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August 2019 VOL. 53, NO. 3 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Ph. (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Home Page: http://www.charolaisbanner.com email: charolaisbanner@gmail.com ISSN 0824-1767

Features

Helge By, Manager/Publisher

Maritime AGM Tour ................................................................20 New Mexico Livestock Production..........................................26 Honour Roll – Jack McAffee ..................................................34 Alberta Charolais Summer Tour ............................................54 Saskatchewan Charolais AGM ................................................56 Charolais Banner Hires Chomik ..............................................58 Obituary – Yvonne By..............................................................62 CCA New Members..................................................................64 Esau Inducted to Manitoba Agriculture Hall of Fame ..........66 Obituary – Richard Smith ........................................................66 Honour Roll – Louis & Benoit Leblanc....................................68 Obituary – Roger Goldsmith ..................................................70 Obituary – Arlane Parsonage..................................................70 Obituary – Everett Laboucan ..................................................70

Candace By, Managing Editor charolaisbanner@gmail.com Cell 306-536-3374 @ByCandace Susan Penner, Production/Design charolais.susan@sasktel.net Dalyse Robertson, Web Design Box 2458, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0 Ph/Fax (204) 476-8856 pdmrobertson@gmail.com Sarah Wright, Admin Cell (306) 831-6332 charolaisbanner2@gmail.com FIELDMEN: Helge By Office Fax (306) 546-3942 Res (306) 584-7937 • Cell (306) 536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com @CharolaisBanner Jon Wright Cell (306) 807-8424 charoaisbanner2@gmail.com

Departments From the Field............................................................................8 Dans nos champs ....................................................................10 Keeping Track ..........................................................................16 Herd Health ............................................................................32 Profile  Hedi Trescher ............................................................36 Canadian Beef Breeds Council Report ..................................58 Charolais Life ..........................................................................60 Road Tales ................................................................................64 Canadian Charolais Youth Association News ........................68 Magazine Rates and Deadlines ..............................................80 Calendar of Events ..................................................................81 Index of Advertisers ................................................................82

Robbie Chomik Cell (780) 336-6424 charolaisbanner3@gmail.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Payable by credit card at www.charolaisbanner.com

All Rates Are Listed In Canadian Funds Canada (Canadian prices include 5% GST) 1 yr. - $52.50 3 yrs. - $136.50 USA 1 yr. - $80, 1st class (2 week delivery) - $140 3 yrs. - $215, 1st class (2 week deliver) - $395 Overseas 1 yr. - $85, 1st class (2 week delivery)- $150 3 yrs. - $225, 1st class (2 week delivery)- $420

Animals in the photographs in the Banner have not been altered by computer enhancement or mechanical methods according to the knowledge of the publisher.

On the cover… Photo taken at Hunter Charolais

The material produced in this publication is done so with the highest integrity, however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. We are responsible for only the value of the advertisement. Charolais Banner (ISSN 0824-1767) is published 5 times per year (February, May, Aug, Oct and December) by Charolais Banner Inc., Regina, SK. Postage paid at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Printed by: Western Litho Printers Ltd. Publication No. 40047726 Registration No. 9810

Photo: Helge By Design: Susan Penner

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Return undeliverable addresses (covers only) to: Charolais Banner 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Canada charolaisbanner@gmail.com

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POINTS TO PONDER

From the Field Helge By

First off, thank you for the feedback on my May editorial on decision deferred semen tests. Comments like “best editorial you have written,” “I have been watching this for a few years and agree,” “never thought about it, but yes there are some correlations.” As I had said in the editorial it isn’t scientific with enough data, but boots on the ground and observing can provide many answers to breeding better cattle. The more you analyze the more you will see and the tougher the conditions, the more pronounced they will be. Over the years, we have had the opportunity to work with many breeders of varying success and life spans in the industry. The most successful had one thing in common. They all wanted to learn and improve. It is such a joy to work with people who are open to new ideas and challenge their beliefs. The flip side of this is the people who do things because 'this is the way we have always done it' and complain about things to make conversation. Which person would you prefer to work with? Be that person. Try something new. Go a day without saying a negative thing about anything. How hard this is for you will be a measure of how negative you are. There is always a pleasant way to say something. Would you like a judge to say your cattle are just plain bad, or would you prefer they say your cattle have a good quality but need a little improvement in one area? Marketing will come much more easily if you are positive and nice to people. Being open enough to listen to ideas and possibly consider them is a way to move forward.

Don't get stuck in a negative mindset, stay positive and look for the bright side in everything. As Zig Zigler said, "What you think about, you bring about; so be very careful what you think." Have you done any customer follow up this summer to see how the bulls you sold are holding up in pastures and making sure they are working? You can never talk to your customers too much, even if it is just a text. Also, it is amazing how many bulls are sold after the bulls go out to breed because of injuries or foot rot, etc. Many breeders we visited this summer sold a lot of bulls after the sale season, many bull pens are empty and much of this is due to customer relations. There have even been breeders telling stories of giving a customer use of one of their herd bulls to make sure they get their cows bred and come back to buy their bulls. A quote I read recently was good “the extra mile is the hardest, but the most rewarding.” It has been an interesting spring and summer weather wise right across the country. Too wet, then dry in the east. Very dry to too wet in some areas of the west, but from the 1st of June to the middle of July, it seems like the feed situation is not as desperate as it appeared to be and things are progressing well in most areas. We had a great trip to the Maritimes for the CCA AGM and tour and there is a full report of these events in this issue. The Maritime hospitality was great, and the quality of the cattle was impressive and unexpected by many who had never been there before. Keep up the good work down there. By the time you read this, many of you will be starting to get the show

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Charolais Banner • August 2019

strings picked for fall. Weaning early and getting the groceries into them is very important to show the genetics you have to their fullest potential. The National Show and Sale are in Toronto this fall and if you have never been to the show, try to make it. You won’t be disappointed in the quality of the cattle or the presentation of the show. Excuses be gone in getting to some of the fall events and bringing out some cattle to promote the breed and your operation. Also in this issue you will see the announcement of our newest employee with the Charolais Banner. Robbie Chomik from Bruce, Alberta, started in June and it has been great touring around Alberta introducing him and getting through some of the great herds that are there. If you haven’t met him at some of the events, please introduce yourself. You will find him very easy to visit with and we look forward to working with him. Well, it is time to welcome the nine international young adults from six countries that are coming to be part of the Canadian Charolais Youth Conference in Weyburn and do some herd tours for a few days. There will be full coverage of the event and their participation in the October issue. Then we are off to the World Technical Conference in Ireland in early August and will also cover this interesting event in the October issue. The next issue we are working on is the Fall Connection and it is a great place to thank your bull buyers and start the promotion of your offering next spring. If Robbie, Jon or I can help in any way, please let us know. Until next time, Helge


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DES POINTS À RÉFLÉCHIR

Dans nos champs Helge By

En premier lieu, je tiens à remercier ceux qui m’ont partagé leurs commentaires sur l’éditorial du mois de mai en ce qui concernait mon opinion qui suggérait le délai des test de semences sur les taureaux après un hiver froid. Certains d’entre vous pense que c’était le meilleur éditorial que j’ai écrit. Une autre personne a ajouté que les facteurs discutés explique les divers résultats or observe que le tout fait du sens. Tout comme décrit dans l’article, mes données ne sont pas scientifiques mais pour ceux qui côtoient les taureaux jours après jours, ceci apporte une certaine crédibilité à la théorie. Avec plus d’analyse rassemblée et en notant l’endroit des conditions les plus froides qui se sont produites, nous pourrons identifier une hausse d’échec des test de semences. Au fil des années, nous avons la chance de travailler avec plusieurs éleveurs de multiples races et des producteurs avec des carrières de variantes durées. Ceux qui ont connu le succès ont le même point en commun; le désir d’apprendre et de s’améliorer. Travailler avec des gens qui sont ouverts aux nouvelles idées et qui affrontent les obstacles lorsqu’ils se présentent m’apporte beaucoup de joie. De l’autre côté, on retrouve les personnes qui se plaigne de faire les choses comme ils les ont toujours fait et iront à s’en plaindre comme sujet de conversation. Quelle personne aimeriez- vous mieux être? Essayez quelque chose de nouveau! Essayer de passer une journée entière sans commentaire négatif. Ce défi représentera votre niveau de négativité. Il y a toujours une manière de dire ce que nous voulons dire avec un peu plus d’affinité. Aimeriez-vous que le juge présente ses commentaires sur votre animal avec un seul adjectif négatif sans ajouter une critique constructive? Vos techniques de vente 10

s’amélioreront avec une attitude positive et avec de l’entregent. Gardez une ouverture aux suggestions et être attentifs aux idées des autres est un bon début. Il y a un côté positif à tout. Comme Zig Zigler a dit: Ce que vous pensez, vous dégagez alors réfléchissez à ce que vous penser. Avez-vous eu la chance de faire un suivi sur les taureaux que vous avez vendu ce printemps? Quel est le résultat et la performance de ceux-ci au champ? Vous ne pouvez jamais trop parler à vos clients. Même juste un petit texto suffit. Il est surprenant d’apprendre qu’une bonne quantité de taureaux sont vendus aussitôt la reproduction terminée. Certains d’entre eux souffrent de blessures, de piétin etc. Plusieurs éleveurs que nous avons croisé cet été ont admis avoir vendu leur taureau après la saison, laissant les enclos vident. Ceci représente un bon signe du rapport entre producteur et vos clients. On m’a même raconté que certains producteurs prêtaient au client leur taureau pour s’assurer de la reproduction et que le client est revenu plus tard pour acheter ce taureau. Je vous partage l’énoncé que j’ai lis: L’effort supplémentaire est la plus difficile mais la plus enrichissante. Le printemps et le début de l’été a varié du côté température à travers notre pays. Un début pluvieux passant au très sec pour l’est. Trop sec et ensuite trop mouillé pour certaines régions de l’ouest mais de la mi-juin à la mi-juillet, les conditions des semences semblent être moins endommagées qu’on le croyait et les gains continuent. Nous avons eu un voyage formidable dans les maritimes lors de la réunion annuelle de l’association Charolais et des visites de fermes. Nous vous partageons un résumé de l’événement dans cette publication. L’hospitalité des maritimes était merveilleuse et la qualité des troupeaux en a pris certains par surprise. Continuer votre beau travail! Lorsque vous lirez ces quelques lignes, plusieurs d’entre vous aurons Charolais Banner • August 2019

choisi vos sujets pour les expositions d’automne. Un sevrage hâtif et une bonne nutrition est très importante pour s’assurer de montrer le potentiel maximum de la génétique. La vente Nationale aura lieu à Toronto cet automne et je vous suggère d’y aller faire un tour. La qualité des sujets exposés vous décevra pas. Il a pas d’excuse à ne pas participer à ces événements. Venez encourager les exposants ou apporter vos propres sujets afin de promouvoir votre élevage et notre race. Dans ce numéro, on vous présente le nouveau membre de l’équipe du Charolais Banner. Robbie Chomik, de Bruce en Alberta s’est joint à notre équipe depuis le mois de juin. Il a fait le tour de l’Alberta avec nous et il a eu la chance de faire la connaissance de troupeaux exceptionnels. Si vous n’avez pas encore eu la chance de faire sa connaissance à l’un de nos événements, soyez pas gêné et venir lui dire bonjour. Bruce est simple et très approchable et nous avons hâte de travailler ensemble. Il est maintenant le temps d’accueillir neuf jeunes adultes de six pays différents lors de la conférence des jeunes éleveurs (CCYA) qui se déroule à Weyburn en Saskatchewan. Nous ferons la visite de plusieurs troupeaux. Nous revisiterons leur participation dans le numéro du mois d’octobre. Nous participerons à la conférence technique mondiale en Irlande au début du mois d’août. Nous partagerons aussi les points forts de cet conférence au mois d’octobre. Sous peu, nous préparons l’édition d’automne de Fall Connections. Un mot de remerciement aux acheteurs qui étaient à votre vente du printemps ou encore une annonce qui décrit ce que vous pensez offrir au printemps est un bon endroit pour vous faire connaître. En tout temps, Robbie, Jon et moi sommes à votre disposition. Il suffit de nous le demander. À la prochaine, Helge


