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August 2018 VOL. 52, NO. 3 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Ph. (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Home Page: http://www.charolaisbanner.com email: charolaisbanner@gmail.com

Features

ISSN 0824-1767

Genomics Have Arrived for CCA Genetic Evaluation ............14 Les valeurs génomiques font maintenant parties des évaluations génétiques Charolais ..........................................16 Obituary – Ken Poole ..............................................................18 World Charolais Congress – Sweden ......................................25 Post World Congress – Norway ..............................................72 2018 Honour Roll Recipients – Brian & Doris Aitken ............80 Manitoba Charolais Association AGM ..................................81 Obituary – Ron Lacey ..............................................................82 Alberta Charolais Summer Tour ............................................84 Obituary – John Rudiger ........................................................85 Saskatchewan Charolais AGM ................................................86 Think Outside the Fence Charolais Banner Breeder School..87 Charolais Charbray International AGM..................................90 Obituary – Lawrence Moore ..................................................91 CCA New Members..................................................................92 Obituary – Betty Oram ............................................................92 Obituary – Jack Bullied............................................................93 Obituary – Denise Hind ..........................................................93

Departments From the Field............................................................................8 Du Champ ................................................................................10 Canadian Charolais Association Keeping Track ....................20 Charolais Life ..........................................................................50 Herd Health ............................................................................68 Canadian Beef Breeds Council Report ..................................70 Canadian Charolais Youth Association News ........................82 Road Tales ................................................................................93 Magazine Rates and Deadlines ............................................100 Calendar of Events ................................................................101 Index of Advertisers ..............................................................102

Helge By, Manager/Publisher Candace By, Managing Editor charolaisbanner@gmail.com Cell 306-536-3374 @ByCandace Susan Penner, Production/Design charolais.susan@sasktel.net Dalyse Robertson, Web Design Box 2458, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0 Ph/Fax (204) 476-8856 pdmrobertson@gmail.com FIELDMEN: Alberta & British Columbia Craig Scott 14 Keown Close, Olds, AB T4H 0E7 Res. (403) 507-2258 • Fax (403) 507-2268 Cell (403) 651-9441 sbanner@telusplanet.net @craigscott222 Saskatchewan, Manitoba, USA & Eastern Canada Helge By 124 Shannon Rd., Regina, SK S4S 5B1 (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Cell (306) 536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com @CharolaisBanner

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All Rates Are Listed In Canadian Funds Canada (Canadian prices include 5% GST) 1 yr. - $52.50 3 yrs. - $136.50 USA 1 yr. - $80, 1st class (2 week delivery) - $140 3 yrs. - $215, 1st class (2 week deliver) - $395 Overseas 1 yr. - $85, 1st class (2 week delivery)- $150 3 yrs. - $225, 1st class (2 week delivery)- $420 Animals in the photographs in the Banner have not been altered by computer enhancement or mechanical methods according to the knowledge of the publisher.

On the cover… ...is Vita Fall Charolais, Sweden. Photo was taken during World Charolais Congress, extensive coverage starts on page 25.

The material produced in this publication is done so with the highest integrity, however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. We are responsible for only the value of the advertisement. Charolais Banner (ISSN 0824-1767) is published 5 times per year (February, May, Aug, Oct and December) by Charolais Banner Inc., Regina, SK. Postage paid at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Printed by: Western Litho Printers Ltd. Publication No. 40047726 Registration No. 9810

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POINTS TO PONDER

From the Field Helge By

It has been a very busy summer, but that is the life we choose. From the CCA AGM in Ontario, to Breeders School in Saskatchewan, to World Charolais Congress in Sweden, to herd tours across the prairie provinces, to provincial AGMs and pen shows, to interviews for feature articles, it has been great. Coverage on all these events are in this issue and we hope that you get a sense of being there as well. Doug Blair, who has been the Association guru on Genomics the past few years, has an excellent explanation of the new Genomically enhanced EPD that has been run with the July EPD. It has taken five years of work to get to a GEPD, and finally with the single step, it is a reality. You won’t notice any difference in the expression of the EPD, just the accuracies are higher for all traits. Over time and with more data and DNA collected, this will continue to increase the accuracies as it has so well in the Holstein industry. To use the example of BW EPD, when DNA data is included, it will give you an accuracy up .25 and that would be as if that animal had 25 progeny. Less guess work when improving areas of production or selecting a bull for a certain job. It is important to note that if you want GEPD for your sale bulls next spring, you will need to pull hair and submit it by the end of August. This will give the lab time to process and send the DNA information to the association to be included with the performance data at the end of October and be combined in the December run. Having said that about EPD, I think it is also important to not only look at numbers when breeding cattle. The history of the cattle

industry and judging trends has been interesting. From belt buckle cattle, to race horse size, to EPD, I believe there is a reason. Producers and especially investor types have used these trends to cover up their lack of knowledge of breeding cattle. To be a good stockman, you need to know cattle and look at structure, function ability, fertility and many other things to improve your programs. What is a good foot, or a bad foot? You can’t just look at numbers. We would also like to wish Lois Chivilo all the best in the future as she moves on after 10 years with the Charolais Association in the office in Calgary. If you have ever phoned the office with a registry question, I am sure you will have talked to Lois. It is Charolais’ time to shine in the commercial industry, when you analyze the data presented by the Canadian Beef Grading Agency. There has been a definite trend down in Yield Grades as the cattle have gotten fatter and marbled more. In 2017, just under 2% graded Prime, just under 70% graded AAA, 26% AA and just under 2% were A. If you look at the animals making AAA only 14% were yield grade one with the Y2s and Y3s splitting the rest. Yield is an estimation of the percentage of the carcass that is red meat. That is a lot of waste trying to feed for a AAA. The packers have paid for feeders to strive for the top grade but may have to shift some incentives to the Yield grades too. It is interesting that sometime this year, Canada will come more in line with the United States and move from three to five yield grades. Carcasses are bigger and fatter and that turns into a loss because external fat is trimmed away. Fat depth is up by 76 percent since the last audit about five years ago. The trend shows that 63% of the fed cattle were yield grade

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ones in 2000 compared to about 50% in 2010. Just six years later only 37% are making yield grade one. This data is from federally inspected plants where 99% of the cattle are harvested. Charolais crosses will help with the growth for the bigger carcasses, still hit the high-quality grade but improve the yield grade. This has been shown in the C-C program for years. We did an interview for a Connection story with an operation running 400 black cows and white bulls and feeding them out. You should see the quality of those finished steers and heifers. The crossbreeding door is opening (slower than I was hoping) but will be a win for all involved. I hope that you have considered taking some cattle out this fall to promote Charolais and your operation. Whether it be to a show or a sale, it all helps the industry. It isn’t too late and if you can’t take the cattle out at least make an honest effort to attend some of the events. The National show in Edmonton this fall has an exciting component in the bull calf show that will be great to see. The marketing tip of the month is to get family pictures done before you are past when you need them. You can use them on your business card, in advertising, and sale catalogues, to name a few. When used in the operation, it can be claimed as an income tax deduction, if that makes a difference to you. Now it is off to the CCYA Conference and show and an exciting adventure with 12 international young adults from eight countries coming to participate. Until next time, Helge

@CharolaisBanner

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POINTS À RÉFLÉCHIR

Du Champ Helge By

Nous avons passé un été très achalandé, tel est notre réalité. En passant par la réunion annuelle de l’ACC en Ontario, l’école des éleveurs en Saskatchewan, au congrès Mondial Charolais en Suède, des tournées de troupeaux à travers les prairies, aux réunions annuelles provinciales, les concours de progéniture et des rencontres pour des articles qui paraîtront dans le futur, ce fut très agréable. Dans la revue du mois, vous pourrez y trouver un résumé de ces activités et j’espère que vous vous sentirez comme si vous y étiez. Notre expert en génomique dans notre association depuis plusieurs années, Doug Blair, nous apporte une excellente explication des nouveaux EPD Génomique amélioré qui a été mis en place avec les EPD du mois de juillet. Il a pris cinq ans à développer ce GEPD et avec cette dernière étape, il est maintenant en place. Vous ne remarquerez aucune différence à l’interprétation des EPD mais plutôt des résultats plus accrus pour chaque trait identifiés. Au fil du temps et les accumulations de données ADN, nous pourrons remarquer l’amélioration de l’exactitude de ces données tout comme l’industrie Holstein qui utilise aussi cette plateforme. Si nous prenons comme example l’indice du poids à la naissance (BW) avec ADN, cela nous donnera .25 comme indice d’exactitude pour sa progéniture. Il y aura moins d’estimation lors du choix du taureau pour améliorer certains aspects de votre troupeau. Pour ceux qui désirent des GEPD pour leurs ventes de taureaux du printemps, les échantillons de poils doivent être envoyé au laboratoire avant la fin du mois d’août. Ceci permettra au laboratoire de faire parvenir les résultas à l’association pour les inclure dans les données de performance d’octobre et de décembre. 10

