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HIGH SCHOOL

MIDDLE SCHOOL

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS SECONDARY PROGRAM OPTIONS PLANNING GUIDE FOR PCSS STUDENTS, GRADES 5 - 12

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Our Vision

To engage and inspire every child, every day to achieve excellence in college, the workforce, and throughout life.

Our Mission Engage. Inspire. Achieve. Every Child, Every Day. No Exceptions.

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HIGH SCHOOL

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Course Catalog This publication is designed to give a broad view of the secondary program. The information provided in this publication is designed to assist students and parents in planning and making choices for the student’s high school career. The most current Course Catalog can be found on the PCSSTN website. Information found in this printed version is current as of January 1, 2017. Based on graduation requirements and preliminary post high school plans, a personalized graduation plan is developed in a team effort by the student, parents, and the school. Students and parents may review this graduation plan by contacting the appropriate counselor at: Algood Middle School (931) 537-6141 Avery Trace Middle School (931) 520-2200 Burks Elementary (931) 839-7641 Prescott South Middle School (931)528-3647 Upperman Middle School (931) 858-6601 Cookeville High School (931) 520-2287 Monterey High School (931) 839-2970 Upperman High School (931) 858-3112

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2017-2018 PCSS Secondary Campuses Middle Schools (0008) Algood Middle (Pre-K & 5-8) 540 Dry Valley Road Cookeville, TN 38506 Tele: 537-6141 Fax: 537-3700

(0025) Burks Elementary (PreK-6) 300 Crossville Street Monterey, TN 38574 Tele: 839-7641 Fax: 839-6683

(0065) Avery Trace Middle (5-8) 230 Raider Drive Cookeville, TN 38501 Tele: 520-2200 Fax: 520-2204

(0100) Prescott South Middle (5-8) 1859 S. Jefferson Avenue Cookeville, TN 38506 Tele: 528-3647 Fax: 520-2019

(0110) Upperman Middle 6700 Nashville Hwy. Baxter, TN 38544 Tele: 858-6601 Fax: 858-6637

High Schools (0037) Cookeville High (PreK & 9-12) 1 Cavalier Drive Cookeville, TN 38501 Tele: 520-2287 Fax: 520-2268

(0090) Upperman High (9-12) 6950 Nashville Hwy. Baxter, TN 38544 Tele: 858-3112 Fax: 858-4641

(0055) Monterey High (7-12) 710 Commercial Avenue South Monterey, TN 38574 Tele: 839-2970 Fax: 839-6070

(0105) White Plains Academy 288 East Main Street Cookeville, TN 38506 Tele: 537-3862 Fax: 537-3062 (0006) VITAL (K-12) 288 East Main Street Cookeville, TN 38506 Tele: 526-2176

Central Facilities

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Central Office 1400 East Spring Street Cookeville, TN 38506 Tele: 526-9777

Operations and Support Annex 3860 Phifer Mtn. Rd Cookeville, TN 38506 Tele: 528-1847

SAC 3860 Phifer Mtn Rd Cookeville, TN 38506 Tele: 528-1847

Maintenance 240 Raider Drive Cookeville, TN 38501 Tele: 520-6409

Transportation 515 Veterans Drive Cookeville, TN 38501 Tele: 526-9342

Student Support Services 2353 N. Washington Avenue Cookeville, TN 38501 Tele: 525-4707


How to Use the Course Catalog Planning Your Course of Study Planning your course of study during middle high and high school is an important step in planning your future. The deci sions you make, along with the course of study you pursue, will affect your post-secondary plans, including college and career readiness. College students change their majors an average of three times. This is typical, and you, too, will probably reconsider your career goals several times. The decisions you make now, regarding both your program of study and the activities in which you engage, will impact your options beyond high school. It is best to pursue a broad, well-rounded program of study that will prepare you for a variety of opportunities. PCSS offers a wide range of programs designed to give our students a firm foundation for entering college, business or technical school, military services, or the workforce. As a student, you are strongly encouraged to pursue a rigorous, challenging program that is best suited for your needs. The following pages contain information on graduation programs, graduation requirements, and information on career planning. In the Catalog of Courses, pages 52 - 103 contain information specifically regarding high school courses, while pages 104 -117contain information on prerequisites, grade level placements, and any applicable fees. We are confident that you will find the educational opportunities offered at PCSS campuses to be among the best in the state. Please use this book as a guide to planning your coursework and your future. You have many important decisions to make -- take them seriously and make them count! High School Students and Parents: •

Review the graduation requirements on page 8. Review the 4-year plan that you have completed and/or review records of the high school courses you have already taken.

Think about your post-secondary education plans and career goals. Decide which college and/or articulated credit opportunities you might want to pursue in high school. For information about: • Ways to potentially earn college credit, see pages 29 - 32. • Ways to earn credits outside the normal school day, see pages 37-39. • Career preparation courses, see pages 41-65.

Choose courses for next year’s schedule that support your 4-year plan and career goals. Be sure you have completed the prerequisite requirements for the courses you select.

Complete the Course Selection process that was issued by your campus and submit it by the required deadline.

MIddle School Students and Parents: •

Review the Middle School Program of Study on page105. Also familiarize yourself with the requirements of the Focus Areas and Diploma Types on pages 8-10.

Study the content and requirements of the catalog of courses available for your grade level on pages 107-115.

Think about your future goals for high school and college. Consider the examples of ways to earn high school credit while in middle school on pages 115-116.

Make a final decision about the courses you plan to take for next year. Complete the Course process provided by your campus to indicate your requests for next year and submit it by the required deadline.

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Table of Contents Our Vision.................................................................. 2 Our Mission............................................................... 2 Course Catalog......................................................... 3 2017-2018 PCSS Secondary Campuses.................. 4 Middle Schools.......................................................... 4 High Schools............................................................. 4 Central Facilities........................................................ 4 How to Use the Course Catalog................................ 5 Planning Your Course of Study................................. 5 The High School Program......................................... 7 Graduation Requirements......................................... 7 PCSS Diploma Options............................................. 8 Regular Diploma........................................................ 8 Honors Diploma......................................................... 8 Diploma with Distinction............................................ 9 TN Scholars............................................................... 9 Early Graduation..................................................... 10

High School Information General Information - High School.......................... 12 Communication with Parents................................... 12 Schedule Changes.................................................. 13 Course Fees - High School Courses....................... 15 Early Postsecondary Opportunities (EPSOs).......... 17 International Baccalaureate (IB) ............................. 17 Diploma Programme............................................... 17 Advanced Placement.............................................. 21 Honors/AP/IB Course Entry and Exit....................... 23 Dual Enrollment and Statewide Dual Credit............ 29 Dual Enrollment....................................................... 29 TN Dual Enrollment Grant....................................... 30 Statewide Dual Credit.............................................. 31 Division I or Division II College Athletics ................ 33 TN Ready................................................................ 33 TN Ready, College Athletics, and NCAA Eligibility.. 33 Academic Career Coaches..................................... 34 VITAL Personalized Learning.................................. 34 End of Course Testing ............................................ 34 Grading and Class Rank System............................ 35 Grading System....................................................... 35 Tennessee Uniform Grading System....................... 35 Grade Point Scale................................................... 35 Class Rank and Graduation Recognition................ 37 Class Rank.............................................................. 37 Graduation Recognition........................................... 37 Earning Credits That Meet Graduation Requirements.......................................................... 38

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General Information about Credits.......................... 38 Credit Intervention................................................... 39 Credit Recovery....................................................... 39 PCSS Summer School (Original Credit and Credit Recovery)..................................................... 40 Credit from Home School or Non-accredited Private Schools.................................................................... 40 Preparing for College.............................................. 41 Career/Workplace Preparation................................ 42 Career and Technical Education (CTE)................... 43 CTE Programs of Study.......................................... 46 Career Technical Education Course Fees............... 51 Career Technical Education..................................... 52 English Language Arts (ELA).................................. 67 Mathematics............................................................ 74 Science.................................................................... 79 Social Studies.......................................................... 84 Personal Finance.................................................... 87 Other Courses......................................................... 87 SPED and Related Services................................... 88 Fine Arts.................................................................. 90 JROTC..................................................................... 95 Health and Wellness................................................ 96 World Languages.................................................... 97

Middle School Information Dual Enrollment Courses for High School Credit.. 101 The Middle School Program.................................. 106 General Information - Middle School..................... 106 Communication with Parents................................. 106 Middle Years Program - IB.................................... 107 Middle School Course of Study............................. 110 Course Designations............................................. 110 Advanced Courses Entry and Exit Guidelines....... 111 High School Courses at the Middle School........... 112 Placement Criteria for High School Courses in Middle School.................................................... 112 Course Fees - Middle School Courses.................. 113 MS English Language Arts.................................... 114 MS Mathematics.................................................... 115 MS Science........................................................... 118 MS Social Studies................................................. 119 MS Encore............................................................. 120 High School Courses at the Middle School........... 121

The contents of this handbook are not contractual and do not give rise to a claim of breach of contract against the school district. The most current Course Catalog can be found on the PCSS website. Information found in this printed version is current as of July 2017. Further, the contents of this handbook apply to all students of the district, as the contents now appear in the handbook or may be amended in the future.