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AUGUST 2019 2320 - 41st Avenue N.E., Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 T: (403) 250-9242 • F: (403) 291-9324 www.charolais.com The 2019 newly elected Board of Directors: President: Mike Elder, Coronach, SK First Vice President: Kasey Phillips, Waskatenau, AB Second Vice President: Shawn Airey, Rivers, MB Past President: Darwin Rosso, Moose Jaw, SK Directors: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau, QC Roger Maloney, Indian River, ON Jim Olsen, Portage la Prairie, MB Lorne Lakusta, Andrew, AB Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton, ON Rod McLeod , Cochrane, AB SAVE THE DATE for the Canadian National Show and Sale November 1, 2019 at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, Toronto, ON. OTHER CHAROLAIS SHOWS THIS FALL INCLUDE: • Expo Boeuf, October 10-13, Victoriaville, QC • Manitoba Ag Ex, October 23-26, Brandon, MB • FarmFair International, November 6-10, Edmonton, AB • Canadian Western Agribition, November 25-30, Regina, SK 16

2019 CCA Board of Directors, pictured left to right/2019 Conseil d'administration de l'ACC, de gauche à droite: Front (L-R): Kasey Phillips, 1st Vice-President, Waskatenau, AB; Mike Elder, Coronach, SK, President; Shawn Airey, Rivers, MB, 2nd Vice-President; Darwin Rosso, Moose Jaw, SK, Past President. Back (L-R): Craig Scott, General Manager; Jim Olson, Portage la Prairie, MB; Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau, QC; Roger Maloney, Indian River, ON. Missing: Rod McLeod, Cochrane, AB; Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton, ON; Lorne Lakusta, Andrew, AB.

Charolais enthusiasts from across Canada met in Moncton, NB for the Canadian Charolais Association’s Annual General Meeting, held June 6, 2019. By Livestock organized the tour which included three herd tours, a winery, Tidal Bore Rafting, sightseeing and the Maritimes Junior show. The first stop on the tour was Downeast Charolais where we were treated to some excellent hospitality, cattle, ice Charolais Banner • August 2019

cream and homemade sweets. Next, the group travelled to Magnetic Hill Winery where we were educated on wine tasting and the process of wine making. That evening after dinner, we were entertained by Honour Roll recipient and Recording Artist Jack McAffee. Charolais members and guests met for the 59th Annual General Meeting on the morning of Thursday, June 6th in Moncton, NB.


An overview of the Association was presented, along with the Financial report and various Committee and Provincial reports. At the luncheon, the awards for Dams of Distinction were presented (Twenty-Five, Forty and Fifty-year members), as well as the awards for the Honour Roll members. This year’s Honour Roll members were Louis & Benoit Leblanc of LXL Charolais, Haute Aboujagane, NB and Jack McAffee of Lower Knoxford, NB. Russ Mallard of Atlantic Beef Products then gave a very informative presentation on their Branded Beef programs. The tour resumed with a stop at Cavendish Beach, and then on to a delicious Lobster feast. The next morning, we toured Lady Fane Charolais, Crapaud, PEI, a Charolais and potato operation; we then proceeded to the next stop on the tour, Balamore Farms, Great Village, NS, where they grow strawberries and raise Charolais; once again we were treated to some great cattle and hospitality. The remainder of the tour was filled with sightseeing, adventure seeking and a Junior show. The CCA congratulates Mike Elder of Coronach, SK on being elected President. We would also like to welcome new board members Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton, ON and Rod McLeod Cochrane, AB to the Board of Directors of the Canadian Charolais Association. The CCA would like to sincerely thank, retiring Directors, Brian Coughlin and Allan Marshall for their time and dedication to this breed association. CCA Update The Canadian Charolais Association has had a few changes in the last 6 months. In February, Mel Reekie left the CCA for an opportunity back in Ontario. We wish her all the best and thank her for her service to the CCA. Craig Scott was hired as the new General Manager, starting on May 15. Lois Chivilo has returned to the CCA to work in DNA

and registries; it is great to have her wealth of knowledge back in the office. In mid June, Lori Connolly’s employment with the Canadian Charolais Association ended and we are currently accepting applications to fill that position. We are also updating a few of our services to increase efficiency in the office and for our members: 1.One of these is our invoicing process and mailouts. In the past, if a member owed money there was a minus sign in front of the amount. To make it easier to understand, we are changing that so if a member has a credit, there will now be a minus sign in front of that number and if they owe, there will be nothing in front of the number.

American International Charolais Association on the joint evaluation trial project and we hope to have a report to the members soon. 4.The Board of Directors would like to thank the members for their continued support and dedication to this great breed.

Darwin Rosso presented Allan Marshall with his Gold Star Dam certificates.

2.Also, we are working with our lab, Bureau Veritas, on a Homo polled test, and plans are underway to have the test available very soon. 3.Our Breed Improvement Consultant, Sean McGrath, has been working with the

Darwin Rosso presents lucheon speaker Russ Mallard, President of Atlantic Beef with a Charolais tie

25 Year Members: Peter Peters, Souris, PE Dowell Charolais, Didsbury, AB Bellhaven Farms, Coldwater, ON Golden Meadow Farms, Earlton, ON Acadia Colony Farming Co. Ltd.,Oyen, AB Macks Charolais, Cambellford, ON

Chomiak Charolais, Mundare, AB McKeary Charolais, Compeer, AB Briar Ridge Charolais, Bay Tree, AB Angle H Stock Farm, Debden, SK Allen Mcleod, Claresholm, AB N3 Stock Farms, Admiral, SK Bel-Char, Godfrey, ON

40 Year Members: Grant Shuttleworth, Rocky View County, AB Circle J Charolais, Raymond, AB Box J Ranch, Cochin, SK

50 Year Members: Donmoore Farms, Neudorf, SK Giddings Bros, Telkwa, BC

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2018 Gold Star Dams of Distinction TATTOO RSK 137Y RSK 215Z WWW 152Y LEO 102Z CEE 144Y WLMR 17X WLMR 36X SB 243Y SB 250S GDSF 36X GDSF 21U GDSF 35T GGD 843U JIL 88U JIL 69X WGJ 13R TLJ 873Z HBSF 95T LDM 247Z MAC 212Z MVX 814U HVA 241Y

NAME BERICH BRETT LADY 137Y BERICH FARGO LADY 215Z WWW 152Y CEDARLEA UPROAR 102Z CIRCLE CEE RIO CARNIVAL 144Y CHARROW XTREME MISS 17X CHARROW XALENT MISS 36X SPARROWS PUFF BALL 243Y SPARROWS SIMONE 250S GDSF MISS SUPER WIND 36X GDSF MISS SUPER RIO 21U GDSF MISS VICTORY RED 35T DUBUC URIANA 843U JIL SUPREME QUEEN 88U JIL SWEETHEART 69X HARBOUR HILL RAINBOW 13R PLEASANTDAWN ROSE 873Z HIGH BLUFF NATASSIA 95T LEEMAR MS ZESTFULL 247Z MAC 212Z MVX MADEMOISELLE 814U HVA COUNTESS 241Y

FPC 225Z FPC 31X JWX 32Z DZS 26X TMJF 194U TMJF 118R CBT 2110Z CEE215Z CTP 341Z MRSC 796X

FPC ZIZI 225Z FPC LUCY 31X JWX MISS PATTY 32Z CHARWORTH MS VANILLA 26X TMJF UNDAZZLED 194U TMJF RACHELLE 118R THRR TRISHA 2110Z CEE’S COOL WATER 215Z CTP MISS BEAUTIFUL 341Z MRSC MISS 796X

BREEDER BE-RICH FARMS BE-RICH FARMS BRICNEY STOCK FARM LTD. CEDARLEA FARMS CIRCLE CEE CHAROLAIS CHARROW CHAROLAIS CHARROW CHAROLAIS CK SPARROW FARMS LTD CK SPARROW FARMS LTD DEFOORT STOCK FARM DEFOORT STOCK FARM DEFOORT STOCK FARM DUBUC CHAROLAIS SENC FUTURE FARMS FUTURE FARMS HARBOUR HILL CHAROLAIS TRENT HATCH HIGH BLUFF STOCK FARM LEEMAR CHAROLAIS MACMILLAN CHAROLAIS COUGAR HILL RANCH PALMER CHAROLAIS LAND & CATTLE CO. LTD PENO VALLEY CHAROLAIS PENO VALLEY CHAROLAIS WILGENBUSCH CHAROLAIS DARRYL SHUTTLEWORTH TEE M JAY FARMS TEE M JAY FARMS P BAR 3 RANCH CIRCLE CEE CHAROLAIS TURNBULL CHAROLAIS UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

OWNER BE-RICH FARMS BE-RICH FARMS BRICNEY STOCK FARM LTD. CEDARLEA FARMS CIRCLE CEE CHAROLAIS CHARROW CHAROLAIS CHARROW CHAROLAIS CK SPARROW FARMS LTD CK SPARROW FARMS LTD CLINE CATTLE COMPANY DEFOORT STOCK FARM DEFOORT STOCK FARM DUBUC CHAROLAIS SENC FUTURE FARMS FUTURE FARMS HARBOUR HILL CHAROLAIS TRENT HATCH HIGH BLUFF STOCK FARM SVEN JENSEN MACMILLAN CHAROLAIS JORDAN MOORE PALMER CHAROLAIS LAND & CATTLE CO. LTD PENO VALLEY CHAROLAIS PENO VALLEY CHAROLAIS PHILLIPS FARMS DARRYL SHUTTLEWORTH TEE M JAY FARMS TEE M JAY FARMS THISTLE RIDGE RANCH GORDON & LEONE THURSTON TURNBULL CHAROLAIS UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA AND AGRICULTURE AND AGRI-FOOD CANADA

Tenir Compte • L’Association Canadienne Charolais • Août 2019 Les amateurs de Charolais de partout au Canada se sont réunis à Moncton, au Nouveau-Brunswick, pour l'assemblée générale annuelle de l'Association canadienne Charolais, qui s'est tenue le 6 juin 2019. By Livestock a organisé le programme qui comprenait trois visites de troupeau, un vignoble, Rafting Tidal Bore, des visites touristiques et le concours Junior des Maritimes. Le premier arrêt fut la 18

visite chez Downeast Charolais où nous avons eu droit à une excellente hospitalité tout en regardant le bétail, en savourant de la crème glacée et des gourmandises maison. Ensuite, le groupe s'est rendu à Magnetic Hill Winery où nous avons été éduqués sur la dégustation de vin et le processus de vinification. Ce soir-là, après le dîner, nous avons été divertis par Jack McAffee, récipiendaire du tableau d'honneur et artiste bien connu. Charolais Banner • August 2019