Après cette précision sur le EPD, il faut pas oublier de ne pas regarder seulement les chiffres lors de la reproduction. L’historique et les tendances des jugements aux concours est intéressante. Nous avons passé à travers des formats courts et compacts, d’autres qui avaient l’air des chevreaux de courses, aux EPD et il y a une raison dont je crois expliquerais ces tendances. Certains producteurs et investisseurs dans l’industrie se sont servis de ces tendances pour couvrir leurs manque de connaissances face à la reproduction. Un bon éleveur saura regarder la structure, la conformation, fertilité et beaucoup d’autres aspects pour améliorer son troupeau. La différence entre des bons membres et des mauvais ne se traduit pas en chiffres. Je profite de cette occasion pour souhaitez bonne chance à Lois Chivilo dans ses projects futurs. Lois quitte le bureau de Calgary après 10 années à aider tout ceux qui appelait au bureau avec leurs question de registre. Vous avez sans doute parlé à Lois à un moment donné. Lorsqu’on analyse les statistiques révélées selon le Règlement sur la classification des carcasses de bétails, la race Charolaise se démarque des autres. La tendance au calibrage des rendements est à la baisse, ce qui veut dire que les carcasses sont plus grasses et que le persillage s’est amélioré. En 2017, moins de 2% se classifiait comme premium, 70% se classait dans la catégorie triple A, 26% dans la catégorie double A et moins de 2% dans la catégorie A. Si nous examinons la catégorie AAA, seulement 14% de ces carcasses étaient classifiées ce qu’on appelle Y1 (rendement niveau 1) et le reste étaient partagé dans les classes Y2 et Y3. Le <Y> de cette formule représente la quantité de viande rouge (rendement)sur la carcasse. Il y a beaucoup de perte à essayer de produire du triple A. Les usines d’emballage subventionnent les producteurs à obtenir les meilleurs Charolais Banner • August 2018

résultats possible mais un incentive à avoir un meilleur rendement (Y1, Y2, Y3) devrait être un but pour maximiser le rendement en général. Plus tard cette année, la Canada, introduira un système de rendement qui passera de 3 à 5 indices de rendement, dans la même direction que les États-Unis. Les carcasses sont plus larges et plus grasses, ce qui produit une perte à cause de la découpe de tout ce gras. L’épaisseur du gras est en hausse de 76% depuis le dernier contrôle. Les données démontraient qu’en 2000, 63% du bétails engraissé étaient qualifiés en rendement (Y1). Ce nombre était à la baisse en 2010 avec un taux de seulement 50%. Six ans plus tard, ce chiffre dégringole toujours et affiche seulement 37% toujours dans la catégorie (Y1). Ces données proviennent des abattoirs inspectés ou 99% des carcasses sont abattues. Les croisements Charolais permettront d’obtenir une carcasse de bonne taille et à haut rendement. Ces résultats sont démontrés dans le programme C-C depuis quelques années. Dans une interview pour le magazine Charolais Connection, nous avons visité une entreprise de 400 femelles noires, saillies par des bœufs blancs où les veaux sont engraissés. La finition sur ces taures et bouvillions est exceptionnelle. L'approche aux croisement est plus lente que je l’aurais espéré mais ces croisements sont une formule gagnante pour tous. Cette automne, j’espère que vous planifiez sortir des têtes de votre troupeau à l’extérieur de la ferme. Que ce soit pour une vente ou à l’exposition locale, la promotion de la race est bénéfique pour l’industrie. Si vous n’êtes pas inscrit à une exposition, je vous invite à allez encourager ceux qui le font. La compétition au concours National d’Edmonton tiendra un volet spécial pour les taureaux d’un an qui sera intéressant à voir. Pour mon conseil de marketing du mois, je vous conseille de prendre le temps de faire vos photos de continued on page 81


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NEWS

Genomics Have Arrived For CCA Genetic Evaluation Doug Blair

The initial EPD run which includes Genomics has now been provided by Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI), our genetic evaluation service provider. AGI used the Spring 2018 EPD pedigree and performance dataset

and added information from DNA test results via the Single Step Method (SSE) to each animal in the CCA database that had been genotyped. The new EPDs have been evaluated and Genomics will be added to the CCA July EPD run.

Terms: EPD – Animals that have not been Genomic tested. GEPD – Animal that have been Genomic tested Evaluation Of Genomics:

Table 1. Number of genomically tested animals in the genetic evaluation and a comparison of EPD accuracy and EPD changes between the Spring 2018 and SSE evaluations.

* Lean Yield (LY) is a composite trait and thus does not have an associated accuracy value. Accuracy Table 1 shows that accuracies for the genomically tested animals increased for all traits, but especially for BW +.25, WW +.17, YW +.15, and CE +.14. These results are as good as or better than expected and will be a valuable improvement to the accuracy of EPDs. All accuracy improvement will not be the same as genomically tested animals with no progeny will in most cases, show more improvement. Animals that have more progeny already have higher accuracies and will in most cases, show less improvement. For example, animals with no progeny changed on average from EPD accuracy of .31 to GEPD .61 for birth weight, a change of +.30 while 14

animals with an average of twenty progeny changed from EPD .56 to GEPD .73, a change of +.17. Similar results for weaning weight, animals with no progeny moved from EPD accuracy of .19 to GEPD .38, a change of +.19 and animals with twenty progeny moved from accuracy of EPDs .43 to GEPD .53 a change of +.10. The greatest benefit for breeders to have genomics added to EPD evaluations, will be the evaluation of young animals before they have progeny. Change In EPDs The results in Table 1 show less than 1% change in EPD value for genomically tested animals across all traits. Most animals GEPDs will be close to their current EPD however, Charolais Banner • August 2018

for some individual animals there will be a significant change. This is to be expected as whenever there is a change in information such as the addition of genomics or progeny, changes occur. Genomics adds significantly more information. Table 1 shows the Minimum and Maximum changes experienced by the 1365 genomic tested animals in this evaluation. Animals that have not been genomic tested will likely not experience much change in their EPDs however if their parents, grandparents, contemporaries or progeny have been genomic tested and have changed significantly in a trait, there will be some impact. Another way to look at Genomics continued on page 18


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NOUVELLES

Les valeurs génomiques font maintenant parties des évaluations génétiques Charolais Doug Blair

Les premiers EPD contenant des valeurs génomiques, ont été récemment calculés par Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI), notre fournisseur de services d'évaluation génétique. AGI a utilisé l'ensemble de données EPD du printemps 2018 provenant des généalogies et de la performance

et a y ajouté les résultats des tests d’ADN qui ont été fait par le biais de la méthode « étape unique (EU) » pour chaque animal dans la base de données de l’association qui avait été génotypée. Les nouveaux EPD ont été évalués et la valeur génomique sera ajoutée aux EPD de juillet.

Termes: EPD – animaux qui n'ont pas été testés pour la génomique. GEPD – animaux qui ont été testés pour la génomique Évaluation de la génomique:

Tableau 1. Nombre d'animaux testés génomiquement pour l'évaluation génétique et comparaison de la précision (répétabilité) des EPD et des changements d'EPD entre les évaluations printanières 2018 et la méthode étape unique.

*Le rendement maigre est une combinaison de caractères et ne possède pas de valeur de répétabilité. Précision/Répétabilité Le tableau 1 démontre que les précisions pour les animaux testés pour la génomique augmentaient pour tous les caractères, surtout pour le poids à la naissance +.25, le poids au sevrage +.17, le poids à un an +.15 et la facilite de vêlage +.14. Ces résultats sont aussi bons ou même meilleurs que prévu et constitueront une amélioration appréciable de 16

l'exactitude des EPD. Les améliorations de précision ne seront pas toutes pareilles car les animaux testés génomiquement sans descendance démontreront dans la plupart des cas, la plus grande amélioration. Les animaux qui ont des progénitures, ont déjà des précisions plus élevées et dans la plupart des cas, démontrent moins d’écarts. Par exemple, les animaux sans descendance ont Charolais Banner • August 2018

changé en moyenne l'exactitude de leurs EPD de 0.31 à 0.61 GEPD pour le poids à la naissance, un changement de +0.30 tandis que les animaux avec une moyenne de vingt progénitures ont changé la précision de leurs EPD de 0.56 à 0. 73 pour les GEPD, un changement de +.17. Des résultats similaires pour le poids du sevrage, les animaux sans suite à la page 18


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OBITUARY

Ken Poole 1933 – 2018

Kenneth Lorne Polled, aged 84 years of Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, passed away on May 26. Ken was born on December 10, 1933. He was raised and farmed in the Moose Jaw district, just south of the city. Two of his favourite loves

were Holstein and Charolais cattle. They ran Pooledale Charolais from the early 1970s for many years and were very active in the 1980s showing cattle across the prairies at numerous summer and fall shows. Ken was also a director on the Saskatchewan Charolais Association Board of Directors for a couple of terms. Ken was a passionate junior

hockey supporter in Moose Jaw for many decades. He was predeceased by his wife, MaryAnn. Ken is survived by his special companion Zena Robinson and her family, sister-in-law Geraldine Kobylanski and her family; sister Fern (Will) Maisonneuve; as well as numerous nieces, nephews and cousins.

GENOMICS, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14 is to equate it to progeny equivalents. Table 2 below shows the approximate number of progeny required to have the same information from a genomic test. Table 2. Progeny records roughly equivalent to the information provided from a genotype test in the SSE. Milk equivalents are expressed as grand progeny from daughters. Carcass traits are

expressed as ultrasound record equivalents.

Breeder Action Plan to genomic test your bulls and significant females as young as practical. Genomics is a valuable new tool to significantly improve evaluation of animals, improve selection decisions and speed breed progress. The above EPD evaluation was submitted by AGI and the Tables and data above supplied by Sean McGrath.

GÉNOMIQUES, SUITE DE LA PAGE 16 descendance sont passés de l'exactitude de leurs EPD de 0.19 à 0.38 GEPD, un changement de +0.19 et les animaux avec vingt progénitures sont passés de la précision de leurs EPD 0.43 à 0.53 pour leurs GEPD; un changement de +.10. Le plus grand avantage d'avoir la génomique ajoutée aux évaluations EPD pour les éleveurs, sera l’exactitude de l'évaluation des jeunes animaux avant qu'ils aient de la progéniture. Changement des EPD Les résultats du tableau 1 montrent une variation de moins de 1% pour la valeur EPD pour les animaux testés en génomique pour tous les caractères. Pour la plupart des animaux avec des GEPD, les valeurs seront très semblables à celles des EPD traditionnels, mais pour certains animaux, il y aura un changement significatif. Il est tout fait normal qu’il y ait du changement avec l’ajout d'information comme la génomique ou de la progéniture. La génomique ajoute de l’information en grande 18

masse. Le tableau 1 montre les changements minimaux et maximaux observés par les 1365 animaux testés pour la génomique dans cette évaluation. Les animaux qui n'ont pas été testés en génomique ne subiront probablement pas beaucoup de changements au niveau de leurs EPD cependant, si leurs parents, grands-parents, contemporains ou descendants ont été testés en génomique et ont changé de façon significative pour un caractère, il y aura un certain impact. Une autre façon d'examiner l’impact de la génomique est de l'assimiler aux équivalents du nombre de descendants. Le tableau 2 ci-dessous, montre le nombre approximatif de descendants pour équivaloir un test génomique. Tableau 2. Le nombre de données provenant de progéniture équivalent à l'information obtenu par un test de génotype à étape unique. Les équivalents pour le lait sont calculés selon la progéniture des filles. Les évaluations de carcasses sont Charolais Banner • August 2018

exprimées en équivalents de données échographique. Action Éleveur Prévoyez de tester génomiquement vos taureaux et vos femelles importantes aussi jeunes que possible. La génomique est un nouvel outil précieux pour améliorer de manière significative l'évaluation des animaux, améliorer les décisions de sélection et accélérer les progrès de la race. L'évaluation EPD ci-dessus a été soumise par AGI et les tableaux et données ci-dessus fournis par Sean McGrath.


