview@gmail.com

1st VICE-PRESIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net 2nd VICE-PRES: RICKY MILTON 4558 Route 19, Nine Mile Creek, PEI C0A 1H2 902.675.3091 C 902.393.8699 rmilton@upei.ca

PAST PRESIDENT: BRENT SAUNDERS RR 3, Markdale, ON N0C 1H0 519.986.4165 C 519.372.6196 F 519.986.4273 saunders@bmts.com

DIRECTORS: MATHIEU PALERME 814 Ch. Pink, Gatineau, QC J9J 3N2 819.682.2723 matpalerme@yahoo.com ALLAN MARSHALL 35266 Rang Road 33 Red Deer County, AB T4G 0N3 allan@futurefarms.ca MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C 306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C 780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca

TRAVIS FOOT Box 414, Esther, AB T0J 1H0 403.664.3167 C 403.664.0961

The Charolais breed has a long and colourful history of leadership in Canada. Aside from the original importations, which were a game changing event in their own right, Charolais breeders had the audacity to tackle performance testing and genetic selection head on. The Conception to Consumer Progeny Test program, start in 1968 marked the first of many steps towards improving the selection of Charolais cattle. The program tracked calving, growth and carcass traits of Charolais sires in commercial cow herds. This structure was the first move towards formalized genetic evaluation, although results in the test reports were expressed as phenotypic rather than genetic differences. In 1981 the CHARM performance testing program was the first independent performance testing program to collect birth, weaning and yearling weights from Charolais member herds. Charolais was also the first to use a computerized herdbook and to offer a software solution for on farm reporting. Some breeders may remember scrolling through a DOS based text program to record weaning weights, and they will certainly remember that if they missed a cow they had to scroll back through the whole list to find her again. While that seems quaint today, at the time it was revolutionary. Genetic Evaluation Another first was using this data in a genetic evaluation of Canadian Charolais cattle. The original evaluations were conducted at the University of Georgia (UGA) as they had computer models and the computing horsepower to perform such a task at the time. This first evolution of genetic evaluation resulted from the leadership of a strong board and a very performance oriented group of breeders. For the period the genetic evaluation added a significant degree of improvement in the power of members to select growth traits more accurately. Using C to C data, CCA was also the first Canadian breed to offer a carcass evaluation.

Travis@bigskyrealestate.ca

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Charolais Banner • February 2017

Charolais was the first beef breed to produce and publish a sire summary, providing information on sires that were in active use in purebred member herds. In 1996, another major leap forward was providing animal information on the internet with CCA leading the way providing valuable selection information to users of Charolais genetics. CCA also invested in an aggressive research program in cooperation with Agriculture Canada that resulted in the development of a cow herd at One Four research station and the addition of many new carcass and feed intake phenotypes to the Charolais dataset. This has led to the current Charolais herd at the Kinsella Research station. New evaluation methodologies were developed for carcass, calving ease and several other traits. In fact, CCA is the only breed in North America that accounts for differences in gestation length in their evaluation of calving ease. North American EPD Due to growing trade with the US a joint North American evaluation was initiated roughly 5 years after the NAFTA agreement was signed. Since both AICA and CCA were conducting evaluations with UGA they were the logical choice to conduct the evaluations. A massive effort was undertaken to analyze the data from both the US and Canada and to match pedigrees and animals between the countries. As well edits and adjustments to the data were standardized between countries. The result was one of the first North American evaluations in beef cattle. While the EPD highlighted some differences between the countries, the results actually had the vast majority of Canadian sires sorted in the same order as before the US data was included, and trade was enhanced by the ability to compare results directly across countries. Canadian EPD After BSE there was an immediate halt to most trade, particularly that involving live animals. This not only meant a change in the economics behind cattle production


in Canada vs. the USA, it also created some difficult times for CCA. Due to the Ag Canada’s strong relationship with CCA, their familiarity with the data, as well as revolutionary changes in the computing industry, it was decided to move away from the North American evaluation and provide a Canadian solution through Ag Canada. In time various Ag Canada staff took new positions and the Canadian evaluation followed their technical expertise to be conducted at Colorado State University. This evaluation used the same software and models as Ag Canada. As staff changed at CSU, a move was made to transition the evaluation to Angus Genetics Incorporated (AGI), which is a large, independent service provider to conduct the genetic evaluations. Again, with this move results were carefully examined and although the EPD were expressed on a new scale, animals ranked nearly identically. The Future of Genetic Evaluation Today Charolais members have a robust, scientifically sound genetic evaluation but that is not the end of the leadership story. A new form of data has come on the scene over the last few years in the form of DNA SNP (pronounced Snip) data. This information has the potential to look directly into the composition of an animal’s DNA and how it relates to various traits of interest such as growth or carcass merit or longevity or fertility. This development is moving fast and could be compared to the evolution of computers over the last 25 years. When I first walked into the Charolais office in 1996, the state of the art DEC computer was the size of my deep freeze. It is also less powerful than my current cell phone. Over the last 10 years DNA has

evolved in much the same way, so that today we are able to look directly at 50,000 to 750,000 pieces of DNA in an animal for less than the price of a parentage test using 16 pieces of DNA 10 years ago. Currently the CCA is working with both DNA information and performance data to map this Charolais DNA onto the relevant performance results. The end goal is to show leadership through being able to use DNA or genomics to enhance the speed and accuracy of genetic prediction. In other words, we want to be able to use DNA directly to improve the EPD. This technology has already been adopted by other breeding industries and in fact is already in heavy use in dairy breeding as well as emerging in importance in breeding of beef cattle. Pursuing genomics is definitely in the spirit of leadership that the original breed builders displayed. As with all breeds, the cattle are built by the breeders and their decisions. The current EPD are the result of a long evolution and they will continue to evolve and improve. Certainly there can be arguments made about the direction breeders have chosen over time but there can be no argument about the effectiveness of EPD for ranking animals for a trait of interest. The biggest number often gets confused with the best number which is unfortunate, but the EPD ranking tool is still 9 times more effective than an in-herd index or adjusted weight for determining the correct genetic placing of animals for a trait. While we may or may not agree on the direction that breeders have taken the breed, Charolais breeders have reason to be both proud of and believe in their genetic evaluation. In fact it

Table 1: Summary of data counts by year 2011-2016. Yr 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Enroll Num 22834 22197 22379 21482 22430 22496

BW Num 15276 15460 15040 14973 14371 4066

WW Num 10051 10246 8941 9363 8915

YW Num 4477 4571 4282 4169 3829

Ultrasound Num 310 585 605 369 304

Charolais Banner • February 2017

was Charolais pioneers taking the bull by the horns and demonstrating real leadership is genetic selection that turned the entire industry on its ear. And that is certainly a legacy worth building on. DATA Over time much of the leadership displayed by Charolais breeders has been dependent upon objective data, and that is one area where Charolais breeders should be very proud. From the C to C program, to implementing CHARM and Whole Herd Reporting, and work with research herds Charolais members have never stopped submitting quality data. Often the argument is made that we do not have enough data, or that the data is corrupt in some way, but if one actually sorts through the over 1 million performance records in the Charolais database, nothing is further from the truth. A short data summary of current data is provided in Table 1 and Table 2 shows historical data, to provide some idea of the depth of data that the Charolais breed has in Canada. Additionally, the genetic models are much more robust than a simple adjusted weight as they use standard edits, improved adjustment factors for things like age of dam and also have restricted contemporary group definitions in place. When we factor in the power of tying all of this information together through pedigrees we wind up with a very powerful selection tool. Surprisingly to some, the methodologies are quite old, but were restricted by computing horsepower for many years. Table 2: Charolais Record Counts by TraitSent to Spring 2017 Evaluation Type of Data Number of Records Pedigree 1,232,508 BWT 577,560 WWT 441,066 YWT 244,948 Scrotal 9,263 Gestation 90,371 Breeding 385,678 Calving Ease 653,061 Ultrasound 7,232 C to C 8,645 11


DE L'ASSOCIATION CHAROLAISE CANADIENNE

CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais www.facebook.com/cdncharolais

Notre histoire de leadership nous conduit vers l’avenir

PROVINCIAUX REPRÉSENTANTS:

Sean McGrath, Ranching Systems

ALBERTA Président: Stephen Cholak, Lamont SASKATCHEWAN Président: Carey Weinbender, Canora Secrétaire: Dave Blechinger, Rosetown MANITOBA Président: Shawn Airey, Rivers Secrétaire: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie ONTARIO Président: Jim Baker, Stayner Secrétaire: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC Président: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secrétaire: Chantal Raymond MARITIMES Président: Ricky Milton, Cornwall Secrétaire: Jennifer MacDonald, St. Mary’s, Kent Co., NB PERSONNEL: Directeur général: MEL REEKIE Registry Manager: LOIS CHIVILO Registry: JUDY CUMMER Composition française: BERNARD DORE bernarddore@videotron.ca EXÉCUTIF: PRÉSIDENT: BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 613.646.9741 C 613.312.0270 bh.cornerview@gmail.com

1er VICE- PRÉSIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net 2e VICE- PRÉSIDENT: RICKY MILTON 4558 Route 19, Nine Mile Creek, PEI C0A 1H2 902.675.3091 C 902.393.8699 rmilton@upei.ca

ANCIEN PRÉSIDENT: BRENT SAUNDERS RR 3, Markdale, ON N0C 1H0 519.986.4165 C 519.372.6196 F 519.986.4273 saunders@bmts.com

ADMINISTRATION: MATHIEU PALERME 814 Ch. Pink, Gatineau, QC J9J 3N2 819.682.2723 matpalerme@yahoo.com ALLAN MARSHALL 35266 Rang Road 33 Red Deer County, AB T4G 0N3 allan@futurefarms.ca MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C 306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C 780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca

TRAVIS FOOT Box 414, Esther, AB T0J 1H0 403.664.3167 C 403.664.0961 Travis@bigskyrealestate.ca

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La race Charolaise possède une longue histoire de leadership au Canada remplie d’accomplissements. Mis à part les importations d’animaux du début, qui ont été un événement impressionnant à part entière, les éleveurs de Charolais ont eu l’audace d’attaquer le testage de la performance et la sélection génétique de plein front. Le programme de testage de la progéniture « De la conception jusqu’à la consommation ou C à C qui a commencé en 1968, marque la première étape envers l’amélioration des bovins Charolais suivi par de nombreuses autres envergures. Le programme se veut de suivre la performance à partir descaractéristiques de vêlage, tout le long de la croissance et jusqu’au mérite de carcasse des taureaux Charolais qui sont utilisés dans les troupeaux de vaches commerciales. Cette structure a été le premier pas envers les évaluations génétiquesqu’on connait, bien que les résultats dans les rapports de test étaient exprimés en différences phénotypiques plutôt qu’en différences génétiques. En 1981, le programme de testage des performances « CHARM » a été le premier qui recueillait les poids de naissance, les poids au sevrage et les poids à un an provenant des troupeaux pur-sangdes membresde l’association. La race Charolaise a été aussi la première à utiliser un livre généalogique informatisé et à offrir un logicielle pour faciliter la déclaration des informations à partir de chaque ferme. Certains éleveurs se souviendront du programme DOS pour soumettre leurs poids au sevrage, et le cauchemar qu’il représentait lorsqu’il manquait une donnée pour une vache. Les utilisateurs devaient défiler à travers toute la liste pour trouver la manquante. Bien que cela semble typique aujourd'hui, à l’époque, c’était révolutionnaire. Les évaluations génétiques L’utilisation de ces données pour le calculdes évaluations génétiques des bovins Charolais canadiens, a été une autre première. Les évaluations originales étaient

effectuées à l’Université de Géorgie (UGA) puisque celle-ci possédaitles modèles informatiques et la puissance de calcul pour effectuer cette tâche à l’époque. Cette première édition des évaluations génétiquesest le résultatdu leadership d’un Conseil d’administration puissant et d’un groupe d’éleveurs à vocation sur la performance. A ce moment-là lesévaluations génétiquesoffraient aux membres un degré de pouvoir important pour ceux qui cherchaient à sélectionner les caractères de croissance avec plus de précision. En utilisant les données de la conception jusqu’à la consommation, l’Association canadienne Charolais a également été la première race canadienne à offrir une évaluation pour les mérites carcasse. Le Charolais a été la première race de bœufqui acompilé et publié un sommaire de ses taureaux en production, fournissant des informations sur les taureaux actifs, utilisés dans des troupeaux pur-sangdes membres. En 1996, nous avons pris une autre longueur d’avance majeure en publiant les détails des animaux de notre registre sur internet et l’association ouvraient la voie en fournissant des outilsde sélection précieux aux utilisateurs de la génétique charolaise. L’association canadienne a également investi envers un programme de recherche agressive en collaboration avec Agriculture Canada qui a abouti à l’élaboration d’un troupeau de vaches à la station de recherche One Four et celle-ci a ajouté de nombreuses nouvelles données de carcasse et de conversion alimentaire à la banque de phénotypes Charolais. Cela a conduit au troupeau Charolais actuel qui est à la station de recherche de Kinsella. De nouvelles méthodes d’évaluation ont été développées pour la carcasse, la facilité de vêlage et plusieurs autres caractères. En fait, l’ACC est la seule race en Amérique du Nord qui tient compte des différences de la durée de la gestation dans l’évaluation de la facilité de vêlage. Les EPD nord-américains En raison de la croissance du commerce

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avec les États-Unis, une évaluation conjointe nord-américaine a été lancée à peu près 5 ans après la signature de l’accord de l’ALENA. Puisque notre association et l’association américaine effectuaient leurs évaluations respectives avec Université de la Géorgie, celle-ci était le choix logique pour faire les évaluations nordaméricaines. Un effort massif a été entrepris pour analyser les données provenant des États-Unis et du Canada et pour faire correspondre les pedigrees et des animaux entre les deux pays. De plus,des modifications et des ajustements aux données ont été normalisés entre pays. Le résultat a été une des premières évaluations nordaméricainespour un groupe de bovins de boucherie. Alors que les EPD soulignaient certaines différences entre les pays, les résultats avaient effectivement la grande majorité des taureaux canadiens triés dans le même ordre une fois que les données américaines ont été incluses, et ainsi le commerce a été renforcé par la possibilité de comparer les résultats directement entre les pays. Les EPD canadiens Après la crise de la vache folle, il y a eu un arrêt immédiat de tout commerce, en particulier pour les animaux vivants. Non seulement cela a changé l’économie derrière la production bovine au Canada, mais la situation a également créé des obstacles pour ACC. En raison de la forte relation entre Agriculture Canada et l’association Charolais, leur familiarité avec nos données, ainsi que des changements révolutionnaires dans l’industrie informatique, il a été décidé de s’éloigner d’une évaluation nord-américaine et de fournir une solution canadienne par l’entremise de Agriculture Canada. Au cours du temps, divers employés de Agriculture Canada ont laissé leurspositions et les évaluations génétiques canadiennesont suivi l’expertise technique qui a abouti à Colorado State University. Cette évaluation utilisait le même logiciel et les mêmes modèles qu’Agriculture Canada. Malheureusement, le personnel de CSU a aussi changé résultant à un autre déménagement des évaluations vers AGI(Angus Genetics Inc), qui est un grand

fournisseur indépendant de services d’évaluationsgénétiques. Encore une fois, avec cette nouvelle démarche, les résultats ont été soigneusement examinés et bien que le EPDétaient exprimés sur un nouveau barème, les animaux se classaient presque identiquement. L’avenir des évaluations génétiques Aujourd'hui, les membres Charolais ont des évaluations génétiques scientifiquement robustes, mais ce n’est pas la fin de notre histoire de leadership. Une nouvelle sorte de données est arrivée sur la scène au cours des dernières années provenant de l’ADN, qui s’appelle SNP (prononcé Snip). Cette information a le potentiel d’analyser directement la composition de l’ADN de l’animal et comment il se rapporte à divers caractères d’intérêt tels que la croissance ou le mérite de carcasse ou la longévité, ou la fertilité. Ce développement se déplace rapidement et peut être comparé à l’évolution des ordinateurs au cours des 25 dernières années. Lors de ma première visite au bureau de l’association Charolais en 1996, l’ordinateur de pointe était de la même taille que mon congélateur. Il étaitégalement moins puissant que mon téléphone portable actuel. Au cours des 10 dernières années, l’ADN a évolué de la même manière, alors qu’aujourd'hui, nous sommes en mesure de d’étudier 50 000 à 750 000 morceaux d’ADN chez un animal pour un prix moindre que celui d’un test de parentéd’il y a 10 ans qui ne demandaitque 16 morceaux d’ADN. L’ACC travaille actuellement avec les deux, soit l’information qui provient de l’ADN et celle de la performance pour tracerle profil Charolais basé sur les résultats de performance de fondation. Le but ultime est de faire preuve de leadership en étant en mesure d’utiliser l’ADN ou la génomique afin d’améliorer la vitesse et la précision de la prédiction génétique. En d’autres termes, nous voulons être en mesure d’utiliser l’ADN directement pour améliorer les EPD. Cette technologie a déjà été adoptée par d’autres industries d’élevage telle chezles bovins laitiers, et son importance émerge dans l’élevage de bovins de boucherie. Charolais Banner • February 2017

Poursuivre la génomique conserve certainement dans le même esprit de leadership que les pionniers de la race avaient adoptés originalement. Comme pour toutes les races, les bovins se transforment selon les décisions des éleveurs. Les EPD actuels sont le résultat d’une longue évolution et ils vont continuer à changer et à s’améliorer. Certes il peut y avoir des arguments concernant la direction que les éleveurs ont choisi au fil du temps, mais il ne peut y avoir aucun argument au sujet de l’efficacité des EPD pour le classement des animaux pour un certain caractère d’intérêt. Les plus groschiffres, sont sou vent confondus avec les meilleur schiffres, ce qui est regrettable, mais les EPD entant qu’outil de classement est encore 9 fois plus efficace qu’un indicede troupeau ou un poids ajusté pour la détermination de la valeur génétique des animaux pour uncaractère en particulier. Que nous soyons d’accord ou non avec la direction que les éleveurs ont prise, les éleveurs Charolais ont raison d’être à la fois fiers et de croire en leurs évaluations génétiques. En fait, c’est grâce aux pionniers Charolais qui ont pris le taureau par les cornes et qui ont démontré un leadership véritable que la sélection génétique a transformé l’industrie. Et c’est certainement un héritage qui vaut la peine d’être continué. Les données Au fil du temps, les éleveurs se sont concentré sur leurs objectifs d’amélioration en fournissant des données pour les caractèresqui leurs étaientimportants. Leurs efforts ont porté fruit et il se doivent d’en être fiers. Du tout début du programme C à C, en passant par la mise en œuvre de CHARM et l’enrôlement complet du troupeau, ainsi que le travail avec les troupeauxCharolaisde recherche, les membres n’ont jamais cessé de déclarer des données de qualité. On entend souvent dire que nous n’avons pas suffisamment de données, ou que les données sont corrompues en quelque sorte, mais lorsqu’on trie le million de données qui ont été rassemblées dans la base de données de Charolais, rien n’est plus loin de la vérité. Vous trouverez un sommaire des données 13


CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION NEWS

Piper Whelan joins CCA as Registry/Member Services Assistant We are pleased to announce that we will welcomePiper Whelan to the Canadian Charolais Association on January 23, 2017. Piper comes with experience and a keen interest in the beef industry. She grew up on a purebred Maine-Anjou ranch at Irricana, Alberta and was active in junior shows and 4-H.Piper studied at the University of Alberta and the University of King's College School of Journalism. She has worked in the

journalism and publishing industries for the last few years, and her written work has appeared in several beefrelated magazines. Piper will be part-time, two days a week and involved with the daily operations of the Association as Registry/Member Services Assistant working closely with Lois Chivilo and Mel Reekie. Please join us in welcoming Piper Whelan to your CCA team.

ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE DU CHAROLAIS NOUVELLES

Piper Whelan se joint à l’équipe de l’Association Canadienne Charolais Nous sommes heureux d’accueillir Piper Whelan comme assistante aux services aux membres à partir du 23 janvier 2017. Piper possède beaucoup d’expérience et un vif intérêt pour l’industrie du bœuf. Elle a été élevée sur un ranch de Maine-Anjou pur-sang à Irricana (Alberta) et elle a participé activement aux concours juniors et 4-H. Piper a étudié à l’Université de

l’Alberta et College School of Journalism de l’Université de King. Elle a travaillé dans le domaine du journalisme et dans l’industrie de la publication au cours des dernières années, et ses œuvres écrites ont été publiées dans plusieurs revues axées sur la production de viande bovine. Piper sera à temps partiel soit deux jours par semaine et impliquée dans

les opérations quotidiennes de l’Association aux services de registre/membre en collaboration étroitement avec Lois Chivilo et Mel Reekie. Malheureusement, Piper ne parle pas français. Je vous prie de vous joindre à nous pour l’accueil chaleureux de Piper Whelan.

DE L'ASSOCIATION CHAROLAISE CANADIENNE, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 actuels au tableau 1 et au tableau 2 qui démontrent les données historiques, vous donnant une idée de la profondeur des données de la race Charolaise au Canada. En outre, les modèles génétiques sont beaucoup plus robustes qu’un simple poids ajusté car ils utilisent les modifications standards, les facteurs d’ajustement pour des divergences comme âge de la

mère et ils ont également restreints selon les groupes contemporains en place. Quand on tient compte de la puissance de toutes ces informations liées par le biais de généalogies, nous nous retrouvons avec un outil de sélection très puissant. Surprenant pour certains, ces méthodes sont assez vielles, mais elles étaient limitées par la puissance de calcul à venir jusqu’à dernièrement.