Les membres Charolais et invités se sont réunis pour la 59e assemblée générale annuelle, le jeudi 6 juin au matin, à Moncton, au NouveauBrunswick. Un aperçu de l'Association a été présenté, ainsi que le rapport financier et divers rapports de Comités et d’associations provinciales. Lors du déjeuner, les prix pour les vaches de distinction ont été remis (les membres qui adhèrent à l’association depuis vingtcinq, quarante et cinquante ans), ainsi


que les prix pour les membres sur la liste d'honneur. Cette année, ceux-ci étaient Louis et Benoit Leblanc, de LXL Charolais, Haute Aboujagane, N.-B., et Jack McAffee, de Lower Knoxford, N.-B. Russ Mallard, d’Atlantic Beef Products, a ensuite fait une présentation très instructive sur ses programmes de bœuf de marque. La tournée a repris avec un arrêt à Cavendish Beach, suivi sur un délicieux festin de homard. Le lendemain matin, nous avons visité Lady Fane Charolais, à Crapaud, I.P.É, une exploitation de Charolais et de pommes de terre, nous a procédé ensuite à la prochaine étape de la tournée qui était chez Balamore Farms, Great Village, N.-É., où ils cultivent des fraises et élèvent des Charolais; une fois de plus, nous avons eu droit à des bovins de qualité et une hospitalité dépareillée. Le reste de la tournée a été rempli de visites, d’aventures et d'un jugement des juniors. Les membres de l’association félicitent Mike Elder, de Coronach, SK, pour avoir été élu président. Nous souhaitons également la bienvenue aux nouveaux membres du conseil d'administration Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton, ON et Rod McLeod Cochrane, AB, au conseil d'administration de l'Association canadienne des charolais. L’ACC tient aussi à remercier sincèrement les administrateurs qui prennent leur retraite, Brian Coughlin et Allan Marshall, pour leur temps et leur dévouement envers notre association. Mise à jour de l’association L'Association canadienne Charolais a subi quelques changements au cours des six derniers mois. En février, Mel Reekie a quitté pour une occasion de retourner en Ontario. Nous lui souhaitons tout le meilleur et la

remercions pour ses services rendus à l’ACC. Craig Scott a été embauché comme nouveau directeur général à compter du 15 mai. Lois Chivilo est retournée au sein de l’association pour travailler aux registres d'ADN et aux enregistrements; c'est formidable d'avoir sa richesse de connaissances de nouveau au bureau. À la mi-juin, l'emploi de Lori Connolly au sein de l'Association canadienne des charolais a pris fin et nous acceptons actuellement les candidatures pour combler ce poste. Nous mettons également à jour quelques-uns de nos services afin d'accroître l'efficacité au bureau et pour nos membres : 1. L'un d'eux est notre processus de facturation et de publipostage. Dans le passé, si un membre devait de l'argent, il y avait un signe négatif en face du montant. Pour faciliter la compréhension, nous changerons pour l’inverse; quand un membre a un crédit, il y aura maintenant un signe négatif en face de ce nombre et un montant est dû, rien n’apparaitra en avant du chiffre. 2. En outre, nous travaillons avec notre laboratoire Bureau Veritas, sur un test Homozygote pour les animaux acères et les plans sont en cours pour l’avoir de disponible très bientôt. 3. Notre consultant pour l’amélioration de la race, Sean McGrath, travaille avec L’Association Américaine Charolaise Internationale sur le projet d'essai d'évaluation conjointe et nous espérons avoir un rapport aux membres bientôt. Le conseil d'administration tient à remercier les membres pour leur soutien continu et leur dévouement à cette grande race. Charolais Banner • August 2019

Le conseil d’administration pour 2019; Présidente Mike Elder, Coronach, SK Premier vice-président Kasey Phillips, Waskatenau, AB Second vice-président Shawn Airey, Rivers, MB Président sortant Darwin Rosso, Moose Jaw, SK Directeurs: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau, QC Roger Maloney, Indian River, ON Jim Olsen, Portage la Prairie, MB Lorne Lakusta, Andrew, AB Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton, ON Rod McLeod , Cochrane, AB

RÉSERVEZ LA DATE pour le Canadien Salon national et vente le 1 novembre 2019 au Royal Agricultural Foire d'hiver, Toronto, ON. AUTRES EXPOSITIONS CHAROLAIS CET AUTOMNE: • Expo Bœuf, 10-13 octobre, Victoriaville, QC • Manitoba Ag Ex, 23-26 octobre, Brandon, MB • FarmFair International, 6-10 novembre, Edmonton, AB • Canadian Western Agribition, 25-30 novembre, Regina, SK

2320 - 41e Avenue N.E., Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 T: (403) 250-9242 • F: (403) 291-9324 www.charolais.com 19


ASSOCIATION NEWS

Maritime AGM Tour

Balamore Farms is a beautiful setting with a view of the Bay of Fundy from their yard and pastures

The weather co-operated nicely for the five days we toured through New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia. Breeders from across Canada and Australia participated in this fun event.

Magnetic Hill Winery was informative and fun with taste testing their fruit wines

Recording artist and long time Charolais breeder, Jack McAffee entertained us after supper

Martin Horan won the guess the number of candies in the jar at Downeast Charolais with hosts Bob & Diane Eastwood

Cavendish beach was a fun place to walk and explore sea life continued on page 22

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You can’t go to PEI without a stop for COWS ice cream

Mike Elder presents Carolyn, Joe, Robert & William Cooper with a gift of appreciation for their hospitality and tour of their beautiful cattle and strawberry operation Our four Australian guests

Yes, we ate Lobster a few times

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Brent & David Francis of Lady Fane Charolais gave us a very informative tour of their cattle & potato operation

A quality set of cows were presented at all the farms continued on page 24

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Tidal Bore rafting was a highlight for many

Viewing the cattle and visiting the people at the All Breeds Junior Show in Nova Scotia

Sailing out of historic Lunenburg was something new for many

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And some even got to drive the sailboat

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MANAGEMENT

Livestock Production in New Mexico Helge By

In April after the bull sales Candace and I went to New Mexico to see Dr. Neil Burcham at the New Mexico State University (NMSU). Dr. Burcham was a speaker at our Breeders School in 2018 and we wanted to learn more about the selection of the cattle and the conditions where they are raised. NMSU has three breeds of cattle they raise and do research with; Brahman, Brangus and Angus. We spent time on the 64,000-acre ranch just north of Las Cruces where the University is located. At this ranch, they have the Brahman and Brangus herds. Above: We were at the New Mexico State University when they had their bull sale to market the top end of the bulls Left: Santa Teresa Livestock Auction at the Mexican border south of El Paso. This auction mart is located at the border and has auctions on cattle coming into the USA that aren’t already sold Bottom left: A strong Charolais influence is seen in the feeder cattle coming into Santa Teresa with many from the Mexican state of Chihauhau Bottom right: All imported cattle from Mexico have a M branded on their right hip

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We also toured the Santa Teresa livestock crossing. Approximately 25% of the Mexican cattle imports into the United States enter at Santa Teresa, New Mexico. This port is near El Paso, Texas, directly across the border from its Mexican counterpart, San Jerónimo. Both the Santa Teresa and the San Jerónimo facilities are owned and operated by the Unión Ganadera Regional de Chihuahua (Chihuahua Regional Cattlegrower’s Association).

Mexican cattle spend 24-48 hours at the Santa Teresa-San Jerónimo facilities. They are fed, watered, and inspected by U.S. and Mexican federal officials. APHIS veterinarians working on the Mexican side conduct visual and tactile inspections, verify castration, and send the animals through 60-foot-long vats of insecticide. The cattle cross the international border on foot, are loaded on trailers, and are shipped throughout the United States. continued on page 30

Until water is released from the dam for irrigation, the Rio Grande river is dry

Flood irrigation is the water source for the pecan trees

New Mexico is a large producer of pecans with miles of groves Above: Brahman pair at the NMSU ranch Below: Newborn Brahman calf

Brangus pairs laying in limited shade

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Above: Antique scale that was used to develop the 205-day adjusted weight formula at NMSU Left: Scale and processing shed on the NMSU ranch Center – Left: Two-year-old Brangus in great shape on limited grazing pasture Right: The cows teach the calves to eat new growth on the Chamise bush

Left: Neil Burcham & Andrew Cox (Ranch manager) toured us around the ranch Below: Miles of desert where the herds survive

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HERD HEALTH

Rumen Magnets Prevent Hardware Disease Roy Lewis DVM

Traumatic reticuloperitonitis is a term referring to a medical condition caused when an object penetrates through the reticulum, or second stomach causing infection in the abdomen. If a sharp object goes through the diaphragm, the cow can die of heart failure. Hardware disease, as it is more commonly called, drains production of a cowherd since penetration can also cause infection and abscesses with adhesions (scarring). This can lead to the cow losing weight and having intestinal problems. Diarrhea may result or they talk about cows appearing to walk on eggs (humped back and stiff gait). With advanced hardware disease there may be infection around the heart and brisket edema resulting from the heart failure. When they reach this stage, treatment is seldom successful. Occasionally the infection will damage or over stimulate the vagus nerve (this nerve is responsible for rumen contractions). If over stimulated, the cow or bull may appear bloated. Grunting from the pain is another common finding. Veterinarians often diagnose hardware by listening for a grunt with the stethoscope at the same time as doing a withers pinch. The very key to this disease is prevention. A heavy exceptionally strong rumen magnet can sit in the reticulum. As ruminal contractions push the feed past this area (all feed must pass this area), metal (ferric containing metal) objects attach to the magnet. The digestive juices gradually degrade the metal pieces, so there is a continual transition of metal being attracted and degraded so the magnets never loose their effectiveness. The magnets a low-cost investment (cost around three dollars), stay in the reticulum for the life of the cow or 32

bull so a per year investment are dirt cheap plus the labor to put them in. Modern farms use a lot of large equipment silage choppers and feed wagons that can be the source of metal as well as picking up metal on pasture. For instance, a silage cutter can pick up a chunk of wire in a swath and turn it into many sharp, bite size pieces. Cattle are indiscriminate eaters. They do not sift through their feed the way some other species such as horses do. This is why we find things such as metal and twine balls in their stomachs. It is a good idea that many equipment manufacturers already put large strong magnets on equipment such as feed wagons, silage choppers and blowers (blow feed up an upright silo). It is amazing how much metal accumulates in these areas after only a few days use, so we know there is lots of metal around. These magnets should be cleaned weekly to allow new pieces to be attracted. Unfortunately, these magnets do not protect cows on pasture or eating baled hay. Magnets or metal detectors are also used in commercial feed mills. If you have ever had cows doing poorly, hardware disease is a definite possibility. A magnet can easily be administered. Insert the magnet into the animal’s mouth with a plastic or aluminum balling gun and wait to be sure it is swallowed. Often these are put in bred heifers as they are confirmed pregnant. Many dairy cows have magnets inserted when they enter the breeding herd as well. Lots of mechanical feeding with dairy cattle as well, so the metal gets into the feed source. Purebred breeders put a lot of value on their stock and should consider magnets. It may be wise for purebred breeders and commercial producers to put them in their donor cows, recipients and Charolais Banner • August 2019

valuable breeding bulls or if hardware has been a problem give all breeding age heifers a magnet, They stay in for the life of the animal so are a small investment for a long-time gain. Magnets can often be purchased in bulk for a reduced price. Several brands are on the market and generally speaking the better the quality (strength) the higher the price (most are less than $4.00). Test them before use, coins nails etc should be very hard to pull off. If they aren’t the magnet isn’t strong enough. Two magnets are no improvement because they will attach to one another perhaps increasing the surface area to attach to, but that is all. If an animal requires a postmortem, the vet can retrieve the magnet for use in another animal. It also provides useful evidence of the metal sources to your operation. I have seen these magnets have such things as fencing staples, chain links, grease nipples, wire nails screws and the list goes on and on. Unfortunately, the magnets will not attract aluminum and some other metals used in today’s modern farming practises. continued on page 34