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NEWS

Charolais Life This column will be dedicated to keeping Charolais members in touch with the people of the business. It will contain births, weddings, convocations and momentous anniversaries and events of note, but not high school graduations. If you have news and/or photos you’d like to submit, please email charolaisbanner@gmail.com for print in upcoming issues.

Potter Convocates Emily Potter convocated from the University of Guelph with a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, majoring in Animal Science. Emily is a CCYA Alumni and plans to work in the beef industry. She is the daughter of Barry Liz Potter, Potter Charolais, Earlton, Ontario. Rosso Convocates Raelynne Rosso, from Rosso Charolais, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, convocated from Lakeland College, Vermilion, Alberta, with an Animal Science Technology Diploma. She is currently the secretary on the CCYA National Board and daughter of Kevin Rosso, CCYA Alumni. McLeod Convocates Megan McLeod convocated with a Bachelor of Commerce Degree with Honours in Marketing. In her final year of studies she completed an independent international research study, called “How COOL is Canadian Beef? An Exploration of European Consumer Attitudes,” which studied how we can effectively market Canadian beef to the European consumer market and change European perceptions towards our industry and products. Megan is a CCYA Alumni and daughter of Rod and April McLeod, 50

McLeod Livestock, Cochrane, Alberta. Weinbender Convocates Laura Weinbender convocated from the University of Saskatchewan with a Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness with a Minor in Field Crop Production. She is currently employed as a Crop Specialist with Grain Millers Canada, Yorkton, Saskatchewan. Laura is a CCYA Alumni and the daughter of Carey and LeeAnn Weinbender, of Sliding Hills Charolais, Canora, Sask. Rural Alberta Youth Grabs 4-H Top Honours Evan Jamieson, from Dalemead, Alberta, is the 2018 4-H Alberta Premier’s Award recipient. Evan is a nineyear member of the Bow Valley Beef and Multi 4-H Club, and was chosen from among the province’s top 4-H members to receive this prestigious award during the annual 4-H Selections program at Olds College. The Premier’s Award was started in 1964 to recognize the accomplishments of youth in rural Alberta. 4-H members and leaders continue to be instrumental in keeping rural communities strong, developing skills in leadership and giving back to their communities through volunteer work and developing their skills and expertise in agriculture and other project areas. The Premier’s Award recipient represents 4-H Alberta at various regional 4-H and agricultural events Charolais Banner • August 2018

throughout the year and will also have the opportunity to meet with the Premier and minister of Agriculture and Forestry. Evan is a CCYA Alumni and son of Neil and Laurie Jamieson, CCYA Honourees in 2016. Summer Synergy Three Charolais youth received scholarships at Calgary Stampede's Summery Synergy. Ward Marshall, Innisfail; Bret Marshall, Innisfail, and Logan Jamieson, Dalemead, each received $1000. In 7 years Charolais youth have received $77,500 in Scholarships. Bret Marshall

Ward Marshal

Logan Jamieson

It’s A Girl! Guthrie Isabel Barber was born on March 22, 2018, weighing 8 lb., 15 oz. and 21.5 inches long. Proud parents are Haylan Jackson and Del Barber of Inglis, Manitoba. Haylan is a CCYA Alumni. Guthrie is the first grandchild of Carman and Donna Jackson, High Bluff Stock Farm.


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HERD HEALTH

Lameness Diagnosis and Treatment Roy Lewis DVM

There are many different causes of lameness in either the cow-calf or finishing sector of the cattle industry. Making the correct diagnosis or recognizing specific clinical entities will alter specific treatments that are given. This article will review most common lameness issues and what common solutions are available, and may help you get more favorable outcomes and potentially use fewer antibiotics. Remember lameness is the symptom caused by pain. We need to find the cause of that pain. Pain control in many cases may be justified as well to either help with recovery or ease the pain until other things can be done. There are infectious versus non-infectious causes of lameness. Trauma or injury are examples of non-infectious causes of lameness so antibiotics are often not necessary. Sometimes waiting one day will get resolution of the lameness indicating a sprain strain or sole bruise. Most producers diagnose lame cattle as “footrot” and antibiotics are given. Some recover but many don’t, as footrot is not what the animal is dealing with. With you as producers often making the call, the first advice with a lame animal is have as good a look as you can. With the animal walking and then in the chute where the whole leg is checked over and the foot lifted up. Footrot classical signs are the swollen foot with toes spread apart and often an open smelly wound between the toes. Cleaning the area up they often respond nicely to one course of antibiotics. If they don’t, it is most often something else. In wetter conditions in some farms and feedlots, digital dermatitis is increasing in incidence. These cattle are extremely sore especially over the back of the foot into the heel bulbs. They often try and walk on their 68

tiptoes to avoid the back of the hoof and heel bulbs contacting the ground. They can become chronic and hard to treat but tetracycline sprays or bandaging (bandages need to be removed) with tetracycline antibiotics and potentially the use of footbaths is what your veterinarian may recommend. If wrapped though they need to be removed in a day or two tops. Wraps can hold in moisture and worsen the condition so be careful. Another primarily feedlot lameness is called toe-tip necrosis and it develops just how its described. The bony end of the last bone in the toe gets necrotic or dead and causes tremendous pain over the end of the toe and almost a three-legged lameness. This condition is more often seen in fractious cattle and it is believed may start with transportation or processing of cattle. I am convinced that we have made traction of cattle a top priority in our chutes and alley systems. The struggling and pushing against these rigid traction bars may pull away the sensitive part of the toe. The hoof gets lifted off and the process starts. These become chronic and severely lame and removing the tip of the toe to facilitate drainage may be curative. You can see foot rot and digital dermatitis relatively easily, whereas toe tip necrosis is not. Some veterinarians are even amputating the toe on a case-by-case basis with good results. The last three examples footrot, digital dermatitis and toe tip necrosis all carry vastly different treatments and prognosis. Your veterinarian often may need to help you diagnose these different lamenesses all involving the foot. The cases need to have individual treatment time and attention paid to them. Dr. Karin Orsel an experienced bovine veterinarian at the UCVM (University of Calgary Veterinary Medicine) presented on helping Charolais Banner • August 2018

producers come up with a diagnosis by watching the type of lameness. Close examination of the feet and legs of our livestock when lameness is detected is critical to making the correct diagnosis. A good video of the lameness that can be replayed will definitely help and provides a comparison later to see if the lameness is improving. Even the facial expressions of the cattle can help determine if the lameness is painful. Lameness also creates one of the highest levels of pain so often painkillers are part of the treatment prescribed by veterinarians on their lameness protocols. We now have pain killers approved injectably, orally and pour on products each with different withdrawal periods. It could be argued that painkillers facilitate healing and recovery more than antibiotics do. With footrot, cleaning the wound out and allowing air in will kill the organism, with digital dermatitis topical and not parenteral tetracycline is more effective. With toe tip necrosis facilitating drainage or the toe amputations are the curative measures taken. Straight sole abscesses that we often see in dairy cows or breeding beef bulls also clear up rather quickly once drainage is established. You may see cattle throwing the lame leg in or out trying to avoid weight on the claw that is affected. Other lamenesses may be the result of joint infections often caused by Mycoplasma or histophilus, two bugs that can also cause pneumonia among other things. Your veterinarian may need to culture these joints to see what the bug is and although recovery is not likely, there may be preventative measures for the rest of the herd. Trauma and/or nerve damage round out most of the common causes of lameness in most cattle. Mature cows and bulls can develop bad cracks, corkscrew and other hoof continued on page 70


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INDUSTRY NEWS

Canadian Beef Breeds Council Report Michael Latimer, CBBC Executive Director

One of the core mandates of CBBC is the promotion of Canadian beef cattle genetics in select countries around the world. This includes the development of the International Market Development Strategy which is a collaborative effort between breed associations, live cattle and genetic exporters, livestock exhibitions, government and industry organizations. These organizations work together through a series of independent activities designed to achieve the goal of increased recognition and opportunities for Canadian beef cattle genetics. What isn’t mentioned are the cattle and the farmers and ranchers who raise them, which obviously play an important role in accessing international markets. Without the right cattle to sell into a particular international market, our efforts are a moot point. As a producer there are a few key actions that you can do to develop cattle for an international market and then capitalize by selling into that particular market. This will vary across breeds, country and whether you are exporting live cattle, semen or embryos. However, there are

several factors which are common. International breeders require as much information as possible, which generally includes breed association pedigree and performance data (EPDs) along with phenotype information, such as birth weights, yearling weights, and mature weights. This allows them to compare and identify the genetics that will be best suited to their breeding program based on information which is standard across most countries. There is a lot of competition from other countries and other breeders, so without this basic information there is very little chance of selling into these markets. Another important step is to develop a marketing plan for your cattle operation. You may have a plan for marketing within Canada (or the USA) but international markets require additional effort or a different approach. Even if you have cattle that are well suited for a particular market, you still need to have a plan for how you are going to sell into that market. Understanding the market you are focusing on is critical in this plan and you shouldn’t assume that what works in Canada is what will work in a particular international country.

HERD HEALTH, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 68 deformities as well as interdigital often not the answer and each case fibromas (corns). Again by careful must be evaluated individually. If observations these issues can be cattle don’t respond to the treatment detected and your veterinarian or it is imperative to have another look. good hoof trimmer may be able to Next time one goes to treat lameness improve the situation. Septic arthritis because of the diagnosis of footrot I of the last joint underneath the hoof want you to ask yourself two things. results in a severely lame cow or bull Is it really footrot or another diagnosis and are antibiotics and often results in claw amputation necessary. If it is something you have or drilling out the joint by your not seen before, perhaps your veterinarian under anesthesia so it veterinarian should be advised and will fuse and a sound animal with an help you with the diagnosis and a enlarged claw is the result. protocol for that type of lameness in You can see with every lameness the future. The outcome will be more there are many different causes and favorable and while painkillers may treatment options your veterinarian be prescribed in most cases less may use. With most, antibiotics are 70

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Even within a country there are different requirements and preferences depending on the needs of the purchaser. In most cases you can either choose to market your cattle yourself or you may choose to contact companies who are currently working in that particular market. In most cases this isn’t accomplished overnight but over years of relationship building and developing genetics that work in a particular international market. The Canadian Beef Industry Conference will once again be held August 14-16, 2018 in London Ontario. This conference has quickly become the meeting place for the beef industry and I encourage you to attend. It is a great place to meet other cattle producers and enjoy some time away from the ranch while still ‘working’. The keynote speaker is Rex Murphy who is sure to inform and entertain you with his provocative commentary on Canadian politics. The CBBC will be hosting its second annual Technical Forum at CBIC which will focus on the science and of cattle breeding. There is more information available on the website www.canadianbeefindustry.com. antibiotics will be used. This article applies to cattle at home or out on pasture. Getting the right diagnosis is critical. Talk to your veterinarian about the changes coming regarding all antibiotics requiring prescriptions. For the vast majority of you with a good working relationship with your veterinarian, there should be very little change. The most visible to purebred producers is that tetracyclines and penicillins will not be available anywhere but through the veterinary practices. Have a great summer grazing season everyone.


