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Obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome Simopoulos AP (ed): Nutrition and Fitness: Obesity, the Metabolic Syndrome, Cardiovascular Disease, and Cancer. World Rev Nutr Diet. Basel, Karger, 2005, vol 94, pp 1–12

Criteria and Classification of Obesity in Japan and Asia-Oceania Masao Kanazawa a, Nobuo Yoshiikeb, Toshimasa Osaka c, Yoshio Numba d, Paul Zimmet e, Shuji Inouef a

The Third Department of International Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, Division of Health and Nutrition Monitoring, and c Division of Human Nutrition, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, d Department of Geriatric Disease Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; e International Diabetes Institute, Caulfield, Vic. Australia; and f Department of Nutrition and Physiology, Kyoritsu Women’s University, Tokyo, Japan b

In developed and developing countries, morbidity and mortality rates are increasing in individuals classified as being obese [1–6]. The higher morbidity and mortality rates of obese people are due to the increased incidence of obesity-related (lifestyle-related) diseases. It is now recognized that different criteria of obesity by BMI are necessary in different ethnic groups and populations [7, 8]. In addition to the degree of obesity, other factors which increase the morbidity rate of obese people include abnormal fat distribution such as upper body obesity and visceral obesity [9, 10]. Recently, the definition of ‘pathological obesity’ has been made in Japan [11]. Definition of Obesity and Previous Criteria of Obesity

Obesity is defined as excessive fat accumulation but not over-weightedness. The average human body usually consists of 82% lean body mass, which is essential for sustaining daily life and physical activities, and 18% body fat which, in essence, is energy store for emergency situations [12]. Thus, obesity can be defined as ‘overstorage of body fat beyond 18%’. Usually, body fat above 25% in men and 30% in women is considered to be obese. According to this definition, obesity should be determined by measuring body fat. Although there are presently many methods for measuring body fat, no methods can be conducted easily, accurately and inexpensively.

Nutrition and fitness 1  

Obesity, the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and cancer - Artemis P. Simopoulos et al (2004) Tags: diet, health, omega-3, omega-6...

Nutrition and fitness 1  

Obesity, the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and cancer - Artemis P. Simopoulos et al (2004) Tags: diet, health, omega-3, omega-6...

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