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ASSOCIATION NEWS

2019 Honour Roll Recipient – Jack McAffee

Darwin Rosso, Past-president; Jack McAffee, Honor Roll Recipient; Craig Scott, CCA General Manager

I started out with the Charolais breed by crossing with Holstein in the early 1970s. I was crossing with a Charolais bull named Baldy ABE from our New Brunswick AI unit. His calves were moderate, easy fleshing and polled. In 1974, I decided to start a purebred herd. That year I purchased my first two cows from Paul Lagaais in Levi, Quebec. These cows were bred at the time of purchase in June 1974. They calved out in August. I didn’t have very good luck with these first calves – one got sick and

died, the other had bad front legs. I was a bit discouraged but decided to keep with the breed. Gradually, we built the J & J McAffee Charolais herd with A.I. sires. In the mid to late 1990s, my son Jeffrey and I decided to have a bull and heifer sale at our local Co-op auction barn. The sale was a great success. We sold cattle to buyers from NB, NS, Quebec and Maine. We held this sale for seven years. It was nice to see our cattle going into other herds and promoting the Charolais breed. Jeffrey also wanted to do some

showing in the 1990s. He thought it would be a good way to promote our cattle. We attended shows in NB, PEI, NS and Quebec. We had some success in the show ring but the best part of showing cattle is the people you meet and the lasting friendships. After having our sales and showing cattle in the 1990s and early 2000s, we were also expanding our potato operation and found we just didn’t have the time to do justice to these endeavours. We have in the past sold bulls at Nappan Test Station and the Charolais sale in Truro, NS. I am very lucky my son Jeffrey and his wife Sharron have a son, Jacob, who is very interested in the Charolais breed. Jacob is now showing and has attended shows in NB, NS and at the Toronto Royal Fair. Jacob, with the help of new technology, is selling cattle all over the Maritimes. Jacob has grown up with our herd and knows our cattle very well. I still go to work every day and enjoy seeing new calves being born. We all know there will be new challenges in the beef industry but if we hang in there, it will always work out. I have enjoyed my 45 plus years raising Charolais cattle and by God’s grace hope to have a few more.

HERD HEALTH, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 32 We must try to minimize exposure of cattle to metal objects by keeping pastures clean. Picking up wire fragments when fencing and keeping equipment in good repair all minimize the exposure our cattle have to picking up metal objects. Old deteriorating fences are a very common source of metal.

For every case of clinical hardware disease there are probably many subclinical cases where decreased production is the only real sign. In situations where you have one or more cases of clinical hardware yearly or if pasturing very metal littered pastures consider magnetizing every animal. This may

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be an investment well worth it. Place heavy magnets on feeding equipment and be sure to have your vet retrieve a magnet if doing a postmortem. It can reveal much about how and to what types of sharp metal objects your cattle are exposed.


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H

edi Trescher was born in Switzerland and immigrated with her parents to Vancouver, where she attended high school. She was employed during the summers at Radium Hot Springs in a restaurant that was Swiss managed for three years. This is how she met Alfred, who came from Germany. “He had an uncle living in Spillimacheen. He was working in the bush and all those bush guys were waiting for summer for all the girls to show up,” Hedi giggles. She married Alfred in 1957 and Alfred had a small sawmill at the time with a partner. “I had to learn all about sawmills. It took me a while to figure out that larch and tamarack were the same species,” she laughs. “I was the gopher and they would send me for something and of course

they never gave me all of the information. Finally, I got to the point where I knew what I had to ask them before I left.” “After I got that all figured out, Alfred decided to go farming in 1962 and I had to start learning all over. I knew there were bulls and cows, but that was about it. My grandmother had been farming, but my dad worked in an office, so I had very little exposure to farming. I had to learn and I was so naive, I believed everything I was told. I was told we were going to go farming and have this wonderful life. I had no clue about business. My mother came to see the farm and she came into the kitchen and literally backed out. She said ‘I can never come and visit you here.’ That didn’t bother me at all, I can make do and improve as we go,

but the financial part, that was a revelation!” They started with 40 cows, some of which were dwarf carriers. They received $25 for every calf in the fall and knew they had to do something for cash flow. There were people in the area that grew seed potatoes, so they did that and they were a good paying crop at the time. “We had Winston Wolfenden as a neighbour and he was promoting Charolais. Alfred had grown up on a farm, so he knew things about farming. He went up to look at Winston’s bull and didn’t like him. Then Winston bought a bull from Shirley Branum, from outside of Calgary, and Alfred thought he could live with him so we bought a percentage bull sired by him.” “Winston and Alfred went to buy continued on page 38

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c You look at what you have and try to make an advantage out of it. d

Charolais cows in 1965 and by that time I could see our farm would be suitable for purebred cattle. We had small fields that were all fenced. You look at what you have and try to make an advantage out of it.” “Alfred took an A.I. course and they went down to Bauman’s in Wyoming. He was supposed to buy bred cows, but when he got there he could see that he could purchase more heifers than cows, so he came home with three bred cows and ten heifers. The cash turn around on the heifers’ calves was slow.” This was the start of Brisco Charolais, at Brisco, just north of Radium Hot Springs, in British Columbia, that produced Charolais bulls for 40 years. “We bred those cows to Arthur Nick, this was before the French importations. Somewhere along the line when we first started, there was a guy named Lloyd Schmidt at the Charolais convention, and he gave a speech about performance testing. I could see right away that we would have to do this. We put our bulls in a test station at Bassano. The first bull we sold was out of those cows and he sold to Keith Polson in the Okanagan. Alfred liked that bull so much he almost didn’t sell him. He loved his cattle.” “When the first French importation happened, we bred our females to Aiglon. We always bred everything the same way and we got five bulls from that crop. We took them to the Stanford Test Station, in Montana, and we did really well with them. At that time, we averaged more than $3000 USD per bull. It was not only financially good for us, but also psychologically good for us to be successful.” “Then for quite a few years we used a bull named Bingo. We went to Stanford Test Station until Lloyd Schmidt was no longer in the business. When we weaned our calves, Alfred would load up the bulls and leave to put them on test and I would be left at home with the

bawling cows. That was the way he liked it. He loved his cattle too much to hear that noise. We went to Wyoming the first year the Stanford Test closed.” “At the time, the test stations wanted five bulls from the same sire born within 90 days. For many years after we went to Tranquille Bull Test Station, near Kamloops, British Columbia.” “We had more bulls to market, so we also took bulls to the Rudiger Test Station. One year we had the Banner Bull in both tests.” The Banner Bull was awarded to the bull judged the best by a commercial producer and a purebred breeder, from the top ten indexing bulls in the test that made the sale. It was awarded by the Charolais Banner. “We did go to the odd show, but it wasn’t our thing. Our promotion was bull test stations and we were aiming our marketing at commercial cattlemen. You have to do what you are comfortable doing.” “We were always on a performance testing program of some sort. We were on ROP (Rate of Performance) and then we were on CHARM (Charolais Herd Analysis and Record of Performance Management). When the Sire Summary came out, we would have up to five bulls in the junior herdsire list.” “We had a fall bull sale on the farm for about 25 years. We would sell about 30 bulls when they were over a year old and we would deliver them in the spring. We also sold some in some bull sales.” Their bull sales were actually field days and the bulls were priced according to quality. “We had fun and families came. We would start with a speaker and we would have lunch. We had catalogues available but we never mailed any. We had a board with the starting price for each bull and the customers could sign their name on it. If someone wanted to bid more, the bidding was raised in $50 increments. At three o’clock, we called it off and whoever had the last bid owned the bull. We had supper and played bocce and it was a full day.”

c At the time, the test stations wanted five bulls from the same sire born within 90 days. d 38

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“These were held at our place, but for many years, the Wolfendens also had bulls here. We shared all of the cooking and worked together.” “We used to take a trip each year to visit bull customers. It didn’t matter where they were, we visited them all. Some of the people we visited said we were the first seller to visit them.” For many years they consigned bulls to the Rudiger Bull Sale. They also had a bull sale in Kamloops and Williams Lake for a period. At the peak of their program they had 120 cows and sold about 40 bulls. They never sold any females and culled hard. They culled when they weaned and culled again before breeding. For 30 years, they bred everything by A.I. If they didn’t catch, they were shipped. The ones they retained were calved and cows were only given two strikes before they were shipped. One they could

Hedi and Alfred Trescher

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forgive, but the second time they were gone. “We kept building but not that fast because of our strict culling. We sold the purebreds in 2002, selling a number to Harold Bayes, at Trochu, Alberta, but we kept a few so Alfred

commercial cows. Now we have cows that die here of old age, some are 18. We can afford to do that now. Peter (their son) is the farmer and he makes the decisions. I was so short of money for so long, I so appreciate having it now.” Peter has 100 commercial cows that are Red Angus x Limousin, Shorthorn and Simmental cross and always breeds them to polled Charolais bulls. Peter has two daughters, Bianca and Hannah, but neither of them is interested in committing to farming at this time. Hedi laughs, “I have learned through a lot of things, you wait until you see the white in their eyes. In my whole life I worried about so many things that never came to pass. Now I think, I will worry about it if it happens, instead of having scenarios for this and scenarios for that. It was a waste of energy.” They had a feed mill, but they are doing a grass-fed program now, so the feedmill sits idle. They feed hay in the winter from the first snow

c Our promotion was bull test stations and we were aiming our marketing at commercial cattlemen. d wouldn’t go through withdrawal. The ones we wanted weren’t ones Harold wanted as we each looked for different things in our cows. Then when we were ready to quit totally, we sold our cows to Foats, at Carstairs, Alberta, who had been long time bull customers. Alfred passed away in 2009 and by that time we were in

around December 1 to May 1. They do rotational grazing. All of the hay is irrigated as their average rainfall is twelve inches per year. They now have 700 acres, but it is less than they had when they were in continued on page 42

Hedi Trescher and longtime friend Rowana Rudiger

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Hedi Trescher family on the 2019 vacation cruise

purebred cattle. They sold some to Ducks Unlimited as the ducks were there anyway. They have about 300 acres of irrigated hay. They have all hand lines and wheel lines. About two-thirds of it is gravity fed. Peter is also the secretary for the local Farmer’s Institute, which consumes some of his time. He researches everything thoroughly before investing in equipment. When we visited Hedi, he was backpacking in Spain. He enjoys more solitary vacations than Hedi, who prefers to travel with her daughters and grandchildren. They have travelled together to Mexico, and cruises through Europe, the Mediterranean, Panama Canal (Alfred went on this one) and a Baltic cruise. Her daughter Heidy has three boys and they live in Kelowna and daughter Anne has a

boy and girl and lives in Vancouver. They wean and ship off the cow. “Peter and I separate the cows, I am so proud of myself, I still separate cows. It takes us about 20 minutes, and a truck picks them up that day. After the cows have given up on their calves returning, we truck them across the river. We used to chase them, but this is much easier.” “People didn’t mind when we chased them down the road, they seemed to feel privileged to watch a cattle drive. We would put one person at the front and one person at the back and there was quite a long stretch of open road, so they could see us for quite a ways away.” When they were in purebred cattle, Hedi got very involved in the performance testing and developed a program called Brisco Beef Herd

Management. She took a computer class and started to write a program. They used it in their operation and when she was comfortable with it and its capability, it went on sale in the 1980s. I am still surprised to get calls from people that use the program. We have our commercial cows on the program, not to performance test, but it allows us to push a button and get our age verification data. The program is a performance testing program that includes pedigrees, herd health, scoring cattle, catalogue capabilities, worksheets to use for calving and processing. It can produce lists of calves that are still to calve or whatever you need at a given time. Hedi re-wrote it once to update it to more current operating continued on page 44

c We used to take a trip each year to visit bull customers. It didn’t matter where they were, we visited them all. d 42