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ASSOCIATION NEWS

2018 Honour Roll Recipients Brian & Doris Aitken

Brian took over his parent’s small dairy operation in 1976 and married Doris in 1977. Together they operated Bridor Holsteins on their 150 acre home. It was at this location that Brian was born and raised. Once this became the Bridor farm, Brian’s parents moved up the road and started their semi-retirement with a herd of Charolais cows. During the 35 years of Bridor Holsteins, they had many high notes! As well as running the farm, they were heavily involved in 4-H. Together they completed 25 years of being leaders and had several 4-H kids borrowing calves. Some years as many as a dozen kids came to Bridor for their 4-H calves. The emphasis on high type cows was always evident which naturally led them to the showring. The Bridor herd received several awards from the showring to the top milk production and even putting a homebred bull in AI. With 2004 bringing the biggest accomplishment of the dairy career, being recognized as a Master Breeder herd by Holstein Canada. In the next 5 years a succession plan was implemented to see their nephew Corey Rae and wife Kimberly take over the Dairy Farm while the Aitkens moved up the road to semi-retire with the Charolais herd, just as Brian’s parents did. 80

This herd was partially started with the purchase of a calf from herd vet and good friend, Brian Hicks, in 1992. Just as they did with the Holsteins, the Bridor Charolais herd was also heavily promoted in the showring. They had Junior Champion Female in 1996 with Bridor Elenore, who returned to the Royal as Reserve Senior Champion Female in 2010. Bridor Elenor proved to be a prominent brood cow as she was the Paternal Granddam to Hicks Kasino, who was Grand Champion Bull at the Royal in 2001 and 2002. Kasino was also named BOSS Show Bull in 2001. In 2004, a Kasino son named Bridor Myron was Reserve Champion at the Royal. In more recent years, Bridor Connie 1C was Heifer Calf Champion at the Royal and Reserve Heifer Calf Champion at Agribition in 2015. Bridor Chevy 12C was Bull Calf Champion and Reserve Grand Champion, also in 2015 at the Royal. Doris became secretary and director of the OCA in 1998 and still holds these positions today. While tending to these duties and helping on the farm, Doris worked full time at the North Wellington Co-op in Mount Forest for 23 years, but recently retired. In 2009, Doris was awarded the Woman of Excellence in Agriculture Award, which recognizes Charolais Banner • August 2018

women that tirelessly contribute to excellence in agriculture. At home on the farm, the Bridor homesteads were always simple, yet tidy and impressive operations with very minimal hired help. Brian had most of the equipment he needed to crop his land, mainly to make feed. One of Brian’s hobbies was team penning, which he did with a group of friends for several years, leading him to winning the Ontario Team Penning Championship in 1997. In 2007, the Aitkens were recipients of the first Don Turnbull Award at the Royal. Don Turnbull was a good friend and mentor to Brian and Doris. This award is presented to a Charolais Breeder who shows integrity, excels in herd management and ultimately promotes the breed to the best of their ability. This is very evident in Brian and Doris as they either attend, participate or organize most Ontario Charolais events. In fact, Bridor Charolais has been an exhibitor at the Royal for 25 years. They are comanagers of the annual High Point Bull Sale, as well as the Uppin’ the Ante Sale, an annual female sale. When these two decide to put their feet up, they don’t head to the beach, they go to Regina. Brian and Doris have been attending Agribition regularly for a quarter century. Brian and Doris have a close relationship with Corey and Kimberly and their three children, Owen, Kayden and Kalista. Anyone that knows Brian and Doris personally, know that family comes first. This Great Aunt and Uncle are more like parents and grandparents. Since the kids came along, Brian’s tractor is in need of a bigger buddy seat as he is seldom in there alone. Now with Doris’s retirement, the kids have her baking muffins and cookies steady. Brian jokingly said when he bought his first Charolais, they were his RRSPs, but it looks like they won’t be retiring from the Charolais business anytime soon.


ASSOCIATION NEWS

Manitoba Charolais AGM

Brad & Juanita Cline received the Breeder of the Year Award from Scott Johnston

Shirley & Ron Allan, Rathwell, received the Commercial Producer of the Year Award from Scott Johnston.

The 51st Annual General Meeting of the Manitoba Charolais Association was held at the farm of Brad and Juanita Cline, Cline Cattle Co., near Belmont. A hot day and good haying weather, along with weddings and everything else that happens in the summer, did hamper the crowd size. 17% of the membership attended the meeting. Those that attended had a good time and were treated to some great hospitality. Hans Myhre, Dauphin, was reelected president of the Manitoba Charolais Association at their Annual General Meeting held July 14 at Belmont. Jeff Cavers, LaRiviere was re-elected 1st-Vice President while

Matthew Ramsey, Strathclair, fills the 2nd Vice-President position and Rae Trimble-Olson, Portage la Prairie stays on as Secretary-Treasurer. Re-elected to the board of directors for three-year terms were Scott Johnston, Rathwell and Ron McDonald, Sidney and for a one-year term Brad Cline, Belmont. Newly elected to the board for three-year terms were Erin Jackson, Inglis and Kevin Stebeleski, Oakburn, replacing retiring directors Trent Hatch, Oak Lake and Rob Gilliland, Virden. For the year ending 2017, the financial report showed assets at just under $15,000 with total revenue for the year of $46,500 and expenses of

$55,700 or a loss of just over $9,100. Some of this was attributed to the National show in Brandon last fall and the Bulletin due to some year over year accounting. The Bulletin is now down to two issues a year. Although the National show cost some money it was considered a huge success with 60 commercial producers attending and participating in the jackpot bull show. 13 of the 16 producer sponsored $1,000 sale credits were used this spring as well. Sponsorship is the largest expenditure with 63 4-H youth receiving leather show comb holders in 2017. Youth Beef Roundup and producer awards also contributed to the $5,000 budget as did two $750 scholarships to Keegan Blehm, LaRiviere and Lindsay Verway, Portage la Prairie. The promotion budget was over $2,400 and the Advertising invested in Cattle Country and Radio advertising was $5,800. Mel Reekie, General Manager of the CCA, attended and gave an update of the national association affairs. After the meeting, people were encouraged to look at the 15 pens of cattle which included cow/calf pairs both purebred and commercial and yearling heifers which were judged by locals Chad Thompson and Terry Fehr and prizes awarded before supper. Also presented was the Breeder of the Year award as voted on at the meeting with Brad and Juanita Cline being the recipients. The Commercial Producer of the Year Award was also presented to Ron and Shirley Allan, of Rathwell. A nice supper was served to about 60 people, including local commercial producers and friends, and visiting continued into the evening.

opération agricole, vous pouvez ajouter ces dépenses à votre prochain retour d’impôts. Il est maintenant venu le temps de me diriger vers la conférence

annuelle des jeunes éleveurs Charolais et la participation de 12 jeunes provenant de huit différents pays. À la prochaine, Helge

Manitoba Charolais Association Board of Directors: (L-R) Erin Jackson, Inglis; Shawn Airey, Rivers (CCA director); Tyler Stewart, Foxwarren; Kevin Stebeleski, Oakburn; Jeff Cavers, LaRiviere (1st Vice-President); Scott Johnston, Rathwell; Hans Myhre, Dauphin (President); Ron McDonald, Sidney; Matthew Ramsey, Strathclair (2nd Vice-President); Jim Olson, Portage la Prairie (CCA director); Rae Trimble-Olson, Portage la Prairie (Sec-Treas.); Brad Cline, Belmont; (Missing: Andre Steppler, Miami; Michael Hunter, Roblin and Jared Preston, Ste-Rose

DU CHAMP, SUITE DE LA PAGE 10 famille maintenant. Elles peuvent être utilisés sur vos carte d’affaires, dans vos annonces et les catalogues de ventes. De plus, lorsqu’elles sont utilisées comme dépenses pour votre

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CANADIAN CHAROLAIS YOUTH ASSOCIATION NEWS

2018 Conference Offers New Opportunities Wyatt Ching, Vice President

Hello, I hope everyone’s summer is going well. The 2018 CCYA Conference in Brandon, Manitoba, is fast approaching and looks like it is going to be a good one. There are many new and exciting things happening at this year’s conference. Instead of the infamous mixer that has been a CCYA staple for many years, this year there will be a steak cook off. Each herdsman group will be given two steaks to cook for the judges, the group will be responsible for gathering supplies and preparing a CCYA NATIONAL BOARD charolaisyouth@gmail.com President: Shelby Evans sle379@mail.usask.ca Vice-President: Wyatt Ching w.ching476@gmail.com Treasurer: Aidan Jamieson awjamieson@gmail.com Secretary: Raelynne Rosso littlerosso@hotmail.ca

complete steak supper for 2 judges. It will be interesting to see how much culinary talent our members have. An exciting new program for younger members at the conference is the Little Chars program. The Little Chars program is designed to help peewee members get more out of the conference. It will be a morning of fun, educational activities for them that will be led and organized by past CCYA senior members. This year we have several international guests attending the conference. There will be senior members from Czech Republic, Director: Bret Marshall blm5012@cesd73.ca Director: Keegan Blehm keegb34@yahoo.ca Director: Tyson Black blackbern@hotmail.com Director: Bradley Fergus bradleyfergus3@gmail.com Ex-Officio: Shae-Lynn Evans evans32s@uregina.ca

Estonia, Ireland, USA, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and Sweden. There will be an international senior placed in each herdsman group and they will get to participate in the whole conference with us. We are really excited to have these international visitors at our conference, as it will be very interesting to hear how they do things in their country and show them how we do things here. The Manitoba planning committee has done a fantastic job planning another great conference and I hope to see you all there.