Table 1: Sommaire des données recueillies entre 2011-2016 Année 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 14

Enrôlement Nombre 22834 22197 22379 21482 22430 22496

PN Nombre 15276 15460 15040 14973 14371 4066

PS Nombre 10051 10246 8941 9363 8915

P1A Nombre 4477 4571 4282 4169 3829

Ultrason Nombre 310 585 605 369 304

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Table 2: Données Charolais par caractère pour les évaluations génétiques du printemps 2017 Type de données Généalogie PN PS P1A Circ. scrotale Gestation Accouplements Facilité de vêlage Ultrason Conception à consommation

Nombre de données 1,232,508 577,560 441,066 244,948 9,263 90,371 385,678 653,061 7,232 8,645


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PALMER CHAROLAIS

Profile Bob and Monette Palmer started in the Charolais business like many breeders of that era. They bought a Charolais bull to put on their commercial cows and were convinced the end result was worth pursuing. That was in 1971 and in the next couple of years they bought some E and F 7/8 females. “They were pretty good cows,” Bob remembers. “We were so naive, we thought we could

would sell it. I gave him $2500 for the calf and wrote the cheque. Then I had to figure out how to get the darn thing home. He asked where we lived and when we told him, he said they would drop him off on their way home. It was a Cabotin son,” Bob tells. “Then we went out to Pochylko’s sale that fall and bought some females. We bought three cows with Mexican foundation bloodlines. They

❝They bought a Charolais bull to put on their commercial cows and were convinced the end result was worth pursuing.❞ breed up to Full French, but Harvey Trimble straightened us out on that,” Monette tells with a grin. They registered their first females in 1974. “We bought a bull calf in 1975 at the second Canadian Western Agribition. Don Pochylko had it on the side of a cow and I asked him what he wanted for it and he said he supposed he

Candace By He told the staff if I put my foot down I’m done. Nobody knew he was even bidding,” Monette tells. “Don Pochylko sold a share in Poker King Jr in their 4th SanDan Production sale in 1977. We, along with Jim and Marj Crabbe, Jim Cruikshank, Bill and Joe Wagner, Ken and Lorraine Qualman and Marvin McDonald purchased the 1/8 semen interest for $9,000. There were six of us in the deal and Cruikshank was doing the bidding. They started to announce it to him and he started yelling ‘No, no’ and he started listing off all the names,” Bob explained. The bull worked in their program

were big cows and we paid just over $10,000 for the three. There were quite a few guys criticizing us saying they would never work. I just said ‘Yeah, they probably won’t, but we’ll give it a try.’ They really worked,” Bob chuckles. “That was the same year Pochylko bought Poker King Jr. 18G for $18,000 at Agribition with his foot on the rail. Charolais Banner • February 2017

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Miss RGP Perfection 1 125L sold to Stone-Del Farms and went on to be U.S. National Champion

was not expected, but there just weren’t many polled cattle available.” “We didn’t have a lot of cattle, so we only consigned a couple to sales, but we had a lot of fun participating.” The Palmer semen tank was very valuable. When they sold in a sale, the female always came with breeding rights to anything in their tank, and it went deep. They bought into a lot of quality bulls. “Probably the best bull we ever bought was E-CEE Katmandu 200B. He fixed every problem in the herd. We bought him out of the Sterling Collection sale from Emile Carles and kept the walking rights. Perrots and Rairdans had semen interests. He was a changer, he had some thickness to him. The breed had been going through some tall, lean genetics and Kat gave us a group of females that really worked. We later bought another bull from him that is still in use in the herd – the Rhapsody bull.” In 1981, they were struck hard by drought. They had no pasture and no feed. They were forced to sell fifty cow/calf pairs. They were really worried, as droughts don’t affect one operation alone. Wagners also sold

and produced many champions and high sellers. RGP Perfection 1 125L sold in the SanDan sale in 1979. Don Phillips, of Stone Del Farms, Hartville, Ohio, bought the ❝In 1983, Bob and Monette were Poker King heifer calf for $9000 and she went on to be the U.S. National Champion. “It was the place to sell cattle named the Saskatchewan Charolais in the day, you couldn’t move in that barn for people,” Association Breeder of the Year at the says Monette. RGP Perfection 1 125L was a granddaughter of one of Saskatchewan Royal.❞ the Mexican Foundation females that everyone said wouldn’t work. “In 1978, Henry Begrand, Ken Teneycke and Harry Fleury came to interview us to see if we were worthy of animals in the sale. “We had a pre-sale party the night being members to the Hub Charolais Breeders club,” before and it was quite a party. We had dancing girls and Monette laughs. “We ended up in one heck of a party that everything. It was quite a night and the stands were full afternoon and we were in the club.” the next day.” They still get choked up thinking about the “We participated in a sale in Saskatoon Kunkle put support they experienced at that sale. “Breeders from together. There was a little show before and they started Alberta and Saskatchewan really came out to help us the sale with the champion heifer and it only brought that day.” continued on page 20 $1500. I thought this isn’t good. We had a decent heifer but I was no fitter. They kept selling and got down to 1100 and 1200 dollars. I thought ‘oh geez, we’re giving ours away.’ Then she came in the ring and brought $3200. After that we got Neil and Lorna McMillan to look after the cattle we took out,” says Bob. Miss RGP Kay 65M was also purchased inside a female and turned into a great success story for Bob and Monette. She was shown extensively and was the 1984 World Charolais Show Grand Champion Female with her twin Knockout heifer calves at side, Starlight and Starbright. They sold in the Hub sale for many years and in the Sterling Collection for a couple of years. “We sold in the Copper Classic Sale at Crawford’s place outside of Regina. The sale was held in conjunction with Canadian Western Agribition. We never dreamed that sale would be that strong. We sold The Buffalo Days show crew in 1985: Lorna and Neil MacMillan, some polled cows in that sale for $3500-4000, which Monette, Calvin Booker and Velon 18

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Miss RGP Kay 65M – 1984 Grand Champion Female World Show in Red Deer

In 1983, Bob and Monette were named the Saskatchewan Charolais Association Breeder of the Year at the Saskatchewan Royal. This was an annual event that included the AGM, a very strong sale and a dress-up banquet where awards were presented. In June, 1990, they hosted a successful sale on their farm the day after the Moose Jaw Royal. It was called Palmer & Friends and everyone just sold one or two lots. Monette served as a director on the Saskatchewan Charolais Association board for a term. They supported the work of the association by making sure fundraisers went well. They are proud owners of many quilts auctioned at the Saskatchewan Royals over the years. They also did their

share of judging. Bob judged the PNE show in Vancouver for Charolais and Simmental in 1987. Together they judged Ag-Ex in Brandon. Bob also selected cattle for the Agribition Sale on behalf of the SCA in 1984, 1987 and 1989. In 1989, they worked together to select the cattle for the Sask Royal in Lloydminster. In 2001, Bob and Monette were named to the Saskatchewan Charolais Association Honour Scroll. The memories from their early days are vivid and colourful. The industry was full of really strong characters of all different shades. It was an era where a lot of investment money was spent in Canada from the United States. There were lots of suspicious money sources for sure, but everybody enjoyed the excitement.

RGP Cyclone 120C – 1993 Agribition Reserve Junior Futurity Champion, sold to Reich Charolais, ND

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Bob and Monette travelled a lot through out Canada and the United States and believe the people are the best part of the business. Velon Herback is their nephew and spent all of his weekends and holidays on the farm with his grandparents, Hazel and Gordon Palmer. When he was born, his mother was still in university, so his grandparents helped out. As he got older, he would ride the bus out on Friday and go back on Sunday night. Their place is just four miles west of where Velon lives now. “My Uncle Jack used to feed a bunch of pigs for butchering and my Grandma gave me a weanling pig for doing chores. I wasn’t very old, but I sold that and the following summer I bought a Holstein calf. My Uncle Jack picked it up for me at the stockyards and I bottle fed it all summer. I sold it and did that for a couple of more summers. When I had enough money, I bought a purebred heifer from Bob and Monette in the Hub Breeders Sale. I would have been about 11. She just stayed with their cows and I got hooked up with Neil and Lorna McMillan showing cattle at summer shows,” explains Velon. “I kept some daughters from her and had the odd bull calf that got sold and that was how my herd started. I bought my first quarter of pasture when I was sixteen out in the valley. Bob bought two quarters and I bought one. I couldn’t have done it without him, I had no collateral. Having no

Bob and Monette received the SCA Honour Scroll in 2001 from Cam Sparrow

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❝Having no children of their own, they generously made a place for me in the operation and helped me get started.❞ children of their own, they generously made a place for me in the operation and helped me get started. Once I was old enough to do more than simple chores, I spent most of my time here and stayed in Bob and Monette’s basement.” “When I graduated, I took welding and I knew I didn’t want to do that my whole life. I talked to Bob and Monette and Bob cosigned a loan through Farm Credit so I could buy more cows. Bob and Monette had a production sale on the farm in 1990 and I think I was volume buyer in the sale and that is when I moved here full time. Bob gave me free reign to breed my females from his semen tank.” Originally the farm was Gordon Palmer and his sons Larry, Jack and Bob. Before Gordon and Hazel passed away, they dispersed their land to their kids. So when Velon decided he was going to farm, his Mom (the only daughter of Hazel and Gordon). made a deal to see that Velon got her half section. “That really helped because I could use it for collateral on other land.”

Larry, Jack and Bob continued the family operation and now it is being taken over by the next generation. Doug, Lenny and Velon are three cousins who are getting it done.

A sample of the commercial herd

“I first moved into a little house by the highway and rode my dirt bike back and forth. Then I moved an old house trailer where the house is now, but I showered and ate at Monette’s, as I couldn’t afford to get the plumbing and electricity done until near the end of summer.” “Once I moved here, I started to

buy a bit of land here and there. Bob and Monette both taught me about cows. At that time, Monette spent as much time outside as Bob. I never was in 4-H, but I did go to CCYA attending the Regina, Ridgetown and Waterton conferences. I was on the Saskatchewan Charolais Youth Board for a few years with Robyn Carles, Victor Rosso and maybe Layne Evans. We decided to have a goat raffle at Agribition to make some money. Layne and I went and bought this goat and we sold raffle tickets. It was the kind of raffle where you bought a ticket and put someone else’s name on it and it was supposed to be fun, but we got into so much trouble. The darn goat got away and ran down the front of the stalls and cattle were spooked and jerked back on their neck ropes and ropes were breaking. George Anderson made the draw and Dick Carmichael won. He donated it back to the juniors, so we sold it in the Agribition sale and an Ontario breeder bought it. Then we got in trouble from the goat breeders because they thought we were making

Bob and Velon believe in breeding performance

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Two of the most influential bulls in the program in the last 20 years were E-CEE Katmandu 200B (left) and Merit 7879U (Rhapsody) (above)

fun of their breed. It didn’t turn out as we had hoped.” Velon started dating Leah in the summer of 1997 and they were married in 2001. She convocated from U of S and is a Chartered Professional Accountant. In January, 2002, the opportunity to open her own firm in Davidson arose when a lady who had been doing a lot of bookkeeping retired. Leah started her own business renting a space in a law office and later bought the dental building and renovated it. “It works great because it has a little suite in it and the kids can come after school and go to their music and dance lessons and come home with me when their activities are finished,” explains Leah. “The first summer after I started my own business I found out I was pregnant, so I hired someone to work for me and I think I took two weeks off when Hunter was born. Thank God for my Mother as she helped me a lot. I have the same full time employee now and we put some long hours in during tax season, but we work well together. I do municipal audits, corporates in town, bookkeeping, payrolls and village audits but the farm corporates are the majority of my clients.” Now Velon farms about twenty quarters of grain land and fifteen quarters of pasture. He has about

160-170 commercial cows and 90 purebreds. Bob has about 60 purebreds. Hunter, the oldest son of Velon and Leah, has started building a herd. Bob has let him go in and pick some heifers from his pen for doing chores and stuff. He has six purebreds and one commercial cow now. I also bought a Stars donation heifer last year and gave it to Hunter for all the work he does to start his commercial herd.” The commercial cows are basically Simmental/Red Angus. They started out Charcross cows but they are slowly switching over and any replacements they buy are red and red baldies now. Velon has been buying replacements out of the Agribition Commercial sale and also from a bull customer in a Swift Current sale. “I stay with the people I know are raising their own and not people that go out and buy groups to make packages. Then I know what I am getting. I like to use bigger performance bulls on them. I would say the cows are 1500 to 1700 pounds. I have been buying more Simmental influenced females, so they do get a bit bigger.” “Our commercial and purebred herds calve at the same time and we start in January. When we breed, our commercial cows get two fresh bulls everyday. We rotate them through the

herd, pulling two out of a pen and putting two fresh ones in. We do that for the first cycle for sure so the bulls are always fresh and don’t get run down. Then I usually have some extra bulls that I put out with them when they go to pasture. The bulls are always fresh and it keeps them in shape and keeps your calving tightened up. You can’t do that with the purebreds.” “Our commercial calves probably average 108-110 pounds. If my cows can have that calf, I want it, I don’t want a 90 lb. calf. In my opinion, it is like having a 50 bushel canola crop and throwing 10 bushels away because your bin won’t hold it. You want as much out of them as you can get. It is January when we calve so we are around to make sure we don’t lose ears. I don’t think I would have any trouble calving on grass, but the last few years we have weaned calves that were pushing a thousand pounds. We wean as soon as I can get off the combine and we sell at SLS in Saskatoon. I have marketed my calves privately. I wanted to market my calves in a pre-sort weighing them off the truck because they are old enough. I would lose too much with shrink on an overnight stand. I also wanted to sell as a package, not mixed in with anyone else’s cattle. Saskatoon allows me to do that and we have topped continued on page 24

❝In my opinion, it is like having a 50 bushel canola crop and throwing 10 bushels away because your bin won't hold it.❞ 22

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RGP 481P – A 12 year old female that shows the soundness and udder quality in the herd. She is out of a Katmandu daughter.

their sale for that day. We may keep smaller or later cattle or twins and feed them to finish. Those are the ones you make the most money feeding anyway.” “We used to finish all of the calves here. The way the markets have been with calf prices so high, it just hasn’t been worth feeding them. I know what these calves will do. I think anybody that sells bulls should have to fatten and market them once in their life. They should see what they rail and what they get in return. I think it might change some guys’ opinions on what they want to raise.” Palmers used to sell their bulls privately. They sold some through Regina Bull Sale and some through the SCA sale in Saskatoon. They sold some in a sale in Cereal, Alberta, with George Anderson for four or five years. He took the black bulls and Palmers took the whites. When they started their own sale, some of those customers have continued to be customers by traveling to the sale. “We don’t buy a lot of females, maybe one or two a year. We keep our own replacements. We used to do a lot of A.I.ing, but we have moved away from that. We have our own bulls that walk and for the most part the bloodlines that we use are exclusive to us. There isn’t a whole lot of it out there.” “We completed our fifth sale in 2016 and I will never go back to not having one. It just saves so much time. It is a 24

little stressful at the time, with the weather and wondering if anyone is going to show up, but it is so much better. We don’t sell any bulls after the sale. We probably could sell one or two more but I just refuse. If people want something from here they have to be here on sale day.”

ten days old. I have a little chute that has a scale under it where I can clamp the head down to dehorn. I don’t record the commercial weights, but lots of times when you are pushing a calf up we like to guess at their weight. When you look at the scale, we are often surprised.” “Our cows stay out in pastures until pretty much Christmas. When we bring them home they get vaccinated and ready for calving. Our purebred and commercial cows run together in the winter. If they can’t hold their own with the commercial cows, they shouldn’t be here. They stay separate in the summer so the bull power is sorted, but in the winter they are together.” “The get Scourguard, Ivomec and IBR once a year a year at Christmas. We switched over to using a live vaccine on all our cows, which you aren’t supposed to be able to do. Once they have been vaccinated open, you can vaccinate them as a bred for IBR. My vet talked me into trying this about ten years ago and we haven’t

❝I think anybody that sells bulls should have to fatten and market them once in their life.❞ “We used to show a little bit but I didn’t really enjoy it. I like going to the shows but I didn’t really enjoy the hours you have to spend getting them ready. I like the cattle, but I like the way we do it now. When I was on the road we used to do all the summer shows and I didn’t have to miss school. We went to Davidson, Hanley, Buffalo Days, Swift Current and Prince Albert. Everything has gotten so much bigger and busy. When I first came here we only farmed 3000 acres and it was half and half. You had time to do other things, it isn’t like that now.” “All of our calves get weighed when they are born - commercial and purebred. Everything goes through the barn and before they leave they have been weighed, tagged, dehorned, vaccinated and castrated. We have enough buildings here that if it is really cold they can stay in somewhere until they are a week or Charolais Banner • February 2017

had any trouble. We make sure all of our replacement heifers are done before we put the bulls in with them. Anything we buy gets vaccinated with a non-live vaccine when they get here and we write it down on the board to vaccinate that animal with live before the bulls get turned out.” “When we process, I give all of the needles myself. Quite a few years ago, we had a guy working on the other side of the chute and about an hour later I looked at my empty bottles and his, and he only had about half as many as me. We had one of those guns that was self loading and his was buggering up and squirting back in the bottle. Ever since then, we threw those guns away and we use single needles and give them all. We have our chute setup beside a little shed with a sliding window and there is a table and a heater inside in case it’s cold and that is where the kids are. continued on page 26


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They fill the needles and line them up by the window for every animal. It takes us about 3 hours, we do about 100 per hour.” “There are two uncles and three cousins farming together. Everybody owns their own land, and everybody decides what they want to seed on their land but all of the equipment is shared on the grain side. We crop around 10,000 acres. The two uncles, Bob and Jack, are semi-retired. They don’t run any equipment anymore, they just tell us what they want done and we do it. We all work together to get the job done. Everybody runs their own piece of equipment and you are responsible for the maintenance of it. You don’t have to guess who or when the oil was changed in a tractor, for example.” “They each kind of have their own jobs, too.” Leah explains. “Len has always run a drill, Velon keeps everybody working by running for seed, water, chemical, etc.; and Doug runs the sprayer. They all know their job and it just works.” “Now we have a couple of hired men and one trades off on the drill with Len. The other one runs a drill and I trade off if he needs it,” says Velon. “When we trade a piece of

equipment, the guy that is going to drive it kind of gets the final say in what we get.” “The cost of the equipment, including insurance and repairs, is pro-rated per acre for each owner. It all runs through us and I sort it all out,” explains Leah. “All of our crew grain farms and we all have cattle except Doug. So I have to figure out who has shares is each piece of equipment and allocate expenses accordingly.” Her accounting knowledge is necessary to keep all of it straight. They built a house in place of their house trailer and moved in with their four children in 2013. Hunter is into hockey, football and basketball and he is 14. He can run all kinds of equipment on the farm, he runs the payloader, cleans corrals, combines, cuts most of the hay, picks bales and he knows the cows. “We did a sort through the pens one day for how the cows were going to get bred. He came home from school and didn’t think it was good enough, so he pulled his cows out and moved them around to be bred by different bulls.” Halle is 12 and is interested in dance and volleyball. She likes cleaning and cooks a bit. She has been babysitting since she was nine. She helped a lot

since she was six. She does do some outside work but her preference would be inside. She keeps the office clean, fills all of the needles when they process and she can drive a payloader. Hayla is 9 and she does dance and loves to swim. She loves to be outside and helped Velon sort this spring. She will be able to do more in the coming years when she gets a little older. Hinton, better known as Mitt, is 6. He mimics the work on the farm in his play. When they are sorting cows, he has his corrals set up in his room and sorts cows. When they are seeding, he is seeding his fields. He rides around all day with Hunter or Velon in the field. He enjoys picking bales with Hunter. He is in tune with what is happening on the farm. This summer Leah had a swimming pool built outside their house. It saw a lot of use and will be enjoyed for many years. Bob and Monette really enjoy having the ‘grandkids’ around and recognize their hard work, encouraging them in school and on the farm. Seeing the next generation show interest in their life’s work is rewarding.

Photo: Lee Gunderson

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HERD HEALTH

Monitoring the Suckle Reflex Roy Lewis DVM

A recently studied easy test for producers may make it much easier to predict which calves (purebred or commercials) should receive supplemental colostrum when only a few minutes old. Dr. Elizabeth Homerosky, a veterinarian from the university of Calgary, was looking at comparing various tests, procedures and observations to help determine weak calves. This may be simply weak calves at birth, ones that have undergone a hard pull and even those that had a delayed parturition and are possibly anoxic at birth. Off all the tests she compared the one with the most predictive result and coincidentally is the easiest to do is assessing the suckle reflex of calves. This simply involves inserting a couple of fingers into the mouth of a newborn calf fifteen minutes after it is born and determining how vigorous the suckle reflex is. Now we have all done this on calves and can well attest many of the calves we are tubing often have a very poor suckle reflex. The main point is determining whether the suckle reflex is vigorous or weak. This determination is fairly obvious and if in doubt I would call the suckle reflex weak. These weak calves should then be given supplemental colostrum, as they are very likely to be slow to rise and thus slow to nurse. The suckle reflex determines essentially their vigor and when one is questioning whether to give supplemental colostrum it makes that decision extremely easy. A rule on many family farms is any assisted calving, the calf gets colostrum. The reasoning is the cow is caught and it only takes a few minutes to milk the cow in a good

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maternity pen and you are then assured the calf has adequate colostrum early. Again the reasoning is the birth has been harder than normal or may have been delayed. We are going to start checking the suckle reflex on these assisted births and see where they stand If you consistently check your calves those fifteen minutes after being born it will be easy to identify the sluggish ones. The beauty today is we now know partial failure of passive transfer accounts for many of our problems down the road and if we can go one step further to eliminating this then great. Also there are some excellent colostral products out there such as headstart from the Saskatoon Colostrum Company. Make sure to read the label and know how much immunoglobulin you are giving the calves as not all colostrum substitutes are created equal. You want a minimum of 100 grams into them early. Then it depends whether the colostrum substitute or natural colostrum will be the entire source if you figure the mother will still provide a percentage of her fresh colostrum. If checking the suckle reflex make sure to either use latex gloves or wash your hands well before and inbetween checks. The main reason for this is you don’t want to be the main cause of spread of organisms between calves. Much the same reason as we clean our esophageal feeders well between uses especially the oral tube. By identifying the weaker calves easily we can administer colostrum and provide other treatments early to enhance calf survival. The suckle reflex is easy for producers to check, has no cost associated with it and then relies on our skilled judgment. There are a few cases where we could still get fooled such as calves

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appearing very vigorous but not rising because of a bad back or other developmental issue. We still need to be fully aware of udder conformation, as often with the large coke bottle type teats, suckling no matter how vigorous can be unsuccessful. There are always a few calves born to cows with blocked or scarred teats or those that simply don’t have enough milk. When in doubt supplement the calves. There is no question when blood evidence reveals many calves have a partial failure of passive transfer making them more susceptible to things like scours and pneumonia. These diseases can start with these calves and spread to others in your herd. Checking the suckle reflex will help to identify early many of these calves. I guarantee if we all start to check the suckle reflex if will be time well spent. When you think it will only really take a few seconds to accomplish this and provide a healthier crop of calves. I am not sure why others haven’t associated a strong vigorous suckle reflex with a more vigorous and ultimately a healthier calf. I am glad Dr. Homerosky of the Beef production Animal Health of the veterinary school in Calgary pursued this research. Now we all need to make our own treatment plan when we encounter a slow suckle reflex. This simply provides us one more tool in which to do an even better job of raising calves. If in doubt when testing, compare calves to healthy ones in the same herd and you will soon all be experts at determining those calves that need a little more TLC (tender loving care) which must include colostrum. Have a great spring and hopefully we can prevent even more sick calves than previous years.