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c I told them, if you don’t make the effort to breed this cow to the best possible bull, don’t expect me to come and help you calve. d systems, but it is no longer available as it isn’t compatible with current computers. “Back then you couldn’t get feedback from your customers as they ran multiple bulls in their pastures. Now you can do DNA testing to get data cost effectively.” “We started using our own bulls on the heifers so we could gain more data. We found that our bulls performed just as well as the A.I. sires we were using. When we looked for a new A.I. sire, we would pick the easiest calving bull and put him on our biggest cows to moderate the size. We selected for ease of calving and growth and culled for everything else. You don’t need to do that in a commercial herd, but we did in our purebred herd.” “I ran into quite a bit of resistance for not having a bull in our pasture when we first started A.I.ing everything. I did the heat detecting and went to the pastures five times a day. I told them, if you don’t make the effort to breed this cow to the best possible bull, don’t expect me to come and help you calve. We didn’t have calving problems, but it made them think.” “I also have an accounting program that is really good and I would like to find somebody to market it. I started working at North Star Hardware & Building Supplies Ltd., a local business that needed help with its bookkeeping. I worked once or twice a week and told them they really needed to put it on the computer. I started to build it when I was there starting with the basics. Then I continued to develop it and its capabilities. It was based on an accounting system that my father developed called Shorty Bookkeeping and it was a one-write system. You put one thing in and it goes through the system. I started it because I couldn’t find anything that I felt was worth anything. Mine is so simple, it is a journal entry and you are done. I made it so you can actually fix a journal entry and not by adding a correcting entry. It is kind of sad that I can’t get anyone to promote it.” “I tend to do things that I like to do and I enjoyed developing the programs. To write a good program, you have to be able to do the job and know what is possible and necessary.” “I had to learn to bake bread when I moved to the farm. If you don’t bake when you live in the country, your reputation is pretty poor. Somebody told me there were better ways to lose your reputation than by not baking.,” she laughs. “I learned by trying and trying again. There were no computers then. Now I have a granddaughter that googles anything she wants to know and I do too.” “If I want to make something and I don’t have an Bull Sale Field Day

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Alfred sat on the Canadian Charolais Association Board when Rodney James was secretary and later Hedi also sat for two terms on the CCA board. ingredient, I don’t run to town, I cook with what I have and it varies from season to season. I like the challenge.” “I did what was expected of me as I was too good to rebel. I did that and then I did what I needed to do to survive. I went to high school in Vancouver and took chemistry, etc. There was nothing that I learned that I didn’t use somewhere. I was a little over confident and it led me to do a lot of things by the seat of my pants. I wired one of our barns for example.” “When you live in the country, you share with the wildlife. The birds eat the mountain ash berries. We have apples but we don’t pick them all, we have to leave a few for the bears.” Hedi worked as the secretary for the BC Charolais Association off and on for many years throughout their involvement with the breed. Alfred sat on the Canadian Charolais Association Board when Rodney James was secretary and later Hedi also sat for two terms on the CCA board. “People learned to not ask me a question if they didn’t want an answer. There was always a push and pull between promotion and performance. I believed that performance was an investment. There isn’t that much money in cattle, but it seemed that the only new money that came in was from people that wanted to show cattle and win ribbons. It was frustrating for us, because we had some of the best performance cattle, but people were more interested in buying show winners then hoping they wouldn’t do too bad on performance. I brought the voice

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for performance to the board. I remember telling them, we have our life invested in these Charolais cattle and if the market changes and you don’t produce what the market needs, you are out of business. Your customers will go somewhere else to buy a bull. No one believed me, but it happened. It was after we were out of business, but the tide went to Angus.” While on the board Hedi had to learn about promotion as she chaired the Ad & Promotion Committee for a period. “I went to the pasture once, and the cows had a bear treed. If there was a way to climb a tree, the cows would have been after it. The next day the bear was gone and the herd was calmed down. We don’t own a gun and we don’t shoot anything. We have lots of elk, deer and coyotes. People asked if they could hunt and it got to be a problem. Now we offer land access for $50 per day and we guarantee you are the only one on our land. We have

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Hedi has also worked on a history of the Charolais Associations in Canada and the families. It is posted on charolaisbanner.com and is a great resource to members. people that come on the first day of hunting season every year. It isn’t the money, it is the way it self-regulates. If they don’t want to pay, we tell them there is lots of government land where they can go. If they are willing to pay, they sign a paper releasing us from responsibility, and they can bring one partner. We have really abundant wildlife on our land. BC does have a program where you can apply and get compensated for wildlife damage.” Hedi was involved in the building of a local abattoir. “When BSE came, we had to build an abattoir to offer government inspected meat products. The Windermere District Farmer’s Institute, which was constituted in 1914, owned some nice land at the crossroads at Invermere, so we decided that was where we wanted it. Unfortunately, it was zoned as agricultural land and it had to be rezoned, which was quite a process.” The Farmer’s Institute owns the building but have leased it to an operator and it opened in March of 2017. “An enterprise does a lot better if the guy that runs it, owns it. He has some parameters, one of which is he has to kill, even if he doesn’t get the

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cut and wrap job. He also has to do cattle, pigs, sheep and goats. He does wildlife too, but that is his decision. It is a really great building. We have two separate coolers so they can separate wildlife from the domestic animals. We looked at this as infrastructure. It offers people that opportunity to market it as they wish – directly to consumers, restaurants, retail, etc.” The Farmer’s Institute offered a class in pork production. There are many small acreages in the area, but people couldn’t do anything with them because they had no means of marketing their product. This provides an outlet. Hedi is the Project Co-ordinator of the Farmer’s Institute. “If you are a farmer, you can be a member. If you own cattle and have more than four head, you also have to be a member of the BC Cattlemen’s Association. If you have livestock other than cattle, you are encouraged to join the respective association.” Hedi goes to the library and volunteers to do income tax for seniors or low income people and says it is nice to do something that is appreciated.

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“We used to have a women’s group that did community work as volunteers, Brisco Community Aid. Now it doesn’t happen as most women drive to town to work and when they get home, they don’t want to go to a meeting. When the group started, we didn’t have television, so we would get together and have tea and visit and work on a project, a cookbook being one of them. Hedi voluntarily compiled and edited a cookbook and a Brisco & Spillimacheen history book. Now we have a 50/50 thing at the Brisco store, we do flowers for people in longterm care, and we give money for Christmas hampers for those in need.” Hedi has also worked on a history of the Charolais Associations in Canada and the families. It is posted on charolaisbanner.com and is a great resource to members. Hedi has spent her life learning, adapting and sharing her gained knowledge. She is eager to learn and try new things, testing and expanding her skills and knowledge. Her contributions to this industry and her community are numerous and inspiring.


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ASSOCIATION NEWS

Alberta Charolais Summer Tour

This year the Alberta Charolais herd tour took us to the east-central part of the province. Around 200 people participated throughout the day. The first stop was at Lakeview Charolais, Marwayne. Lakeview Charolais and Good Anchor Charolais had cattle on display and provided a very welcoming

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atmosphere. We enjoyed a great breakfast, complete with live music sponsored by the Vermilion Group. From there we loaded up and headed to stop number two, K-Cow Ranch, Elk Point. Spruce View Charolais and Sherwood Charolais also had cattle on display. Here we toured another great display of cattle

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and enjoyed a barbecue lunch. The last stop of the day took us to Sugarloaf Charolais, Minburn. We got to tour another excellent display of cattle and topped the night off with another fabulous meal. The Murray, Good, Wirstra and Anderson families provided top notch hospitality. That we all appreciate.


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ASSOCIATION NEWS

Saskatchewan Charolais AGM The 56th Annual Saskatchewan Charolais Association Annual General Meeting was held July 13th at Creek’s Edge Land & Cattle Co., near Yellow Creek. 13% of the voting membership were in attendance and about 35 were on hand for the supper afterwards. Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw, was re-elected President, with Jordan Moore, Redvers, newly elected as 1st Vice-President and Kurtis Phillips, Estevan, elected as 2nd Vice-President. The position of Secretary-Treasurer is being held by the Saskatchewan Livestock Association, Regina. Re-elected to another three-year term on the nine-member board was Raymond Paschke, Love. Jared McTavish, Moosomin and Mike Neilson, Willowbrook, stepped off the board after many years and Justin Cay, Kinistino, and Doug Harcourt, Quill Lake, were elected to their first terms on the board. The 2017 financial statement showed net earnings of over $11,000 on revenues of $45,700 and expenses of $34,700 with assets over $65,300. Advertising and Promotion was one of the biggest expenditures in the budget at over $8,500. They purchased extra pop-up banners to be used at local events and continue

to run video on the Heartland Livestock TVs across Saskatchewan. Bob Jackson, their fieldman, attended industry events like Agribition, the Saskatchewan Beef Industry Conference, Saskatchewan Stock Growers AGM and U of S Livestock and Forage Center of Excellence Field Days. New this year, the SCA is partnering with the CCA in putting a display at Ag In Motion. In 2018, 99 promo items were sent out to 4-H members in 31 different clubs that showed Charolais sired animals. They also supported the Saskatchewan Beef Expo, CCYA, Yorkton Spring Steer and Heifer

show, Young Ranchman’s show, the Kennedy 4-H Jackpot and the Weldon Spring Steer and Heifer Show as well as the Junior Beef Extreme at Canadian Western Agribition. Craig Scott, CCA General Manager, gave a report and was available for questions. Following the AGM six breeders exhibited in a pen display: Creek’s Edge Land & Cattle, Cay’s Cattle, Harcourt Charolais, Perrot Charolais, Pine Bluff Charolais and Sliding Hills Charolais. After the pen viewing, awards were presented, followed by supper and visiting.

Jared McTavish and Mike Neilson receive a token of appreciation for years of service on the board from SCA from President, Kelly Howe

Saskatchewan Charolais Association Board of Directors: (L-R) Doug Harcourt, Quill Lake; Justin Cay, Kinistino; Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw (President); Jordan Moore, Redvers (1st Vice-President); Raymond Paschke, Love; Tyler Smyth, Swift Current; Matt Jones, Gull Lake; Stephen Wielgosz, Yellow Creek; Missing Kurtis Phillips, Estevan (2nd Vice-President).

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NEWS

Charolais Banner Hires Chomik The Charolais Banner is pleased to announce the hiring of Robbie Chomik, from Bruce, Alberta, to work with breeders to promote their genetics and operations. Growing up in the cattle business he and his wife and four children have a commercial

herd near where they both grew up. Robbie has been active in his community as a 4-H leader and district president, 8 years as president of the Holden Minor Hockey Association and president of the Bruce Stampede Association.