2018 CCYA Conference & Show Exec. President: Lindsay Verwey Vice-President: Keegan Blehm Treasurer: Randi Verwey Secretary: Kiernan Olson CCYA Provincial Advisors SK: Suzanne Smyth | suzannetylersmyth@gmail.com ON: Karen Black | blackbern@hotmail.com MB: Donna Jackson | Jackson7@mymts.net AB: Kasey Phillips | kphillips@mcsnet.ca Youth Coordinator: Kirstin Sparrow kp.sparrow@hotmail.com

OBITUARY

Ron Lacey 1941 – 2018

It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of our dear Ron on Wednesday, July 18, 2018. At the time of his passing he was surrounded by loved ones. Ron was born on May 15, 1941, to Arthur and Anne Lacey. In 1968, he married the love of his life, Joanne, and they were blessed with a son Tod and a daughter Nancy. Ron, not ever being afraid to take a risk, started his early years as a hairdresser, he then 82

decided to try his hand at farming and moved into the Charolais cattle business, which he loved. Ron was a promoter and doer and in the ‘70s was very active. He was Chairman of the CCA Convention in Brandon in 1977 and hosted over 300 at the MCA summer picnic on their farm south of Brandon in 1978. They dispersed in October of 1980. Going back to his roots, Ron bought the hairdressing school and built Hairitage Salon. He then decided he wanted to work with Tod and started a used car business, and from there everything grew Charolais Banner • August 2018

...including the family. Ron has three precious grandchildren: Carson, Brooklyn and Easton, whom he loved dearly and always made sure they knew it. He was predeceased by his wife Joanne, father and mother, sister Bonnie and grandbaby Noah. Ron leaves to cherish his memory, Tod (Colleen), Nancy (Jeff); Carson, Brooklyn and Easton, and special friend Charlotte. Ron leaves us the legacy of a remarkable life. We will all be forever grateful to have been a part of it.


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ASSOCIATION NEWS

Alberta Charolais Summer Tour

This year the Alberta Charolais herd tour was held in the southern part of the province. On June 30, over 200 people joined in this annual event. The first stop was at Turnbull Charolais, Pincher Creek, where everyone enjoyed a great breakfast and herd tour. The next stop was at

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Nelson Hersche Purebreds, Del Bonita, where we were greeted with a BBQ lunch and a great display of cattle, plus a chance to see this amazing facility. The final stop of the day was at Coyote Flats Charolais, Coaldale. The tour included the purebred herd along with the feedlot. The day

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concluded with a wonderful dinner and the ACA auctioned off the cover spots in the new ACA Breeder Directory. The hospitality that was received from the Turnbull, Nelson, Hersche and Lohues families was second to none and very much appreciated.


OBITUARY

John Rudiger 1934 – 2018

John Rudiger lived life to the fullest. It was always pedal to the metal and go all in, every hand. John was always thinking of what he could do to create some excitement and was always full of enthusiasm in everything he did. Telling the world about Charolais cattle was John’s passion since 1958 when he sold 50 commercial cows to buy a handful of this new breed he heard about. In 1960, a small group of breeders met at the Palliser Hotel in Calgary to form the Canadian Charolais Association. John became a director and continued to serve until 1969 and again from 1994 to 1999. (That’s nearly 40 years) When the Saskatchewan Charolais Association was formed in 1963, John served as its first president. He understood that for the breed to flourish, the associations also had to grow and dedicated time and effort to ensure it happened. And it wasn’t just in Canada as he was an influence in Mexican and American Associations in the early years. Our friend Manuel Garza from Mexico stated that John was at the 1st meeting of the Charolais Herd Book International and believes John was on the executive representing American and Canadian breeders. John’s entrepreneurial nature moved the family from the Cutknife farm his father started in 1910, to their present home on the west side of Calgary, in 1968. At the peak of production on Rudiger Ranch, they ran about 350 purebred females. The family was very involved working and showing Charolais when they were growing up. Their home became a showcase of their lives, Rudiger Ranch history, show road success and Charolais memorabilia gathered from their travels around the world. When the Charolais Banner was started in 1966, John signed up for the back cover, a

position he held for many, many years. The production of a leaner meat had to be sold to consumers through a higher profile campaign. John, along with Rodney James, John Owen and Harvey Smith, formed Charolais Beef Products in 1968. They sold Charolais bulls to commercial ranchers and contracted to buy back their calves and finish them. They marketed the meat as Charolais beef to restaurants and retail customers across Canada. The Lake Bonavista Inn, in Calgary, priced steaks at a premium over their regular menu steaks and Charolais out sold them. Charolais Beef Products introduced aged, cryovaced, frozen loins to the restaurant trade. John thought it was a great program, but it was probably 25 years ahead of its time. This was branded beef 50 years ago. As Rodney James wrote in his book, “this was the brain child of John’s.” John understood branding and the lazy JR brand was visibly part of his marketing. It was not only on his cattle, belt buckles, hats and boots, but everywhere he could put it – in their patio bricks at the front of their house and even in the ceramic tile in their shower. The list of awards John and Rowana received is a testament to their long-standing commitment to the breed: 1st on the Saskatchewan Charolais Association Honour Scroll in 1991; 1st on the Canadian Charolais Association Honour Roll in 1999; Alberta Charolais Association Pioneer of the Year, 1998; Canadian Cattleman of the Year at Denver Stock Show, 2001 and the ACA Breeder of the Year, 2005. There isn’t anyone else who has maintained a Charolais membership as continuously and enthusiastically since the start of the CCA. When the importations from France became a reality in 1965 John was there and made countless trips to France selecting cattle to import and did so for 14 consecutive years. After Charolais Banner • August 2018

years of importing genetics, John started to realize the potential for Canadian genetics around the world. No matter where John traveled, he promoted Charolais cattle. Everyone was a potential customer in John’s eyes. His tireless promotion of the breed saw him exporting cattle, embryos and semen to Egypt, England, Scotland, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, France, U.S.A., Brazil and Cuba. They showed and sold cattle in Guadalajara, Mexico; Houston, Denver, Las Vegas, Reno, and San Francisco, besides Canada. A definite highlight in their showing career was the 2006 World Charolais Congress Full French Show in Edmonton where they won Grand Champion Bull and Grand Champion Female. They have attended many Charolais International Congresses: Canada 1967, 1975, 1986 & 2006, Mexico 1990 & 2002, Brazil 2004, Hungary-Slovakia-Czech Republic 2008, and United States 2010. Charolais have been John’s passion, but he also had other interest that showed his ability to go for it. He owned and flew his own plane for 40 years. They also bred, raised and marketed Arabian horses for many years and he and Rowana always enjoyed riding in the mountains together. John formed an Ostrich marketing company and imported many plane loads from Africa and Australia to sell here. From there to Emu, Elk, Boar goats, John sought opportunity in everything marketable. In the 1980s, John along with 5 others bought the huge Gang Ranch near Williams Lake, BC. John again saw opportunity to improve this operation with the use of Charolais bulls and they were a big part of the management for many years. John was larger than life at times and always led by example. When many people resisted change and continued on page 86

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ASSOCIATION NEWS

Saskatchewan Charolais AGM

Saskatchewan Charolais Association Board of Directors (Front L-R) Jared McTavish, Moosomin (1st Vice-President); Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw (President); Stephen Wielgosz, Yellow Creek (2nd Vice-President). (Back L-R) Jordan Moore, Redvers; Mike Neilson, Willowbrook; Tyler Smyth, Swift Current; Matt Jones, Gull Lake; Raymond Paschke, Love.

Dave Blechinger receives a belt buckle as an appreciation gift for his years on the board of the SCA from president Kelly Howe.

The 55th Annual Saskatchewan Charolais Association Annual General Meeting was held July 21st at McTavish Charolais near Moosomin.

12% of the voting membership were in attendance and about 40 were on hand for the steak supper afterwards. Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, was re-elected President, with Jared McTavish, Moosomin re-elected 1st VicePresident and Stephen Wielgosz, Yellow Creek retaining the position of 2nd Vice-President. Dave Blechinger, Rosetown stepped off the board and the position of Secretary-Treasurer after many years and that position was not filled at the meeting. Re-elected to another three-year term on the nine member board were

Kelly Howe and Tyler Smyth, Swift Current, while Kurtis Phillips, Estevan was elected to his first term. The 2017 financial statement showed net earnings of over $2,700 on revenues of $63,700 and expenses of $61,000 with assets over $51,000. Advertising and Promotion was one of the biggest expenditures in the budget at over $14,000. They put up signs in several auction markets and are running video on the Heartland Livestock TVs across Saskatchewan and into Manitoba. They invested in more coffee cups and had Bob Jackson their fieldman attend industry events at Agribition, Cattle Genetics Round Up in Langham, SBIC in Saskatoon and Sask. Stock Growers AGM. They also sponsored at the Edam Fall Fair. In 2017, 98 promo items were sent out to 4-H members in 27 different clubs that showed Charolais sired animals. The SCA also sponsored youth events; Sask. Beef Expo, CCYA, Yorkton Spring Steer and Heifer Show, Young Ranchmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s , Junior Beef Extreme and Lloydminster Spring Steer and Heifer show. Mel Reekie, CCA general manager, gave a report and was available for questions. Following the AGM a pen show with 22 entries was held and judged by Rob Young, Carievale and Sheldon Kyle, Redvers, followed by award presentations and supper.

RUDIGER, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 85 technology, John embraced it. He learned how to use a computer and continued to market cattle through his laptop when they spent their time in Palm Desert. When the airplane was gone, the fifth wheel became a source of enjoyment and escape from Canadian winters. Rudiger Ranch hosted many events on behalf of the Charolais breed. Many government delegations 86

came to their place because of their proximity to Calgary and their excellent hospitality. John and Rowana knew how to host people. They hosted the World Charolais Congress one evening in 1986 and they were on the committee for the 2006 Congress. John is forever remembered by his loving wife Rowana of 48 years, his three children; Grace Rudiger Charolais Banner â&#x20AC;˘ August 2018

Jozwiak (Brian), Calvin Rudiger and Kirk Rudiger; his grandchildren Jennessa Waters, Morgan Rudger (Heather), Kaylee Rose Read (Josh), Travis Jozwiak (Yvonne) and Cody Rudiger (Emma) and well as greatgranddaughters Ava Wagner, Charlie Rudiger and Emma Read and many extended family and friends.