The High School Program Graduation Requirements English: 4 Credits Students must complete four (4) credits of English, including English I, English II, English III, and English IV. Mathematics: 4 Credits All students must complete all of the following: Integrated I, Integrated II, Integrated III, or the equivalent and another course beyond Integrated Math III. Students must be enrolled in a mathematics course each school year. Students who complete any of the required math credits prior to ninth (9th) grade may receive graduation credit for that coursework; however, those students are still required to enroll in a mathematics course during each high school year. Science: 3 Credits Students must complete three (3) credits of science. Students must complete Biology, Chemisty OR Physics, and a third lab science. Social Studies: 3 Credits Students must complete three (3) credits of Social Studies. Required courses include United States History and Geography, World History and Geography, Economics, and United States Government and Civics. • 3 Credits of JROTC may be substituted for US Government • The US History, US Government and Economics requirements may be satisfied by completing the sequence of IB History of the Americas HL. Wellness 1 Credit Students must complete one (1) credit in wellness. Participation in marching band and interscholastic athletics MAY NOT be substituted for this aspect of the graduation requirements. • 2 Credits of JROTC may be substituted for 1 credit of Wellness if not used for focus area. • IB Diploma Candidates may substitute completion of the CAS program requirements for Lifetime Wellness credit. Physical Fitness Education 0.5 Credit Students must complete one-half (1/2) credit in Physical Education. This requirement may be met by substituting a document and equivalent time of physical activity in one of the following: • Boys/Girls Competition Swim Team • Boys/Girls Lacrosse • Competition Dance Team • Marching Band • JROTC • Cheerleading

TSSAA sanctioned interscholastic sports (baseball, girls’ softball, basketball, bowling, cross country, football, golf, tennis, track and field, girls’ volleyball, soccer, and wresting) Personal Finance: 0.5 Credit Students must complete one-half (1/2) credit in Personal Finance in an online format. Foreign Language 2 Credits Students must complete two (2) credits of the SAME Foreign Language. Fine Arts 1 Credit Students must complete one (1) credit in Fine Arts. ELECTIVE FOCUS: 3 Credits Students must complete three (3) credits in an elective focus. The focused program of study is designed to prepare students for the workforce and postsecondary study. The intent of the elective focus is to provide students with an opportunity to explore a particular academic area in greater depth. The elective focus is selected from the following: •

CTE (Students must complete 3 units in the same CTE program of study)

Science and Math

Humanities

Fine Arts

AP/IB/Dual Enrollment

JROTC

Core Curriculum Elective Focus

Total

19 Credits 3 Credits

22 Credits

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PCSS Diploma Options Regular Diploma

Honors Diploma

See Graduation Requirements for details on specific course requirements.

See Graduation Requirements for details on specific course requirements.

English

4 credits

English

4 credits

Math

4 credits

Math

4 credits

Science

3 credits

Science

3 credits

Social Studies

3 credits

Social Studies

3 credits

Foreign language

2 credits

Foreign language

2 credits

Fine Arts Physical Education

1 credit 0.5 credit

Fine Arts

1 credit

Physical Education

0.5 credit

Wellness

1 credit

Wellness

1 credit

Personal Finance

.5 credit

Personal Finance

.5 credit

Elective Focus

3 credits

Elective Focus

3 credits

Students seeking the Honors Diploma designation must also meet the following criteria in addition to the above graduation requirements: Per Tennessee State School Board Policy 2.103 Must meet ALL ACT subject area readiness benchmarks: • • • •

English Math Reading Science

18 22 22 23

The benchmarks are scores on the ACT subject-area tests that represent the level of achievement required for students to have a 50% chance of obtaining a B or higher or about a 75% chance of obtaining a C or higher in corresponding credit-bearing first-year college courses.

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Diploma with Distinction

TN Scholars

See Graduation Requirements for details on specific course requirements.

See Graduation Requirements for details on specific course requirements.

English

4 credits

English

4 credits

Math

4 credits

Math

4 credits

Science

3 credits

Science

3 credits

Social Studies

3 credits

Social Studies

3 credits

Foreign language

2 credits

Foreign language

2 credits

Fine Arts Physical Education

1 credit 0.5 credit

Fine Arts Physical Education

1 credit 0.5 credit

Wellness

1 credit

Wellness

1 credit

Personal Finance

.5 credit

Personal Finance

.5 credit

Elective Focus

3 credits

Elective Focus

3 credits

Students seeking the Diploma with Distinction designation must also meet the following criteria in addition to the above graduation requirements:

Students seeking the TN Scholar designation must also meet the following criteria in addition to the above graduation requirements:

Per Tennessee State School Board Policy 2.103

Earn 2 additional credits of your choice in any subject.

Students will be recognized as graduating with “distinction” by attaining a B average (3.0 GPA) AND completing AT LEAST ONE of the following:

A student cannot count these courses as part of their regular requirements.

• earn a nationally recognized industry certification • participate in at least one of the Governor’s Schools • participate in one of the state’s All State musical organizations • be selected as a National Merit Finalist or Semi-Finalist • attain a score of 31 or higher composite score on the ACT • attain a score of 3 or higher on at least two advanced placement exams

Attendance • 95% Required (no more than 36 total days in 4 years) Discipline • No “out of school suspensions” Volunteer Service • 80 hours (These hours must be done outside the school day. Please see the list on the website for what will and will not count for Tennessee Scholars.) Grades • Maintain a C or above average in all classes. If your final class completion grade is a D or F you must retake that class and make at least a C to count that grade for the class.

• successfully complete the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme • earn 12 or more semester hours of transcripted postsecondary credit • complete Work Based Learning Career Practicum as CTE Level 3 or 4 Career Cluster/Capstone course 9


Early Graduation

Some students may have clearly developed personal and career goals such that they want to consider graduating from high school in three years instead of the traditional four years.It is possible with careful planning and by using a variety of ways to earn high school credit described on pages 29-32. As specified in the high school student handbook, to be eligible for early graduation, a student who plans to graduate at the end of his/her junior year must submit a letter of intent for early graduation and an early graduation plan to the counselor and principal during the last grading period of the sophomore year or no later than the end of the third week of the junior year. Early graduate candidates will be considered for reclassification to senior status at the time the letter of intent is received. The following chart gives one example of a high school plan that would allow a student to meet the requirements for the Recommended High School Program and graduate in 3 years. A student with the desire to graduate from high school in 3 years should begin planning for this during the middle school years with the school counselor. Once graduation requirements are met and the student is granted early release, the student is considered an alumnus and shall not participate in further school activities or functions except the student has the option of attending prom and/or graduation exercises. Students choosing to attend these school-sponsored events must conform to the same rules and regulations required of regularly enrolled students of the district. Students who choose early graduation will remain eligible for scholarships for which they qualify. Early Graduation Plan Course Worksheet Graduation Requirements