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EDUCATION

Polled/Horned/Scurred… How Does It All Work? Helge By

In this article, I am going to try to explain in simple terms how the polled and horn genes work and then throw in the scurred gene and the homozygous polled factor. As we travel around, we have realized that many don’t understand exactly how these three genes work, so I thought I would write this article to give breeders a basic understanding. All cattle breeds started out as horned animals, but with a gene mutation the polled head appeared. To begin, I am not going to tell you that polled cattle are better because there should be no difference between polled and horned cattle if the selection criteria is the same. In the late 1960s when the first polled breeders in Canada started single trait selecting for polled cattle, the quality did suffer in other areas. This goes with single trait selecting for anything. But over the next nearly 50 years as polled and horned genetics were crossed back and forth the quality of the polled cattle grew and is now equal to the horned cattle with over 70% of the Charolais herdbook in Canada being polled. Polled genetics from Canada have provided the bases for many countries around the world including the Scandinavian countries where all the polled cattle originated in Canada except for the last decade or so when France discovered the polled gene. I believe the value of the polled cattle will increase as more restrictions are put on farmers when dehorning. From having to use a local anesthetic, to only a veterinarian being able to do it, this is already in place or coming in many countries. I do not have a PhD in genetics but have enough cow dung on my boots to hopefully explain it completely but simply enough to understand. I will also preface this with, there are 30

always exceptions to the rules, albeit rarely. We are going to look at the three separate genes, the polled gene P as dominant, the horned gene p as recessive and the scurred gene Sc. PP Homozygous Polled all progeny will be Polled Pp Heterozygous Animal is Polled pp Animal is Horned This is a single gene trait so each animal has two alleles, and gets one from each parent. So, what percentages do you get when you cross horned and polled, heterozygous and homozygous? pp Horned X pp Horned = 100% pp Horned calves Pp Heterozygous Polled X pp Horned = 50% Pp Heterozygous Polled, 50% pp Horned calves Pp Heterozygous Polled X Pp Heterozygous Polled = 25% PP Homozygous Polled, 50% Pp Heterozygous Polled, 25% pp Horned PP Homozygous Polled X pp Horned = 100% Pp Heterozygous Polled calves PP Homozygous Polled X Pp Heterozygous Polled = 75% PP Homozygous Polled, 25% Pp Heterozygous Polled calves PP Homozygous Polled X PP Homozygous Polled = 100% PP Homozygous Polled calves Until recently the only way you could identify a bull as homozygous polled was by mating him to horned or heterozygous polled females and waiting for several offspring to be polled. Statistically I think that if the first 8 calves out of horned females are polled you are 95% sure he is homozygous polled and if the first 14 out of horned females are polled you are 99% sure. Today though you can test for homozygous polled from DNA using a hair sample. This will speed up the process of selection for homozygous cattle immensely. The polled gene is dominant so Charolais Banner • February 2017

there are no hidden recessive polled genes in horned cattle. A horned animal out of polled parents does not carry the polled gene. If you do get a polled calf out of two horned parents it would have to be a genetic mutation which is how the polled gene came to be in the first place. The 3rd gene I need to touch on is the Scurred gene Sc that causes a horn like growth that is loose from the head and can vary from a very small scaly patch to a large horn like growth. This gene is independent of the Polled and Horned gene and is a sex-linked gene. What does this mean? I compare it to the bald gene in people. You see many bald men but not many bald women. The reason for this is that men only need to have one bald gene to express it where women must have two bald genes or be homozygous to express baldness. If a bull exhibits a scur you then know that he carries the scur gene. A cow can carry the scur gene but not exhibit it if she only has one. If she exhibits a scur she will be homozygous scurred and all her progeny will carry the scur gene thus all her sons, if polled, will exhibit a scur. Now to complicate things. The scur gene can be masked by an animal being Homozygous Polled or Horned and we have seen this in both over the years. What this means is an animal can be Homozygous Polled and smooth polled as the scur gene is masked or not visible. All their offspring out of horned females will be polled but 50% of their sons will be scurred and 50% of their daughters will carry the scur gene. The only way to find out if a homozygous polled or a horned animal carry the scur gene is by seeing their offspring. One thing that I have observed, although not scientific, is that the size of scur seems to be constant with the parent’s genetics. For example, a bull with continued on page 32


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very small scurs seems to sire sons with very small scurs and a big scurred bull seems to throw big scurs. There is another gene that affects horned or polled called the African horned gene, but it is only prevalent in Bos Indicus cattle like the Zebu or Brahman. In the early days of Charolais in Canada we did see some of it in some of the cattle upgraded in the southern U.S. with Brahman influence. It has been virtually eliminated so is a non-factor now. A way I have been using for years to tell if an animal is polled or horned is by looking at the eyelashes. Horned cattle have only one row of eyelashes where polled cattle have two rows coming out at about a 45-degree angle to each other. This works in all continental breeds of cattle and I have put a couple of pictures in so you can see the difference. When is this useful? At birth if you can't feel any horn buttons you can tell if the calf is polled. Not saying that scurs may not develop sometime in the future but again by looking at the eyelashes you

Above: Horned female with one row of eyelashes Below: Polled female with two rows of eyelashes

can tell if a heavily scurred animal or one who has had a scur or horn growth removed is polled or horned.

ÉDUCATION

ACÈRE, CORNE, CORNILLON, DÉMYSTIFICATION Helge By

Dans cet article, j’essaie d’expliquer simplement la manière dont fonctionne les gènes, pour donner le gène acère, à corne, à cornillon et le gène homozygote acère. En voyageant, nous avons réalisé que plusieurs ne comprenaient pas comment ces gènes fonctionnaient exactement. J’ai pensé écrire cet article pour donner aux éleveurs une certaine connaissance pour mieux comprendre. Toute les races de bovins ont débuté avec des cornes, mais avec un gène mutant, et de là est apparu l’acère. Pour débuter, je n’oserais pas dire que les bovins acères sont meilleurs, parce qu’il n’y a aucune différence entre un animal acère ou à corne, le critère de sélection est le même. Dans les années 60 quand les éleveurs ont commencé à sélectionner pour des 32

bovins acères, la qualité en a souffert. Autrement dit c’était sélectionner juste pour un caractère rustique. Mais depuis les 50 dernières années la génétique acère et à corne a été utilisé pour aller de l’avant avec la qualité, qui est maintenant semblable et en forte croissance, et 70% des animaux enregistrés dans le (Herd Book ) au Canada sont acères. La génétique acère Canadienne a fourni les bases à plusieurs pays autour du monde, incluant les pays Scandinaves ou la génétique acère est d’origine canadienne, excepté pour la dernière décennie, quand la France a découvert le gène acère. Je crois que la valeur des bovins acères augmentera avec les restrictions imposés aux éleveurs pour le décornage. Soit utiliser un anesthésique local, et que seulement un vétérinaire peut faire, et qui est en place ou en le devenir dans Charolais Banner • February 2017

plusieurs pays. Je ne suis pas un PHD (docteur en génétique) mais j’ai eu assez de fumier sur mes bottes, pour pouvoir l’expliquer simplement pour le comprendre. Je commencerai avec ceci, il y a toujours des exceptions à la règle, quoique rarement. Nous allons commencer par regarder les 3 gènes séparément, acère (P) dominant, corne (H) récessif, et cornillon (SC) homozygote PP) tous les descendants seront acères. Pp hétérozygote sont acères, pp sont à cornes. Ceci est un gène particulier pour chaque animal, et en ont un de chaque parent. Quel pourcentage aurez-vous en croisant corne et acère hétérozygote et homozygote? pp corne avec pp corne = 100% veaux à corne / Pp hétérozygote acère avec pp corne =50% acère et 50% pp continued on page 34


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corne pour les veaux. Pp hété acère X Pp hété acère = 25% PP acère / homo acère 50% Pp hété acère 25%pp corne PP homo acère x pp corne = 100% / Pp hété veau acère PP homo acère x Pp hété acère = 75% PP/ homo acère 25%Pp =hété acère pour veaux PP homo acère x PP homo acère = 100% PP homo acère pour veaux Jusqu’à récemment la seule manière pour pouvoir identifier si un animal était Homo, c’était de l’utiliser avec des sujets à cornes ou avec des sujets acères Hété et attendre pour voir si la progéniture sera acère. Statistiquement, je pense que si les 8 premiers veaux sur des femelles à cornes sont acères, vous êtes sûr à 95% qu’il est Homo acère, et si les 14 premiers sont acères avec des femelles à cornes, vous êtes sûr à 99%. Aujourd’hui avec un test d’ADN vous pouvez savoir si votre animal est acère Homo avec un échantillon de poils. Ce test va accélérer grandement, pour identifier un sujet acère Homo. Le gène acère est dominant, et il n’y a pas de gène récessif acère caché dans le gène à corne. Un animal à corne de parent acère ne transportera pas le gène acère. Si vous obtenez un veau acère de deux patents à corne ce serait une mutation génétique et que le gène acère deviendrait le dominant. Le 3ième gène que je veux toucher est le gène cornillon, qui cause une corne qui se développe ou qui tombe, et qui peut varier d’un petit bouton à une grosse corne en vieillissant. Ce gène est indépendant du gène acère et du gène à corne c’est un gène associé au sexe. Qu’est-ce que cela signifie? Si je compare le gène chauve pour l’homme, vous voyez plus d’hommes chauves que de femmes. La raison c’est que les hommes ont besoin de juste un gène chauve pour l’exprimer, tandis que les femmes doivent avoir les deux gènes ou être Homo pour pouvoir l’exprimer.

dans la génétique des parents. Exemple un taureau avec de très petits cornillons, ses fils en auront de très petits, et ceux avec de gros cornillons en auront des gros. Il y a un autre gène qui affecte le gène corne et le gène acère appelé le gène à corne africain, mais il est seulement présent pour (Bos Indicus) comme le zébu ou le brahma. Dans les premiers temps du charolais au Canada nous avons eu Au dessus: Femelle à corne avec une rangée de cils. Au dessous de: Femelle acère avec deux rangées de cils.

Si un taureau est à cornillon, vous savez qu’il possède le gène cornillon. Une vache peut possèder le gène cornillon et ne pas l’exprimer si elle a juste un gène. Et si elle en a un elle possède le gène et est Homo cornillon et toute sa progéniture transportera le gène cornillon ainsi tous ses fils s’ils sont acères auront des cornillons. Maintenant pour compliquer les choses. Le gène cornillon peut-être caché, par un animal acère Homo, ou un animal à cornes et nous avons vu les deux avec les années. Ce qui signifie qu’un animal peut- être homo acère et acère et masquer le gène cornillon et qu’il ne soit pas visible. Toute leurs progénitures provenant de femelles à cornes seront à 50% acère et leurs fils auront des cornillons à 50% et leurs filles transporteront le gène. Le seul moyen pour connaître si un animal est acère Homo ou un animal à corne possède le gène cornillon est en voyant leur progéniture. Une chose que j’ai observée, et qui ne se veut pas scientifique, est la grosseur des cornillons qui semblent être constante

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quelques sujets nouvelle version dans le sud-ouest des USA avec l’influence brahmane. Et il a été éliminé depuis, et n’est plus un facteur maintenant. Un moyen que j’utilise depuis plusieurs années pour savoir si un animal est acère ou à corne est de regarder ses cils. Les animaux à cornes ont seulement une rangée de cils, et les animaux acères en ont deux rangées commençant à angle de 45 degrés à peu près entre eux. Cela fonctionne pour toutes les races continentales de bovins, et j’ai ajouté quelques photos pour que vous puissiez voir la différence. Quand ce sera utile? À la naissance de vos veaux, si vous ne pouvez pas voir aucun bouton de corne, vous pourrez dire si le veau est acère. Vous ne pourrez pas savoir si des cornillons ne pourront pas se développer dans le futur, mais encore en regardant les cils vous pourrez assurément dire si c’est un animal à cornillon ou qui est à corne et l’enlever ou s’il est acère.


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NEWS

Charolais Life This column will be dedicated to keeping Charolais members in touch with the people of the business. It will contain births, weddings, convocations and momentous anniversaries and events of note, but not high school graduations. If you have news and/or photos you’d like to submit, please email charolaisbanner@gmail.com for print in upcoming issues.

It’s Twin Boys!

Trent, Ashley and Savery Hatch are pleased to welcome two little boys to the family. Seften Valor Trent weighed 5 lb., 4 oz. and measured 20". Hollis Royal Trent weighed 6 lb., 1 oz. and measured 20.5". Trent & Ashley are part of the Pleasant Dawn Charolais team with Trent’s parents, Tully and Arlene, at Oak Lake, Manitoba. Ashley is a CCYA Alumni. It’s A Boy! Stetson McInnis Siddall is a welcomed addition to Fundy Charolais Farm, Amherst, Nova Scotia. Born September 7th, he weighed 8 lb., 6 oz. and was 20.5" long. Proud parents are Jacy McInnis and Brad Siddall. Jackson - Barber Wed

Farm, and is a CCYA Alumni. The couple resides in Inglis. Haylan is a teacher and Del is a musician. Oattes, McLeod and Evans Receive CCA Scholarships The Canadian Charolais Association received a significant number of highly qualified applicants for their 2016 Scholarships. Of the twenty impactful applications received, the selection committee had the tough decision to select three recipients. Jack Oattes, Cobden, Ontario, was the successful recipient of the 2016 Dale Norheim Memorial Scholarship ($1500). The Charolais breed played a large role in Jack’s upbringing and a passion that he has remained committed to; Jack is currently in his first year of Master of Science in Ruminant Nutrition at the University of Illinois. Jack finds personal fulfillment and is honoured to be recognized and associated with this prestigious award in memory of Dale Norheim. Dale was a positive influence to him personally from a young age and assisted Jack with a purchase in the fall of 2005 that went on to be the CCYA Grand Champion Female!

Saskatchewan. Megan appreciates the opportunity to apply for the Charolais Association scholarships as she’s been showing Charolais cattle since she was six years old and has since been quite involved in CCYA and 4-H in Alberta. Megan is supporting herself in her education as she works on her third year of Commerce at the University of Saskatchewan. ShaeLynn has also been actively involved in CCYA and 4-H from a young age and has most recently represented CCYA at the Australian National Youth Stampede, where she broadened her understanding of the breed and began what are sure to be lifelong friendships. Shae-Lynn is in her final year of Nursing through the University of Regina. Charolais Breeder Publishes 8th Book

Jean-Pierre Patry, of La Ferme Patry in Quebec, is an excellent writer. This picture was taken at the launch of his eight book. Jean Pierre est un écrivain remarquable, une photo du lancement de son 8ième livres. Haylan Jackson and Del Barber were married on July 30, 2016, in Inglis, Manitoba. Haylan is the daughter of Carman and Donna, High Bluff Stock

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Receiving $1000 scholarships are Megan McLeod, Cochrane, Alberta, and Shae-Lynn Evans, Kenaston,

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OBITUARY

Sharon Burgomaster December 8th, 2016 after an extended illness and medical complications, Sharon Burgomaster of Sharodon Farm, near Omemee Ontario, passed away. Sharon was the beloved wife of Don (50 years). Loving and devoted mother of Steven and his wife Helen, and Heather Burgomaster. Cherished

Grandmother of Wyatt, Trent and Tyler. Having graduated from Trent University and Peterborough Teachers College, Sharon was a longtime Educator, retiring Principal in 2002. Sharon grew up on a local dairy farm and following her marriage to Don in 1967, they settled on the Burgomaster Family Farm (est 1893) where they have continued to live. In 1971 Sharon and Don joined the Canadian Charolais Association and

there began Sharodon Charolais. Sharon always enjoyed meeting and visiting with Charolais Breeders from Coast to Coast in Canada when attending conventions, shows, sales and CCYA events. She was a Past President of the former Ontario Charolettes, a former 4-H Leader, President of St. James A.C.W., a member of two local choirs and a clarinet player in a Peterborough band.

OBITUARY

Henry Bowers Henry Barrow Bowers – Age 78, of Musquodoboit Harbour, NS, passed away on November 23, 2016, following an 18-month battle with brain cancer. Henry was the beloved husband of Jennifer for 53 years; wonderful father of Helen (Gerry Judah), London, England; Sarah (Brian Coxhead), Fall River; and Nigel (Dawn Carlisle), Hillier, ON. Henry grew up on a farm in Ontario and agriculture was his passion. He obtained a MSA from the Ontario Agricultural College. He was

a pioneer Charolais breeder, starting with the first Charolais bull to enter Canada in 1956. He was a great promoter of the breed for 40 years and was president of the Ontario Charolais Association from 1977 to 1979. Their farm name was Bowlais Charolais at Elora and then at Urbania, NS, where they moved in 1984. Jennifer was President of the Maritime Charolais Association in 1988, 1989, 1992 and 1993 and a director of the Canadian Charolais Association from 1988-1992. They were life members of the CCA until they sold their farm and cattle in 1999 but still had many wonderful friends who

they met through the cattle business. He was a lifetime supporter of the 4-H movement. In 2015 he gave up being treasurer of the Nova Scotia 4-H marketing committee which he had served for 27 years. Among his many agricultural endeavors in Nova Scotia, he was chair of the Natural Products Marketing Council, general manager of the Farm Debt Review Board and executive director of Agri-Futures. After selling the farm and retiring to Musquodoboit Harbour, he and Jennifer enjoyed many adventures around the world.

Bull Sales in Brief 2016 Acadia Colony Bull Sale November 30, 2016 • Oyen,AB Gross Average 23 Long Yearling Bulls $87,900 $3,821

Transcon’s Working Girls Charolais Sale December 10, 2016 • Innisfail, AB 2 Cow/Calf Pairs 2 Bred Cows 15 Bred Heifers 3 Heifer Calves 22 Lots 1 Semen Lot

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Gross Average $23,500 $11,750 20,000 10,000 80,900 5,393 25,000 8,333 149,400 6,790

Foat Valley Stock Farm Complete Dispersal December 15, 2016 • Innisfail, AB

Rainalta Charolais Dispersal December 29, 2016 • Brooks, AB

Gross Average 99 Cow/Calf Pairs $412,850 $4,170 12 Bred Cows 30,800 2,566 34 Bred Heifers 92,050 1,392 32 Long Yearling Bulls 113,600 3,500 7 Mature Bulls 25,450 3,629

14 Cow/Calf Pairs 16 Bred Cows 10 Bred Heifers 2 Heifer Calves 2 Bull Calves 2 Mature Bulls

184 lots

46 Lots

$674,750

$3,667

$4,100

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Gross Average $123,200 $8,800 59,850 3,740 62,050 6,205 6,300 2,100 8,750 4,375 14,800 7,400 274,950

5,977


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MARKETING

15 Secrets From Top Social Media Experts Melanie Deziel, Contributor, Inc.com@mdeziel

The best and brightest took the stage at Social Fresh 2016. Here’s what they shared. I had the pleasure of speaking at Social Fresh 2016 in Orlando to share some insights about creating relevant content with the audience of marketers, social media managers and entrepreneurs. As a professional speaker, I get to travel the world, make genuine connections with so many talented people, and grow my own personal brand, but I also get to attend the sessions by the other incredibly talented speakers and learn right along with the other conference attendees. I’ve compiled the most tweetable quotes and insights from the experts who took the stage at Social Fresh 2016, so you can apply their wisdom to your social accounts, your marketing strategy, and your entire business. 1. “Become goal-oriented. If you try to check off too many boxes at once, you won’t be successful at any of your objectives.” -- Jeremy Goldman, Founder of Firebrand Group and author of “Getting To Like”

So many entrepreneurs create products or services that try to be everything to everyone, and wind up be nothing to anyone. Keep focused and you’ll make greater progress toward your goal. 2. “Every time you communicate, you’re either adding value or taking up space.” -- Sally Hogshead, New York Times Bestselling author of “How The World Sees You”

Be intentional about what you put out in the world, whether it’s a tweet, a blog update or a blast to your email list. Everything you share sends a message about who you are. 3. “Quantity is NOT quality, more is NOT better.” -- Jess Ostroff, Manager of Calm at Don’t Panic Management and Managing Editor at Convince & Convert.