Think Outside the Fence was the theme of this event and it lived up to its name. Many people’s views were challenged in ways they did not expect. They did not always agree with the thoughts presented, but they definitely got food for thought. From the first session, people were faced with the influence of Artificial Intelligence in agriculture, something not many producers even considered. Marty Seymour, Director, Industry and Stakeholder Relations for FCC, presented the session on Market Ag Disruptors. Chris Lane, CEO of Canadian Western Agribition, was formerly with the CBC and was a multiple Gemini-winning TV news producer for CBC. Social Media Marketing was his topic and his upbeat presentation gave the attendees examples of what works and what doesn’t work, brand building, how to expand their social media market and where to focus their most time and energy. Marty and Chris attended the mixer following their sessions on the first evening and had a chance to

meet many of the producers and continue answering questions on their respective topics. Saturday morning started with a presentation on Bull Fertility by Steve Campbell, from Idaho. Steve was replacing Gearld Fry, who had to withdraw his participation due to illness. Steve has worked and presented with Gearld in the past and

his presentation did not disappoint. His views on identifying a bull’s fertility from visual appraisal were completely new to many of the participants. I am sure many will be studying their bull pen to see if they can utilize this information for profit in selection. Neil Burcham, from New Mexico, followed with a presentation on bulls

The weekend started with strong powerpoint presentations

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Helge By thanked Chris Lane and Marty Seymour for their presentations

Candace By thanked Sarah Novak for the social media class

Helge thanked Justin Morrison and Grant Alexander for sharing their expertise

from a different angle. Neil was a university professor for 48 years and a junior college professor two years before. The participants had many questions for both these presenters and they were often one-on-one with Charolais members. Sarah Novak, Marketing and Brand Manager at Canadian Western Agribition presented Social Media 2.0. In our first Breeder School, the attendees were introduced to the basics and all left with social media accounts and the ability to start. This presentation opened their minds to new possibilities. Sarah shared some apps to assist producers in making their posts/tweets more professional with easy add-ons and editing features. She gave examples of what works well and how each of the social media platforms differs. She also shared some of the pitfalls people fall into and how to avoid them. Judging by the number of questions and the number of people that were downloading apps even before she finished her presentation, it was a resounding success. The afternoon started with our two main presenters, Steve and Neil, doing live evaluations of bulls at Wilgenbusch Charolais. Craig Wilgenbusch was extremely generous when Helge and Neil went there prior to the event to select cattle for this afternoon. He turned them loose in his cull pen and said, “Take what you want, and say

Helge thanked Steve Campbell for sharing his knowledge

Helge thanked Neil Burcham for coming from New Mexico to provide leadership for the event

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Bull evaluation demonstration

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anything about them you want, they are not breeder bulls.” Neil was thrilled as he rubbed his hands together and said, “this is going to be good,” with a grin on his face. Many participants said it was a great afternoon. It was one thing to be told things in the classroom, but it was another thing to actually see them pointed out on live cattle. After the demonstration, the participants did some judging of 4 different bulls in three different scenarios. This was quite controversial and the participants and the judge generally did not agree. The official judge, judged the cattle by New Mexico standards and the participants judged them by Canadian standards. It created much discussion, which is healthy. Once again, one of the highlights was the Marketing Panel. We had sound system problems and were concerned about people being able to hear, but you could have heard a pin drop. Everyone was very attentive and didn’t want to miss a word. While listening to the presentations, I noticed many of the producers nodding their head in agreement and appreciation of their comments. Grant Alexander, Horseshoe Creek, spoke first describing his operation’s move to online sales and embryos marketing worldwide. In 2015, he marketed 534 embryos and his business has continued to grow. He said, “In this era, you have to be able


to use every avenue of marketing available.” He spoke of general marketing pitfalls as well and attributes a lot of his success to treating people with integrity. “Integrity will come back to pay you hundreds of thousands of times or it will break you. You have to treat people well.” Justin Morrison, Brooking Angus, followed explaining how he started his operation by working for someone and finally starting on his own with the assistance of FCC. Today they have a highly successful Angus operation with a bull sale that averaged over $10,000 this year. He has some different sale ideas and markets in a high profile way. “We knew we had to get a premium for out cattle to make it. We look at genetics, marketing and management. If you are weak in one of those areas, you will lose your premium. He talked about building his brand and how he utilized information he learned while

working for others. There were questions for both of these panel members and they were very well received. Many participants were astounded by the effort it takes to reach their level of success. Western Prime Meat Processors served a roast pig stuffed with sausage and Brenda and Tricia Wilgenbusch rounded the meal out with salads and dessert. It was scrumptious. Craig took producers on a tour of some of his herd before returning to the hotel for the night. Sunday started with a presentation by Steve Campbell on females and milk production. If a producer can use visual appraisal of a heifer calf to know if she is going to be a good milk producer with good butterfat, think of the profit implications? That is an outside the fence skill in visual appraisal that I am sure many producers will be testing on their replacement heifers in the next few years. Raising replacements that will stay in the herd for a long period of

time is a common goal. Neil Burcham talked about steers with a presentation on muscle and fat. Some producers that judge 4-H shows said they will be talking about the steer classes a little differently after this presentation. It was followed with a visit to Western Prime Meat Processors. Owner Mike Guest had 18 cuts of meat on display and the breeders had to try to name them. It was tougher than most people anticipated. Mike also brought out 3 separate carcass halves. The comparisons were obvious and only confirmed that Charolais is the breed of choice in meat production. Western Prime is also the home of Bandits Distilling and the group was treated to some sampling along with lunch. The event concluded with a visit to Beck Farms were the group judged heifers and steers for placings and then by memory recall for certain traits. Steve and Neil followed this with the live demonstrations and on the Beck Family 4-H heifers and steers. Actually seeing the visual milking markers on these heifers was continued on page 91

Mike Guest preparing to serve the pig roast

An attentive group listening to the marketing panel

Left: Everyone’s knowledge of beef cuts was tested. Right: Mike Guest identifying the differences in the carcasses and the location of the cuts displayed

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Charolais Charbray International AGM

CCI Delegates: Front (l-r): Dominque Louleruqe, 2nd Vice President, France; Lennart Nilsson, Past President, Sweden; Kevin Maguire, President, Ireland; Candace By, Secretary, Canada; Brendan Scheiwe, 1st Vice President, Australia, Cécile Lainé, Treasurer, France; Reet Pikkmets, Estonia. Middle (l-r): Zoltán Domokos, Hungary; Neil Orth, United States; Darwin Rosso, Canada; Kate Jordan, New Zealand; Francisco Elizondo, Mexico; Targo Pikkmets, Estonia; Mel Reekie, Canada; Nevin McKeirnan, Ireland. Back (l-r) David Hobbs, United States; Chris Curry, United Kingdom; Göran Mänsson, Sweden; Colin Rex, Australia; Istvan Pomichal, Slovakia; Márton Bujdosó, Hungary, Peter Phythian, United Kingdom

The Charolais International Annual General Meeting was held in conjunction with the World Charolais Congress in Sweden. President Lennart Nilsson chaired a very well attended meeting. Membership The membership report was circulated and the secretary, Candace By, asked for help with contact information for inactive countries. All countries receive the organization’s news and are invited to become members at any time. Contact information for the countries was circulated. Genomics Subcommittee The subcommittee has met quarterly and shared information about their respective paths in genomic development. It was decided to continue with the committee. Ben Harmon, United Kingdom, was named as the new chairperson. Quarterly General Assembly The delegates have met quarterly through meetings over the past year. 90

This is the first time the organization has held meetings outside of the faceto-face AGMs. The web meetings have been received favourably and participants felt they were beneficial. The new president and the secretary will call the next quarterly meeting in September. Charolais International Youth Program Helge By reported there are twelve youth participating in this year’s program from eight countries: United Kingdom, Ireland (2), Sweden (2), Australia (2), New Zealand, United States and Estonia (2). It is a very positive response for the first year of the program. It has also created a lot of excitement within countries as competitions were held to select the participants. It is important to encourage youth to become involved in future international events to keep Charolais International alive and growing. Australia will host the 2019 Charolais International Youth Program. The ages will be 18-24 and it will be held in the first week of Charolais Banner • August 2018

July. Funding for the 2019 year will continue with one person per active paid country receiving half of their travel and expenses to a maximum of 1000 Euros. Website Candace By presented the analytics of the website showing the viewership is truly worldwide. She encouraged countries to continue to send the updates and information to keep the site current. Kevin Maguire expressed a note of gratitude for the work done on the site. Statutes Over the past year, Peter Phythian and Ben Harmon of the United Kingdom have worked to update the statutes of the organization. They had not been updated since 1999. At the 2017 AGM, Mexico requested that Charbray be accepted into the organization to facilitate active member countries from areas where they flourish. This was accepted, but changing the name in the statutes needed to be voted on during an AGM. continued on page 91


OBITUARY

Lawrence Hector Moore 1932 – 2018

Lawrence passed away peacefully on March 2, 2018 at Broadview Nursing Home. Lawrence was born on the family farm at Redvers, Saskatchewan, on June 2, l932. He is survived by his wife of 64 years Lillian, and their family: Doug (Sharon, Jordan, Megan and Cody),

Andrew (Angie), Leila (Wayne), Isabelle (Ron), Colleen (Lyle), Lloyd (Linda), Lee. Lawrence worked pipeline and seismic across Canada before returning to the family farm at Redvers. While on the farm he continued to work in the oilfield as a battery operator. He purchased his purebred Charolais cattle in the 1960s and was

one of the founding members of the South East Charolais Group. Doug and Jordan continue to raise Charolais cattle under the CharlaMoore herd name. In 1986, Lawrence and Lillian moved to Redvers. He enjoyed curling, golfing, was on town council, and belonged to the Elks. He always enjoyed a game of cards and visiting. In 2011, they moved to Moosomin.

BREEDER SCHOOL, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 89 helpful to the producers. The day ended on a positive note as many people agreed with the official judge, Neil Burcham’s placings for the class. Awards were handed out for the various competitions throughout the weekend and Beck Farms took the group on a quick tour of the cowherd before serving supper. The weekend would not have been possible without the generous hospitality of Wilgenbusch Charolais, Beck Farms and Western Prime Meat Processors, thank you. Opening your doors to a group like this does not happen without some preparation and work, but having the ability to assess live and carcass cattle was key to the success of the event.

Heifer analysis at Beck Farms

CCI AGM, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 90 This was the most obvious change in the statutes. The statutes were adopted as presented unanimously. Event Protocol Colin Rex, Australia, explained the process for the creation of the document, which was written to assist new countries attending world events. It was adopted as a working document to accommodate changes as the organization evolves. There was discussion about the amount of time taken to make appreciation presentations at the Congress. This will be put on the agenda for the next quarterly meeting.