Credits earned in Middle School or other alternate format

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Total Credits

English 4.0 credits

English I in 8th grade or English III summer before Grade 11

English I or English II

English II or English III

English IV

4.0

Mathematics 4.0 Credits

Integrated Math I in 8th Grade

Integrated Math I or Integrated Math II

Integrated Math II or Integrated Math III

Integrated Math III or Pre Calculus

4.0

Physical Science or PWC Honors

Chemistry

Biology

3.0

Economics and Government

US History

3.0

Science 3.0 Credits

10

Social Studies 3.0 Credits

VITAL Options in 8th World History Grade or DE Options beginning in Grade 10

Health and Wellness 1.5 Credits

VITAL Options

Personal Finance 0.5 Credit

Personal Finance in 8th Grade

Foreign Language 2.0 Credits

Spanish I in 8th Grade Spanish I , French I, German I or Spanish II

1.5

Physical Education Lifetime Wellness Personal Finance

1.0 2.0

French II or German II

Fine Arts 1.0 Credit

Visual Arts or Music

Visual Arts or Music

Visual Arts or Music

1.0

Elective Focus 3 Credits

Elective Focus Course

Elective Focus Course

Elective Focus Course

3.0


“Move On When Ready” Act A second option for early graduation is provided in the provisions for the Move on When Ready Act. TCA 49-6-8303 outlines a procedure that, beginning in the 2012/13 school year, allows students to graduate from high school early and enroll in a two-year or four-year institution of higher education provided specific requirements have been met. The requirements include the following: 1. Earned 18 credits, •

English I, II, III, and IV

Integrated Math I, II, and III

United States History

Two (2) courses in the same foreign language

One (1) course selected from the following: Economics Government World Civilizations World Geography

One (1) course selected from the following: History and appreciation of visual and performing arts A standards based arts course, which may include studio art, band, chorus, dance, or other performing art

Health and Physical Education (Wellness)

Biology

Chemistry

2. Have a cumulative GPA of at least a 3.2 on a 4 point scale 3. Scored at the advanced level on TNReady end of course assessments 4. Met benchmark scores on the ACT or SAT examinations in mathematics and English as determined by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission 5. Scored a 3 or better on a AP world language assessment 6. Completed two credits in AP, IB, dual enrollment or dual credit offerings.

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General Information - High School Communication with Parents

Progress Reports

Progress reports are sent home with students at 4-1/2 weeks and 13-1/2 weeks of each term. Report Cards Report cards are sent home with students at the end of each 9-week quarter and at the end of each term. Students with a F in any one class will receive a report card by mail within a few days of student distribution. Parent/Teacher Conferences and Open House Parent/Teacher Conferences and Open house are scheduled in August and January. The dates are listed on the annual school calendar for PCSS. Individual Conferences Individual Conferences with teachers may be scheduled at any time by calling your child’s counselor for help in setting up an appointment time. If an individual conference with an administrator is needed, please contact the main office to make an appointment.

use to obtain information in the College and Career Room. Our counselors are dedicated to meeting the needs of all students, faculty, parents, and administrators. We encourage parents to contact their appropriate counselor for any reason. Counselors are key players during this critical time of planning course work for the upcoming school year. Parking Fees Parking fees are required if your child chooses to drive and park on a high school campus. These fees are used to maintain the parking lot and school grounds. School Fees School fees are optional. Core academic course fees may be requested but cannot be required. Assessment fees for AP/IB classes are exceptions. Elective focus area course fees are required, if applicable. Schools may request an optional registration fee. •

If a fee is Non-Required (NR), all documentation sent home to parents must indicate to parents that these fees are “discretionary and not required”.

If a fee is required, Fee Waiver funds may be applicable according to Board policy.

Periodic Newsletters Periodic newsletters from each high school are available via email. You may sign up for emails by updating your student’s records. Call the school office for assistance. Other Information Sources Important information is also posted on Power School bulletins, School Messenger calls and texts and on each school’s website. We welcome parents to participate in our Family Engagement activities. Family Engagement meetings and activities are scheduled periodically throughout the school year. Call your child’s school for information. Counseling Center Each high school houses a counseling center that offers many services to the students and faculty. The counselors offer guidance to students individually and in groups regarding personal, social, educational, and career needs. They work with school staff to provide school-wide counseling and guidance programs. The Counseling Center houses informational materials such as career opportunities, job trends, colleges, state technical schools, scholarships, financial aid, tests, and other publications. A computer is also available for student 12

Semester Exam Exemption Policy Year long courses - All students take the 1st and 3rd nine week exams, but can be exempt from the 2nd and 4th nine week exams. Students must follow the attendance exemption policy* listed below. Semester long courses - Students will be required to take a nine week mid term exam. Students will only be exempt from the final exam if they meet the attendance exemption policy* listed below. Attendance Exemption Policy •

A average and no more than 3 days absent

B average and no more than 2 days absent

C average and 1 day absent

D with 0 absences

On the 4th tardy to any class, the student will be required to take the exam. Students will have the option of taking the comprehensive exam if they wish in order to improve their grade even if they meet the exemption criteria. If they choose to take the exam and it lowers their grade, it will not be counted against them.


Students in honors, IB and AP will continue to take comprehensive exams both semesters but will be exempt from attendance on scheduled exam days if they meet the criteria. If the student transfers from another class within CHS, the teacher will obtain attendance info from the previous teacher and the regular exemption policy applies. If the student is a recent transfer and the teacher feels the student needs to complete work before taking the exam, the teacher has the option to give the transfer student an incom- plete but will set a specific date for the student to make-up their exam. • Excused absences DO count towards having to take semester exams. • Filed Trips are counted as regular school days.

Schedule Changes Students are encouraged to make careful course selections during registration due to it’s direct correlation to the development of the master schedule for the upcoming school year. Students receive information about course offerings and advisement about appropriate course selection from the counseling staff early in the spring semester.

requested class Dropping AP, IB, or Honors (see pages 24-26)

If you have schedule questions or concerns, please stop into the counseling office at your school or contact your school counselor. For unusual circumstances which require a schedule change after the semester begins, students should be aware that: • Grades earned in Honors/AP/IB courses will be transferred to the academic course without any adjustment after the tenth day of class. • Grades earned in the first three weeks of a dropped class can impact NCAA eligibility. • Dual-credit students must also officially withdraw from the post secondary institution (TCAT, TTU, Vol State)after consulting with a PCSS campus counselor (withdrawing from a dual credit course may impact terms of the Dual Enrollment Grant and/or Hope Scholarship). • A change to a new course title requires the student to make up work done prior to his/her entry in the course.

During that semester, students have the opportunity to discuss their course options with parents, teachers, and campus counselors. Based on input and because we want all students to be happy with their schedules, students may request a change in course selections for the following year until the conclusion of the spring semester and one week following the conclusion of spring semester. Changes in a schedule or a course may only be made within the time frame noted above. After the course change deadline, schedule change requests will not be accepted or considered beyond the deadline -- no exceptions. Requests for schedule changes will be honored for a limited number of reasons such as: • Do not have the prerequisite. • Medical need (requires official documentation). • Error in scheduling on part of school such as data entry error. • Recommended level change. • Missing a required class Not all requests for schedule changes can be honored. Examples of requests not honored are: • • • • •

Changing teachers. Changing class hours. Requesting classes with friends. Switching due to activities participation. Student changing their mind about a

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Putnam County School System (PCSS)

Schedule Change Request Form

Students may request a change in course selections for the following year until the conclusion of the spring semester and one week following the conclusion of spring semester. Schedule changes will be prioritized based upon academic necessity (ex. missing a required classes). The goal of this form is to maintain balanced class sizes and use limited resources wisely. Please complete this form in its entirety and be as specific as possible to expedite your request. TURNING IN THIS FORM DOES NOT GUARANTEE A CHANGE WILL BE MADE. CHANGES ARE NOT IN EFFECT UNTIL THE STUDENT RECEIVES A REVISED SCHEDULE OR NOTIFICATION FROM THE COUNSELING OFFICE. PLEASE FOLLOW YOUR CURRENT SCHEDULE TO AVOID ATTENDANCE ISSUES. Date of Request Name Grade Cell Phone #

Email address:

Identify the reason for your schedule change request:

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_____Failed a prerequisite / inappropriate placement. _____ Do not have the prerequisite. _____Medical need (requires official documentation). _____Error in scheduling on part of school such as data entry error. _____Recommended level change. _____Missing a required class (list request in next section, sign and return – no parent signature required) Please describe your request in detail: If dropping a class, what would you like to add to replace the credits? (Please give 2-3 options) Why do you feel this request is necessary? Please be specific. Will this action potentially help or hurt your career and college readiness? Why? Student Signature (required) Parent Signature (required except for missing a required class) Thank you for completing this form. It provides helpful information to assist in the prioritization and decision-making process.