For your social posts, your business and anything else, only commit to and execute on as much as you can reasonably do well. Anything more 40

than that isn’t helping you achieve your goals. 4. “If you have to convince someone to work with you, it’s probably not the right fit.” -- Liz Kennedy, Director of Content and Social Media for Fresh Direct

Sure, Liz was talking about finding influencers to promote and partner with your brand. But this could just as easily apply to your business partners, vendors or investors. No amount of passion on one half of the partnership will make up for a lack of it on the other side. 5. “Give them what they want and need, not just what you’re willing to give them.” -- Heather Taylor, Director of Creative Strategy at The Economist

It’s easy to get lost in your own goals, both as marketers and as entrepreneurs. But your audience isn’t interested in everything you have to say, so focus on those messages and stories that best serve them. 6. “If it doesn’t make people care, share or swear, it’s boring.” -- Sarah Evans, digital correspondent for major brands

Emotional content--or content that creates an emotional reaction in your audience-- is some of the most remembered and engaged with. Create social posts, blogs and other content that connects with the audience emotionally. 7. “Build the message first. Build the media second.” -- Sally Hogshead, New York Times Bestselling author of “How The World Sees You”

If you don’t know what you’re going to say, don’t worry about how you’re going to say it yet. Focus on your message, your goal and your story, then determine the best way to get that out into the world. 8. “Personality is the window to the soul of your brand.” -- Juntae DeLane, founder of the Digital Branding Institute

If you want to bring consumers in and show them who you are, then they need to know who you are, not Charolais Banner • February 2017

just what you do. Showing your personality through your tone, voice, style and more provides a great pathway for letting your consumers and potential consumers get to know you. 9. “Attention is like water. You can’t control it, but you can guide it.” -- Faris Yakob, author of “Paid Attention: Innovative Advertising For A Digital World”

It’d be great if you could get your audience to see everything you want them to see, click everything you want them to click, and buy everything you want them to buy. But you can’t. What you can do is offer value, respects their preferences, and give clear pathways and options for next steps. 10. “It’s good to be the great. It’s better to be different.” -- Sally Hogshead, New York Times Bestselling author of “How The World Sees You”

A lot of things are good. But all those good things will begin to blend together if they’re not differentiated. Don’t aim to be one of several “good” options, or even one of several “great” options. Aim to be the only option, because you’re the one that offers a different solution, approach or value. 11. “Acknowledge your mistakes, and show how you’re making up for them.” -- Cory Vasquez, Director of Digital Communications at Remax

While you might want to bury your head in the sand when something goes wrong, own up to your errors and speak openly about how you’re working to resolve them, or prevent them from happening again. 12. “People are drawn to PEOPLE.” -- Stacy Minero, Head of Planning & Creative Agency Development

Ads with people in them tend to attract more attention than those without. Don’t hide behind a product, logo or mascot. Be honest, be yourself and be transparent about who you are. 13. “People trust their friends and family 5 times more than a brand message.” -- Amy Greber, Director of Social Engagement for Red Cross continued on page 41


INDUSTRY NEWS

Canadian Beef Breeds Council Report Michael Latimer, CBBC Executive Director

With calving underway for most purebred operations, it can be an exciting time of year. It can also be a challenging time of year for many cattle producers, long dark cold nights with all the daytime responsibilities of feeding, tending to sick calves and the fact that cows calve around the clock, resulting in a lack of sleep and at times a sense of isolation. In addition, there can be a lot of pressure placed on producers this time of year, worrying about the price of cattle or an upcoming bull sale. It can be incredibly draining and often seems like there is no end in sight. I want to open a discussion on a very important topic and an issue that we don’t talk enough about in the cattle industry, which is mental health. Mental health is a broad term that encompasses a variety of issues from depression to addictions and can affect anyone of any age, gender, race, or economic situation. There is help available but the first step is recognizing that either you or someone you care about may need help. As rough and tough cowboys,we want to be a character

from an old John Wayne movie where we want to simply toughen up. I think we have all heard or made comments of the following nature “I don’t see anything wrong with you… get moving” or “I don’t see any broken bones, toughen-up”. If we suspect that someone is having symptoms of mental health issues, whether it be family members, coworkers or even ourselves, it is important not to judge and to seek professional help. A few important pieces of information provided by the Mental Health Commission of Canada that highlight the enormous scale of the situation. Mental health problems and illness affect more people in Canada than many of the major physical disorders. One in five people in Canada will experience a mental health problem or illness in any given year. Approximately 70% of adults living with a mental health problem or illness say their symptoms started in childhood. Over 60% of people living with a mental health problem or illness won’t seek help for fear of being labelled. There are 500,000 Canadians in any given week, that are unable to work due to ongoing mental

health problems or illness. One in three workplace disability claims are related to mental health problems or issues. These are not isolated incidents or people ‘faking it’ to get out of work. You should always consult your local physician or a mental health professional if you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms, there is help available. It is also important to note that mental health illness can manifest itself in a variety of symptoms or issues and are often difficult to recognize. There are many online resources that are a good source of reliable information to help guide you. They include, but are not limited to, the Mental Health Commission of Canada mentalhealthcommission.ca, Healthy Minds Canada healthymindscanada.ca, or Mental Health First Aid mentalhealthfirstaid.ca. There are also many local and provincial organizations dedicated to mental health who are there to help. *Statistics provided by Mental Health Commission of Canada, www.mentalhealthcommission.ca

15 SECRETS, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 40 Enlist the help of influencers to spread your message, so its better received, but also aim to create something worth talking about. Be remarkable, and let word-of-mouth marketing push you foward. 14. “Planning is sexy.” -- Jess Ostroff, Manager of Calm at Don’t Panic Management and Managing Editor at Convince & Convert

There’s nothing cool about “winging it” and falling flat. Take time to plan out your social posts as well as your broader business strategy. 15. “If you want time for your content, you have to take it from someone else.” -- Faris Yakob, author of “Paid Attention: Innovative Advertising For A Digital World”

www.charolaisbanner.com Charolais Information Charolais Banner • February 2017

There is no shortage of things to read, video content to watch, games to play, apps to download, audio listen to, things to buy or places to visit. If you truly want consumers to pay attention to YOU, then you need to be better than the next best option. The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

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BULL CALVES TOP SALE

Char-Maine Sale

The Quintons put forth a unique offering of all their A, B & C white females and those females’ heifer calves along with their regular bull sale offering. The quality female offering featuring the service of the popular JWX Downtown was great. The bull sale had strong purebred and commercial interest from across the prairie provinces with some black bulls selling into the USA. High Selling Cow/Calf Pairs Lot 20, MAIN COBB’S SHADOW 439B (Double Polled, 24 Milk EPD, 1,585 lb.), sired by ABC Cobb’s El Magico Poll, out of a MAIN Silver Shadow 30W daughter, bred to JWX Downtown 7C. Sold for $14,500 to Johnson Livestock, Brooks. Lot 20A, MAIN LEDGER’S SHADOW 26D (3rd Gen. Polled, 84 lb. BW, -1.5 BW EPD, 1,190 lb.), sired by LT Ledger 0332 P. Sold for $18,000 to Kelly & Peg Donahue, Fort MacLeod. Lot 1, MAIN IGNITION HOMBRE

403B (Double Polled, 101 YW EPD, 1,780 lb), sired by G.Bros Hombre 908X, out of an HEJ Ignition 31R daughter, bred to JWX Downtown 7C. Sold for $9,500 to Wrangler Charolais, Westlock. Lot 1A, MAIN LEDGERMAN 20D (3rd Gen. Polled, 90 lb. BW, 54 WW EPD, 102 YW EPD), sired by LT Ledger 0332 P. Sold for $11,000 to TJ Ranches, Mountain View. Lot 27, JS TACY 356A (4th Gen. Polled, Red Factor, 1,665 lb.), sired by MAIN Redberry 26Y, out of a Crystal D Sir Boom 60S daughter, bred to PleasantDawn RedZone852Z. Sold for $9,250 to Footprint Farms, Esther. Lot 27A, MAIN LONE RANGER 13D (3rd Gen. Polled, Homo Red, 93 lb. BW, 1,250 lb.), sired by MAIN Stenberg Ranger 3A. Sold for $9,500 to Footprint Farms. Lot 19, MAIN COBB’S PHAPSODY 446B (Double Polled/s, 1,710 lb.), sired by ABC Cobb’s El Magico Poll, out of a Merit Rhapsody 8878U daughter, bred to JWX Downtown 7C. Sold for $7,250 to Footprint Farms. Lot 19A, MAIN PAYLOAD 60D (3rd Gen. Polled, -.4 BW EPD, 84 lb. BW, 1,240 lb.), sired by JS Payload 36A. Sold for $8,500 to Old Elm Colony, Magrath. Lot 14, MAIN SILVER LANZA 407B (4th Gen. Polled, -.2 BW EPD, 27 Milk EPD, 1,540 lb.), sired by LT Lanza 1427 Pld, out of a MAIN Silver Shadow 30W daughter, bred to LT Rushmore 4024 Pld. Sold for $5,250 to Char-Lew Ranches, Pincher Creek. Lot 14A, MAIN Merit 21D (4th Gen. Polled, 86 lb BW, -.1 BW EPD), sired by Merit 62D. Sold for $9,500 to Hansen Ranches, Cardston.

Lot 25, PLEASANTDAWN LADY 803A (4th Gen. Polled, 31 Milk EPD, 1,775 lb.), sired by Pleasantdawn Razor 14W, out of a Pleasant Dawn Max 70S daughter, bred to JWX Downtown 7C. Sold for $7,250 to Turnbull Charolais, Pincher Creek. Lot 25A, MAIN EL MAGICO 5D (Double Polled, 98 lb. BW, 1,200 lb.), sired by ABC Cobb’s El Magico Poll. Sold for $7,250 to N over 7 Ranch, Stavely. High Selling Bred Heifers Lot 44, MAIN LANZA COBB 534C (3rd Gen. Polled, -.5 BW EPD, 25 Milk EPD, 1,535 lb.), sired by LT Lanza 1427 Pld, out of an ABC Cobb’s El Magico Poll daughter, bred to LT Ledger 0332 P. Sold for $8,250 to Borderland Cattle Co., Rockglen, SK. Lot 40, MAIN LANZA 519C (4th Gen. Polled, 25 Milk EPD, 1,495 lb.), sired by LT Lanza 1427 Pld, out of a Merit Rhapsody 8878U daughter, bred to HEJ Chester 1C. Sold for $8,000 to JR Ranches, Lethbridge. High Selling Heifer Calf Lot 37, MAIN EL LANZA SHADOW 648D (4th Gen. Polled, ET, 25 Milk EPD, 1,085 lb.), sired by MAIN El Lanzo 22B, out of a MAIN

Trent & Kevin Hatch took home the high selling bull calf

Peg & Kelly Donahue selected a high selling bull

Laverne & Debbie Steeves added seven to their operation at Bluffton

Char-Maine Ranching “Heart of the White Herd” Female Sale & 12th Annual Bull Sale December 16, 2016 • Fort MacLeod, AB Gross Average 29 Cow/Calf Pairs $354,200 $12,214 4 Bred Cows 21,750 5,438 17 Bred Heifers 83,100 4,888 5 Heifer Calves 22,250 4,450 15 White Bull Calves 138,100 9,207 16 White Two Year Old Bulls 96,250 6,016 8 Black Two Year Old Bulls 39,250 4,906 9 Black Bull Calves 45,000 5,000 103 Lots

$799,400

$7,761

Auctioneer: Frank Jenkins Sale Manager: By Livestock

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Charolais Banner • February 2017

continued on page 43

Art Gibbs bought a top herdsire prospect for their Gold In Boulders Farms

Gary Quinton took six females and a high selling bull calf for his Triple Q herd


WE ALL NEED A LAUGH

Road Tales Ron Kletzel

My name is Ron Kletzel and I wanted to share this little story with you to show just how remarkable and gracious people in the Charolais breed have been and continue to be. Before I begin, I just have to add a bit about the last Road Tales that appeared in the December issue. The year Neil and Roger judged Agribition I was showing, I am not sure where I was standing, but I think 4th or 5th hole. I motioned Neil over and looked up the line asking Neil how bad he wanted to know who put the pig in his house. He just started laughing really hard and walked away. Most people had heard the story and enjoyed the humour. The early years of Agribition took place at the same time the importation of Full French Charolais were well under way. Along with Charolais being imported, the other “exotic” breeds were making a gigantic entrance onto the cattle scene. Agribition was quickly becoming the showcase to the World. Cattle breeders from around the World were beginning to converge on Agribition in large numbers. For Charolais breeders, Agribition was the finale to another year of long hours and hard work ensuring Charolais maintained their place as leaders of this transformation. At the same time, endless discussions of the benefits of “polled” vs “French” vs “Domestic” and different combinations of them were ongoing.

And nowhere was this more evident than with the number of people attending and exhibiting at the Show and gathering for the banquet. The ballroom at the Vagabond (now the Travelodge on south Albert Street) was always jammed with breeders, world visitors and old friends. It was in many ways a celebration of the past year – after the meal, the main event began – tables of discussions on all aspects of the breed took place. Relief from this could be found on the dance floor when room could be found on it. This all went on into the wee hours of the morning. It was a time when the promotion of the breed was the number #1 concern, it was seriously worked on year round, and the Agribition banquet was a time for Charolais breeders to come together and assess and celebrate their accomplishments. Sometimes celebrating too much. This is one such instance. This particular banquet was attended by a Count and Countess from France, who also happened to raise Charolais cattle. This is the story of the only time I personally got to meet and have breakfast with a Countess! As previously mentioned, the dance would last into the wee hours of the morning. Deciding that it was finally time to call it a night, I went to get my coat and head out. Most people had already left and to my dismay my coat was missing, but as many of the early Agribitions seemed to coincide with -30 degree

weather, I was not leaving without a coat. The only warm one that I could get into was a Lady’s fur coat – and I wasn’t leaving without a coat. Yeah, I did it. Early the next morning I woke up to someone pounding on my hotel room door. It was my friend Rene Bosc. Rene was French and had worked with some of the top French cattle in Canada. He had spent a great deal of time interpreting for the Count and Countess the previous evening. When the coat had been discovered missing that night, Rene soon learned it was me who had taken it. He assured the Countess and Hotel Management that he could straighten it all out in the morning. So off Rene, I and the fur coat were, heading to the Vagabond to return it to the Countess. So with Rene interpreting, I began as graciously as I could apologizing to her. And she was gracious! She not only accepted my apology, but she and the Count insisted Rene and I stay so they could order up breakfast for us all. It was show day, but damn right I stayed and had breakfast – and apologized, apologized, apologized. Later in the day, we were out showing in one of the classes when I glanced into the crowd. I couldn’t believe it when the Countess caught my eye and she was waving to me. I have never had a Countess wave to me before and I know it will never happen to me again! But I guess that’s what makes a Countess special, my Countess at least.

CHAR-MAINE, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 42 Silver Shadow 30W daughter. Sold for $7,000 to Hopewell Charolais, Kerrobert, SK. High Selling Bull Calves Lot 56, MAIN MAGICO LANZA 36D (3rd Gen. Polled, -.7 BW EPD, 83 lb. BW, 25 Milk EPD, 1,300 lb.), sired by LT Lanza 1427 Pld, out of an ABC Cobb’s El Magico Poll daughter. Sold for $26,000 to Pleasant Dawn Charolais, Oak Lake, MB.

Lot 57, MAIN WHITE OUT 38D (Polled, ½ French, 94 lb. BW, 92 YW EPD), sired by LT Lanza 1427 Pld, out of a Snoopy daughter. Sold for $18,000 to Gold In Boulders Farms, St. Lina. Lot 65, MAIN DURANGO 49D (4th Gen. Polled, ET, 102 lb. BW, 918. lb 205 DW, 1,300 lb.), sired by MAIN El Lanzo 22B, out of a MAIN Silver Shadow 30W daughter. Sold for $13,750 to Triple Q Ranch, Cardston. Charolais Banner • February 2017

New breeder Rod Scott took 18 head to his JR Ranches operation

Travis Foot purchased a few

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ASSOCIAITON NEWS

Alberta Charolais Association AGM The Alberta Charolais Association held their AGM in conjunction with the Alberta Select Show and Sale. Stephen Cholak, Lamont, was re-elected President with Stephen Johnson, Barrhead as 1st Vice-President and Kyle O’Neill, Red Deer County as 2nd Vice-President. Tracee Vikse will remain as Treasurer. The rest of the board is Rod McLeod, Cochrane; Luke Marshall, Red Deer County; Scott Anderson, Minburn; Wyatt Daines, Red Deer County; Chad Bouchard, Compeer; Bob Burla, Meeting Creek; David Prokuda, Glenevis; Marina Rasmussen, Red Deer County, and Tyler Bullick, Bashaw.

Purebred Breeder of the Year was presented to Philippe Lusson, Valanjou Charolais by Stephen Cholak

ACA Board of Directors: Back Row: Rod McLeod, Cochrane; Luke Marshall, Red Deer County; Scott Anderson, Minburn; Wyatt Daines, Red Deer County; Chad Bouchard, Compeer; Bob Burla, Meeting Creek and David Prokuda, Glenevis. Front Row: Marina Rasmussen, Red Deer County; Stephen Cholak, President, Lamont; Stephen Johnson, 1st Vice President, Barrhead; Kyle O’Neill, 2nd Vice President, Red Deer County; Tracee Vikse, Treasurer, Donalda; Tyler Bullick, Bashaw.

April, Rod & Colby McLeod from Balzac Meats received the Booster of the Year Award from Stephen Cholak and Luke Marshall

Cordel & Mandy Griffiths & family received Commercial Producer of the Year Honours from Stephen Cholak & Lorne Lakusta

Cheryl & Keith Altwasser were presented the Pioneer Award by Stephen Cholak, Bob Burla and Mika Panasiuk

Champion Pen of 3 Bulls, Johnson Charolais

SUGARLOAF/JOHNSON WIN

AB Select Bull Show December 8 - 9, 2016 • Red Deer, AB SLC DOZER 3D, a Sparrows Aquarius 493B son from Sugar Loaf Charolais, Minburn, was selected as this year’s Single Bull Champion. The Reserve Single Bull Champion, from Mcleod Livestock, Cochrane, was 44

Reserve Champion Pen of 3 Bulls, McLeod Livestock

Charolais Banner • February 2017


CML ENVY 626D, a CML Heisman 413B son. There were 22 entries. The Pen of 3 bull show was held the next morning with Johnson Charolais exhibiting the Champion Pen with two sons of Sparrows Kingston 139Y and a son of Sparrows Estevez 417B. McLeod Livestock exhibited the Reserve Pen, with a son of CML Heisman 413B, a son of CML Diablo 2X Reserve Single Bull Champion – CML ENVY and a son of CML Gunslinger 410B. 626D, McLeod Livestock

Single Bull Champion – SLC DOZER 3D, Sugarloaf Charolais

HIGH TOP END PRICES

Alberta Select Sale Alberta Charolais Select Sale December 9, 2016 • Red Deer, AB Gross Average 1 Cow/Calf Pair $8,150 $8,150 4 Bred Cows 74,000 18,500 12 Bred Heifers 110,600 8,445 17 Heifer Calves 105,000 6,750 3/4 Bull Calf 20,000 20,000 34 ¾ Lots $317,750 $9,143 1 Semen Lot

$7,800

$7,800

Sale Manager: T Bar C Cattle Co. Auctioneer: Chris Poley Once again, this sale proves to be one of the best in the nation. Cattle were sold right across Canada. The high selling female for 2016 came out of this offering. High Selling Bred Cow Lot 7, SOS JESSICAH 34B (Polled, .3 BW EPD, 79 YW EPD), sired by Winn Mans Chavez 826Y out of a SDC King Ranch 70T daughter, bred to SOS Chuckwagon 34C. Sold for $41,000 to McKeary Charolais, Compeer. Consigned by Springside Farms, Airdrie. Lot 38, GERRARD DUSTY 34U (Polled, 53 WW EPD, 92 YW EPD), sired by SVY Pilgrim PLD 655S out of an SVY Bed Rock PLD 816H daughter. Sold for $17,500 to White Lake Colony, Barons. Consigned by McLeod Livestock, Cochrane. High Selling Bred Heifer Lot 2, GERRARD STARSTRUCK 11C (Polled, 0.9 BW EPD, 69 YW EPD), sired by Cedardale Zeal 125Z, out of an SVY Freedom PLD 307N daughter, bred to Gerrard Python 27B. Sold for $23,000 to Bouchard Livestock, Crossfield. Consigned by Gerrard

Legacy Charolais took a high selling bred heifer back to Botha

Lorne Lakusta teamed up with Deb and Stephen Cholak on the high selling bull calf

Prairie Cove Charolais bought the pick of the Circle Cee bred heifers

McKeary Charolais selected the high selling bred cow

Livestock, Red Deer County. Lot 12, SOS COTTON CANDY 127C (Polled, 1.3 BW EPD, 80 YW EPD), sired by WC Benelli 2143 P ET out of a SVY Pilgrim PLD 655S daughter, bred to Winn Mans Chavez 826Y. Sold for $16,000 to Legacy Charolais, Botha. Consigned by Springside Farms. High Selling Heifer Calf Lot 14, MISS PRAIRIE COVE 604D (Polled, .5 BW EPD, 84 YW EPD), sired by Sparrows Kingston 139Y out of an HTA Whitehot 105A daughter. Sold for $17,000 to Dwein Trask, Saskatoon, SK. Consigned by Prairie Cove Charolais, Bowden. Lot 11, SOS DIRTY LAUNDRY 155D (Polled, 1.8 BW EPD, 98 YW EPD), sired by Winn Mans Chavez 826Y, out of an SVY Pilgrim PLD 655S

daughter. Sold for $14,000 to Jeff McAffee, Lower Knoxford, NB. Consigned by Springside Farms. High Selling Bull Calf Lot 40, SLC Chad Lorenz chose DOZER 3D the high selling (Polled, -2.8 BW bred heifer EPD, 75 YW EPD), sired by Sparrows Aquarius 493B, out of a CMF 193 Wrangler 256 daughter. Sold 3/4 interest and full possession for $20,000 to Spruce View Charolais, Andrew, and Circle CEE Charolais, Lamont. Consigned by Sugarloaf Charolais, Minburn.

Charolais Banner • February 2017

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SEMEN LOT TOPS SALE

Sterling Collection Sale High Selling Bred Heifers Lot 17, MVY TINA 69C (3rd Gen. Polled, 1,605 lb., 97 YW EPD, 26 Milk EPD), sired by Gerrard Pastor 35Z, out of a Pleasantdawn Hybrid 37W daughter, bred to LT Ledger 0332 P. Sold for $11,250 to Casbar Farms, Blaine Lake. Consigned by McAvoy Charolais. Lot 21, HBC VENUS 513C (Double Polled, 1,510 lb., -1.6 BW EPD, 28 Milk EPD), sired by Sparrows Divergent 104Y, out of a Sparrows Fargo 811U daughter, bred to Cedardale Zeal 125Z. Sold for $10,000 to Good Anchor Charolais, Vermilion, AB. Consigned by Harcourt Charolais, Quill Lake. Lot 16, SKW REG 46C (Double Polled, 1,635 lb., .7 BW EPD), sired by LT Sundance 2251 Pld, out of a Steppler 83U daughter, bred to Pleasant Dawn Chisum 216A. Sold for $8,250 to Casbar Farms. Consigned by Creek’s Edge Land & Cattle, Yellow Creek. Lot 22, SKW JAVA 140C (Double Polled, 1,510 lb., 96 YW EPD, 25 Milk EPD), sired by LAE Land Baron 232Z, out of a Steppler 83U daughter, bred to Cedardale Zeal 125Z. Sold for $8,200 to White Cap Charolais, Moose Jaw. Consigned by Creek’s Edge Land & Cattle.