INDUSTRY NEWS

Canadian Beef Breeds Council Report Michael Latimer, CBBC Executive Director

Canadian agriculture benefits from exporting our products to international markets. This is relevant for beef, pork, grains, oilseeds and of course beef genetics. Sales to international markets injects new money into the agriculture economy which directly benefits farms and ranches. This allows us to invest back into our livestock, utilize on-farm technology, install modern farm equipment and new management practices. Canada prides itself on producing high quality agricultural products. This is our competitive advantage and we need to continually improve across all aspects of production to maintain this. International marketing is challenging from a time and cost perspective, often with uncertain results. There have been a few purebred operations which have been very successful, and it is worth taking the time to explore how this was accomplished, good genetics and hard work will be just the start. Other groups such as breed associations, genetic companies, livestock exporters, livestock exhibitions and service providers work year- round to promote the Canadian genetics that you produce to international 58

markets. This is done on behalf of purebred producers, but these groups often do not make the final sale. Contacts made on trade missions are generally invited back to Canada through funding made available by CBBC, Provincial governments and AAFC in order to showcase our genetics and our people. There will be a number of international visitors this fall which are looking for new genetics. I encourage you to prepare ahead of time by identifying key markets and have product ready to sell that is qualified in order to capitalize on the opportunity. The advancement of technology has changed how our farms operate. We now have the ability to communicate and receive information in real time around the clock. Our farms and personal lives have devices that collect hundreds if not thousands of data points each day without any additional work and provide valuable information that guides our decision making. The lower cost of this technology now makes it possible to incorporate devices and data in new ways that were only science fiction a few years back. In beef production we are generally slow to uptake new technology which puts us at a disadvantage over other protein commodities. Either as Charolais Banner • August 2019

industry groups or producers we need to continually evaluate our operations and modernize to remain at the forefront of global beef production. We often hear about ‘big data’ and probably don’t give it a second thought as it doesn’t apply to beef production. At the recent Beef Improvement Federation Conference, we heard how the pork industry is using a variety of new scanners, cameras, and other sensors in their operations. They have embraced ‘big data’ but also recognize that they are an integrated industry and the beef industry operates under a different structure. However, what if we could connect additional relevant data points that are currently collected on our farms; more specifically genetic data and production records along the production chain; and then use it to improve our cattle. Could this information allow us to make more informed or targeted breeding decisions? Could we develop cattle specific to a particular consumer market segment while maintaining or improving beef quality and superior production traits? I like to think it would, but I am interested in hearing your perspective on incorporating any new technologies into our farming operations, email me at mlatimer@beefbreeds.ca.


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NEWS

Charolais Life This column will be dedicated to keeping Charolais members in touch with the people of the business. It will contain births, weddings, convocations and momentous anniversaries and events of note, but not high school graduations. If you have news and/or photos you’d like to submit, please email charolaisbanner@gmail.com for print in upcoming issues.

Oram - McGregor Wed Nigel Oram and Lindsay McGregor were married in Montego Bay, Jamaica, on November 30th, 2019. Nigel, Lindsay and her son, Kaidon reside near Central Butte, Saskatchewan. Nigel works on his family's mixed grain/cattle farm and is also an Agronomistl. Lindsay works for Nutrien Ag Solutions as a Crop Production Advisor. Nigel is a CCYA Alumni and son of Mark & Deb Oram of Valley's End Charolais. Maguire Named to Ireland Hall of Fame The Irish Charolais Cattle Society was honoured to nominate Kevin Maguire from Dunderry in County Meath, as the Charolais recipient of the National Hall of Fame Award for 2019. This prestigious accolade is awarded to a representative from each Breed Society in Ireland every year, for their outstanding contribution to that Breed over their lifetime. Originally hailing from Ballyconnell in County Cavan from a family of 16, Kevin moved to Dunderry in 1991 after buying a farm there. He still lives and farms there today with his wife Teresa and five children. He set up the RIVERSDALE Charolais herd in 2001. His first major success in the show ring was at the Royal Meath Show in 2005 where he received the Overall Charolais Champion. He has since gone on to win many prizes at numerous agricultural shows across the Country. In 2007, a bull bred by Kevin won the Overall Male Champion at the Society’s National Show. Then in 2011, Kevin won the Reserve Junior Male Calf Champion with the homebred bull, Riversdale General. Earlier this year, Kevin was re-elected to Council at the Society’s AGM, topping the pole once again. This will be his third term on Council. He has held the position of Society President for the last three years, stepping down earlier this year after serving the maximum term. Over 60

the course of the three years, he has overseen many changes and improvements within the Irish Charolais Cattle Society. Kevin is the current President of Charolais International, elected at last year’s AGM in Sweden. This Presidency will coincide with the World Charolais Technical Congress, which will be held in Ireland this August. Since setting up his Riversdale Charolais herd, Kevin has enjoyed great success as a breeder and has proved in recent years to be a wonderful asset to the Charolais breed, both at home and abroad. The Irish Charolais Cattle Society would like to sincerely thank Kevin for his fantastic service as a breeder, Council member and President. Neil Orth Honoured The National Pedigreed Livestock Council honored the AmericanInternational Charolais Association’s Executive Vice President, Neil Orth, as the 2019 Lifetime Honorary Membership Inductee for his dedication to the purebred seedstock industry at the recent annual NPLC meeting held May 6-8, 2019 in San Marcos, Texas. Neil began his professional career in the industry as a field representative for the Drovers Journal in the late 1960’s. After a 20-year career at Drovers Journal, Neil has since served over a time span of three decades as Executive for two breed associations starting at the International Brangus Breeders Association and now currently serving as Executive Vice-President of the American-International Charolais Association. “I am honored to be recognized by NPLC as Lifetime Honorary Membership. It’s great to be honored for something I’ve really enjoyed for the past 50 years,” Neil said. Neil has served many years in a leadership role of pedigreed livestock. Through its membership association and organizations, NPLC represents livestock breeders and the importance of livestock registry. NPLC represents a variety of non-profit breed associations of dairy, horse and pony, sheep, goat, swine and beef species. Though Neil’s lifetime of dedication to the purebred seedstock sector he has shown his professionalism and passion for the industry.

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Don Good Has Double Celebration Land sakes alive, look who’s 75! Also, congratulations on being inducted into the “Lions Hall of Fame!” You deserve it! Love, Marion 50th Anniversary

Dawn Charolais, Oak Lake, Manitoba, weighing 7 lb., 8 oz. Proud grandparents are Bev and George Abey and Tully and Arlene Hatch.

It’s Twin Boys!

Beck Awarded Research Scholarship

On April 24th, Charles and Philippe Audet were born to Geneviève Dubuc and Mickael Audet. They weighed 5 lb., 13 oz. and 5 lb., 4 oz. respectively. Geneviève is a CCYA Alumni and daughter of the very excited grandparents Chantel Raymond and Guy Dubuc, Dubuc Charolais, Ste-Eulalie, QC. It’s a boy!

Congratulations to Lee and Connie Eaton, Eaton Charolais, Lindsay, Montana, as they celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary! This photo was taken at the 2012 World Charolais Congress in Scotland. It’s a boy! Kayson Hardie Lewis was born on April 16, 2019, and welcomed by his parents Brant and Renita and big sister Rhetaya. True to his Charolais roots, he is growing like crazy at Char-Lew Ranch!

Brooks Reginald was born June 18th to Nigel and Lindsay Oram and big brother Kaidon. He weighed 8 lb., 1 oz. and was 21" long. Proud grandparents are Mark and Deborah Oram, Valley's End Ranch, Central Butte, Saskatchewan. It’s a Girl! Bristol Saige Ensley was born May 10, 2019, to siblings Savery, Hollis and Seften and parents Trent and Ashley Hatch, Pleasant

Cynthia Beck was awarded the Joseph Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Master's Scholarship through Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. The Council is a Canadian federal research-funding agency that promotes and supports postsecondary research and training in the humanities and social sciences. Supervised by Dr. Hadjista, Cynthia will research alternative technology to improve accessibility to Internetbased therapy for under-served populations. Cynthia has completed her Bachelor of Arts Honours Degree in Psychology and is starting the Masters Clinical Psychology Program. Cynthia, Wade, Mason and Jorja Beck reside on Beck Farms, Milestone, SK.

OBITUARY

Yvonne By Yvonne By passed away May 21st at the age of 87. Yvonne along with her late husband Oliver started raising Charolais in the early 1960s under By Crest Farms, for over 30 years. They also managed 62

Charolais sales in Manitoba and Saskatchewan as By’s Sales Service in the 1980s. Yvonne was like most farm wives helping with the grain and cattle whenever needed, although one time had an allergic reaction when she backed into a needle in her husband’s hand while vaccinating calves. She was also known for the Charolais Banner • August 2019

fresh bread and cinnamon buns that regularly came out of her oven. Yvonne is survived by her four children Karen (Lourne) Anderson; Robert (Luann) By; Donna (Ron) Hundeby and Helge (Candace) By, along with 13 grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren.


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ASSOCIATION NEWS

Welcome New Members/ Bienvenue aux nouveaux membres AUSTIN HAMILTON Glen Huron, ON

FRANCREST FARMS Wingham, ON

ROSEDALE FARMS Sturgeon County, AB

BACK HILL FARM Breadalbane, PE

GREENIRON LIVESTOCK Bassano, AB

RYAN WOOD Madoc, ON

BRADEN DOUGLASS Gem, AB

HIDDEN LAKE STOCK FARM Carberry, MB

SHERWOOD FARMS Vermilion, AB

CAMPBELL CHAROLAIS Port Hood Inverness County, NS

J G LARSON LIVESTOCK Enchant, AB

CHARRED CREEK RANCH Weyburn, SK CROSSALTA FARMS LTD Crossfield, AB D K CHAROLAIS Treherne, MB DEVIN/VIRGINIA ATTFIELD/WASIECZKO Smith, AB DALE LAZIER Shannonville, ON

JJBD CHAROLAIS Eriksdale, MB KARINE DUBUC St. Patrice de Beaurivage, QC KEVIN & CORY PICRAY Iron River, AB KINROW CATTLE Pangman, SK LAZY J RANCH Fox Valley, SK PAULA M. COLLICOTT Northhampton, NB

SILVER BAY CHAROLAIS Ashern, MB SUNVILLE CHAROLAIS McCreary, MB VANDERWIER CHAROLAIS Ethel, ON WAGSTAFF FARMS Lindsay, ON WESLEY DRSCHIWISKI Cecil Lake, BC FLYING O CHAROLAIS Brooks, AB HANNAH CALDWELL Weyburn, SK

DOUG HEIMER Spring Branch, TX U.S.A.

ROBERT ARSENAULT Nine Mile Creek, PE

ED DEKEYSER Colborne, ON

ROCKY COULEE RANCH Airdrie, AB

TABLELAND CATTLE CO. Estevan, SK

ENM ENTERPRISES INC Dundalk, ON

RODERICK BINNY Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia

TIFFANY FROST Kingsey Falls, QC

FANTASY CHAROLAIS Enderby, BC

ROGER L. DAVIS Rockyview County, AB

JAYELLE DEMERS Adrmore, AB

WE ALL NEED A LAUGH

Road Tales Candace By

I am a lifelong learner and believe you can learn something from everyone. While attending a Charolais event years ago, I was involved in a discussion about balancing the work at home. Between a job, on the farm or off, a family, numerous afterschool activities and looking after a home, things can get quite hectic. One very wise lady told me she 64

trained everyone in her family to just do a little bit, and what a difference it makes. As an example, she taught her hockey playing, teenage boys to swish the water around the sink with their hand once after they spit when brushing their teeth – and voila – the sink stays clean. This was such a simple, easy idea. Everyone could just do a little bit in their daily routine and what a difference it would make! I went home inspired. Charolais Banner • August 2019

The next morning, Helge and Natassja were in the bathroom brushing their teeth and I went in with my well-prepared spiel… everyone needs to help out a bit… one swish of water with your hand after you spit… very appreciative of everyone’s help… I barely turned my back to leave, when I heard Natassja, who was about eight at the time, say “You’ve got to stop letting her get out so much.”