Course Fees - High School Courses Each year schools submit a list of fees for board approval. Below are the current fees for the 2016-2017 school year that have been approved. This will be updated when fees for 2017-2018 are approved in April. School fees are optional. Core academic course fees may be requested but cannot be required. Assessment fees for AP/ IB classes are exceptions. Elective focus area course fees are required, if applicable. Schools may request an optional registration fee. •

If a fee is Non-Required (NR), all documentation sent home to parents must indicate to parents that these fees are “discretionary and not required”.

If a fee is required, Fee Waiver funds may be applicable according to Board policy.

Cookeville High School Type of Fee

Amount

Required (R) or Not Required (NR)

Activity Fee

$ 25.00

Accounting

25.00

R

AP Exam

93.00

R

Art

35.00

NR

Chorus

40.00

NR

Dance I

60.00

R

Dance II, III, and IV

70.00

R

Engineering

30.00

R

5.00

NR

40.00

NR

250.00

R

5.00

R

Parking

35.00

R

Parking Violation

10.00

R

Piano

40.00

R

Replacement ID

5.00

R

Science

8.00

NR

10.00

NR

5.00

R

English Graduation Fee IB Exam Journalism

Science/Honors Speech

NR

175.00

R

Symphonic Band/Spring

60.00

R

Theory of Knowledge

42.00

R

Symphonic Band/Fall

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Monterey High School Type of Fee

Amount

Required (R) or Not Required (NR)

Art I

$ 10.00

NR

Art II

15.00

NR

Drama

10.00

NR

Parking

10.00

R

Science

8.00

R

Upperman High School Type of Fee

Amount

Required (R) or Not Required (NR)

$ 15.00

NR

5.00

NR

Registration Fee

10.00

NR

Parking Fee

20.00

R

Art Foreign Language

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Early Postsecondary Opportunities (EPSOs) International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme Pathways to TN Diploma Available at Cookeville High School ONLY Tennessee Association of International Baccalaureate World Schools (TNAIBWS) The IB Diploma Programme is designed for juniors and seniors in high school. Rigorous course expectations and examinations have been well established since 1968. International end-of-course examinations, scored by international assessors on a scale of 1-7, establish the quality of student learning in six subject areas. The chart below shows multiple pathways through which IB Diploma candidates in authorized TN schools can meet the TN graduation requirements through IB coursework. Higher level (HL) courses are 2 years and begin in the students Junior year. SL courses are 1 year and can be taken either as a Junior or a Senior. TN Requirements and IB Pathways to Meeting TN Requirements Graduation Requirement

9th

10th

11th

12th

English 4.0 credits

English I Honors

English II Honors

IB English HL III

IB English HL IV

4.0

Mathematics 4.0 Credits

Integrated Math I Honors or Regular

Integrated Math II - Integrated Math Honors or Regular III - Honors or Regular OR IB Math Studies SL

IB Math Studies SL OR Other Math

4.0

Science 3.0 Credits

Physical Science or PWC Honors

Biology and Chemistry

IB Biology SL/HL OR IB Chemistry SL/ HL OR IB SEHS

IB Biology SL/HL OR IB Chemistry SL/ HL OR IB SEHS

3.0

Social Studies 3.0 Credits

World History or AP World History

History of the Americas SL

History of the Americas HL

3.0

Health and Wellness 1.5 Credits

Full diploma candidates meet this requirement through CAS. Certificate students must take Lifetime Wellness and PE

Personal Finance 0.5 Credit

Personal Finance

1.5 1.0

Foreign Language 2.0 Credits

Spanish I in 8th Grade Spanish II - Honors OR French I - Honors

Spanish III - Honors OR French II - Honors

French III - Honors IB Spanish SL OR OR Spanish IV - Hon- IB French SL ors

2.0

Fine Arts 1.0 Credit

Any fine arts course

Any fine arts course

IB Music SL OR IB Art I SL

IB Music SL OR IB Art II HL

1.0

Elective Focus Course

Elective Focus Course

Elective Focus Course

3.0

Elective Focus 3 Credits

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Founded in 1968 the International Baccalaureate Programme works with thousands of schools in 138 countries worldwide serving students aged three to nineteen. The diploma program, which Cookeville High is authorized to offer, is offered at more than 800 public and private high schools in the United States. The diploma program is designed for students aged sixteen to nineteen years of age. An IB diploma leads to a qualification widely recognized by universities around the world for the high standards it represents. The diploma program encourages students to ask challenging questions, think critically, develop a strong sense of one’s own identity and culture, and develop an ability to communicate with and understand others from different cultures and backgrounds. It includes a broad and balanced curriculum for students enrolled, and the program emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to learning with the student as an active participant. Students who choose to enroll in the diploma program study languages, a social science, an experimental science, mathematics, and an elective (most likely in a fine arts subject). Wherever possible, subjects are approached from an international perspective. Students who enroll and who satisfy the rigorous demands of the diploma program demonstrate a strong commitment to learning. They develop mastery of subject area content and mastery of skills and discipline necessary for post secondary success. The goal of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme is to produce critical thinkers with a well-rounded global perspective on learning. Cookeville High students who enroll in the IB diploma program are able to meet requirements set by the local school board, the state, and the International Baccalaureate diploma program.

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What is included in the IB curriculum? Students who enroll in the IB diploma program must complete and test in six areas; 3 courses must be HL & 3 SL 1) Language A – English 2) Language B – (Spanish or French) 3) Individuals and Society – (History of the Americas) 4) Experimental Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Exercise Sports Health Science) 5) Mathematics – (Mathematics Studies) 6) Arts or Electives – (visual arts and music) Three unique components make up the remaining portion of an IB diploma: 1) Theory of Knowledge – a critical thinking course designed to teach students how they learn across all subject areas 2) A 4,000 word extended essay researched, documented, and written on a topic of choice, written over 2 years. 3) Creativity, Activity, and Service – Diploma students complete service-learning opportunities over 2 years under the direction of the CAS Coordinator. 4) The diploma program requires that students meet defined standards and conditions to be awarded a diploma, including earning a minimum of 24 points on IB exam points total.

What are the advantages of an International Baccalaureate Diploma/Certificate Program? - Participating in active learning that involves critical thinking, independent research and verbal communication - Having a program that emphasizes the “whole” student - Participating in interdisciplinary and intradisciplinary group and individual projects. - Gaining an international perspective on education - Requiring student involvement in extracurricular activities, for both school and community (diploma program only) - Provides alternative forms of assessment allowing students the opportunity to show what they have learned - Includes emphasis on academic integrity and honesty - Earning possible admission and scholarship opportunities at prestigious universities - Earning college credit at many universities What are the qualities of a successful IB student? Students who are successful in the IB program often have the following qualities: - self-motivated -inquiring mind -organized -academic integrity -participate in school and community activities -good time management skills -good attendance record *It is also beneficial to have a passion for learning, curiosity, and strong writing skills. Cookeville High IB Course Offerings: Cookeville High offers the following IB courses. As the program grows, other courses may be added. English HL* Spanish B SL** History of the Americas HL Mathematics Studies HL Biology HL Chemistry HL Exercise Sports Health Science Physiology SL Music SL Visual Arts SL/HL *Theory of Knowledge I & II - This course is not designated SL/HL. It is a required course for all diploma students. Any student may register for the IB Theory of Knowledge class, but IB students are strongly encouraged to take TOK, but IB Students who are already enrolled in at least one IB class are given priority during registration as opposed to students who aren’t taking any IB courses but want to TOK only.. * HL - higher level (higher level courses are studied for 240 classroom hours over a two-year period prior to testing) **SL - standard level (standard level courses are studied for 150 classroom hours over one year of study and then tested) What Must I Do To Participate in the IB Diploma Program at Cookeville High School? First, all students should have a 3.0 to enroll an IB class