Lot 19, HC SILVER & GOLD 527C (3rd Gen. Polled, 1,520 lb., 27 Milk EPD), sired by Sparrows Sanchez 715T, out of an RPJ Carrera 53X daughter, bred to LT Ledger 0332 P. Sold for $8,000 to Good Anchor Charolais. Consigned by Hunter Charolais, Roblin, MB. Lot 44, HBC BLOSSOM 522C (Double Polled, 1,590 lb., -.6 BW EPD, 26 Milk EPD), sired by Sparrows Divergent 104Y, out of an LT Rio Blanco 1234 P daughter, bred to Cedardale Zeal 125Z. Sold for $7,300 to Gordon Wiebe, Prespatou, BC. Consigned by Harcourt Charolais. Lot 15, LAE CARRIE 530C (Polled, 1,690 lb., 108 YW EPD, 26 Milk EPD), sired by Sparrows Landmark 963W, out of an MNE Pocatello 23P daughter, bred to Circle Cee Legend

Marion Smyth & Don Good added seven to their Good Anchor operation

Clay Casavant purchased two high selling bred heifers

Michael Hicks took three

Allan & Keli Samoleski bought four

Kelly & Mike Howe selected a top seller for their White Cap Charolais herd

37th Annual Sterling Collection Sale December 2, 2016 • Saskatoon, SK Gross Average 4 Cow/Calf Pairs $30,250 $7,563 37 Bred Heifers 185,300 5,147 9 Heifer Calves 34,450 3,828 1 Semen Lot 18,250 18,250 50 Lots

$268,250

$5,365

Auctioneer: Michael K. Fleury Sale Manager: By Livestock The eight consignors in this year’s sale put forth another high quality offering and saw many repeat and new customers buy in volume. This longest running sale in the country is always a great event. High Selling Cow/Calf Pair Lot 5, LAE AMELIA BEDELIA 3129A (3rd Gen. Polled, 1,675 lb., 107 YW EPD), sired by Winn Mans Saginaw 538X, out of a Sparrows Eldorado 361L daughter, bred to Circle Cee Legend 307A. Sold for $6,800 to McAvoy Charolais, Arelee. Consigned by Horseshoe E Charolais, Kenaston. Lot 5A, LAE DREAMER 669D (4th Gen. Polled, 930 lb., 113 YW EPD, 24 Milk EPD), sired by Cedarlea Winslow 89B. Sold for $3,250 to Eldorado Charolais, Redcliff, AB.

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Gordon Wiebe took a couple more to northern BC

Charolais Banner • February 2017

Dean & Mike McAvoy consigned and bought the high selling cow

Jordan Moore took two including the high selling heifer

Rebecca & Amber Shuttleworth were there and Rebecca purchased a bred heifer


STRONG LOCAL SUPPORT

M & L Sale M & L Cattle Co. & Guests Sale December 10, 2016 • Campbellford, ON Gross Average 19 Cow/Calf Pairs $63,250 $3,329 7 Bred Cows 16,775 2,396 26 Bred Heifers 57,950 2,229 10 Heifer Calves 16,375 1,638 1 Two-Year Old Bull 3,500 3,500 63 Lots

$157,850

$2,506

7 Simmental Bred Cows $13,100 1 Commercial C/C Pair 2,300 4 Commercial Bred Hfrs 7,750 8 Commercial Open Hfrs 11,825

$1,871 2,300 1,938 1,478

Total Sale Gross

$192,425

Auctioneer: Brad DeNure

M & L Cattle Co., Indian River, Ontario, had a production sale to cut some numbers down and to focus the herd more on the Full French side of their operation. The sale also included the herd dispersal of Rollanda Charolais, Mark and the late Carlyle Rollins, of Madoc. Their herd was primarily Full French or French influence with shorter breeding dates not giving them the best opportunity to bring a top dollar. Strong area buying saw some new breeders get started with good buying throughout the sale, with many buying in volume.

High Selling Cow/Calf Pair Lot 45, WHISKEY HOLLOW BEYONCE 12B (25 Milk EPD), sired by PCC Navigator 403P, out of a PCFL Texas 52P daughter, bred to M&L Performer 92C. Sold for $4,300 to Whiskey Hollow Cattle Company, Norwood. Lot 45A, M&L Destined 14D (Polled, .9 BW EPD), sired by XAL Fire It Up 5A. Sold for $4,900 to Southview Farms, Courtice. High Selling Heifer Calves Lot 61, M&L Tom Smith added a MS VITTOZ 206D couple to his Royal T herd

Volume buyer Harry Lamis visits with Roger Maloney after the sale

(Polled, 1/2 French), sired by Vittoz, out of an JWX Three Peet 73X daughter. Sold for $3,400 to Langstaff Charolais, Wallaceburg. Lot 58, M&L MS TURTON 10C (Polled), sired by TR PZC Mr Turton 0794 ET, out of a PCFL Lexus 36F daughter. Sold for $3,250 to Sharodon Farms, Omemee.

Kelly Langstaff bought a high selling heifer calf

Gord Tomlinson bought the high selling female

Derek, Tami, Garrett & Ed Dekeyser purchased some

STERLING, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 47 307A. Sold for $7,250 to Westdale Cattle Co., Tisdale. Consigned by Horseshoe E Charolais. High Selling Heifer Calf Lot 10, SKW SAMANTHA 22D (Double Polled, 1,080 lb., 94 YW EPD), sired by Silverstream Geddes G102,

out of a Steppler 83U daughter. Sold for $4,500 to Charla-Moore Farms, Redvers. Consigned by Creek’s Edge Land & Cattle. High Selling Semen Lot Lot 1, PALGROVE JUSTICE (Homozygous Polled), sired by

Silverstream Evolution, out of a Palgrove Barrister daughter. 250 doses of semen sold for $18,250 to five breeders. Consigned by Hunter Charolais.

Some great online advertising options at www.charolaisbanner.com By the week or month… you will get noticed Charolais Banner • February 2017

47


SALE GOES DESPITE CLOSED ROADS

No Borders Sale 5th Annual No Borders Sale December 6, 2016 • Virden, MB Gross Average 1 Cow/Calf Pair $7,000 $7,000 28 Bred Heifers 161,450 5,766 11 Heifer Calves 45,450 4,132 1 Bull Calf 26,000 26,000 40 3/4 Lots

$239,900

$5,887

Auctioneer: Ryan Dorran Sale Manager: By Livestock The first blizzard of the winter closed some roads in the area, which stopped many from attending the sale. The telephone was very active with 24 of the 41 lots selling to breeders not attending. Once again, the consignors from Manitoba and Saskatchewan put forth a high quality offering with a very strong top end. High Selling Bred Heifers Lot 4, Pick of High Bluff Stock Farm, Inglis heifer pens. Sold for $15,000 to KCH Charolais, Oliver, BC. Lot 36, C2 MISS CARROL 14C (Double Polled, 1,840 lb, 57 WW EPD, 104 YW EPD), sired by Siverstream Geddes G102, out of a BXB Dateline Son 65R daughter, bred to LT Ledger 0332P. Sold for $9,250 to DRD Charolais, Sintaluta, SK. Consigned by C2 Charolais, La Riviere. Lot 43, SCF CANDY 282C (Full French, 1,600 lb), sired by Andalou, out of a G4 Acres Roper 121R daughter, bred to Falcon. Sold for $9,250 to Rollin Acres Charolais, Shelburne, ON. Consigned by Stephen

Andre Steppler supported, taking five head

48

Chester Tupling bought a high selling Full French heifer

Charolais, Moosomin, SK. Lot 14, PLEASANTDAWN MICKY 12C (3rd Gen. Polled, 1,615 lb, .4 BW EPD, 112 YW EPD), sired by Pleasant Dawn Chisum 216A, out of a Sparrows Fargo 811U daughter, bred to LT Ledger 0332 P. Sold for $8,500 to Wrangler Charolais, Westlock, AB. Consigned by Pleasant Dawn Charolais, Oak Lake. Lot 2, JMB MISS PEACHES 534C (Double Polled, 1,555 lb, 2nd in class at Agribition), sired by CS Mango 256M, out of a BXB Dateline Son 65R daughter, bred to JMB Renaissance 444B. Sold for $8,200 to Wrangler Charolais. Consigned by Fun Bus Syndicate, Neepawa. Lot 6, PLEASANTDAWN CELINE 4C (3rd Gen. Polled, 1,575 lb, -.1 BW EPD, 26 Milk EPD), sired by Pleasant Dawn Chisum 216A, out of an SVY Kaboom Pld 7113T daughter, bred to LT Ledger 0332 P. Sold for $8,000 to Steppler Charolais, Miami. Consigned by Pleasant Dawn Charolais. High Selling Heifer Calves Lot 37, DRD LEDGERSTAR 942D (3rd Gen. Polled, 990 lb, -2 BW EPD, Ag-Ex Res. Jr. Heifer Calf), sired by LT Ledger 0332 P, Carman Jackson out of a SRK Solid consigned and bought the high 12U daughter. selling heifer calf

Sherry & Wade Meakin took two top heifers to Alberta

Charolais Banner • February 2017

Sold for $8,500 to High Bluff Stock Farm. Consigned by DRD Charolais. Lot 44, SCF DESTINIE 333D (Full French, 1,010 lb, 101 YW EPD), sired by Jumper, out of an LIG Riotejo 101R daughter. Sold for $7,750 to Double P Stock Farm, Ste. Rose du Lac. Consigned by Stephen Charolais. Lot 31, LEJ DELILAH 648D (3rd Gen. Pld, Double Red, 845 lb, 23 Milk EPD), sired by JS Navajo Red 15X, out of a Winn Mans Bancada 816U daughter. Sold for $6,000 to KCH Charolais. Consigned by LEJ Charolais, Portage la Prairie. High Selling Bull Calf Lot 1, JMB FISHER 604D (Double Polled, 104 lb BW, 1,470 lb Ag-Ex Grand Champion Bull, Charolais winner of Agribition President’s Cup), sired by KRF What-A-Boy 104Y, out of a Sparrows Oakridge 66R daughter. Sold for $26,000 for ¾ interest to C2 Charolais. Consigned by JMB Charolais, Brookdale.

Don Railton consigned and bought high sellers

Jeff Cavers added the Fisher bull to his operation

Dillon, Don & Cody Milliken added six to their operation


CATTLE TO FIVE PROVINCES

Steppler Sale Steppler Farms A Piece of the Program Female Sale December 12, 2016 • Miami, MB Gross Average 6 Cow/Calf Pairs $82,550 $13,758 3 Bred Cows 30,950 10,317 23 Bred Heifers 141,150 6,137 5 Heifer Calves 23,800 4,760 37 Lots

$278,450

$7,526

Auctioneer: Brent Carey Sale Manager: By Livestock Steppler Farms dug deep for their first “Piece of the Program” female sale and found excellent support for the offering. Cattle sold across the country with the service of Sparrows Braxton creating some extra interest. High Selling Cow/Calf Pairs Lot 4, STEPPLER MISS 144Z (Double Polled, 1,860 lb.), sired by Sparrows Seminole 927W, out of a Sparrows Oakridge 66R daughter, bred to Sparrows Braxton 519C. Sold for $17,000 to Springside Farms, Airdrie, AB and Connection Cattle Co., Lorette. Lot 4A, STEPPLER MISS 144D (Double Polled, 989 lb.), sired by Sparrows Versace 408B. Sold for $4,000 to Madison Johnston, Rathwell. Lot 1, STEPPLER MISS 16A (Double Polled, 24 Milk EPD, 1,725 lb.), sired by Sparrows Seminole 927W, out of a Sparrows Oakridge 66R daughter, bred to Sparrows Braxton 519C. Sold for $15,000 to Elder Charolais, Coronach, SK. Lot 1A, STEPPLER EMILY 616D (3rd Gen. Polled, 100 YW EPD, 25 Milk EPD), sired by JWX Burnin’ It Down 613B. Sold for $5,000 to Wilgenbusch Charolais, Halbrite, SK.

Bob Burla and Barry & Larissa Peril teamed up on a high seller

Lot 8, STEPPLER MISS 232B (3rd Gen. Polled, 1,560 lb), sired by Steppler Blake 57Y, out of a Sparrows Oakridge 66R daughter, bred to HRJ Crowd Favourite 515C. Sold for $11,750 to Circle 7 Charolais, Shaunavon, SK. Lot 8A, STEPPLER MISS 232D (4th Gen. Polled, .8 BW EPD, 1,064 lb.), sired by Steppler Jacksonville 335Z. Sold for $5,100 to Sliding Hills Charolais, Canora, SK. High Selling Bred Cow Lot 2, STEPPLER MISS 352Y (3rd Gen. Polled, 25 Milk EPD, 1,813 lb.), sired by Stepplers Distinction 38T, out of a Sparrows Santiago 333N daughter, bred to Sparrows Braxton 519C. Sold for $17,750 to Springside Farms and Circle Cee Charolais, Lamont, AB. High Selling Bred Heifers Lot 10, STEPPLER MISS 145C (Double Polled, 1,685 lb., Ag-Ex Res. Grand Female), sired by Sparrows Seminole 927W, out of a Sparrows Berlin 30M daughter, bred to Steppler Jacksonville 335Z. Sold for $22,000 to Dale McKay, Brandon. Lot 27, STEPPLER MS WATKINS 209C (Polled, 28 Milk EPD, 1,811 lb.),

sired by Sparrows Copenhagen 210Z, out of a Steppler 12P daughter. Sold for $10, 250 to Elder Charolais. Lot 14, STEPPLER MISS 10C (Double Polled, -2 BW EPD, 1,610 lb.), sired by Sparrows Seminole 927W, out of a Sparrows Berlin 30M daughter, bred to LAE Canadiana 561C. Sold for $9,500 to Fondoak Farms, Renfrew, ON. High Selling Heifer Calf Lot 37, STEPPLER MISS 6213D (Polled, 100 YW EPD, 31 Milk EPD), sired by Sparrows Copenhagen 210Z, out of a Sparrows Seminole 927W daughter. Sold for $6,600 to Horseshoe E Charolais, Kenaston, SK.

Kelly Oberle added three to their Circle 7 operation

Doug & Marianne Hunter and Bernard Begin selected a few

Dale McKay purchased the high selling bred heifer

Ron Elder & Craig Wilgenbusch bought

Charolais Banner • February 2017

Emily Bromley took a high selling bred heifer to Ontario

Mason & Kaden Beck teamed up on a couple

49


2016 B.O.S.S. SHOW BULL HONOURS We would like to commend all the Charolais Exhibitors in 2016 for a job well done. A great amount of effort and expense goes into exhibiting cattle. We often wonder how many of us realize the spin offs and the free promotion the breed receives from these few breeders who carry the torch for the Charolais industry. Congratulations on a great year and thank you! The Banner Of Show Sires, or B.O.S.S., was developed in 1984 and is administered by the Charolais Banner. It is the only purebred publication that sponsors such a program. The B.O.S.S. program was set up as a method of keeping track of the winnings of the Charolais animals in the show ring. The shows that receive B.O.S.S. designation are decided by the Charolais Banner and spread out evenly across Canada. B.O.S.S. Points are awarded accordingly: BY CATEGORY 20 pts. Grand Champion 15 pts. Res. Grand Champion 10 pts. Sr. & Jr Champions 5 pts. Res Sr & Jr. Champion

BY CLASS 10 pts. – 1st 8 pts. – 2nd 6 pts. – 3rd 4 pts. – 4th 2 pts. – 5th Toronto Royal, because of its National Status in 2016, received double B.O.S.S. points. Canadian Western Agribition also received double B.O.S.S. points for having more than 80 entries. Shows with 80 plus entries received double points; 40 plus entries received full points; 30 – 39 entries received ¾ points and less than 30 entries receive ½ points. The B.O.S.S. program has become an effective method of recognizing the most popular bull and female on the show road each year. The B.O.S.S. Chart is very detailed and takes hours for our administration to ensure accuracy. We do believe the chart provides a number of great results in which we can base decisions. After all, popularity of type is a very important marketing tool. The B.O.S.S. chart breaks down points given to animals

from all the B.O.S.S. designated shows and tabulates bulls gaining 10 points or more. The chart also illustrates all bulls from 1984 to present that have gained 250 points or more. 2016 B.O.S.S. PROGRAM RESULTS ARE AS FOLLOWS: (118 bulls received points) The top 5 B.O.S.S. Bulls gaining points were: 5. Steppler Ultimate 75X ..................................................160 4. Cedardale Zeal 125Z ......................................................199 3. Silverstream Geddes G103 ............................................221 2. Sparrows Kingston 139Y ..............................................237 1. TR PZC Mr Turton 079 ................................................530 The B.O.S.S. Show Sire of the year is awarded to TR PZC MR TURTON 079. The top 5 Females that competed for the honour of B.O.S.S. Show Female in 2016 were: 5. JSR Jasmine 5B ............................................................72.25 4. CRG Princess Valentine 42D ..........................................83 3. CRG Barely Legal 69B ....................................................96 2. SVY Starstruck 409B ......................................................120 1. WSS Annabelle 355A ....................................................140 The B.O.S.S. Female of the year was awarded to WSS ANNABELLE 355A. The top 5 Bulls that competed for the honour of the B.O.S.S. Show bull in 2016 were: 5. Rollin Acres Zip 12B ........................................................66 5. Sharodon Tulo 14C ..........................................................66 4. PCC Rome 437B ............................................................120 3. HRJ Crowd Favorite 515C ............................................125 2. SOS Chuckwagon 54C ..................................................120 1. Sharodon Double Vision 1D ........................................153 The B.O.S.S. Show Bull of the year was awarded to SHARODON DOUBLE VISION 1D. 2016 had 2 bulls reaching the 500-point mark or the honour of B.O.S.S. Status: Gerrard Pastor 35Z Sparrows Kingston 139Y In the 33 years the B.O.S.S. Program has been running 203,122 points have been awarded.

TOP BOSS FEMALES OF 2016 W S S Annabelle 355A ................................140 S V Y Starstruck 409B ..................................120 C R G Barely Legal 69B..................................96 C R G Princess Valentine 42D ......................83 J S R Jasmine 5B ........................................72.25 B F Cinderalla Z 14C ..................................62.5 O N L Obsession 5C ......................................56 Steppler Miss 145C ........................................51 J M B Sweetie 606D ........................................50 S O S Hot Mess 50B ........................................48 E M B Seduction 67C ....................................46 Whitewater Candy Cane 2C......................40.5 J W X Candy Crush 88C ................................40 J W X Cloud Nine 46C ..................................40 M I C Starstruck 642D....................................40 S V Y Luna 609D ............................................40

50

Echo Springs Orianna 13C ....................35.75 Gerrard Starstruck 11C ................................35 Sunrise Houdini 34D ....................................35 Baker Farms Dolce 4D................................34.5 J W X Daydream 619D ..................................31 M I C Starstruck 628D....................................30 Cornerview Daytona 56D........................29.75 C M L Desirae 558C........................................29 Cornerview Dream Date 13D ..................28.5 O N L Hot Dam 14C ......................................28 Sharodon Charmed 12C ..............................28 W S S Cotton Candy 520C ............................28 Moyer’s Zoey 13Z ..........................................27 J W X I Love It 808A ......................................26 J W X I’m So Fancy 983B................................25 J M B Miss Peaches 534C ..............................22

Charolais Banner • February 2017

Moyer’s Dixie Lou 3D ..................................22 Sharodon 33c Bewitched 7B ........................22 Bridor Doris 6D ............................................20 C M L Dezirae 659D ......................................20 Echo Springs Worthwhile 60C ....................20 Elder’s Undeniable 87D ..............................20 Hopewell Whiskey Sour 9D ........................20 Lae Caroline 516C..........................................20 L B L Daddys Pay Check 16D ......................20 Michelson Starstruck 642D ..........................20 M V Y Kandace 8D ........................................20 Sharodon 33c Bedazzled 7D ........................20 S O S Kendra 36D ..........................................20 W S S Classy Girl 597C ................................20


TOP BOSS SHOW BULLS OF 2016 Sharodon Double Vision 1D ......................153 S O S Chuckwagon 54C ..............................130 H R J Crowd Favourite 515C ......................125 P C C Rome 437B ..........................................120 Rollin Acres Zip 12B......................................66 Sharodon Tulo 14C ........................................66 JM B Fisher 604D............................................56 Baker Farms Con Artist 3C ..........................49 Echo Springs Date Night 14D ......................46 Cornerview Diesel 35D ................................44 H R J Doctor Jones 612D ..............................44

M V Y Direct Deposit 22D ............................40 M V Y Dr Pepper 63D ....................................40 Cornerview Dashboard 39D ........................39 S O S Gaucho 139D ........................................30 High Bluff Dodger 99D ................................28 Hopewell Southpaw 6D................................28 Borderlands Capone 74C..............................26 Elder’s Cracker Jack 13D ..............................26 Hicks Obiwan Kenobi 1B..............................26 H R J Django 647B ........................................26 High Bluff Dunner 89D ................................25

Final BOSS Points, 1984 to 2016 Roxy’s Jack Dempsey 63R* 6942 Chardel Reebok* 4398 SVY Freedom Pld 307N* 3240 JSC Chairman 103U* 2907 SLY Eastwood Pld 32F* 2601 CCC Elevations Knockout* 2592 LT Wyoming Wind 4020 Pld* 2529 BR MF Krugerrand* 2482 HTA Northern Light 357C* 2386 MSW Kapone* 2307 Sparrows Sheriff* 2142 KC Stolichnaya H016* 1732 Keys Polled Compass* 1693 FVC Tango 907Y* 1481 V A L&T Big Discovery 27U* 1404 Sparrows Alliance* 1389 Silver Creek High Rise H099* 1360 Brampton Fourstar* 1342 Wildor Raven 6M* 1333 MVX Cougarhill Hank 720G* 1262 Poker King Jr. GV18G* 1249 Hickory Lane Professor* 1235 TR PZC Mr Turton 079* 1230 BXB Dateline Son 65R* 1116 HTA Whitehot 105A* 1076 Pembina Powerplay 81P* 1058 E-Cee Katmandu 200B* 1051 Tall Cool One* 1049 JWK Impressive D040ET* 1046 MNE Exclusive 17E* 1036 Pembina Ultravox 3U* 1014 Donnyweir Prophet 1K* 1013 A-Jay’s Fast Track 71B* 1007 Wat-Cha Streamline 114N* 1001 Great Houdini E.T.* 968 TR Mr Fire Water 5792 * 953 HHP Monte Carlo* 947 Nashville Goldstar 12U* 936 RPJ Eveready 403D* 897 Sparrows Cossack 11L* 896 SVC Futurist 809X* 865 HTA Tundra* 822 Sparrows Sanchez 715T* 799