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NEWS

Esau Inducted to the Manitoba Agriculture Hall of Fame

Ernie at the induction ceremony with five of his children

Ernie Esau, formerly of Elm Creek, Manitoba, is a true leader in Canadian beef agriculture and was inducted into the Manitoba Agriculture Hall of Fame in June. In 1951, Ernmore Shorthorns began with Ernie’s purchase of two purebred Shorthorn heifers. Thinking that the breed was getting too small, Ernie set his sights on improving the breed. By selecting better breeding stock, Ernmore Shorthorns would become bigger framed and better muscled than other Shorthorns of that era. In 1955, Ernie married Irma and two years later, in 1957, they purchased their own farm – Ernmore Farms. That same year, Ernie officially showed his first animal. When the federal government decided to wind down the herds at their research farms in Brandon and Indian Head, Ernie took advantage of the opportunity by visiting these

herds and personally selecting some very influential sires. These herds had been closed for many years and all selection had previously been based on performance. The sires Ernie selected were bigger, thicker and had more growth than most other Shorthorns in North America. As Ernie would often do, he looked at the size and structure of the animal instinctively knowing that they could be bigger and better. While having no formal training in animal genetics, Ernie was quick to practise line and cross breeding, which ultimately resulted in Ernie becoming a trendsetter with his Dual-Purpose Polled Shorthorns. Ernie spent a short but “expensive time” with the Maine-Anjou breed, which included raising the first polled Maine-Anjou calf ever born in Canada. However, Ernie quickly turned his sights to the more commercially coveted Charolais breed. After amassing

a polled Charolais herd from cows and calves across North America, he crossed these with full French Charolais bulls. The results were impressive with Grand Champion prizes and top selling animals at places like the Denver Livestock Show, the Toronto Royal Winter Fair and Canadian Western Agribition. In order to ensure that improvements to the industry were realized around the world, Ernie sold semen from his championship bulls and embryos from his championship cows to places as far away as Australia. Ernie’s abilities and achievements would often come up in a variety of circles including well respected universities. Agriculture professors often espouse that he was the one responsible for driving significant improvements in the beef cattle industry. Ernie’s highly regarded reputation earned him hundreds of awards including the prestigious Builder of the Breed award from the American Shorthorn Association. Always one to give back to the beef industry, Ernie served on the boards of the Manitoba Shorthorn Association and the Canadian Charolais Association for many years. He was a livestock judge throughout Canada and the U.S. and a renowned guest lecturer. Ernie and Irma were most proud of their family of six children, twentyone grandchildren and twenty-one great-grandchildren.

OBITUARY

Richard Gordon Smith 1934 – 2019

Richard Smith of Be-Rich Charolais and Border Collie dogs, Kitscoty, Alberta passed away July 2nd at the age of 85. 66

Richard will be forever loved by his wife of 59 years Bev Smith of Kitscoty; his children Brent (Debra) Smith of Kitscoty, Brian Smith of Vermilion, Scott (Krystal) Smith of Grande Prairie, and Terri (Paul) Leedell of St. Albert; 9 grandchildren Charolais Banner • August 2019

and 9 great grandchildren. Richard and Bev were awarded the ACA Pioneer award in 2012 and have been Charolais breeders for 40 years. Richard was a very friendly person, always had a big smile and loved to visit with everyone about his cattle.


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ASSOCIATION NEWS

2019 Honour Roll Recipients – Louis and Benoit Leblanc

Benoit and Louis Leblanc

Louis and Benoit bought their first Charolais cow from Roger McInnis (Fundy Charolais) in 1979. They both worked off the farm, so they slowly grew their herd to 40 cows. They sourced cattle from across Canada with the majority coming from Quebec. Their focus was always

maternal and calving ease traits. LXL Charolais marketed their bulls threw the Maritime Beef Test Society, doing so for over 30 years. Some of their show highlights included taking two heifer calves up to Fredericton Exhibition in 1994 and LXL Daisy 12D was Reserve Grand

Champion. In 2004, they went to Halifax to the Maritime’s Fall Fair and were awarded the Grand Champion Female and Supreme Champion Bull. Their biggest highlight was the year all 9 grandchildren showed in the junior show. In 2008, Benoit, along with Nancy Milton, created a prestigious little show at the Halifax Fair and called it the Cinderella Classic. It was a big success and brought a lot of excitement to the barns, an achievement that Benoit is very proud of. Both Benoit and Louis spent many years as directors on the Maritimes Charolais Association and held numerous positions on the board. They are great supporters of the breed and due to health reasons are forced to retire. The LXL prefix was always highly sought after by purebred and commercial producers alike. We thank them for their years of dedication!

CANADIAN CHAROLAIS YOUTH ASSOCIATION NEWS

National Board’s 1st Annual Online Auction a Success Reegan McLeod, Alberta Director

The CCYA would like to thank everyone who donated and purchased items in our first annual Facebook Auction. It was a great success and we raised $2950 to use toward our leadership scholarship. The Leadership Scholarship CCYA NATIONAL BOARD charolaisyouth@gmail.com President: Shelby Evans sle379@mail.usask.ca Vice-President: Keegan Blehm keegb34@yahoo.ca Treasurer: Tyson Black blackbern@hotmail.com

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is awarded at the Conference and Show each year to a senior member that displays excellent leadership qualities. The competition is evaluated based on members’ involvement in the Charolais breed, leadership in other activities they’re involved in, and a face to face interview. Your

Secretary: Raelynne Rosso littlerosso@hotmail.ca Director: Bret Marshall blm5012@cesd73.ca Director: Lindsay Verwey Lindsay.verwey16@gmail.com Director: Reegan McLeod Reeganmc11@gmail.com

Director: Bradley Fergus bradleyfergus3@gmail.com Ex-Officio: Shae-Lynn Evans evans32s@uregina.ca 2019 CCYA Conf & Show Exec. President: Dale Weinbender Vice-President: Shelby Evans Treasurer: Raelynne Rosso Secretary: Kylie Beck

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support is greatly appreciated. Our next major fundraiser is our Semen Auction, held in conjunction with the Charolais National Sale at the Toronto Royal. If you would like to support the Charolais youth with a semen donation, contact one of the National Board members. CCYA Provincial Advisors SK: Jill Debenham | kidsandcows@sasktel.net ON: Karen Black | blackbern@hotmail.com MB: Jeff & Jackie Cavers | tobbagirl@yahoo.ca AB: Kasey Phillips | kphillips@mcsnet.ca Youth Coordinator: Shae-Lynn Evans shaelynnevans@gmail.com


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OBITUARY

Roger Goldsmith 1940 – 2019

Beloved partner of Deborah Jones, father of Sandra Semeniuk, and Kirby (Sandra) Goldsmith, grandfather of Jason (Sharona) Semeniuk, Dylan Semeniuk, Jordan (Afton) Goldsmith, and Lacey (Matt) Sargent, and stepfather of Stacey (Gary) Hawkins and Amanda (Ray) Stah passed away

suddenly on June 1st at the age of 78. Roger, from Hoosier, Saskatchewan, was a former Charolais breeder, rodeo competitor, chuck wagon driver and current rancher. He enjoyed the Charolais breeders from around the world and was on World Charolais Congresses in Hungary 2008, Great Britain 2012 & Sweden & Norway in 2018. Roger started competing in rodeos when he was 15

before the Canadian Cowboys Association (CCA) was formed and when he did join the CCA, he was given membership number 87. He was awarded a gold card membership in 2014 for his dedication and passion to rodeo. Roger competed for 25 years in rodeos and then another 15 years racing pony chuckwagons. Always quick with a laugh, Roger was a great guy to be around.

OBITUARY

Arlane Parsonage 1932–2019

It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of Arlane Marilyn Parsonage on June 21, 2019 at the age of 86 in care of the Rosefield Center, Innisfail, Alberta. Arlane was born August 24, 1932 at Stavely, Alberta. She was the youngest of 3 children born to Clarence and Greta Purcell. Arlane met her future husband Gordon Parsonage and they were married in 1955. They moved to the Parsonage family farm north of Innisfail where they would begin their own family with sons Duane and Kim and daughter Kathi. Arlane was a caring mother, grandmother and great grandmother who enjoyed making the most out of the simple things in life. She was

happiest to be at home caring for her children, tending her garden or helping with the livestock. She was a country girl at heart and she spent many hours preparing for their Purebred Hereford cattle sales, 4-H achievement days and rodeo weekends. In 1986 Arlane was given the opportunity to invest in a quality group of 10 purebred Charolais heifers raised by Tom Irwin of Arrowhead Charolais. This was the solid foundation of the impressive Charolais herd P&H Ranching has today. She was actively involved with the cattle until her stoke in late 2015. She was proud to be a member of the Canadian Charolais Association and on numerous occasions she received “Dam of Distinction” awards which she was very proud of. In 1988, Parsonage white bulls started

showing and selling at the Calgary Bull Sale, this led to a long line of championships, new customers and great friendships. In 2011, the family decided to sell their entire bull offering in a single day sale to be held at the Innisfail Auction Market 3rd Saturday in February. This became the highlight of the year for Arlane, she was so very proud of the accomplishments her family had made. Arlane attended every Bull Sale until her passing in June. Arlane was predeceased by husband Gordon and her two sons Duane and Kim. She leaves to mourn her daughter Kathi and daughter inlaw Corinne; grandsons Scott and Thomas Jaroszuk and Codi Bozarth (Sherry); great grandchildren Davin, Colin and Layla Bozarth. Last but not least her special furry friends Rosie and Sylvester.

OBITUARY

Everett Laboucan Everett Laboucan, EZ Ranch, Driftpile, Alberta passed away May 27th, 2019 at the age of 70

50 after losing a battle with cancer. He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Zita; his daughters Samantha Duhamel (Steve) of Lac La Biche, Jolene Laboucan of Driftpile and Mattie Laboucan of Joussard along Charolais Banner • August 2019

with three grandchildren; his parents, Jo and Arlene Laboucan; his brother, Dwayne (Bobbi-jo) Laboucan and numerous family members.


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Services

Advertise Your Services Here! Call today and get your name out there! 306.584.7937

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Alberta Breeders

Barry & Lee-Ann Kaiser & family 403.787.2489 Box 209, Hussar, AB T0J 1S0 Barry 403.334.2489 Lee-Ann 403.334.2155 kaiserbarry@gmail.com

Kasey, Arlana, Kord & Peri Phillips Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0

T 780.358.2360 • C 780.656.6400 • kphillips@mcsnet.ca KREATING KONFIDENCE

Be Wise — Advertise. Your ad should be here. 306.584.7937

GOOD ANCHOR CHAROLAIS HOME OF “GOOD” CATTLE! Don Good and Marion Smyth Box 3261, Vermilion, AB T9X 2B2 780.853.2220 • Don.marion.good@gmail.com

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British Columbia Breeders

Manitoba Breeders SADDLERIDGE CHAROLAIS

Ralph Retzlaff 403.793.0794 Leonard Retzlaff 403.501.9333 Rosemary, AB • www.saddleridgecharolais.com

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Ontario Breeders

Kevin, Crystal, Kory & Shaylin Stebeleski P/F 204.234.5425 Cell 204.365.6010 Box 266, Oakburn, MB R0J 1L0 | happyhavencharolais@gmail.com

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Quebec Breeders

Rollin’ Acres Charolais Full French Charolais 598516 2nd Line, Mulmur, ON L9V 0B6 chester.tupling@premierequipment.ca Chester Tupling 519.925.2938 C 705.627.0672

“Breeding the Cattle that Work in Both Rings.”