in addition to having a thorough understanding of the requirements and expectations for students enrolled in any IB class. The IB Coordinator will verify GPA requirements during registration. Then, students should register for IB courses during the registration period in the Spring. Finally, students must meet all prerequisites for individual IB courses and complete summer assignments when applicable. Separate registration forms and teacher recommendations are no longer required of students if they meet the GPA requirement, prerequisites, and complete summer assignments. Students must comply with the AP/IB Exam Procedures set forth by the Board of Education and acknowledge that they are responsible for both fees and sitting for exams. May I Enroll in an IB Class as a Certificate Candidate? Cookeville High welcomes all students to enroll in as many IB courses as he/she desires as a certificate candidate. Students may choose to enroll in one or more IB courses as a certificate candidate. However, students enrolled in three or more courses are strongly encouraged to complete the full diploma. Please note, however, that students who enroll in an IB course MUST register for, pay for, and take theIB exam prescribed for the course(s). Additionally, all students who opt out of an IB course(s) prior to IB testing forfeit any fees paid for IB exams and lose additional weighted points (scale reverts back to a 4.0). Honor Policy Students who participate in the IB program are required to complete a form that outlines the importance of academic integrity. In addition to this form, IB teachers have additional academic honesty policies that will be given to students enrolled in the classes when classes begin. Exam Fees Exam fees for the IB exams must be paid during the first 6 months of school during the current school year due to international registration requirements. The IB coordinator for Cookeville High School, will provide fee information to all IB students, both certificate and diploma candidates, enrolled in courses at the beginning of the school year. The May 2016 IB exam fee was $194.00 to register and $113.00 per exam taken. Exam prices do increase minimally each year. Payment deadlines are set by IB and communicated to students by their IB teachers at the beginning of the school year. A substantial late fee will be applied to all late payments. Payment plans are available but all payments must be completed by the first Friday following Winter Break of the exam year. For example, students taking a two year course do not have to finish paying until the Friday following Winter Break of their senior year. Students who register and pay for IB/AP exams but fail to take the exam on the designated date forfeit the weighted points from any grade earned in the AP/IB course. Final GPA will be recalculated to reflect this reduction in weight before transcripts are sent to colleges and universities.

Students and parents will sign a form that will be kept on file at each school acknowledging these deadlines and requirements. Sample Schedule for students interested in the IB Diploma This is only a suggested guide; many options exist to be a successful candidate in the IB program. 9th grade

10th grade

English I Pre AP/IB Integrated Math I or II (Honors option*) Physical World Concepts (Honors option*) World History (AP option*) Spanish II OR French I or II Fine Art Requirement Elective

English II Pre AP/IB Integrated Math III (Honors option*) or other Math Lifetime Wellness Requirement Biology Honors** and Chemistry Honors** Spanish III OR French II or III Personal Finance Requirement (or in 11th Grade)

3 Electives *It is highly recommended that potential IB students enroll in some honors classes. 11th grade

12th grade

IB English HL (2 year course) IB Mathematical Studies SL IB History of the Americas HL (2 year course) IB Chemistry HL or IB Biology HL (2 year Course) Spanish IV OR French III or IB French SL IB Theory of Knowledge I 2 Electives Personal Finance Requirement (or in 10th Grade)

IB English HL IB Math SL IB HOTA HL IB Spanish or French IB Music or Art IB TOK IB Science

Diploma Candidates: You must take TOK, 3 HL classes, and 3 SL classes. Of those classes, 5 must be from categories 1-5, and a 6th course from any category. *Honors/AP Option: These courses have an Honors/AP designation but are not required as prerequisites for the corresponding IB courses. **Honors: These science courses with an Honors designation are required for students taking corresponding IB sciences.U.S. History credit and credit for American Government and Economics. Students who are enrolled as full IB Diploma candidates may meet the requirement for Wellness through the CAS program for IB. 19


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Advanced Placement PCSS offers Advanced Placement (AP) courses to high school students who are ready to engage in college level course content and challenging academics. Courses are available in English, social studies, mathematics, and science. AP classes were created in the mid-1950s as a response to the widening gap between secondary school (high school) and college. A pilot program in 1952 had 11 subjects, but AP didn’t officially launch until the 1956 school year, when College Board took over the program and named it the College Board Advanced Placement Program. The program expanded rapidly over the years. Now over 2.4 million students take AP exams every year in 38 subjects. It’s also much more common for students to take multiple AP classes over the course of their high school careers. All Advanced Placement course offerings are contingent upon each campus receiving College Board authorization for each course through the AP Course Audit and having suffiicent enrollment to support the course. The AP Program offers college level instruction to the academically successful high school student with the option of taking an Advanced Placement examination and possibly qualifying for college credit. AP students are expected to work at an accelerated pace and to engage in outside reading and independent learning. AP courses are open to all students with the prerequisite coursework who wish to take on the additional challenge of advanced academics. Students who choose to enroll, however, should be prepared for the increased academic challenge of these courses. AP courses concentrate on providing students with challenging college level academic instruction while preparing students for the AP exam associated with the course. PCSS’s Advanced Placement program includes service to GT students. AP courses earn weighted grade points. Students are responsible for ensuring that the college that they are planning to attend will award credit for AP examination scores. All students enrolled in an Advanced Placement class are required to take the exam.

exam ordering requirements. Counselors will provide fee information to all AP students, enrolled in courses at the beginning of the school year. The May 2016 AP exam fee was $93.00 per exam taken. Exam prices do increase minimally each year. Payment deadlines are set byAP and communicated to students by theirAP teachers at the beginning of the school year. A substantial late fee will be applied to all late payments. Payment plans are available but all payments must be completed by the first Friday following Winter Break. Students who register and pay for AP exams but fail to take the exam on the designated date forfeit the weighted points from any grade earned in the AP/IB course. Final GPA will be recalculated to reflect this reduction in weight before transcripts are sent to colleges and universities. Students and parents will sign a form that will be kept on file at each school acknowledging these deadlines and requirements. Why Take AP Classes? Taking an AP class (or several!) is a great way to challenge yourself academically and show colleges that you are serious about your education. An AP class on your transcript signals stronger academic training, especially with high passing scores of 4 and 5 on the test. In particular, getting a 5 shows that you are more advanced in a subject than 80-90% of advanced students – which looks very impressive to colleges! Since AP courses are challenging and require you to study for a comprehensive exam, they teach you skills that will help you in college classes. According to College Board, students who take AP exams get higher grades in college than those with similar grades who don’t take AP exams. Taking AP exams is also a way to demonstrate real academic interest in a certain subject. For example, if you’re an aspiring engineer, taking AP Calculus and AP Physics and passing the exams proves to a college admissions committee that you are serious about engineering and have the skills to pursue it. Some universities give credit for AP classes. For schools that accept the exams as class credit, it makes it possible to graduate college in a shorter amount of time, saving you money!

Exam Fees Exam fees for the AP exams must be paid during the first 6 months of school during the current school year due to 21


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Honors/AP/IB Course Entry and Exit Courses are designed in various ways to meet the skills and interests of students. Courses are offered as Regular, Honors, AP and IB courses. A student’s course of study may be a combination of courses with different designations. The student, parent, and school will work together to determine the best combination for each learner. See page ??for information about the grading system, weighted grade point scale, and class ranking. PCSS’s academic curriculum is a college-bound curriculum. These core and elective courses use a variety of teaching strategies, student activities, and assessments. The curriculum requires students to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills as well as master core content. Courses are taught on grade level. It is important that you plan wisely. The choices you make during registration will determine your classes next year. Each course request you make is a factor when school officials set budgets and plan staffing for educational needs. Schedule changes will be made based only on graduation requirements or on postsecondary school admission requirements. These changes must be made between your initial registration request and one week after school ends for the summer.