Cedardale Duke 111D ..................................24 J W X Deputy 306D ......................................22 J W X Down Home 6D ..................................22 C2 Capone 2C ................................................20 C M L Envy 626D ..........................................20 O B R New Direction 1B ................................20 Rollin Acres Walter 55C ..............................20 S V Y Denali 615D ........................................20 SV Y Stout 607D ............................................20

(bulls with 250 points or more)

KJP Sky Fire 51T* 795 Spains Show Me Polled* 789 DC Bea Cool* 784 Willowvale Projector 90C* 783 2UP Peugeot ET* 777 CS Mango 256M* 771 LHD Cigar E46* 761 LT Rio Blanco 1234P* 760 Dbar Survivor 220M* 749 HFCC Pld Bond 19L* 715 Sparrows Coach 467S* 699 WESC Hicks Revolver 14R* 698 NZL Polled Raven* 679 MNE Golden Eagle 25W* 672 SVY Guardian Pld 969J* 667 LT Unlimited Chaps* 648 MVX Cougarhill Jake 767G* 646 ABC Iceman 811* 622 Double H Showman’s Dynamo* 622 HFCC Evolution 5L* 616 Sharphills Hurricane 154D* 609 JBJ AJ 787G* 608 RA Big Cat 9017 Pld* 602 JSC Alladin 101P* 594 Merit Roundup 9508W* 583 Gerrard Montezuma 6T* 577 ACF Apocalypse 40M* 572 EC No Doubt 2022P* 571 D R Revelation 467 570 Crystal D Pierce 40P* 567 WH Rambo* 567 WDW Specialist 421S* 557 WDW Prestige 65U* 548 WKM Polled Enticer* 542 VMN Habanero Pld 137L* 540 LT Bluegrass 4017* 537 Wat-Cha N’th Degree 50N* 532 Gerrard Pastor 35Z 527 Hicks Kasino 11K* 522 BKJ Buckaroo 836H* 515 SVY Bedrock* 514 Sparrows Kingston 139Y 501

Keys Polled Fusion 163E Bar EW Pld Casino 637F RCC Royal Masterpiece CS Pld Junction 4J Shelco Made Easy 512R Carlson’s Ice 301C Chardel Intrepid CF Polled Classic DYV Clearcut 14H M6 Gridmaker 104 Pld ET BCR Polled Unlimited E-Cee New Direction 6Z JSC Superstuff 24M PCFL Ultimate 14R Sparrows Landmark 963W HTA Skyliter ASC Eliminator 032 BR Cujo RCH7 LHD Mr Perfect HSF Polled Creation 46M Sir QCR High Gear 2P HTA Desert Storm A-Jay’s Mercury 70D MSW Y2K JSC Express 102L Baldridge Fasttrack Sparrows Eldorado 361L CJH Turning Point 3X Sparrows Seminole 927W Harvie Jager 65J WCR Prime Cut 764 Soderglen Grandorr 4111U Granada’s Red Ace 17B Silverstream Geddes G102 Lazy Jr. Zing 32Z Curtis Wallace 141H SCC Millenium J002P Merit Vintage 4065P Wat-Cha Amalgamated LT Ramrod 4148 KCM Ultimate 144Y RCC Royal Chip I 4192 Green Acres Butler 902Y

488 484 480 465 465 459 455 436 430 418 407 407 403 402 401 397 393 392 389 386 379 377 376 372 371 366 366 364 364 362 355 351 349 349 347 345 345 342 340 335 333 328 323

Double Hooks Cashmere 524P 320 Sir EC 20\20 Pld. 318 EVC Hot King 24D 313 JSR Equity 17M 310 MLU Congress 307 Sparrows Advantage 307 SVC Classical Coke 306 Silver Creek Thunderbolt 305 Charco Monte 41H 303 The Colonel MM 250770 303 CML Diablo 2X 301 DYV Dynamo 14D 301 NZL Top Gun 301 CSS Sir Gridmaker 2W 300 SVS Preserve 7B 299 RCC Royal Express 3269 (P) 298 HEJ Ripper 66P 297 LANC Visitation 3S 293 Silverstream Evolution E168 293 Target Derrick 11D 293 ABC Latoro 263G 291 VET Dr Spock 1S 289 Bridor Haldrey 5H 286 PCC Balistik 441P 283 JDJ Smokester J1377P ET 280 WDZ Mongo 280 RKG Thriller Pld 45D 277 Bar J Silverado 14S 276 Jezebel 274 Sparrows Alcatraz 18N 273 Belmont’s Sonar 3N 271 Cedardale Zeal 125Z 271 GV Raven 2S 271 Keys Front Page 189H 268 MXS Vermillion 527R 266 SVS Mastercard 2M 263 FH-RRR Sequoia 259 SVS Nobleman 25N 259 Keys Handyman Pld 255H 258 LT Western Spur 2061 255 MNE Banjo 70B 255 Skymont Ease 2078 251

* indicates BOSS Bull (500 points or more). The Banner of Show Sires (BOSS) program was developed and is administered by the Charolais Banner. Points are awarded to sires based upon their progeny’s placings at recognized BOSS shows across Canada.

Charolais Banner • February 2017

51


52

Agribition

Edmonton Farm Fair

MB Livestock Expo

Expo Boeuf (Quebec)

Lindsay

Olds

Renfrew

Toronto Royal

Baker Farms Absolute 15A Cedardale Abracadabra 123A Cedardale Winchester 70W Cedardale Yellowstone 25Y Cedardale Zeal 125Z Charworth Advisor 21A CML Distinction 318A CML Gunslinger 310B CML Heisman 413B Cornerview Aveneger 40A CS Mango 256M* CSS Sir Navigator 20Y CTP Bam Bam 350B D R Revelation 467 Dubuc Zenith 302Z Echo Springs Webster 8W Elder’s Blackjack 788B Elder’s Raptor 43Y Elder’s Zeus 22Z Gerrard Montezuma 6T* Gerrard Pastor 35Z HAMM Mogo U23 HEJ Armageddon 84A Hicks Indiana Jones 7Y HTA Ice 19X HTA Tuff Enuff 947W HTA Vegas 134Y JIL Thunder Roll 69Z KayR Liberty 127A KayR Upswing 507Y KayR Velocity 812Z KCM Tribulation 937W Keys All State 149X Keys Jaxon 151B Kirlene Dockage 58X KRF What-A-Boy 104Y LAE Land Baron 232Z LAE Wichita 911W LT Ledger 0332P M6 Gridmaker 104 Pld ET MCF Bohannon 305A McTavish Iron hide 31B Merit Roundup 9508W* Mr Louber Tracker 615A MVY Big News 47B MVY Xplorer 21X MXS Irresistibull 357A PCC Yukon 405B PCFL Chieftan 25X Pleasant Dawn Magnum 49Y Rollin Acres Top Shelf 4Z Rosso Double Down 8Z SCF You Betcha 94Y SCR Triumph 2135 Sharodon Kruger 4Z Silverstream Evolution E168 Silverstream Geddes G102 Sparrows Aquarius 439B Sparrows Escobar 429B Sparrows Estevez 471B Sparrows Kingston 139Y Sparrows Landmark 963W Sparrows Seminole 927W

2016 Totals

Points Awarded in 2016 49 18 70 20 199 14 76 25 20 14 22 29 17 155 27 46 106 11 20 66 73 52 12 20 20 36 72 109 15 20 144 24 30 16 28 106 16 10 72 48 36 16 63 30 12 20 12 14 20 14 32 41 66 28 13 133 221 23 45 26 237 12 51

12 8 16 16 12 106 8 4 28 12 46 16 46 16 4 24 20 36 16 12 12 12 12 26 96 36 32 16 138 12 16

35 14 10 25 20 17 8 22 16 15 10 10 10 14 23 10 61 -

8 8 6 13 16 20 16 6 60 6 29 28 8 2 6 28 37 19 13 35

35 6 10 40 28 10 20 17 13 -

13 2 32 40 66 4 10 6 6 13 4 10 20 -

14 5 10 3 7 14 37 9 1 1 38 -

10 10 3 24 8 13 30 10 26 3 5 10 6 30 -

26 16 28 70 28 66 12 16 30 36 20 12 40 20 54 24 24 28 8 24 20 20 32 40 116 -

Charolais Banner • February 2017


2016 Totals

Agribition

Edmonton Farm Fair

MB Livestock Expo

Expo Boeuf (Quebec)

Lindsay

Olds

Renfrew

Toronto Royal

Stauffer’s King Pin Pld 19X Steppler 83U Steppler Attain 160A Steppler Ultimate 75X SVY Monument Pld 159Y SVY Northstar 153Y TR Mr Fire Water 5792 * TR PZC Mr Turton 079* VFF Time Out 172Y VFF Vikse Ice 189Z WC Benelli 2134P ET WESC Hicks Revolver 14R* Whitecap Mr Blade 5B Winn Mans Big Rig 639Y Winn Man’s Chavez 826Y Winn Mans Cuervo 4A Winn Mans Kracken 635Z Winn Man’s Pistol 615S WKL Mr Big Shot 212S WR Wrangler W601 WSS Budweiser 480B XAL Firestruck 3Z

10 16 28 160 83 120 97 530 28 48 62 26 40 49 82 20 34 16 10 55 12 38

16 60 80 24 224 12 8 62 40 8 74 20 34 -

40 12 40 6

18 20 40 -

10 4 13 42 20 10 39 -

6 4 79 -

3 -

31 2 5 -

28 100 42 24 122 16 26 16 8 16 16 12 32

2016 TOTAL BOSS POINTS

4651

1528

418

442

317

315

141

223

1268

SOLID OFFERING–GOOD BUYING

Howe Family Sale Howe Family Sharing the Herd Sale December 14, 2016 • Moose Jaw, SK Gross Average 16 Bred Heifers $59,600 $3,725 2 Heifer Calves 8,300 4,150 18 Lots

$67,900

$3,772

Auctioneer: Brent Carey The Howes followed the same concept as their first sale two years ago where they sold choice and the buyer takes one and the other goes back into their herd. This shows they offered only animals they would keep in their own program. A quality offering was presented with some good buying throughout and cattle moved to four provinces. 26 Red Angus lots averaged $5,200. High Selling Bred Heifers Lot 32A, WHITECAP MS ASTER 28C (Polled, -.7 BW EPD, 99 YW EPD), sired by LT Ledger 0332 P, out of a Whitecap Coach 253Y daughter, bred to Cedardale Zeal 125Z. Sold for $7,800 to Springside Farms, Airdrie, AB. Lot 34A, WHITECAP MS RAVEN 193C (Polled, 55 WW EPD, 102 YW

Darwin Rosso selected the high selling heifer calf

Andre Steppler took a top bred heifer back to Manitoba

EPD), sired by Merit 9778W, out of an HC Wells Fargo 943W daughter, bred to Cedardale Zeal 125Z. Sold for $4,600 to Palmer Charolais,Bladworth. Lot 33A, WHITECAP MS BLOSSOM 8C (Polled, 64 WW EPD, 117 YW EPD), sired by LT Ledger 0332 P, out of a Whitecap Certainty 263Y daughter, bred to Cedardale Zeal 125Z. Sold for $4,300 to Palmer Charolais. Lot 45A, WHITECAP MS ROYAL 198C (Polled, 56 WW EPD, 100 YW EPD), sired by Whitecap Certainty 263Y, out of a Whitecap Justice 67R daughter, bred to Whitecap Barbwire 52B. Sold for $4,100 to Palmer Charolais. Charolais Banner • February 2017

Donna Ross bought two for their Elder Charolais operation

Velon Herback added a few top sellers to their Palmer Charolais herd

Bob Burla & Mike Panasiuk purchased the high seller

High Selling Heifer Calf Lot 39B, WHITECAP MS LANNY 11D (Polled, 93 YW EPD, 23 Milk EPD), sired by Whitecap Brindle 57B, out of a JWX Yankee 973Y daughter. Sold for $4,900 to Rosso Charolais, Moose Jaw. 53


54

Charolais Banner • February 2017

54


2ND HIGHEST GROSSING YEAR

2016 Charolais Female Sales Summary 2016 CHAROLAIS FEMALE SALES SUMMARY CHART Notes: (Applicable to the following chart) • Statistics were compiled from Canadian Charolais Female Sales which were reported to the Charolais Banner in 2016. • There were 7 more sales reporting in 2016 than in 2015 • In total there were 427 ½ more lots selling in 2016 than in 2015 • Total gross sales were up $1,699,180 from 2015, however the overall average was down by $1301. • Sales which included more than 10 bulls selling will be included in the 2017 Spring Bull Sale Summary Report. General Summary Number of 2016 Sales ..........................................................17 Total Lots Offered ..............................................................901 Average Sale Size ..................................................................53 Total Gross Dollars ................................................$4,879,025 Overall Average per Lot ................................................$5415 Overall Sale Averages More Than $6,000: Canadian National Sale (Toronto) ............................$10,371

Alberta Select Sale ..........................................................$9106 Char-Maine Heart of the White Herd..........................$8751 Canadian Western Agribition Sale ..............................$8570 Steppler Farms “A Piece of the Program” ..................$7526 Transcon’s Working Girls Sale......................................$6673 Sales With 40 + Lots: Foat Valley Stock Farm Dispersal ....................................145 Patton Charolais Dispersal ................................................128 Maple Leaf Ranch Herd Reduction..................................118 M & L Cattle Co. & Guests ..................................................63 Char-Maine Heart of the White Herd................................55 Sterling Collection Sale ........................................................50 Rainalta Total Herd Dispersal ............................................45 No Borders Select Sale ..................................................40 3/4 Top 5 Gross Dollar Sales: Patton Charolais Dispersal ......................................$751,900 Foat Valley Stock Farm Dispersal ............................$535,700 Maple Leaf Ranch Herd Reduction ........................$521,550 Char-Maine Heart of the White Herd ....................$481,300 Alberta Select Sale......................................................$325,550

Top 15 Selling Females of 2016 Name

Price

Purchaser

Consignor

Alberta Charolais Select Patton Dispersal Alberta Charolais Select Canadian National Sale Steppler "A Piece of the Program" Canadian National Sale Steppler "A Piece of the Program" Canadian National Sale Alberta Charolais Select Steppler "A Piece of the Program" Transcon's Working Girls Patton Dispersal Canadian National Sale Canadian Western Agribition Sale No Borders Select

$41,000 24,500 23,000 22,000 22,000 21,000 17,750 17,500 17,000 17,000 16,500 16,500 16,000 15,000 15,000

McKeary Charolais Schnuelle Land & Livestock Bouchard Livestock Tupling Farms Livestock Dale McKay DandG Charolais Springside Farms & Circle Cee Charolais Cays Charolais Trask Charolais Springside Farms & Connection Cattle Co. Clearwater River Ranch Stephen Charolais Steppler Farms Clearwater River Ranch KCH Charolais

Springside Farms Patton Charolais Gerrard Cattle Co. Rollin' Acres Charolais Steppler Farms Prairie Cove Charolais Steppler Farms Prairie Cove Charolais Prairie Cove Charolais Steppler Farms Prairie Cove Charolais Patton Charolais Dudgeon-Snobelen Land & Cattle Prairie Cove Charolais High Bluff Stock Farm

Charolais Banner • February 2017

55


22 Year (19942016) Charolais Female Sale Trends Year 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

COW/CALF PAIR No. Average

# of Sales 42 32 30 35 27 19 19 20 16 15 17 21 16 23 15 12 13 13 14 16 14 10 17

341 300 256 440 276 149 290 179 32 141 193 158 169 402 135 81 189 265 336 261 121 57 284

BRED FEMALES No. Average

$4,688 $3,379 $3,104 $3,480 $3,443 $4,518 $5,116 $5,394 $5,784 $4,978 $4,149 $3,184 $4,241 $2,992 $3,594 $3,496 $3,634 $4,860 $5,201 $4,876 $10,880 $9,904 $6,508

345 279 241 363 287 119 122 262 49 167 132 153 168 1/2 325 172 131 141 152 93 234 83 24 101

BRED HEIFERS No. Average

$2,733 $1,674 $1,721 $1,882 $1,868 $2,429 $2,338 $2,609 $2,836 $2,192 $2,129 $2,010 $1,960 $1,596 $2,136 $2,492 $2,501 $2,666 $2,714 $1,918 $5,116 $5,998 $5,322

469 445 1/2 406 431 1/2 339 280 313 337 254 204 252 240 215 1/2 257 166 179 189 174 277 307 248 199 340

HEIFER CALVES No. Average

$2,336 $2,004 $1,645 $1,914 $2,020 $2,483 $2,543 $2,937 $2,778 $2,534 $2,010 $2,139 $2,709 $2,120 $2,353 $2,225 $2,472 $2,866 $3,419 $2,982 $5,736 $6,874 $4,631

283 229 229 259 1/2 180 150 189 163 160 90 110 111 132 1/2 115 102 93 86 95 107 132 86½ 91 155

$2,247 $1,836 $1,721 $1,646 $1,868 $2,110 $2,301 $2,255 $2,310 $2,290 $1,938 $2,204 $2,237 $2,072 $2,725 $2,256 $2,431 $2,693 $3,194 $3,151 $5,147 $6,482 $4,624

2016 Charolais Female Sale Statistics 2016 Sale Name

Cow/Calf Pair No. Ave. Alberta Select Sale 1 $8,150 Autumn Prestige Sale 2 $6,500 Canadian National Sale (Toronto)   Canadian Western Agribition Sale   CharMaine Ranching “Heart of the White Herd” 29 $12,214 Eastern National Sale 1 $6,200 Foat Valley Stock Farm Complete Dispersal 99 $4,170 Howe Family Farm “Sharing The Herd”   M & L Cattle Co & Guests 19 $3,329 Maple Leaf Ranch Herd Reduction 49 $6,731 No Borders Select Sale 1 $7,000 Patton Charolais Dispersal 56 $6,876 Rainalta Total Herd Dispersal 14 $8,800 Steppler Farms “A Piece of the Program” 6 $13,758 Sterling Collection Sale 4 $7,563 Transcon’s Working Girls Sale 2 $11,750 Uppin’ The Ante Sale 1 $9,100 Average/Totals 284 $6,508

56

Bred Females No. Ave. 4 $18,500 3 $3,633    

Bred Heifers No. Ave. 13 $8,507 21 $4,221 4 $11,313 1 $8,500

Heifer Calves No. Ave. 16 $6,562 9 $3,183 8 $12,125 16 $7,534

Semen No. Ave. 1 $7,800   2 $1,300 1 $28,650

Embryo No. Ave.     3 $6,083 1 $5,400

Flush/Recip No. Ave.     1 $8,000  

Bulls/Semen No. Ave. 3/4 $20,000 1 $3,000 1 1/2 $2,100  

TOTALS No. 35 3/4 36 20 1/2 19

4 4

$5,438 $3,550

17 17

$4,888 $4,518

5 6

$4,450 $3,075

 

 

 1

 $1,625

 

 

55 

$8,751 

$481,300 29 $4,044

12

$2,566

34

$1,392



















145

$3,694

$535,700

 7 15  31 16

 $2,396 $3,563  $6,606 $3,740

16 26 34 28 25 10

$3,725 $2,229 $2,903 $5,766 $4,640 $6,205

2 10 20 11 16 2

$4,150 $1,638 $1,980 $4,132 $2,868 $2,100

     

     

     

     

     

     

18 1  1  4

$3,772 $3,500  $26,000  $5,888

$67,900 63 118 40 3/4 128 46

$2,506 $4,420 $5,887 $5,874 $5,977

$157,850 $521,550 $239,900 $751,900 $274,950

3  2  101

$10,317  $10,000  $5,322

23 37 15 19 340

$6,137 $5,147 $5,393 $5,597 $4,631

5 9 3 17 155

$4,760 $3,828 $8,333 $4,682 $4,624

 1 1  6

 $18,250 $4,100  $10,233

    5

    $5,055

    1

    $8,000

37    9 1/4

$7,526    $11,627

$278,450 50 23 37 901

$5,365 $6,673 $5,272 $5,414

$268,250 $153,500 $195,050 $4,879,025

Charolais Banner • February 2017

GROSS Ave. $9,106 $4,006 $10,371 $8,570

$325,550 $144,200 $202,600 $163,100

$117,275


22 Year (19942016) Charolais Female Sale Trends OPEN FEMALES No. Average 42 59 2 2 0 2 4 11 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$2,680 $1,805 $1,400 $925 $0 $1,425 $1,763 $1,686 $0 $0 $0 $1,475 $0 $1,500 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 0 0

FLUSH/RECIPS No. Average 31 4 9 8 8 5 9 9 16 4 4 8 10 5 4 5 12 6 6 12 4 3 1

$2,031 $2,975 $2,555 $2,919 $2,628 $2,185 $4,717 $2,817 $1,792 $2,275 $3,488 $3,681 $2,895 $3,380 $4,440 $3,840 $3,817 $5,042 $6,192 $4,283 $5,150 $7,233 $8,000

BULLS/SEMEN No. Average 150 2/3 143 1/4 107 1/2 128 1/4 86 75 1/2 104 96 79 70 56 1/6 77 3/5 78 1/2 72 25 1/2 31 1/2 25 3/8 44 1/2 74 3/4 100 23/25 6 15 1/2 9 1/4

$8,998 $3,970 $3,418 $3,749 $3,980 $5,260 $4,263 $5,657 $4,451 $5,404 $5,711 $3,837 $3,378 $3,410 $3,972 $6,458 $5,383 $5,074 $4,029 $3,734 $4,792 $12,977 $11,627

TOTAL LOTS SALE GROSS No. Average 1690 1459 3/4 1250 1/2 1,651 1176 1/12 774 1/4 1031 1054 590 676 3/5 746 755 3/5 770 11/12 1177 603 1/2 519 3/4 641 5/8 736 1/2 891 1/2 1053 11/12 555½ 473 1/2 901

$3,211 $2,304 $2,138 $2,424 $2,426 $3,112 $3,403 $3,406 $3,022 $3,141 $2,879 $2,534 $2,881 $2,352 $2,732 $2,769 $2,975 $3,671 $4,065 $3,381 $6,786 $6,716 $5,414

$5,427,661 $3,363,250 $2,674,080 $4,002,485 $2,853,133 $2,409,676 $3,492,265 $3,590,470 $1,782,960 $2,125,075 $2,147,125 $1,914,985 $2,221,225 $2,768,275 $1,648,520 $1,439,025 $1,909,000 $2,703,825 $3,623,750 $3,563,105 $3,769,850 $3,179,845 $4,879,025

AD RATES Charolais Banner

Charolais Connection

Ads Black & White Full Colour Full Page $725 $1050 2/3 Page 610 840 1/2 Page 490 685 1/3 Page 345 505 1/4 Page 285 410 1/6 Page 190 n/a 1/8 Page 145 n/a 1" Business Card 45 n/a Classified 80 n/a 2"x1 column (add $10.00 to put on web for 1 month)

Ads Black & White Full Colour Full Page $1100 $1450 2/3 Page 825 1125 1/2 Page 690 945 1/3 Page 525 725 1/4 Page 440 615 1/6 Page 330 n/a 1/8 Page 220 n/a Classified 80 n/a 1"x1 column (add $10.00 to put on web for 1 month) Classified 140 n/a 2"x1 column (add $10.00 to put on web for 1 month)

• • • • •

Pictures – $10 • Photos taken by fieldmen – $25 Overruns are $1 each • Catalogue prices available on request 4 ad contracts offer a 15% discount (card ad exempt) Position pages will be given to yearly contracts Sale Budget includes Banner fieldman to attend the sale, take pictures, work the ring and report the sale. Female sale budget is $400 sale attendance fee plus 2 colour pages in Charolais Banner or equivalent in Charolais Connection. Bull sale budget is $400 sale attendance fee plus 1 colour page in Charolais Connection.