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Saskatchewan Breeders


Wendall & Leanne Weston Box 206, Maidstone, SK S0M 1M0 • wlweston@sasktel.net

Tel 306.893.4510 • Cell 306.893.7801

Be Wise. Advertise. Your ad should be here. 306.584.7937 Charolais Banner • August 2019

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USA Breeders

Advertise your program here. Call today! 306.584.7937

AD RATES Charolais Banner

Charolais Connection

Ads Black & White Full Colour Full Page $725 $1050 2/3 Page 610 840 1/2 Page 490 685 1/3 Page 345 505 1/4 Page 285 410 1/6 Page 190 n/a 1/8 Page 145 n/a 1" Business Card 350/Year n/a Classified 1"x1 column 45 n/a Classified 2"x1 column 80 n/a (add $10.00 to put classified ads on web for 1 month)

Ads Black & White Full Colour Full Page $1100 $1450 2/3 Page 825 1125 1/2 Page 690 945 1/3 Page 525 725 1/4 Page 440 615 1/6 Page 330 n/a 1/8 Page 220 n/a 1" Business Card 350/Year n/a Classified 1" x 1 column 80 n/a Classified 2" x 1 column 140 n/a (add $10 to put classified ads on web for 1 month)

Charolais Banner: • Pictures – $10 • Photos taken by fieldmen – $25 • Overruns are $1 each • Catalogue prices available on request • 4 ad contracts offer a 15% discount (card ad exempt) • Position pages will be given to yearly contracts • Sale Budget includes Banner fieldman to attend the sale, take pictures, work the ring and report the sale. Female sale budget is $400 sale attendance fee plus 2 colour pages in Charolais

Banner or equivalent in Charolais Connection. Bull sale budget is $400 sale attendance fee plus 1 colour page in Charolais Connection. Charolais Connection • Pictures – $10 • Photos taken by fieldmen – $25 • Yearly contract – buy 2 ads and get the third at half price (card ad exempt) • Position pages will be given to yearly contracts • Catalogue prices available on request

PUBLISHING DEADLINES

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MAILING

FALL CONNECTION OCT BANNER DEC BANNER

August 21 September 25 November 26

August 28 October 5 November 28

September 12 October 16 December 11

The Banner cannot be responsible for errors in advertisements received after the ad deadline. The Charolais Banner reserves the right to refuse any advertisement. On any advertisement, the Charolais Banner is not liable for any charges over and above the cost of that advertisement. No agency commission allowed on livestock advertising rates. The Charolais Banner assumes no responsibility for distribution.

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IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES IN OUR INDUSTRY

Calendar of Events September 7 Renfrew (ON) Fair Charolais Show (A BOSS Show)

November 20 Acadia Colony Charolais & Angus Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Oyen, AB

September 21 Lindsay (ON) Fair Charolais Show (A BOSS Show)

November 28 Canadian Western Agribition Charolais Sale, 3:30 p.m., Regina, SK

September 28 Mack Charolais & DanG Charolais Production Sale, 7:00 p.m., Hoard’s Station, Campbellford, ON

November 29 Canadian Western Agribition Charolais Show, 2:00 p.m., Regina, SK (A BOSS Show)

October 5 Ranch Ostiguy Charolais Complete Dispersal Sale, at the farm, St-Cesaire, QC

December 4 Genetic Edge Sale, 2:00 p.m., Olds (AB) Cow Palace

October 18 Uppin’ the Ante Charolais Sale, 7:00 p.m., Maple Hill Auction, Hanover, ON October 19 Autumn Prestige Sale, 6:30 p.m., Hoard’s Station, Campbellford, ON October 20 M&L Cattle Company Open House, Beef Day & Female Production Sale. Lunch & Seminars 12 noon. Sale at 3:00 p.m. October 25 Ag-Ex Charolais Show, Brandon, MB (A BOSS Show) November 1 Canadian National Charolais Show, Exhibition Place, Toronto, ON (A BOSS Show) November 1 Canadian National Charolais Sale, 7:30 p.m., Exhibition Place, Toronto, ON November 8 Farmfair International Charolais Show, Edmonton (AB) Northlands (A BOSS Show) November 15 Maple Leaf Charolais Complete Female Dispersal Sale, 1:00 p.m., Stettler (AB) Auction Mart November 18 Turnbull Charolais & Wrangler Charolais, Sharing our Genetics Sale, 1:00 p.m., Olds (AB) Cow Palace

December 6 Sterling Collection Sale, 1:30 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales December 6 Vikse Family Farm Complete Dispersal Sale, Stettler (AB) Auction Mart December 10 No Borders Select Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB December 12 Alberta Charolais Association Annual Meeting, 4:00 PM, Red Deer, AB; Western Grounds December 12 ACA Individual Bull Show, 7:00 PM, Red Deer, AB; Western Grounds December 13 ACA Pen of 3 Bull Show 11:00 AM, Red Deer, AB; Western Grounds December 13 Alberta Select Sale 1:30 PM, Red Deer, AB; Western Grounds December 16 Wilgenbusch Charolais “Volume III” Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the ranch, Halbrite, SK December 18 Steppler Farms “A Piece of the Program” Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB December 20 Char-Maine Ranching “Heart of the White Herd” Female Sale and 14th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange, Fort MacLeod, AB Charolais Banner • August 2019

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Advertisers Index A and D Charolais ..........................................65 Alberta Charolais Association ..........................52 Alta Custom Programs ....................................74 Amabec Charolais ......................................65,77 Annuroc Charolais ..........................................77 B Bar D Charolais ............................................77 Baker Farms ....................................................77 Bar H Charolais ..............................................78 Beck Farms......................................................78 BeRich Farms..................................................75 Blackbern Charolais....................................65,77 Bob Charolais..................................................75 BoJan Enterprises ..........................................78 Borderland Cattle Co.......................................79 Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. ................................74 Bricney Stock Farms ........................................79 Bridor Charolais..........................................63,77 Brimner Cattle Company ................................79 Buffalo Lake Charolais ....................................75 By Livestock................................................51,65 Campbells Charolais........................................79 Canadian Charolais Association..................1619 Carey, Brent ..............................................67,74 Cedardale Charolais ........................................77 Cedarlea Farms ..............................................79 Charla Moore Farms........................................79 CharLew Ranch..............................................75 CharMaine Ranching......................................75 Charolais Charbray Mexico..............................73 Charolais Journal ............................................74 Chartop Charolais ..........................................79 Charworth Charolais Farms ............................75 Chomiak Charolais ........................................75 Circle Cee Charolais Farms ..............................75 Cline Cattle Co...........................................29,76 Cockburn Farms ..............................................78 Cornerview Charolais ......................................63 Cougar Hill Ranch ..........................................77 Coyote Flats Charolais ................................25,75 Creek's Edge Land & Cattle Co.....................7,79 C2 Charolais ..............................................49,77 DanG Charolais ..............................................67 DavisRairdan ..................................................74 Demarah Farms ..............................................79 Diamond W Charolais ................................59,79 Dorran, Ryan ..................................................74 Double P Stock Farms......................................77 Dowell Charolais ............................................75 Dubuc Charolais..............................................78 DudgeonSnobelen Land & Cattle ..............63,78 Eaton Charolais ..............................................80 Echo Spring Charolais ................................63,78 Edge, Dean ....................................................74 Elder Charolais Farms ..................................5,79 Fergus Family Charolais ..................................78 Fischer Charolais ............................................75 Flat Valley Cattle Co. ..................................35,75 Fleury, Michael ................................................74 Flewelling, Craig..............................................74

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Footprint Farms ..............................................75 Fourthlane Farms ............................................65 Future Farms ..................................................75 Gilliland Bros. Charolais ..................................79 Good Anchor Charolais ..............................45,75 H.S. Knill Company Ltd. ..................................74 Happy Haven Charolais ..................................77 Harcourt Charolais ..........................................79 Hard Rock Land & Cattle Co. ..........................77 Harvie Ranching ............................................75 HEJ Charolais ............................................39,75 Hicks Charolais................................................78 High Bluff Stock Farm............................12,13,77 Holk Charolais ................................................75 Hopewell Charolais ........................................79 Horseshoe E Charolais ................................37,79 Howe Family Farm......................................43,79 HTA Charolais Farm ........................................77 Hunter Charolais ......................................77,IBC JMB Charolais ................................................77 Johnson Charolais ......................................47,75 Johnstone Auction ..........................................74 June Rose Charolais ........................................79 Kaiser Cattle Co. ............................................75 KayR Land & Cattle Ltd. ............................23,75 KCH Charolais ................................................76 Kirlene Cattle ............................................65,78 La Ferme Patry de Weedon..............................78 Lakeview Charolais ....................................55,75 Land O' Lakes Charolais ............................65,78 Langstaff Charolais..........................................78 Leemar Charolais ............................................75 Legacy Charolais ........................................27,75 LEJ Charolais ..............................................45,77 LindskovThiel Charolais Ranch........................80 M & L Cattle Co. ........................................33,78 Mack's Charolais ........................................67,78 Maple Leaf Charolais ......................................75 Martens Cattle Co...........................................79 Martens Charolais ..........................................77 McAvoy Charolais Farm ..................................79 McKay Charolais ............................................77 McKeary Charolais ..........................................76 McLeod Livestock ............................................74 McTavish Farms..........................................57,79 Medonte Charolais ....................................63,78 Miller Land & Livestock....................................78 Moyer Cattle Co. ............................................63 Murphy Livestock ............................................76 Mutrie Farms ..................................................79 Myhre Land and Cattle....................................77 Nahachewsky Charolais ..................................79 NelsonHirsche Purebreds ................................53 Norheim Ranching ..........................................74 P & H Ranching Co. ........................................76 Packer Charolais..............................................78 Palmer Charolais ..........................................9,79 Parklane Charolais ..........................................76 Partridge Hollow Charolais ..............................65

Charolais Banner • August 2019

Phillips Farms ..................................................79 Pleasant Dawn Charolais ..............................6,77 Potter Charolais..........................................65,78 Prairie Cove Charolais......................................76 Prairie Gold Charolais ......................................79 ProChar Charolais ....................................11,76 Qualman Charolais ........................................79 R & G McDonald Livestock ........................31,77 Raffan, Don ....................................................74 Ranch Ostiguy ................................................51 Rawes Ranches ..........................................41,76 Reeleder, Andrew............................................74 Rollin' Acres Charolais ................................63,78 Ross Lake Charolais ........................................76 Rosso Charolais ..............................................80 Royale Charolais..............................................78 RRTS Charolais ................................................76 Saddleridge Farming Co. ................................76 SanDan Charolais Farms ..................................76 Saunders Charolais ....................................63,78 Serhienko/Voegeli Cattle Co. ..........................80 Sharodon Farms ..............................................78 Skeels, Danny..................................................74 Sliding Hills Charolais ......................................80 Southside Charolais ........................................76 Southview Farms ............................................78 CK Sparrow Farms..........................................IFC Springside Farms ............................................76 Spruce View Charolais................................59,76 Stach Farms Charolais ....................................76 Stephen Charolais Farm ..................................80 Steppler Farms Ltd. ......................................3,77 Stock, Mark ....................................................74 Sugarloaf Charolais ........................................76 Sunrise II Charolais ..........................................63 Sunshine Oak Charolais ..................................77 T Bar C Cattle Co. ......................................74,81 Taylor Farms....................................................65 Temple Farms..................................................80 Thistle Ridge Ranch ........................................76 Transcon Livestock Corp. ................................74 TRIN Charolais................................................77 Turnbull Charolais ......................................21,76 Twin Anchor Charolais ....................................76 Wendt & Murray Farms Ltd. ......................61,76 Western Litho Printers ....................................74 Whiskey Hollow Cattle Co...............................63 White Lake Colony ..........................................76 White Meadow Charolais Ltd. ........................77 WhiteWater Livestock ................................65,78 Wilgenbusch Charolais ............................80,OBC Wilkie Ranch ..................................................76 Windyview Farm..............................................65 Wood River Charolais ....................................80 Wrangler Charolais................................14,15,76


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August 2019 Charolais Banner