Honors/AP/IB Courses

Honors/AP courses are designed to challenge motivated students and prepare them for success in college level course work in high school and beyond. These advanced or above grade-level courses move at a faster pace, are more academically challenging and require more independent learning than academic courses. A few important factors to keep in mind are: • PCSS’s on-level academic curriculum is a collegebound curriculum. • While Honors courses are designed to better prepare students for AP, Honors courses are not a prerequisite for most AP/IB courses. • Some AP/IB courses have course prerequisites that must be completed. Check the course description for prerequisites. • Honors/AP/IB is not “all or nothing.” Students may take from one to all of their core classes as Honors/AP/IB. • For most courses, it is possible to move from academic to Honors sections from one year to the next. In mathematics,it is more difficult due to the acceleration and compacting of the curriculum in the middle school grades. A student who decides to move from Academic to Honors mathematics will require additional support in making the transition.

Honors/AP/IB Indicators for Student Success Please thoughtfully consider the following criteria as you are making a decision about whether or not Honors/AP/IB level courses will provide the most appropriate learning environment. A student should: 1. Typically be performing at 85% or above on the Norm Referenced Test (MAP) in a specific subject area before considering enrolling in an Honors/AP/IB level course in that subject area. 2. Typically be performing at the Mastered level on the TNReady Assessments in a specific subject area before considering enrolling in an Honors level course in that subject area. 3. Consistently earn an A or B for the subject in which they would like to take an Honors course. 4. Have a high level of interest and strong desire to be challenged in the subject in which they would like to take an Honors course. 5. Consistently exhibit most of the following characteristics: Learning/Intellectual Characteristics: •

Enjoys tasks that are more challenging than average

Has a ready grasp of underlying principles and can quickly make valid generalization about events, people, and things

Tries to understand complicated material by separating it into its respective parts; reasons things out

Analyzes problems and considers alternative.

Enjoys complex concepts and processes.

Is able to process new material/concepts at a brisk pace

Motivational/Affective Characteristics: •

Becomes absorbed and truly involved in certain topics or problems

Needs little external motivation to follow through in work completion

Often requires little direction from teachers 23


Is highly self-motivated and persistent

Has high expectations of self and others

When deciding whether or not to enroll a student in a particular subject area Honors course, please consider the following subject specific characteristics: Math/Science: •

Is interested in numerical analysis

Has a good memory for storing main features of problem and solutions

Reasons effectively and efficiently

Organizes data and experiments to discover patterns or relationships

Is flexible in solving problems

Can see the connections among numerical, analytic, graphical, and real-world applications of principles

Will complete assignments when given, even if they require some research to recall concepts

Social Studies/Language Arts: •

Has advanced vocabulary and is a stylistically mature writer for age or grade level

Willing to read and analyze complex texts l; does not avoid difficult material

Possesses advanced communication skills, both written and verbal

Organizes ideas and sequences in preparation for speaking and writing

Willing to conduct assignments, including research, outside of class

Honors/AP/IB Entry Guidelines

The purpose of the Honors/AP/IB entry guidelines is to provide information to facilitate placement of students in academically challenging courses. 1. PCSS recognizes the value of student participation in advanced academic coursework and encourages students to graduate from high school with at least one advanced course credit such as Advanced Placement or dual credit. To this end, PCSS has an inclusive enrollment 24

model for AP and Honors courses that provides support systems for student success. Students are encouraged to access the most challenging curriculum in which they can be successful, generally defined as earning a C or better semester average. 2. Honors and AP courses are designed to challenge students beyond grade-level academic courses and prepare them for success in future advanced level coursework. Student performance in related courses and teacher input are important elements for parents and students to consider in selecting advanced coursework. Students may require additional encouragement and support to be successful in these courses. 3. Students who opt to participate in AP or Honors must: • Successfully complete prerequisite courses as specified in the course catalog. • Demonstrate mastery on course-related statemandated performance assessments. • Recognize the long term benefits of participation, seek assistance when needed, and commit to staying in the course for a minimum of one semester. Questions about Honors/AP courses should be directed to the school counselor and/or the subject area teacher.

Honors/AP/IB Exit Guidelines

Exit processes are in place to assist students in making sound course selection decisions. Students and parents must be aware that, depending on timeline, grades earned in a Honors/AP/IB course follow the student to the corresponding academic course. These grades will be included in calculating the academic course grade. Consult with the school counselor for more detailed information. 1. It is expected that students seek assistance when needed to be successful in the course and remain in the Honors/AP/IB course for at least one full semester. 2. Students petitioning to exit a Honors/AP/IB course must meet the following criteria: conference with the teacher and completion of course assignments and/or attendance at recommended tutorials. The petition for exit may or may not be granted by the campus. Granting the petition is based on input from the teacher, student performance in the course, availability of space in other courses and the timing of the request. Students experiencing success (maintaining a C or better SEMESTER average) in the course should remain in the course for the semester. Contact the counselor for more information about documenting these requirements on the district petition form. 3. Students who earn an “F” in a Honors/AP/IB course at the end of a report card or nine weeks


will be removed from the class unless otherwise recommended by the teacher and administrator. In the case of AP/IB courses see number 4. 4. Students who elect to take an AP/IB class for which there is no academic equivalent will be required to remain in the course until the end of the semester. Options for credit for AP/IB courses with no academic equivalent which fulfill a graduation requirement are limited and may negatively impact the student. 5. Students who exit an Honors/AP/IB course will forfeit the weighted points from any grade earned in the Honors/AP course.

AP/IB Exams

ALL students enrolled in Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses in PCSS are required to register, pay for, and take the corresponding exam for each course taken. Fees for exams must either be paid or arrangements for payment must be made by the first Friday following Fall Break (ex., Oct. 23, 2017). All payments must be completed by the first Friday in January following Winter Break (ex., Jan. 8, 2017). Any student who has not committed to take the exam for each AP/IB course and completed payment by that date will be removed from the AP/IB class and placed in another class. All weighted points will be removed from any grade earned and all added weight will be removed from any grade already earned in the AP/IB course. AP/IB exams continue through the fourth week of May each year which means that senior students must often return to school to complete exams after the official graduation ceremony. Students may participate in the graduation ceremony before all exams are completed, however, the high school diploma will be held by the school until it has been verified that all exams have been completed. Students who register and pay for IB/AP exams but fail to take the exam on the designated date forfeit the weighted points from any grade earned in the AP/IB course. Final GPA will be recalculated to reflect this reduction in weight before transcripts are sent to colleges and universities. Students and parents will sign a form that will be kept on file at each school acknowledging these deadlines and requirements.

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Putnam County School System Petition for Pre-AP or Honors/AP/IB Course Exit Student’s Name: Last

First

Middle

Student ID Number:

Grade Level:

Course: Teacher:

I request an exit from the course stated above for the following reason(s):

I have completed all requirements for this petition. 

I have conferenced with the teacher about my course performance and have implemented recommendations for improvement.



I have attended all recommended tutorials (before school/after school/during lunch).



I have completed all assignments.

Teacher’s Signature:



I have discussed the implications of a course change with my counselor and, if applicable, the IB Coordinator.

Counselor’s Signature: IB Coordinator’s Signature, if applicable:

As the student (or parent/guardian), my signature below indicates that I understand the implications of a course change for my (or my student’s) grade in the course, course weighting, and athletic eligibility. Signature of Student:

Date:

Signature of Parent/Guardian:

Date:

Counselor Use Only Status: 

Petition Granted



Petition Denied

Signature of Counselor:

Original: Student File Copy to: Counselor/IB Coordinator and Student

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Date:


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SDC

Statewide Dual Credit

Statewide Dual Credit is a high school course aligned to standards at a local postsecondary institution with an required exam to earn credit at any Tennessee postsecondary institution. What student fees are involved with statewide dual credit, and how can I get assisstance with the cost? Will this class still count for a high school credit and meet remaining graduation requirements? Will this class get recognized by my high school according to state policies?

◆ Yes, the statewide dual credit course fulfills the same requirements as aligned high school course ◆ Yes, statewide dual credit courses are recognized according to policy, and statwide dual credit students are able to graduate with state distinction ◆ Qualifies for increased GPA weighting

What determines if I could receive any postsecondary credit?

◆ The student’s challenge exam score is at or above the established cut score

What determines if I will have any postsecondary credit awarded?