PUBLISHING DEADLINES

1" Business Card in the Banner and Connection

$350/Year

• Pictures – $10 • Photos taken by fieldmen – $25 • Yearly contract – buy 2 ads and get the third at half price (card ad exempt) • Position pages will be given to yearly contracts • Catalogue prices available on request

ISSUE

EDITORIAL DEADLINE

AD DEADLINE

MAILING

MAY Banner

April 20

April 27

May 4

The Banner cannot be responsible for errors in advertisements received after the ad deadline. The Charolais Banner reserves the right to refuse any advertisement. On any advertisement, the Charolais Banner is not liable for any charges over and above the cost of that advertisement. No agency commission allowed on livestock advertising rates. The Charolais Banner assumes no responsibility for distribution.

Charolais Banner • February 2017

57


YOUTH ACTIVITIES

CCYA Essay Winners Shae-Lynn Evans, Kenaston, SK Senior - 1st Place

Reaching and Educating Canadian Beef Consumers From GMOfree, to Certified Humane, to hormone and antibiotic free, today’s consumers are bombarded with advertising campaigns promoting so called healthier, safer, and better beef (Campbell, 2016). Bedington (2014) calls the recent advertising campaigns a “meat muddle” for consumers, which could not be more accurate in describing the discrepancy between what information is available to consumers, and the actual facts. The current problem for beef producers involves this discrepancy, or “gap” between consumers and producers. In a perfect world, all beef consumers would take the opportunity to visit cattle ranches and feedlots and gain an insider’s perspective of what the beef industry is all about. Unfortunately, this is not reality, and consumers form opinions based on second hand information. It is crucial that the information they receive is factual and true. So whose responsibility is it to take on this role and to adequately educate consumers, and how is the best way to go about this? I believe this begins with looking at each level of the beef food chain, starting with producers. In the past few years, beef producers have taken a huge step toward building trust and creating transparency with consumers. These components are crucial to the success of the beef industry, as consumers are becoming more and more in control of the markets. Livestock management practices on the producer’s end have been the target of many recent campaigns. Consumer confidence in the beef industry has taken a serious hit. Many consumers are poorly educated when it comes to the 58

production of beef and the quality assurance initiatives that are in place. Producers taking to social media, online blogs, and speaking out to educate peers have been pivotal in reassuring consumers about the safety of the beef being produced and sold. As producers, it is essential for us to continue to speak out and promote our industry. We need to continue to maintain our transparency by opening the doors and allowing consumers to see exactly what goes on at the production end of the industry. Education from the source is often the most meaningful. However, though this is a vital piece of the puzzle, it is not enough when standing alone; the responsibility also falls on those at the other end of the spectrum. Restaurants and grocery stores who are marketing our beef also play a very important role in consumer education. Campaigns focused around antibiotic and hormone free beef have placed fear and doubt in the minds of consumers who now worry about beef from other sources who do not make these same claims. Many brands claim their products are “natural”, “GMOfree”, or most recently, “Certified Humane”. Many of these claims are hollow, with no standards outlining what these claims promise consumers. Marketing lingo has caused consumers to question products that are not advertised in such a way. For example, “Certified Humane” beef is a label derived in the United States. When this label made an appearance in Canada, it caused a stir because there is no “Certified Humane” beef in Canada- however, this is not to say that Canadian beef is not raised or slaughtered in a humane way, simply that the third party labelling system does not exist in Canada. Consumers are misinformed by these marketing tactics, and the beef industry suffers the consequences. It is extremely difficult to monitor those at this level of the chain. The focus is based more on tactics to make a profit, rather than promote the beef industry, and this is Charolais Banner • February 2017

not beneficial to producers. However, some companies, such as McDonalds, use promotion of the Canadian Beef Industry as a marketing tool in itself. We need to support these companies and their marketing decisions because it is these companies that are benefitting our industry as producers, and who can reach out and get the attention of consumers in a positive way, which is our ultimate goal. On a larger scale, the beef industry needs the support of the government, both federal and provincial. There are several areas which need to be addressed by the government in order to support and protect both producers and consumers, and ensure that accurate information is being delivered. Government “intervention” is needed, specifically in terms of marketing and labeling beef products. One example is how the word “natural” is so commonly used as a marketing tool to describe beef, and often goes along with a higher priced product. The government needs to define what this word means in terms of food quality, and when it is appropriate to be used to describe a product. Similarly, there needs to be government- issued clarification in regard to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s role, livestock withdrawal times, and how Canadian beef does not contain dangerous levels of antibiotics, hormones, or other substances. Beef that is marketed with these claims is not any safer or healthier than other beef sold in Canada. Along with this comes the need for an improvement in the curriculum of Canadian schools. Many schools no longer have home economic classes, and if they do, students are often not taught the basics of food safety or food preparation (Campbell, 2016). When a mom cooks her family supper and everyone gets food poisoning from improperly prepared food, many times it is blamed on the beef itself rather than the preparation techniques used. It is very important that schools


are making this information available to today’s youth. The government has the potential to be an excellent resource to the Canadian beef industry in terms of reaching and educating consumers. Clearly, it is not one person or one party who is responsible for reaching and educating consumers, and there is no simple way of doing it. It is a process that will take years before the effects are felt on a larger scale. I think that we are definitely on the right track and producers’ voices are beginning to be heard, which is where it a start. As restaurants, grocery stores, and the government begin to step up into their roles, there will be massive improvements and advancements that go along with the change. I am optimistic that the image of the beef industry will become more and more positive in the eyes of consumers in years to come. Megan McLeod, Cochrane, AB Senior - 2nd Place

From Pasture to Plate: The True Story of the Agriculture Industry Reaching out and trying to teach others about the beef and agriculture industry is no easy task. This becomes especially difficult, when you consider the negative opinion that has been expressed by animal rights and animal welfare groups such as PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) and the ALF (Animal Liberation Front). There are three key components that need to be addressed when you are trying to create awareness for the beef industry. These three components are purpose, position, and promotion. To discover the most effective means of communicating and creating awareness with the general public, we must first know what we are trying to convey, and to whom we wish to convey it. The message is just as, if not more, important than the channel with which you broadcast it. With a movement that dates back to the 19th century, agricultural literacy

has been of interest in North America for a significant period of time(Mars & Ball, 2016). However, in this amount of time, we have yet to critically change the perception of the nonagricultural community. Agricultural education and literacy has almost solely been focused on the integration of agricultural concepts into both formal and non-formal lessons within the kindergarten to grade 12 curriculums(Mars & Ball, 2016). However, this has failed to interact with the adult population, which maintains a great deal of influence over the opinions and perceptions of young children, no matter their formal education. A child may learn about the beef industry and how ranchers take beef from “pasture to plate”, but a parent or teacher may express their own opinions, altering those of impressionable youth. Impressions and opinions are also very strongly held in the media and with animal rights activists and groups. PETA, or People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, is particularly known for their extreme approach to protesting, with horrifying content gracing their ads across social media and various other media outlets. It has becoming increasingly difficult to promote agriculture in an environment that feels the need to blame a few wrongdoings on the masses of farmers, ranchers, and agricultural enthusiasts who actually abide by the societal, and judicial laws set out to protect all parties, including those without voices. It is ads, videos, and posts created by groups such as PETA, that affect the opinions of the majority. Very few people can simply ignore a maimed or brutalized animal that comes across their News Feed on Facebook, which is a tactic that these activist groups have honed in on as a main strategy for interacting with the public. It is apparent though, to the small percentage of farmers and ranchers, that the messages portrayed by these activists are not lined with truth, and do not tell the real story of the industry that feeds the world. This is no longer a task of creating awareness about what we do as cattle breeders and producers, but is now Charolais Banner • February 2017

about setting the story straight when it comes to the horrific tales that are spread by the media and strongly opinionated activist groups. Our purpose is no longer simply interacting with children in schools, but must spread to encompass the population of adults that seem to forget the good of the beef industry. Our overall goal of reaching out is to set the story straight, and to tell the truth of beef production from the producers themselves. For so long, our education of the beef industry has taken a reactive approach, meaning that we wait for slander to be spread, or for something to happen, before we take action. Beef Industry education must take a proactive approach. This is where the concept of “proactive inhibition” comes into the educational strategy, as proactive inhibition is when old information prevents the memorization or learning of new information (Psychlopedia, 2016). This psychological concept, simply put, is saying that to be the first information a consumer learns is best, as it prevents new ideas and perceptions from taking hold (Psychlopedia, 2016). Thus, our strategy must be proactive and come before the propaganda that is spread by the activist groups. Position is another key component involved in this education and awareness strategy. Position refers to the marketing position of the beef industry. Marketing position is the effort made to influence consumer perception of a brand (or in this particular case, an industry) relative to that of competing brands (or opinions and ideologies). Our objective is to occupy a clear, concise, and advantageous position in the minds of the general public(Business Dictionary, 2016). Position is crucial in the court of public opinion, because without an advantageous position, the beef industry will go from fighting an uphill battle, to losing the war. The Canadian beef industry needs to position itself as an ethical and morally-sound industry, that prides itself on the ethical and proper treatment of cattle, with an emphasis on the codes in place, that report on the proper way to raise livestock, which have been present in Canada 59


for a number of years. As well, we must emphasize the high standards set by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) that stand as some of the strictest standards for beef production and processing (Binkley, 2002). In terms of promotion, there are many major changes that need to be made to the current strategy. Firstly, there must be a simple, yet unified approach to teaching the general public about the beef industry. Education about agriculture and the beef industry has always been apparent in the formal education system. However, the information is not fully appreciated by the adolescent demographics, and those that do enjoy this education, continue into post-secondary. What the beef industry needs is more informal, nonclassroom style teachings. These informal teachings are called “extension activities”, which are crucial because they link together the science behind the beef, new technological advancements within the industry, and the producer (Steppler & Switzer, 14). Understanding this link, and making the concepts interesting and integrative, are two areas that are key to enhancing overall awareness and education of the true beef industry. The concepts need to be simple, interesting, and must be relatable to the consumer. If a person cannot relate to the material, they are less likely to remain interested or to understand the concept in its entirety. Promotion at high-traffic events such as Calgary Stampede and Farmfair International, the Canadian Beef Industry will be able to interact with individuals who are keen to learn more about the industry behind the event, which they are attending. It is also important to partner with organizations such as Ag More Than Ever, or Ag For Life, which use extension activities to create an interesting and engaging environment for the teaching of agricultural concepts, not only to children, but to adults as well. There also needs to be a unified approach by regional, provincial and national cattle associations, such as breed 60

associations (Canadian Angus, Charolais, Simmental, etc) to create more avenues and channels to distribute knowledge. As well, partnering with notable brands such as Certified Angus to create promotional material that coincides with the industry position would be a key tactical strategy. There is no singular strategy or idea that will create and maintain awareness for the beef industry, as it is presented with a diversified audience that is equipped with multiple sources of knowledge. Many of these sources have presented stories and fictional facts that have painted the beef industry in a negative light. By implementing some of the ideas and concepts presented above, the beef industry will be able to combat the misplaced anger and distrust that consumers currently have for the industry. By being proactive, being vocal, and being truthful, the beef industry will be able to maintain a more positive image in the court of public opinion. It is time for there to be a unified approach in the telling of our story, of the producer who creates quality, is ethical in all aspects, and who takes beef from pasture to plate, not only feeding a nation but feeding the world. Shelby Evans, Kenaston, SK Senior-2nd Place

In our society today, people are becoming more and more cautious about what foods they are eating, where they come from, and how they got to their tables, allowing marketing schemes to guide their judgments and choices when buying products. In recent years, campaigns promoting hormone-free, antibiotic-free, and even Certified Humane beef have fueled consumer preferences and sparked outrage among beef producers as the backbone of these campaigns is very unstable and highly flawed. These are making it crucial for beef producers and industry leaders to teach the public about the beef industry so they can make informed Charolais Banner • February 2017

decisions when they go out to the grocery store. While there are countless ways to spread the word about the beef industry in order to educate consumers, sharing first-hand experiences and real-life knowledge is the most effective means of informing consumers. It is essential for people who know little about the agriculture industry, particularly the beef industry, to be able to find someway to relate to it so they can gain a better understanding of where their food comes from and how it is produced. This can be done through a variety of hands-on initiatives which involve directly teaching people about the agriculture industry, but can also be done in more passive ways such as through social media. When it comes to teaching consumers about the industry, I think it is most beneficial when it comes the from producers who are able to share first-hand knowledge and personal experiences. A less direct way of promoting and teaching about the agriculture industry which has been increasingly gaining popularity over the last few years is sharing through social media, particularly Twitter. This has been done by countless people involved in the agriculture industry, including the Ontario dairy and grain farmer Andrew Campbell. Campbell began a campaign through his Twitter account where he would post a photo of his life on the farm every day for a year with the hashtag “farm365” attached. This idea caught fire on social media and people from all over who are involved in the agriculture industry began to use the hashtag. When he began this project on the last day of 2014, Campbell had hopes of giving “consumers a sense of what is going on” in the life of a farmer. It did this and more. The campaign sparked an interest among people of all ages, even elementary classes whose teachers would read them the tweets so the kids could follow along. Campbell tells how “the kids would tweet back questions” asking all sorts of questions about the dairy cows. This kind of interaction is extremely beneficial for the industry, as sparking interest among youth gives the opportunity for that interest to


develop as the kids get older, which creates a more informed society in the future. Campbell’s campaign was overall an effective way of reaching consumers as he was able to give people with little exposure to the agriculture industry an insider’s view. Various organizations around Saskatchewan have been developed to reach people who may have questions about the industry. Farm and Food Care Saskatchewan is an online site that offers information and answers about where your food comes from and how it produced, along with teaching consumers about farming in Saskatchewan. Farm and Food Care Saskatchewan “proudly represent[s] tens of thousands of Saskatchewan farmers, ranchers and associated businesses” (Farm and Food Care Saskatchewan, 2016) and have the proper knowledge to be able to adequately inform the public about the agriculture industry in Saskatchewan. When going through the website, people can click on a variety of tabs including one about food safety. This addresses the issue that many people have with medicines being used in the beef industry. It explains how vaccines for cattle have withdrawal times, so that there is zero residue from the vaccine left in the meat when it enters the supply chain. Recent negative marketing campaigns have led consumers to believe that vaccines and medicines are a bad thing in cattle, however Farm and Food Care Saskatchewan take a consumerfriendly approach through the site to explain why treating and vaccinating cattle is actually important for the beef industry and society in general. Another marketing tool that is used to target youth specifically is Agriculture in the Classroom. This nation-wide initiative strives to fill the gap in knowledge that is present between the producers and younger consumers regarding how their food is produced. Executive Director of Agriculture in the classroom, Sara Shymko (2016), stresses that the goal of the project is to “connect [youth] with agriculture” through teaching them the basics of where their food actually comes from and how it gets

to their dinner table. By reaching out to school-aged youth, it allows the agriculture industry to educate more people earlier on in life so that they have the knowledge to support their decisions as consumers and also be able to correct others about the misconceptions they may have about the industry. Agriculture More Than Ever, one of the better known agriculture campaigns, focuses on getting out and telling the real story of Canadian agriculture to people around the country. With the goal of improving society’s outlook on the agriculture industry and clearing up any false assumptions that the public may have, Ag More Than Ever (2016) searches for people to become “Agvocates”, someone who positively promotes the industry through telling their own story and backing it up with factual information. Ag More Than Ever is constantly improving in ways to educate people about the agriculture industry and the beef industry by not only talking to consumers and the general public, but also teaching producers and people in the industry how to positively speak to the public in ways that promote the agriculture industry. The organization also relies heavily on social media to share their information and reach people all over the country. Although all of these campaigns have helped better educate consumers about the beef industry, the most positive teaching can be done by producers in everyday life. Whether it is a commercial cattle producer stopped at a gas station while taking calves to the auction mart or a purebred producer exhibiting their showstring at Agribition, it is crucial that people involved in the agriculture industry are willing and open to speak about the industry and their experiences. Sharing first hand experiences and personal stories from farmers makes it easier for the public to relate to farmers and gain a better understanding about the industry. Cattle producers need to do their part to educate the public about the reality of beef production so they are able to understand why we do what we do. Explaining things such as why we Charolais Banner • February 2017

give our cattle antibiotics when they are sick, the benefits of hormones, and certain handling techniques give consumers insight into the industry and help to clear up any misconceptions that may have arose from marketing ploys. Ultimately, it goes back to knowledgeable producers educating others about the beef industry. With the consumer preference being easily swayed by food safety marketing campaigns, it is more important now than ever before to make sure consumers are aware of the facts about the products they are purchasing. Although there are numerous ways for the public to be educated on the ins and outs of the beef industry and beef production, the most influential way is for producers to share their stories and first hand experiences, backed up by the facts. This can be done through social media, participating in marketing campaigns, or even simply just getting out there and being willing to educate others about the agriculture industry. By increasing consumer knowledge, misconceptions about the beef industry can be put to rest as the facts about beef production are shared. We can all do our part by sharing our story and promoting our beef. Tyson Black, Foresters Falls, ON Intermediate– 1st

What do you see as the most effective means to reach and educate consumers about the beef industry. In today’s world the most effective way to communicate important information to a large number of people in a very short period of time is the use of social media. A very current example of the beef industry using social media is the Earl’s Restaurant chain versus Canadian beef farmers. Late in April 2016 the Canadian restaurant chain “Earls” changed all of its beef from Canadian to American. Earls claimed that 61


Canadian beef was killed inhumanly and contained antibiotics. This brought a huge uproar from Canadian beef farmers. Earls made this claim public to everyone. I think that what Earls said was untrue to what really happens with Canadian beef. I think this because with the Earls debate, farmers and other citizens took to social media and spread the word which caused Earls to lose many customers. By early May the backlash against the Earls restaurant chain through social media got the attention of Earls president Mo Jessa. On May 4th Earls apologized for its plans to get all beef from the US. “Everybody wants Canadian beef back at Earls restaurants, so that’s what we decided to do”, stated by Earls president Mo Jessa. (1) The Canadian Beef industry took Earl’s change in policy to newspapers and television which is the normal way to educate the public about things that are going on. But they also took to social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter to inform the public of Earls decision to no longer use Canadian beef in Canadian restaurants. A photo shared to Facebook with the slogan “If Earl’s doesn’t want Alberta beef it doesn’t want my business” got over 8500 “likes” and 1800 “comments”. Earls president Mo Jessa said “Really, with all the conversations that Albertans have been having online and through social media and all the channels that we’ve been listening to... we reached out to Alberta beef producers, and heard what they had to say and it’s pretty clear to me that we had to do something, we had to make a change.”(1) This is an example of a success story using social media. Unfortunately social media can also work against you. Bad or misinformation can also be spread quickly. And if it’s on the internet it must be true. Right? As an active participant on social media you must be aware of false information that could hurt the beef industry, and correct any misinformation if possible. On a much smaller scale we use social media as a means of promoting 62

our farm, bull sale and other upcoming events. We feel this is a very effective way to promote and educate the consumer about our little corner of the beef industry. Footnote: (1) Western Producer May 4, 2016

Calina Evans, Kenaston, SK Intermediate - 2nd Place

Beef: Connecting and Educating the Consumer The beef industry is one of the strongest industries in the world and an essential source of food for billions of people. Without it, we would struggle is to feed our ever-growing population. With such a significant industry, it is very important that we make sure consumers are educated about it. Three highly effective ways to do this are through social media, though grocery store marketing campaigns, and through educating others by educating yourself first. These are all ways we can present the consumer with the right facts and ensure a strong future for our industry. One of the most efficient and growing methods of reaching and informing consumers is through social media, a huge part of promoting agriculture. You have probably seen the hashtags#ag365 or #agmorethanever which are both part of programs that work towards sharing ag stories. Social media reaches many people and is an easy way for others to learn about your life on the farm. Consumers have access to learn about where their beef was raised, their grain was harvested and their dairy products manufactured; all this information is at their fingertips. By sharing information about your farm and what you do you can help people get a better understanding of what really goes into the products we put on the shelves of the grocery stores. Getting food to the consumer takes a lot of work and this is often not realized by people uninvolved in agriculture. For my own agriculture involvement and use of social media, my farm is accessible on social media Charolais Banner • February 2017

which allows us to not only connect with customers, but to connect with anyone who may come across it. This use of social media is a way of promoting our farm and the safety practices and care that go along with it. Recently grocery stores such as Co-op, have launched a new campaign called “At Home”; its focus is to educate consumers about the beef industry. There are three main components to the campaign, which consists of “grown at home”, “raised at home”, and “produced at home”. Co-op is working with local farmers to create signs beside certain beef products that share information about where it came from and who is responsible for it. There is a QR Code that can be scanned and leads to video information as well as a write up about the farm. This helps consumers identify with the producers, their families and how they make a living. This additional information educates the public about where their food comes from as opposed to just buying it off the shelf. I think this campaign enables consumers to connect with these family run farms and appreciate the hard work put into it. One of the most effective ways of promoting our beef industry to others, though, is educating yourself so you are able to educate others. This strategy for improving awareness and understanding of our industry is huge. There is no one better to tell your story than you, but you must know the facts so you can better inform others. Being able to explain GMO’s, hormones and the way beef is raised in Canada is a valuable asset in consumer education. If we don’t educate consumers with the correct factual information about agriculture and our products other groups such as PETA (People for Ethical Treatment of Animals) or individuals with other agendas will spread false information. Consumers and producers must build a positive relationship. The consumer needs to trust the producer and feel confident about where their beef is coming from. Having the right facts to share with them is essential to building trust. The beef industry is growing and


must continue to expand. By 2050 it is projected the world will need 70% more food and we can provide that. Without consumer support, though, our industry cannot prosper and our contribution to the world’s food supply will decrease. Agriculture has been around for hundreds and hundreds of years, and we hope this continues for hundreds more. Our efforts to grow the industry and educate society about it will have a big impact on our future. This industry is the lives of many people all over the world and is about more than just the food itself. As Thomas Jefferson once said, “Agriculture is our wisest pursuit, because it will in the end contribute most to real wealth, good morals, and happiness”. Jorja Beck, Milestone, SK Junior – 1st Place