Future World Events 2019 World Technical Conference, Ireland, topic Genomics, open to any who wish to attend

Loulergue, France Treasurer – Cécile Lainé, France Secretary – Candace By, Canada

Election of Officers President – Kevin Maguire, Ireland 1st Vice President – Brendan Scheiwe, Australia 2nd Vice President – Dominique

Colin Rex wished to record a motion of appreciation for Lennart’s and Candace’s services for the work done in the past year. It has run smoothly and more work has been done than ever before. This was passed with a round of applause. President Lennart Nilsson thanked everyone for attending and for the appreciation expressed, which helped keep the organizing committee excited and working positively all week. He adjourned the meeting.

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2020 World Congress, Australia, August 2021 World Technical Conference, Czech Republic, May 2022 World Congress, United Kingdom


ASSOCIATION NEWS

Welcome New Members Nouveau Membres ASF CATTLE CO. Bjorkdale, SK

GOLDEN P FARMS Midale, SK

NORTHERN WAY CHAROLAIS Cecil Lake, BC

BRYLYN HOLDINGS INC Grafton, ON

JK CHAROLAIS Lansdowne, ON

PETER BORGEL Whitelaw, AB

CHRIS SEARS East Stewiacke, NS

KEITH & KATHLEEN BAKER Enterprise, ON

SHELDON & KRISTIE THOURET Hay Lakes, AB

CIRCLE R RANCH Fisher Branch, MB

KELLY SCHMIDT Drake, SK

SS BLACK CHAROLAIS Perkinson, MS, USA

D COLLETTE FARM Sainte-Marie-De Kent, NB

LAZY R CATTLE CO INC Joussard, AB

SUNRISE CHAROLAIS II Stayner, ON

D K CHAROLAIS Treherne, MB

LENARD BISCOPE Okotoks, AB

TRAILS EDGE CHAROLAIS Saskatoon, SK

DAVID FRECHETTE Bury, QC

LUTES FARM Steeves Mt, NB

BRAELEE FOLKINS Pearsonville, NB

DIAMOND BAR K FARM Ashern, MB

M AND H LAKE FARM Newport, NS

HILLCREST LIVESTOCK North Elmvale, ON

DU PLESSIS RANCH Toutes Aides, MB

MERIDIAN AGRICULTURE Acadia Valley, AB

DUAL RILL FARMS Golden Valley, ON

NORTH OF 50 CHAROLAIS McCreary, MB

OBITUARY

Elizabeth (Betty) Oram 1928 – 2018

It is with sadness that we announce the passing of Betty Oram of Central Butte, at the age of 90 years, surrounded by loving family. Betty was born and raised on the farm at Bridgeford, attended Normal School in Saskatoon and began teaching at a one room rural school north of Carrot River where she met Reg Oram. They were married in 1949 and farmed in the area until their land was purchased for the development of Tobin Lake. Reg and Betty moved to Calgary where Reg re-enlisted in the army and later they were posted to Petawawa, Ontario. They returned to farm in the Grainland district north of Central Butte in the fall of 1960. Together, they built a Charolais 92

herd and large grain farm eventually including irrigation. Their Valleys End Charolais operation is still operated today by Mark & Deb Oram and their family. Family came first in Betty’s life but she was also involved in the community, helping out with 4-H, the school and the Ag Society. She was very active in the Canadian Charolettes serving a term as National President. She and Reg loved to travel. Betty was well known for her love of horses and trips often included a horse event. In later years, Betty’s health deteriorated and she spent her final years in Regency Manor. Betty was predeceased by her husband Reginald of 61 years, son Murray, daughter-in law Barb, son Chris and his wife Anne, parents Leonard and Beatrice Bryan and Harold and Anne Oram, sister Dorothy (Earl) Williams, brother Jack Charolais Banner • August 2018

(Eileen) Bryan, sister Marnie (Bob) McNabb, sister Edna Murray and special friends to the family Sheldon Nicholson and Donna Brewster. Betty is survived by daughter Kathy (Ken Pillar) Martin and family Shea (Denby), Aaron (Aileen) and Jill (Ryan) Willick; daughter Judy (Ian) MacMillan and family Graham, Teddi (Jonathon) Dear and Katie (Scott) Carefoot; daughter Kim (Don) Harder and family Megan (Chris) Emmerling, Brian and Matthew; son Kerry (Diane) Oram and family Jessica (Ryan) Cooney, Michael and Kaylen; son Mark (Deb) Oram and family Natalie, Nigel, Kelsey and Dane; son Shane (Doris) Oram and family Jason (Melora); and Murray’s family Ryan (Melissa) Oram, Audra Oram and Cole (Cathy) Oram as well as 22 great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.


WE ALL NEED A LAUGH

Road Tales Candace By

George P. Anderson was a good friend of ours, but there were times when he could drive you crazy. About three weeks before Helge and I were married, he sat us down in his hotel room to explain why we should cancel the wedding. He went on a rant about how Helge should just give me half of everything right then and there and end it. It wouldn’t work. He turned to someone in the room and asked, “do you know anyone in the ringman/auctioneer business that has only been married once?” They were all too eager to go through every name they could think of and say how many times they had been married. It was a difficult conversation to say the least and Helge thought it was sort of funny. It is amazing that George and I became friends. One Canadian Charolais Association

AGM was held in Edmonton. It was called “White Excitement.” It was shortly after the West Edmonton Mall opened and there was a private evening in the carnival section. There were about 200 Charolais people and no one else. We could ride everything as many times as we wanted with our wristbands. George was there. There were many gearing up to go on the Mindbender roller coaster. Misery seems to love company, and those that were willing to go were trying to coerce others into joining them. George agreed to go, and everyone told him the front seat was the best, so he hopped into it. I don’t think George had really looked at the track and what he was going to experience. The ride started and everyone watched. George had a comb over that he was very careful about keeping in place, but as this ride progressed he quickly forgot about it. His eyes were big and both hands

were firmly glued to the handrail. These rides are fast and really don’t last that long. When it stopped, everyone got out except George. George sat in the front with his hands glued to the handrail, his eyes big, his combover sticking out on the wrong side, and his colour was as white as a ghost. Everyone tried to urge him to get out. Eventually, they had to peel his hands off the rail and help him out while he was mumbling, “I couldn’t make it stop. I couldn’t make it stop.” Assisted, he made it up to a bench overlooking the ride where people wait and watch. He sat there for a while as he slowly started to come around. His “I couldn’t make it stop” changed to “Don’t go on that” to anyone that came by. After about 45 minutes he disappeared and was not seen until the next day at the sale. There are many George stories to tell. Some will have to wait until I am braver or outlive those involved.

OBITUARY

Agnes “Denise” Hind 1936 – 2018

Agnes “Denise” Hind was born February 12th, 1936 in Cabri, Saskatchewan, to parents Edward and Agnes Oldhaver. She was raised and completed her schooling in Cabri. On October 22, 1954, Denise married Frederick Hind from Assiniboia,

Saskatchewan. They had two children, Danny Hind and Betty Cole. Denise and her husband farmed and raised cattle in the Cabri area, where they became avidly interested in purebred Charolais. In 1977, they relocated to a farm in the Mistatim area, where they continued to farm and raise Charolais until Fred’s health determined they retire and sell the cattle in 2001.

Denise is survived by her son Danny (Debbie) and their children: David (Kendra), Douglas (Alycia) and Davin (Alyshie); daughter Betty Cole and her children: Christopher (Brianne) and Cheri (Calvin); eight great grandchildren and many extended family and friends.

OBITUARY

Walter John “Jack” Bullied Jack Bullied, of Holland, Manitoba, passed away on June 28, 2018 at the age of 87. Jack leaves to mourn his passing

his loving wife Gwen (nee Sime), six children John (Andrea) Bullied of Winnipeg, Janice (Mike) Darling of Treherne, Robert (Marilyn) Bullied of Winnipeg, Linda Key of Winnipeg, Jim (Brenda) Bullied of Holland, Dale (Cassandra) Bullied of Warren, 17 Charolais Banner • August 2018

grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. Jack and Gwen were Charolais breeders for over 30 years running under the name Bullied Charolais and he was still breeding cattle to the end. They tested bulls at Douglas Test Station for many years. 93


Services

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GOOD ANCHOR CHAROLAIS HOME OF “GOOD” CATTLE! Don Good and Marion Smyth Box 3261, Vermilion, AB T9X 2B2 780.853.2220 • Don.marion.good@gmail.com

Alberta Breeders

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Barry & Lee-Ann Kaiser & family 403.787.2489 Box 209, Hussar, AB T0J 1S0 Barry 403.334.2489 Lee-Ann 403.334.2155 kaiserbarry@gmail.com

Kasey, Arlana, Kord & Peri Phillips Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0

T 780.358.2360 • C 780.656.6400 • kphillips@mcsnet.ca KREATING KONFIDENCE

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AD RATES Charolais Banner

Charolais Connection

Ads Black & White Full Colour Full Page $725 $1050 2/3 Page 610 840 1/2 Page 490 685 1/3 Page 345 505 1/4 Page 285 410 1/6 Page 190 n/a 1/8 Page 145 n/a 1" Business Card 350/Year n/a Classified 1"x1 column 45 n/a Classified 2"x1 column 80 n/a (add $10.00 to put classified ads on web for 1 month)

Ads Black & White Full Page $1100 2/3 Page 825 1/2 Page 690 1/3 Page 525 1/4 Page 440 1/6 Page 330 1/8 Page 220 1" Business Card 350/Year Classified 1" x 1 column 80 Classified 2" x 1 column 140 (add $10 to put classified ads on web for 1 month)

• • • • •

Pictures – $10 • Photos taken by fieldmen – $25 Overruns are $1 each • Catalogue prices available on request 4 ad contracts offer a 15% discount (card ad exempt) Position pages will be given to yearly contracts Sale Budget includes Banner fieldman to attend the sale, take pictures, work the ring and report the sale. Female sale budget is $400 sale attendance fee plus 2 colour pages in Charolais Banner or equivalent in Charolais Connection. Bull sale budget is $400 sale attendance fee plus 1 colour page in Charolais Connection.