◆ Credit accepted at all Tennessee public postsecondary institutions ◆ Students should notify registrar upon matriculation to receive credit

What is the structure of SDC? Who is the provider of SDC?

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◆ No exam fees

◆ Course and exam ◆ Tennessee Department of Education


Dual Enrollment and Statewide Dual Credit Dual enrollment is a program that allows high school students (usually sophomores, juniors, and seniors) to enroll in college courses for credit prior to high school graduation. College credits earned through dual enrollment can be simultaneously applied toward high school and college graduation and can be transferred to other colleges or universities. The PCSS Dual Enrollment and Statewide Dual Credit Program

The Dual Enrollment and Statewide Dual Credit Program is a cooperative effort between PCSS and institutes of higher education (IHE) such as Volunteer State Community College (VS), Tennessee Technological University (TTU) and the Tennessee College of Applied Technology - Livingston Campus (TCAT). PCSS students can earn high school credit toward graduation and college credit at the same time. Students may elect to take PCSS-approved courses to apply toward required graduation credits from high school. Only courses with a TN Course Code equivalent can earn high school credit and count in the student’s GPA. Courses that do not have a TN Course Code equivalent are noted on the student transcript and receive college credit but do not count in the GPA. Public institutions of higher learning in the State of Tennessee, by law, accept this transfer credit for college-level course work that has been successfully completed at a public institute of higher education. Approved dual enrollment and statewide dual credit courses earn the same grade points as PCSS academic courses.

Dual Enrollment All dual enrollment course registrations must be completed through the VITAL office. PCSS Dual Enrollment Specialist, Donna Sherrell is available to assist and answer questions. You may contact her via email at sherrelld1@pcsstn. com or by phone at 931-528-2176. All dual enrollment course offerings at each high school are contingent upon availability of IHE qualified instructors.

All courses are not available as a face to face course on all campuses. Online enrollment and attending classes at an IHE campus are also options. Enrollment in IHE classes on the respective campuses is contingent on the availability of seats in the desired class. PCSS students are not guaranteed space in any dual enrollment or dual credit course. Students who attend class at the IHE campus must have a valid meningitis vaccination. The IHE dual credit course may be delivered in a 3 day (IHE instructor) or 5 day format (PCSS instructor with credentials to teach for IHE). •

Enrollment in Dual Credit courses is subject to the student meeting ALL admission requirements for the course or courses the student wishes to take by established deadlines communicated in the spring. These requirements include: • Students must meet their high school requirements for taking dual credit classes. • Students must have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale. • Students must have an acceptable PLAN, ACT, or SAT score (generally a subtest score of 19 in English and Reading and/or the subject area. • Students must pay all fees due to the institute 29


of higher education for the semester courses by established deadlines. • Students must purchase instructional resources for the course. • Eligibility must be confirmed by the end of the current school year for courses beginning in the next school year. • Students are responsible for ensuring that the college they are planning to attend will accept transfer credit from the IHE. •

TN Dual Enrollment Grant

The Dual Enrollment Grant program is defined as a grant for study at an eligible postsecondary institution that is funded from net proceeds of the state lottery and awarded to students who are attending an eligible high school and who are also enrolled in college courses at eligible postsecondary institutions for which they will receive college credit. The Dual Enrollment Grant program is funded by the Tennessee Lottery and administered by the Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation. This program provides opportunities for students to begin working toward a college degree, while still pursuing a high school diploma. Eligibility and Participation Requirements To be eligible for the Dual Enrollment Grant program, a student enrolled in an eligible high school must be admitted to and enrolled in an eligible postsecondary institution. Institutional admission requirements will govern the initial grant eligibility of dual enrollment students. A student must be a Tennessee resident, as defined by Chapter 0240-2-2, Classifying Students In-State and Out-of-State, as promulgated by the Tennessee Board of Regents, for one year as of the application deadline of the semester of enrollment in an eligible postsecondary institution. To be eligible, the student must:

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Have completed all of the academic requirements of the 10th grade (high school sophomore) and be classified as an 11th grader (high school junior) or 12th grader (high school senior) by the student’s high school.

Apply for the grant as a junior and/or senior prior to high school graduation;

Complete and submit the Dual Enrollment Grant application on-line by the deadline date for each semester as indicated below;

Meet admissions criteria for dual enrollment for the postsecondary institution to which the student will enroll as a dual enrolled student;

Enrollment at the postsecondary institution requires no minimum number of hours.

Comply with United States Selective Service System requirements for registration, if such requirements are applicable to the student;

Be in compliance with federal drug-free rules and laws for receiving financial assistance;

Not be in default on a federal Title IV educational loan or Tennessee educational loan;

Not owe a refund on a federal Title IV student financial aid program or a Tennessee student financial aid program;

Not be incarcerated;

Not have already received a high school diploma, revised General Education Development (GED) diploma or HiSET;

Be a Tennessee resident one (1) year prior to enrollment; and

Be attending an eligible postsecondary institution.

Award Amounds at Eligible Two-Year and Four-Year Postsecondary Institutions The award amounts at eligible two-year institutions and four-year institutions will be as follows: • • • • • • • •

Up to $500 – Course #1 Up to $500 – Course #2 Up to $200 – Course #3 No award – Course #4 Up to $100 per credit hour – Course #5 Up to $100 per credit hour – Course #6 Up to $100 per credit hour – Course #7 Up to $100 per credit hour – Course #8

1. DEG award amounts for courses 5-8 shall not exceed $600 per semester ($1,200 per year). 2. A student may receive funding for one (1) course per semester. To receive funding for one additional course per semester, the student must meet the minimum HOPE Scholarship academic requirements at the time of dual enrollment. For more details, please see the Tennessee HOPE Scholarship eligibility requirements. 3. Students who receive the Dual Enrollment Grant amount for more than four (4) dual enrollment courses over the junior and senior years will have the amount reduced from their Tennessee HOPE Scholarship on a dollar for dollar basis. 4. College courses attempted and the number of years enrolled as dual enrolled students shall not count against the 120 semester hours and five (5) years limitation for the Tennessee HOPE Scholarship program.


5. The Dual Enrollment Grant shall be used for lower division (courses numbered 100-200 or 1000-2000) postsecondary degree-seeking courses.

Award Amounts at Tennessee College of Applied Technology Institutions • • • • • • • •

Up to $100 per clock hour – Course #1 Up to $100 per clock hour – Course #2 Up to $100 per clock hour – Course #3 Up to $100 per clock hour – Course #4 Up to $100 per clock hour – Course #5 Up to $100 per clock hour – Course #6 Up to $100 per clock hour – Course #7 Up to $100 per clock hour – Course #8

1. DEG award amounts shall not exceed $600 per term ($1,200 per academic year). 2. A student may receive funding for one (1) course per semester. To receive funding for one additional course per semester, the student must meet the minimum Tennessee HOPE Scholarship academic requirements at the time of dual enrollment. For more details, please see the Tennessee HOPE Scholarship eligibility requirements. 3. Students who receive the Dual Enrollment Grant amount for more than four (4) dual enrollment courses over the junior and senior years will have the amount reduced from their Tennessee HOPE Scholarship on a dollar for dollar basis. Length of Eligibility A student’s participation in the Dual Enrollment Grant program is limited to the remaining amount of time normally required to complete the high school diploma, from the time of initial participation in the program. The grant is available for the summer terms, prior to graduation from high school.

Except for weekends and holidays, the on-line application must be completed by the student and received by TSAC on dates as indicated above. - See more at: https://www.tn.gov/collegepays/article/ dual-enrollment-grant#sthash.EacE0EI7.dpuf

Statewide Dual Credit Statewide Dual Credit courses are high school courses aligned with a postsecondary challenge examination developed and approved by the Consortium for Cooperative Innovative Education, which allows students exceeding an established cut score to earn postsecondary credit at any

public postsecondary institution. This course is taught by high school faculty at the high school. •

Tennessee high school and college faculty worked together to develop the learning objectives and challenge exam for each course.

All students enrolled in a statewide dual credit course are

required to take the online challenge exam, which is used to assess mastery of the postsecondary level learning objectives.