All About The Beef Kids in my class just think that beef is an animal or food but they do not realize it is a lot more. I would teach my classmates the truth about the beef industry. In advertising or social media there are constantly lies or halftruths about beef and agriculture. For example the A&W lie, by A&W saying their beef is raised without the use of hormones or steroids people think the A&W burgers are healthier for you. What people don’t know is that A&W beef does not come from Canada and every animal has hormones. Do people really want to take in diseases? They don’t. We give our cattle medicine when they are sick so they don’t suffer and can get better. There is a law about waiting a certain amount of time after antibiotics before cattle can be butchered. People are convinced and are not told the truth about the antibiotic free advertising. There are lies everywhere around the beef industry, like the myth around all natural. When saying beef is all natural, that is right if it’s made with 100% beef. But, like every beef producer, their food is 100% beef. They just don’t call it natural because that is common sense. It’s time people

knew the truth. I would also teach my class about animal care by bringing them to my farm. Different farmers take care of their animals differently, but most producers care for their cattle, and some cattle are spoiled rotten. It depends on the beef producer you talk to. Different people have different ways of caring for beef. Some farmers are nice and loving to their animals, and for some beef producers it’s all about the money. People might feed their cattle or treat them differently but no matter what, cattle have to be fed, have clean water, and a shelter for the winter. I would teach my class that beef producers sell animals in Canada or all across the world. The beef can make hamburger, steak, ribs and a lot more. Beef puts food on the table for a lot of people. Most people know that beef cattle make good food but it has some pretty cool uses too. The bones of cattle can make jewelry, utensils, and cups. The hooves can make dog treats, gelatin, photograph coating, and fire extinguisher foam. The fat can make rubber tires, soap and dynamite. The ear and tail hair can make paint brushes, the lungs can make heparin, the Andriel glands can make steroids and, the pancreas can make insulin. The intestines can be made into tennis racket strings. Insulin is medicine for diabetics so, a cow can basically save someone’s life! Beef does not just have a lot of cool uses, the beef industry is a job and a big group of people wake up every day, rain, snow or shine, ready to work and dedicate their life to make grade A beef. The beef industry has given many people jobs, and have changed some people’s lives. It’s one of the things that keeps the economy, agriculture, and Ag business strong. Without beef some people would be lost. It’s a job that can keep their family strong with income and not starving to death. Imagine if there was no beef business, no cattle producers and cattle didn’t exist. Many people would lose their job, their way of life, their economy and the food they eat. Everything would be lost in a bunch of important people’s world. A beef producer is a job that thousands of Charolais Banner • February 2017

people have across the world. Agriculture is not just about economy, food and jobs. It’s also about education, farmers get up every day and can learn something new. The future farmers learn every day about working on the farm and get better and braver about doing tasks on the farm. Just like generations, and generations of beef farmers did before them. People who don’t live on a farm need to learn about agriculture and the beef industry too because there are good life lessons. The beef industry is a community of people, and you can make long life friendships with a human or even an animal. For the beef industry there’s a whole bunch of people, some you know and work with, and some you don’t. But, at the end of the day, the only thing that matters is you produce the best beef you can. All of the beef producers have the same goal in mind, to make and produce fresh grade A quality beef. To teach the kids in my class about beef, I would bring samples of beef to my classroom and teach them the difference between A&W beef, ‘all natural’ beef, and my homegrown beef. Children could tour our farm and see what caring for a beef animal is like. I would spread the truth on social media and make true advertisements, and have a YouTube channel with news about the beef industry. I will teach young people about beef and when people are educated they make decisions based on facts. Lilyanne Bouffard, Stanstead, QC Junior – 2nd

How Would You Teach Your Classmates About Beef Have you ever gone to the store with your mom or dad and gone into the meat aisle and been surprised at how many cuts of beef there are? I have! And since I love to cook and eat, it interests me even more. Let me start with the basics, beef comes from cows. There are over forty cuts of beef. To find which part of the cow your meat 63


comes from I have set up a diagram of a cow below:

Beginning with the chuck, that is where the chuck roast and pot roast come from. Next comes the rib section which has ribs of course! and also rib steak, followed by the short loin,

sirloin, tender loin, top loin and bottom sirloin. These sections are the most tender it is also where you find the most steaks for example T- bone steak, sirloin steak, filet mignon and rib eye steak. Boy my mouth is watering!! Next comes the round or rump of the cow this is where we find round steak, rolled rump roast and bottom round steak. The bottom parts like the brisket, short plate, flank and shank are where we tend to find the tougher meats, ones that need to be marinated or cooked slowly like beef cubes and sometimes they are put into hamburger. These are just a few of the many

choices you have when at the grocery store. Knowing about your beef and where it comes from is very important. Choose wisely and locally! Beef has many healthy nutrients like protein, vitamins like B3 (Niacin) which if you don’t get enough of it increases risk of heart disease. B12 which helps with brain functions and the nervous system and minerals like zinc that helps with body growth and maintenance. Beef also contains iron and selenium. Overall beef tastes good and with a little seasoning and a hot grill it tastes even better. Now I’m hungry! Where’s the beef??

CANADIAN CHAROLAIS YOUTH ASSOCIATION NEWS

2017 Winter Meeting News Wyatt Ching, Vice-President

Hi everyone! I’m Wyatt Ching, Vice President of the Canadian Charolais Youth Association National Board. The National Board met in Saskatoon for its annual winter meeting on January 7, where we discussed all things CCYA. We reviewed and made some improvements to the many programs CCYA offers youth members. We reviewed the Genetics program, the Buy and Show program, discussed the upcoming conference and started developing a youth travel scholarship. We made some improvements to CCYA NATIONAL BOARD charolaisyouth@gmail.com President: Shae-Lynn Evans evans32s@uregina.ca Vice-President: Wyatt Ching w.ching476@gmail.com Treasurer: Courtney Black cblack04@mail.uoguelph.ca Secretary: Tomina Jackson tomina.jackson@gmail.com

simplify the Genetics program and I strongly encourage all youth members to apply. The Genetics program allows youth members to receive two straws of semen on any Charolais bull available through Semex and Genex for free. The application deadline is February 15, 2017, and applications can be found on our website at youth.charolais.com and emailed to myself at w.ching476@gmail.com. The Buy and Show program was another program we discussed. This program allows youth members to receive a $50 rebate when they purchase a purebred Charolais or Charcross heifer or steer, and Director: Aidan Jamieson awjamieson@gmail.com Director: Megan McLeod rmegan.mcleod@usask.ca Director: Shelby Evans sle379@mail.usask.ca Director: Keegan Blehm keegb34@yahoo.ca 2016 CCYA Conference & Show Executive President: Courtney Black cblack04@mail.uoguelph.ca

additional rebates are also available if the animal is shown. With few applications received in the past few years, I encourage all youth members buying animals to take advantage of it. Application forms and details about the program can be found on our website at youth.charolais.com. We discussed the successful 2016 conference in Olds, Alberta, and got an update on the progress planning the 2017 conference. The 2017 conference will be held in Barrie, Ontario, August 2 to 5. We look forward to seeing many of you there! Happy calving. Secretary: Tayler Aldcorn Treasurer: Sarah Wyville CCYA Provincial Advisors SK: Suzanne Smyth | suzannetylersmyth@gmail.com ON: Billie-Jo Saunders | dbjsaunders@gmail.com MB: Donna Jackson | Jackson7@mymts.net AB: Kasey Phillips | kphillips@mcsnet.ca Youth Coordinator: Kirstin Sparrow kp.sparrow@hotmail.com

Plan to Attend… Canadian Charolais Youth Association Conference and Show August 2-5, 2017 • Barrie, ON 64

Charolais Banner • February 2017


Services

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GOOD ANCHOR CHAROLAIS HOME OF “GOOD” CATTLE! Don Good and Marion Smyth Box 3261, Vermilion, AB T9X 2B2 780.853.2220 • Don.marion.good@gmail.com

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IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES IN OUR INDUSTRY

Calendar of Events February 25 Quebec Select Bull Sale, Ferme A.R.F. Champagne, St-Sylvestre, QC

March 7 Built Right Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Provost (AB) Livestock Exchange

February 16 Wilkie Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Stettler (AB) Auction Mart

February 25 SanDan Charolais/Springside Farms 20th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Erskine, AB

March 9 Buffalo Lake Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Stettler (AB) Auction Mart

February 18 P & H Ranching 5th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart

February 26 Pro-Char and Guests 6th Annual Bull Sale, at the farm, Glenevis, AB

February 20 Tip the Scale Angus & Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Vikse Family Farm, Donalda, AB

March 3 36th Annual Select Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart

February 11 Myhre Land & Cattle Co. Bull Sale (Denbie Ranch & Guests) Ste. Rose du Lac, MB

February 21 Rawe Ranches 34th Annual Performance Tested Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the ranch, Strome, AB February 22 Beck Farms & McCoy Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Milestone, SK February 22 McLeod Livestock & Kay-R Land & Livestock Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Olds (AB) Cow Palace February 22 Saddleridge Charolais with Kaiser Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping, Brooks, AB February 24 Maple Leaf Charolais 13th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Ponoka (AB) Ag Events Centre February 24 HEJ Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart

March 4 Ferme Louber Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Ste-Marie de Beauce, QC March 4 High Country Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Pincher Creek (AB) Ag Grounds March 4 Wrangler Made 5th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Westlock, AB

March 10 A. Sparrow Farms Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., on the farm, Vanscoy, SK March 10 Footprint Farms Charolais Power Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Dryland Cattle Trading Corp, Veteran, AB March 10 13th Annual Northern Classic Bull Sale, Grand Prairie, AB March 10 Neilson Cattle Co. 27th Annual Bull Sale, at the farm, Willowbrook, SK March 10 Three Choice Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Balog Auction, Lethbridge, AB

March 4 Chomiak Charolais Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Viking (AB) Auction Market

March 11 Horseshoe E Charolais Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK

March 5-6 98th Pride of the Prairies Bull Show & Sale, Lloydminster (SK) Exhibition Grounds

March 11 Benchmark Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Renfrew Pontiac Livestock Facility, Cobden, ON

March 6 Coyote Flats Charolais 2nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coaldale, AB

March 11 Source For Success Bull Sale, Elmlodge Herefords, Indian River, ON

March 7 RRTS Charolais Bull Sale, 12:30 p.m., BC Livestock Co-op, Kamloops, BC Charolais Banner • February 2017

March 11 Northern Impact IV Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., North Central Livestock Exchange, Clyde, AB 71


March 12 Steppler Farms 6th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB March 13 Palmer Charolais 6th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Bladworth, SK March 14 6th Annual McTavish and Guest Charolais & Red Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Moosomin, SK

March 20 Grassroots Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Dryland Trading Corp., Veteran, AB

March 26 Best of the Breeds Bull sale, 2:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Yorkton, SK

March 21 15th Annual Diamond W Charolais, Red & Black Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Minitonas, MB

March 26 Candiac Choice Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Candiac (SK) Auction Mart

March 21 Gilliland Bros. Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Carievale, SK

March 14 Harvie Ranching Bull Sale, at the ranch, Olds, AB

March 22 HTA Charolais & Guest Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB

March 16 McKeary Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping, Brooks, AB

March 23 Elder Charolais 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coronach, SK

March 17 Family Tradition Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at Rolling D Charolais, Dropmore, MB

March 24 Alameda Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Alameda (SK) Auction Mart

March 17 Reese Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart

March 24 Seven Quarter Circle Charolais and Charmil Ranching Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Williams Lake (BC) Stockyards

March 17 Thistle Ridge Ranch Bull Sale, Taber (AB) Agriplex March 18 Pleasant Dawn Charolais 15th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock. Virden, MB March 18 Rollin’ Acres/Patton/Whiskey Hollow & Guests 7th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Maple Hill Auctions, Hanover, ON March 18 Ferme Palerme Charolais Bull Sale, Vinoy Test Station, 1:00 p.m., at Ferme Gagnon, Cheneville, QC March 18 Select Genetics Bull Sale, at Forsyth Angus, Herbert, SK March 18 Canada’s Red, White & Black Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK March 18 North Central Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., North Central Livestock Exchange, Clyde, AB March 20 North West Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Kramer’s Big Bid Barn, North Battleford, SK 72

March 25 High Point Charolais Bull Sale, 6:00 p.m., at Sunrise Charolais, Stayner, ON March 25 Impact Angus & Charolais Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales March 25 K-Cow Ranch Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the ranch, Elk Point, AB March 25 PIC Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Carson Sales Arena, Listowel, ON March 25 Borderland Cattle Company Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the ranch, Rockglen, SK

March 27 Allanville Farms Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Tisdale, SK March 28 Prairie Distinction Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB March 28 Poplar Bluff Stock Farm & Twin Anchor Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Dryland Trading Corp., Veteran, AB April 1 Tri-N Charolais Farms & Guests Bull Sale, 2 p.m.,Heartland Livestock,Virden, MB April 1 Vermilion Charolais Group 30th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Nilsson Bros. Livestock Exchange, Vermilion, AB April 1 Maritime Bull Test Station Sale, at the test station, Nappan, NS April 1 Saunders Charolais 12th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Keady (ON) Livestock Market April 1 JTA Diamond Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Courval, SK April 1 Transcon’s 21st Annual Advantage Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales

March 25 Transcon’s Mountainview Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart

April 3 14th Annual North of the 49th Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at Wilgenbusch Charolais, Halbrite, SK

March 25 Tee M Jay Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Ashern (MB) Auction Mart

April 3 Martens Cattle Co/Four Bar X Ranch Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Spiritwood (SK) Stockyards

March 25 Cornerview Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Renfrew Pontiac Livestock Facility, Cobden,

April 3 Lazy S Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., VJV Auction Mart, Beaverlodge, AB

March 25 Lazy S Cattle Co. Limousin & Charolais Bull Sale, 6:00 p.m., VJV Auction Mart, Rimbey, AB Charolais Banner • February 2017

April 4 Cedarlea Farms at Git ‘R Done Bull Sale, at Windy Willows, Hodgeville, SK


April 5 White Cap/Rosso Charolais & Howe Red Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at White Cap Charolais, Moose Jaw, SK

April 15 Brimner Cattle Co. at Cornerstone Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart

April 5 Chopper K Red Angus & Campbell Charolais Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Alameda (SK) Auction Mart

April 15 Cedardale Charolais 14th Annual Bull & Select Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Nestleton, ON

April 6 Hunter Charolais 5th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Roblin, MB

April 15 Cattle Capital Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Ste. Rose (MB) Auction Mart

April 6 Ringuette Charolais Annual Bull Sale, 12 Noon, Atlantic Stock Yards, Truro, NS April 8 Vanderhoof (BC) Bull Sale April 8 Eastern Select Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Hoards Station Sale Barn, Campbellford, ON April 8 Wilkenridge & Guest Walking Plow Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Ridgeville (MB) Hall April 11 Top Cut Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Stockman’s Weigh Co., Mankota, SK

April 15 Lindskov-Thiel Bull Sale, at the ranch, Isabel, SD May 28-June 2 Charolais International Technical Conference, Monterrey, Mexico June 9 & 10 Canadian Charolais Association Annual General Meeting, Saskatoon (SK) Inn July 28 & 29 Saskatchewan Charolais Association Annual General Meeting & Pen Show, Moose Jaw, SK August 2-6 Canadian Charolais Youth Association Conference and Show, Barrie, ON

April 13 Sliding Hill Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 at the farm, Canora, SK

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LOOKING TO FIND SOMEONE?

Advertisers Index Amabec Charolais ..........................................68

Footprint Farms ............................................66

Parklane Charolais .........................................67

Annuroc Charolais .........................................68

Fun Bus Syndicate ..........................................23

Patton Charolais ............................................69

B Bar D Charolais ...........................................68

Future Farms ..................................................66

Phillips Farms .................................................70

Baker Farms....................................................68

Gerrard Cattle Co...........................................66

Pleasant Dawn Charolais.......................5,33,68

Bar H Charolais ..............................................69

Gilliland Bros. Charolais ................................70

Potter Charolais .............................................69

Bar Punch Ranch ............................................66

Good Anchor Charolais .................................66

Prairie Cove Consulting .................................65

Beck Farms ..................................................9,69

H.S. Knill Company Ltd..................................65

Prairie Gold Charolais....................................70

BeRich Farms.................................................66

Happy Haven Charolais .................................67

ProChar Charolais .........................................67

Blackbern Charolais .......................................68

Harcourt Charolais.........................................70

Qualman Charolais .......................................70

BoJan Enterprises .........................................69

Hard Rock Land & Cattle Co.....................23,68

R Lazy B Ranch ...............................................19

Borderland Cattle Co.....................................69

Harvie Ranching ............................................66

Raffan, Don....................................................65

BovaTech Ltd.................................................65

HEJ Charolais .................................................66

Rawes Ranches...............................................67

Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. ...............................65

Hicks Charolais ...............................................68

RBM Livetock .................................................19

Bricney Stock Farms .......................................69

High Bluff Stock Farm ...................................68

Rebuild with Steel .........................................65

Bridor Charolais .............................................68

Holk Charolais................................................66

Reeleder, Andrew ..........................................65

Brimner Cattle Company...............................69

Hopewell Charolais........................................70

Reykdal Farms Charolais................................68

Buffalo Lake Charolais .................................66

Horseshoe E Charolais ..............................15,70

Rollin' Acres Charolais ...................................69

By Livestock.................................................OBC

HTA Charolais Farm ......................................68

Rosso Charolais ..............................................70

Carey, Brent....................................................65

Hunter Charolais ....................................68,IBC

Royale Charolais ............................................69

Cedardale Charolais.......................................68

JMB Charolais ...........................................23,68

RRTS Charolais ...............................................67

Cedarlea Farms ..............................................70

Johnson Charolais..........................................66

Saddleridge Farming Co................................67

Charla Moore Farms ......................................70

Johnstone Auction.........................................65

SanDan Charolais Farms ................................67

CharMaine Ranching...............................31,66

Kaiser Cattle Co. ............................................66

Saunders Charolais ........................................69

Charolais Banner....................................5,16,19

Kanewischer, Jerry .........................................65

Scarth Cattle Co. ............................................68

Charolais Charbray Herdbook of Mexico .....54

KayR Land & Cattle Ltd. ............................7,66

Semex .............................................................35

Charolais Journal ...........................................65

KCH Charolais ................................................67

Serhienko/Voegeli Cattle Co. ........................70

Charworth Charolais Farms...........................66

Kirlene Cattle .................................................68

Sharodon Farms ..........................................7,69

Chomiak Charolais ........................................66

La Ferme Patry de Weedon ......................29,69

Skeels, Danny .................................................65

Circle Cee Charolais Farms ............................66

Land O' Lakes Charolais ................................68

Sliding Hills Charolais ....................................70

Cline Cattle Co. ..............................................67

Langstaff Charolais........................................69

Southview Farms............................................69

Cockburn Farms .............................................68

Laurel Creek Ranch........................................70

A. Sparrow Farms..........................................IFC

Cougar Hill Ranch ..........................................70

Leemar Charolais ...........................................67

Springside Farms............................................67

Coyote Flats Charolais ..............................25,66

LEJ Charolais ..................................................68

Spruceview Charolais.....................................67

Creek's Edge Land & Cattle Co. ...............33,70

LindskovThiel Charolais Ranch ..........16,19,71

Stephen Charolais Farm ................................70

C2 Charolais ...................................................67

M & L Cattle Co..............................................69

Steppler Farms Ltd. ....................................3,68

DavisRairdan .................................................65

Mack's Charolais ............................................69

Stock, Mark ....................................................65

Defoort Stock Farm .......................................67

Maple Leaf Charolais.....................................67

Stockmen's Insurance ....................................66

Demarah Farms..............................................70

Martens Cattle Co..........................................70

Sugarloaf Charolais ..................................37,67

Diamond W Charolais....................................70

Martens Charolais..........................................68

Sunrise Charolais............................................69

Dorran, Ryan ..................................................65

McAvoy Charolais Farm............................27,70

T Bar C Cattle Co.......................................66,73

Double L Ranch..............................................66

McKay Charolais ............................................68

Temple Farms .................................................70

Double P Stock Farms ....................................67

McKeary Charolais .........................................67

Thistle Ridge Ranch .......................................67

Dubuc Charolais.............................................69

McLeod Livestock...........................................65

Transcon Livestock Corp. ...............................66

DudgeonSnobelen Land & Cattle................68

McTavish Farms ..............................................70

TriN Charolais................................................68

Eaton Charolais..............................................71

Medonte Charolais ........................................69

Turnbull Charolais..........................................67

Edge, Dean.....................................................65

Miller Land & Livestock .................................69

Western Litho ................................................66

Elder Charolais Farms .................................7,70

Murphy Livestock...........................................67

Whiskey Hollow Cattle Company .................69

Ericson Livestock Services ..............................65

Mutrie Farms..................................................70

White Cap Charolais ......................................70

Ferme Palerme ...............................................69

Myhre Land and Cattle..................................68

WhiteWater Livestock ...................................69

Fischer Charolais ............................................66

Nahachewsky Charolais.................................70

Wilgenbusch Charolais..........................71,OBC

Flat Valley Cattle Co. .....................................66

Norheim Ranching.........................................65

Wilkie Ranch ..................................................67

Fleury, Michael...............................................65

P & H Ranching Co.........................................67

Wood River Charolais ...................................71

Flewelling, Craig ............................................65

Packer Charolais.............................................69

WPLB Charolais ..............................................39

Foat Valley Stock Farm ..................................66

Palmer Charolais ............................................70

Wrangler Charolais........................................67

74

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