PUBLISHING DEADLINES

Full Colour $1450 1125 945 725 615 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a

• Pictures – $10 • Photos taken by fieldmen – $25 • Yearly contract – buy 2 ads and get the third at half price (card ad exempt) • Position pages will be given to yearly contracts • Catalogue prices available on request

ISSUE

EDITORIAL DEADLINE

AD DEADLINE

MAILING

FALL Connection

August 21

August 30

Sept 13

OCTOBER Banner

Sept 26

Oct 6

Oct 17

DECEMBER Banner

Nov 22

Nov 29

Dec 12

The Banner cannot be responsible for errors in advertisements received after the ad deadline. The Charolais Banner reserves the right to refuse any advertisement. On any advertisement, the Charolais Banner is not liable for any charges over and above the cost of that advertisement. No agency commission allowed on livestock advertising rates. The Charolais Banner assumes no responsibility for distribution.

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IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES IN OUR INDUSTRY

Calendar of Events September 29 Land O’ Lakes Charolais Dispersal Sale, 1:00 p.m., Hoard’s Station, Campbellford, ON

November 23 Canadian Western Agribition Charolais Show, 2:00 p.m., Regina, SK (A BOSS Show)

October 5-7 Expo Boeuf, Victoriaville, QC

November 24 Canadian Western Agribition RBC Beef Supreme Challenge, 4:00 p.m., Regina, SK

October 6 Sunrise Charolais Dispersal Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Stayner, ON October 8 M & L Cattle Company Complete Simmental & Purebred Charolais Dispersal Sale, at the farm, Indian River, ON

November 28 Genetic Edge Sale, Olds (AB) Cow Palace November 28 Acadia Colony Charolais and Angus Bull Sale, at the farm, Oyen, AB

October 13 Autumn Prestige Sale, 6:30 p.m., Hoard’s Station, Campbellford, ON

November 30 Sterling Collection Sale, 1:30 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales

October 20 Uppin’ the Ante Sale, 2:00 p.m., Maple Hill Auction, Hanover, ON

December 4 No Borders Select Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB

October 26 Ag-Ex Charolais Show, Brandon, MB (A BOSS Show) November 2 Toronto Royal Charolais Show, Exhibition Place, Toronto, ON (A BOSS Show) November 8 Charolais Players Club, 5:00 p.m. at Farmfair International, Edmonton (AB) Northlands Hall B November 9 Canadian National Charolais Show, 1:00 p.m. at Farmfair International, Edmonton (AB) Northlands (A BOSS Show)

December 5 Western Elite Charolais Sale, Keystone Centre, Brandon, MB December 6 Alberta Charolais Association Annual Meeting 4:00 p.m. & Individual Bull Show 7:00 p.m., Red Deer (AB) Westerner Park December 7 Pen of 3 Bull Show 11:00 a.m. & Alberta Select Charolais Sale, 1:30 p.m., Red Deer (AB) Westerner Park December 8 Working Girls Female Sale, Innisfail (AB) Auction Market

November 10 Alberta Supreme Show of Champions, 4:00 p.m., at Farmfair International, Edmonton (AB) Northlands

December 12 Steppler Farms “A Piece of the Program” Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB

November 15 Wood River Charolais/Blake’s Red Angus “Proven Producer” Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK

December 15 Angle H Stock Farm Complete Charolais Dispersal Sale, Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sale

November 22 Canadian Western Agribition Charolais Sale, 3:30 p.m., Regina, SK

December 21 Char-Maine Ranching 14th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange, Fort McLeod, AB

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LOOKING TO FIND SOMEONE?

Advertisers Index A and D Charolais ........................................71 Alberta Charolais Association .....................49 Alta Custom Programs .................................94 Amabec Charolais ...................................71,97 Annuroc Charolais........................................97 B Bar D Charolais..........................................97 Baker Farms .............................................73,97 Bar H Charolais.............................................99 Beck Farms....................................................99 BeRich Farms ...............................................95 Blackbern Charolais ................................71,98 Blakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Red Angus ........................................37 Bob Charolais ...............................................95 BoJan Enterprises ........................................99 Borderland Cattle Co. ..................................99 Bouchard Livestock International ...............75 Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. .............................94 Bricney Stock Farms .....................................99 Bridor Charolais.......................................73,98 Brimner Cattle Company .............................99 Buffalo Lake Charolais ................................95 By Livestock ........................................55,69,71 Canadian Charolais Association .............2023 Carey, Brent .............................................51,94 Cedardale Charolais .....................................98 Cedarlea Farms........................................63,99 Charla Moore Farms.....................................99 CharLew Ranch ...........................................95 CharMaine Ranching ..................................95 Charolais Charbray Herd Book of Mexico ..79 Charolais Journal..........................................94 Chartop Charolais ........................................99 Charworth Charolais Farms .........................95 Chomiak Charolais ......................................95 Circle Cee Charolais Farms ...........................95 Cline Cattle Co..............................................97 Cockburn Farms............................................98 Connell, Charles & MaryJo...........................71 Cornerview Charolais ...................................73 Cougar Hill Ranch ........................................97 Coyote Flats Charolais.............................19,95 Creek's Edge Land & Cattle Co. ................7,99 C2 Charolais..................................................97 DavisRairdan ...............................................94 Defoort Stock Farm ......................................97 Demarah Farms ............................................99 Diamond W Charolais .............................47,99 DLMS.............................................................52 Dorran, Ryan ................................................94 Double P Stock Farms ..................................97 Dowell Charolais ..........................................95 DRD Charolais...............................................45 Dubuc Charolais ...........................................98 DudgeonSnobelen Land & Cattle .........73,98 Eaton Charolais ..........................................100 Echo Spring Charolais .............................73,98 Edge, Dean ...................................................94 Edmonton Northlands ............................51,52 Elder Charolais Farms................................5,99 Fergus Family Charolais ...............................98 Ferme Palerme ........................................71,98 Fischer Charolais...........................................95

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Flat Valley Cattle Co.....................................95 Fleury, Michael .............................................94 Flewelling, Craig ..........................................94 Footprint Farms ......................................41,95 Fourthlane Farms .........................................71 Future Farms.................................................95 Gerrard Cattle Co. ........................................95 Gilliland Bros. Charolais ...............................99 Good Anchor Charolais...........................54,95 H.S. Knill Company Ltd. ...............................94 Happy Haven Charolais................................97 Harcourt Charolais .......................................99 Hard Rock Land & Cattle Co. .......................97 Harvie Ranching ..........................................95 HEJ Charolais ...............................................95 Hicks Charolais .............................................98 High Bluff Stock Farm ........................12,13,97 Holk Charolais ..............................................95 Hopewell Charolais ......................................99 Horseshoe E Charolais..................................99 Howe Family Farm ..................................35,99 HTA Charolais Farm .....................................97 Hunter Charolais ..............................66,97,IBC JMB Charolais ..............................................97 Johnson Charolais ........................................95 Johnstone Auction .......................................94 June Rose Charolais .....................................99 Kaiser Cattle Co............................................95 KayR Land & Cattle Ltd..........................17,95 KCH Charolais ...............................................96 Kirlene Cattle ..........................................71,98 La Ferme Patry de Weedon .........................98 Lakeview Charolais ......................................27 Land O' Lakes Charolais .....................55,71,98 Langstaff Charolais .................................73,98 Laurel Creek Ranch ......................................99 Leemar Charolais..........................................95 Legacy Charolais......................................24,96 LEJ Charolais............................................47,97 LindskovThiel Charolais Ranch .................100 M & L Cattle Co. ...........................................98 Mack's Charolais...........................................98 Maple Leaf Charolais ...................................96 Martens Cattle Co. .......................................99 Martens Charolais ........................................97 McAvoy Charolais Farm ..........................31,99 McKay Charolais ...........................................97 McKeary Charolais .......................................96 McLeod Livestock ...............................5866,94 McTavish Farms........................................33,99 Medonte Charolais..................................73,98 Miller Land & Livestock................................98 Moyer Cattle Co ...........................................73 Murphy Livestock .........................................96 Mutrie Farms ................................................99 Myhre Land and Cattle ................................97 Nahachewsky Charolais ...............................99 Nelson Hirsche Purebreds .......................66,67 Norheim Ranching .......................................94 P & H Ranching Co. ............................61,64,96 Packer Charolais ...........................................98 Palmer Charolais .....................................9,100

Charolais Banner â&#x20AC;˘ August 2018

Parklane Charolais .......................................96 Partridge Hollow Charolais .........................71 Phillips Farms..............................................100 Pine Bluff Farm.............................................39 Pleasant Dawn Charolais ..........................6,97 Potter Charolais.......................................71,98 Prairie Cove Charolais ..................................29 Prairie Cove Consulting ...............................94 Prairie Gold Charolais ................................100 ProChar Charolais .......................................96 Qualman Charolais ....................................100 Raffan, Don ..................................................94 Rawes Ranches ........................................43,96 Rebuild with Steel ........................................94 Reeleder, Andrew.........................................94 Rollin' Acres Charolais ............................73,98 Ross Lake Charolais ......................................96 Rosso Charolais...........................................100 Royale Charolais ...........................................98 RRTS Charolais ..............................................96 Saddleridge Farming Co. .............................96 SanDan Charolais Farms ..............................96 Saunders Charolais ..................................73,98 Scarth Cattle Co............................................97 Serhienko/Voegeli Cattle Co......................100 Sharodon Farms ...........................................98 Skeels, Danny ...............................................94 Sliding Hills Charolais.................................100 Southside Charolais......................................96 Southview Farms ..........................................98 CK Sparrow Farms .......................................IFC Springside Farms ...........................5659,61,96 Spruce View Charolais..................................96 Stach Farms Charolais ..................................96 Stephen Charolais Farm .............................100 Steppler Farms Ltd. ..................................3,97 Stock, Mark...................................................94 Stockmen's Insurance...................................94 Sugarloaf Charolais ......................................96 Sunrise Charolais ..........................................69 T Bar C Cattle Co. ..................................94,101 Taylor Farms..................................................71 Temple Farms..............................................100 Thistle Ridge Ranch......................................96 Transcon Livestock Corp...............................95 TriN Charolais ..............................................97 Turnbull Charolais ...................................11,96 Twin Anchor Charolais .................................96 Wendt & Murray Farms Ltd. ...................53,96 Western Litho ...............................................95 Whiskey Hollow Cattle Company................73 White Lake Colony ...................60,61,64,65,96 White Meadow Charolais Ltd......................97 WhiteWater Livestock.............................71,98 Wilgenbusch Charolais ......................100,OBC Wilkie Ranch.................................................96 Windyview Farm ..........................................71 Wood River Charolais ...........................37,100 Wrangler Charolais .................................15,96


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Charolais Banner August 2018  

Charolais Banner 52nd Annual Herdsire Edition August 2018

Charolais Banner August 2018  

Charolais Banner 52nd Annual Herdsire Edition August 2018