Students ONLY have one attempt at these exams. Any additional attempts will not be reported and/ or recognized by the Tennessee Department of Education.

Awarding Postsecondary Credit •

Students who pass their statewide dual credit challenge exam are eligible to receive college credit at any of the public postsecondary institutions in the state. However, students need to enroll in an institution in order to receive “transcripted” college credit.

Upon matriculation, a student is responsible for contacting the institution’s Records Office and providing his/her statewide dual credit course/exam information in order for postsecondary credits to be awarded.

Statewide dual credit challenge exam scores must be reported on the student’s official high school transcript for the purpose of awarding credit at the postsecondary institution.

Application Deadline Two-year and Four-year Eligible Postsecondary Institutions September 15 – Fall Semester February 1 – Spring Semester May 15 – Summer Semester Tennessee College of Applied Technology Institutions November 1 – Fall Semester March 1 – Spring Semester May 15 – Summer Semester

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Statewide Dual Credit Courses Course

32

Suggested Grade Level

Exam Cut Score Required for Credit

Pre - Calculus

11, 12

75%

Statistics

11, 12

75%

Introduction of Agricultural Business

11, 12

70%

Introduction to Plant Science

11, 12

70%


TN Ready, College Athletics, and NCAA Eligibility Division I or Division II College Athletics Any student who plans to enroll in college as a freshman and participate in Division I or II intercollegiate athletics must be certified by the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse. To be certified by the Clearinghouse, a student must meet several criteria. Please be sure to obtain this information located in the Counseling Center. Students should apply for certification after their junior year in high school if they are sure they wish to participate in intercollegiate athletics as a freshman at a Division I or II institution. Do not wait until the last minute to process these papers. Contact your counselor if this applies to you!

For more information and to register with the Clearinghouse, visit www.ncaa- clearinghouse.net. NCAA legislation provides for the acceptance of StateAdministered ACT test results for use in determina- tion of NCAA Initial-Eligibility for both Division I and Division II schools. Only College-Reportable scores, as determined

by ACT, are eligible to be reported to the NCAA. Scores achieved under State-Allowed conditions are not eligible for reporting to colleges or the NCAA. NCAA Bylaws www. eligibilitycenter.org or www.ncaapublications.com

TN Ready

TNReady replaces the TCAP test for English language arts, math, science, and social studies in grades 3–11. It will provide us with more and better information about our students’ progress. The new TNReady tests are designed to assess true student understanding, not just basic memorization and test-taking skills. TNReady will measure students’ un-

derstanding of our current state standards in English language arts, math, science, and social studies rather than the SPIs (State Performance Indicators), which previously determined what students should know at the end of each year.

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End of Course Testing Students are required to graduate using the plan as established by the High School Transition Policy. This plan requires students to be assessed in the following courses: English I, English II, English III, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, Integrated Math III, US History, Biology and Chemistry. The results of these examinations will be factored into the student’s grade at a percentage determined by the State Board of Education in accordance with TCA 49-1-302(2). The weight of the EOC examination on the student’s final average shall be ten percent (10%) in the 2016-2017school year, fifteen percent (15%) in the 2017 -2018 school year; and shall be determined by the local board from a range of no less than fifteen (15%) and no more than twenty-five (25%) in the 2018-2019 school year and thereafter.

Academic Career Coaches PCSS partners with The Pathways to Prosperity Network. The Network develops career pathways that span grades 9-14, enabling students to transition smoothly through high school, into higher education, and onto family-supporting careers—particularly in high-demand sectors like information technology, health care, and advanced manufacturing. As part of the network, we have two Academic Career Coaches whose focus is to collaborate with counselors, core teachers and CTE personnel in providing education and career assessment interpretation to students and parents, specifically as it relates to the established pathways. The ACCs also connect students with early postsecondary education opportunities (EPSOs), which enhance their educational and career experiences.

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VITAL Personalized Learning PCSS is home to a nationally recognized online learning program - Virtual Instruction to Accentuate Learning (VITAL). We are excited to offer a virtual learning option to Putnam County students. Currently courses are offered for students in Grades 9 - 12 during the regular school year, however, we hope to expand our offerings as the program grows to include younger students. The mission of the Virtual Instruction to Accentuate Learning (VITAL) Program is to provide students with a high quality, flexible, technology-based educational opportunity that allows them to maximize their potential to serve and participate productively in 21st century society. VITAL offers a full complement of high school core academic courses. More information on this program can be found on pages 36 - 37. For full information visit http://vital.pcsstn.com


Grading and Class Rank System Grading System

Tennessee Uniform Grading System

A combination of numbers and letters is used in grading. The number or letter represents the quality of work done by the student. A

93-100

Outstanding progress and mastery of subject matter

B

85-92

Above average progress and mastery of subject matter

C

75-84

Average progress and understanding of material

D

70-74

Below average progress and minimum passing grade

F

69 and Below

Student has not met the class requirements

Grade Point Scale The Classes of 2018, 2019, and 2020 will remain on the 6 point scale outlined below. Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses, advanced VITAL and Dual Enrollment courses that are verified as having an AP/IB course equivalent

Honors, National Industry Certification, Statewide Dual Credit and other Dual Enrollment college courses that have a TN course code equivalent

Regular courses

A

6

5

4

B

5

4

3

C

4

3

2

D

3

2

1

F

0

0

0

AP, IB, and DE courses shall include the addition of 5 percentage points to the grading period at each reporting period and each grading period comprehensive exam used to calculate the semester average. Points are not added to the semester or final average.

Shall include the addition of 3 percentage points to the grading period at each reporting period and each grading period comprehensive exam used to calculate the semester average for Honors, National Industry Certification, and Dual Enrollment courses having a TN course code equivalent. Points are not added to the semester or final average. Shall include the addition of 4 percentage points to the grading period grades and each grading period at each reporting period and each grading period comprehensive exam used to calculate the semester average for Statewide Dual Credit Courses. Points are not added to the semester or final average.

®® Honors courses will be reviewed and approved annually by the PCSS Board of Education and must conform to the Framework of Standards for Honors Courses in the state Uniform Grading Policy. ®® Advanced Placement courses are those designated by the College Board. ®® International Baccalaureate courses are those designated by the International Baccalaureate Organization. 35


To comply with TCA 49-6-407, effective July 1, 2017 all actively enrolled students in the Class of 2021 (2017-2018 freshmen) and following who have earned high school credits will have quality points adjusted as follows. Successive classes will also earn credits based on this scale. Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and Dual Enrollment Courses

Statewide Dual Credit Courses

Honors* and National Industry Certification Courses

Regular Courses

A

5

4.75

4.5

4

B

4

3.75

3.5

3

C

3

2.75

2.5

2

D

2

1.75

1.5

1

F

0

0

0

0

®® Honors courses will be reviewed and approved annually by the PCSS Board of Education and must conform to the Framework of Standards for Honors Courses in the state Uniform Grading Policy. ®® Advanced Placement courses are those designated by the College Board. ®® International Baccalaureate courses are those designated by the International Baccalaureate Organization. Advanced coursework grades will be weighted with additional percentage points to calculate the semester average. Depending on the course taken, the following percentage points will be assigned: Honors Courses - three (3) percentage points; Local and Statewide Dual Credit, Capstone Industry Certification Aligned, and Dual Enrollment Courses - four (4) percentage points; Advanced Placement, College Level Exam Program (CLEP), and International Baccalaureate Courses - five (5) percentage points. Points are added to the grade at each reporting period and to the comprehensive semester exam used to determine the semester average. Additional points are not added to the semester or final course averages.

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Class Rank and Graduation Recognition Class Rank What is class rank? The College Board defines class rank as “a mathematical summary of a student’s academic record compared to those of other students in the class.” Class rank is a way to see how your academic achievements measure up to those of your classmates. Your class rank is determined by comparing your GPA to the GPA of the people in the same grade as you. So, if you are a junior and your high school has 500 juniors, each of them will receive a number, 1-500, with the person who has the highest GPA ranked #1. If there are 500 people in your class and your class rank is 235, then 234 of your classmates have a higher GPA than you, 265 classmates have a lower GPA than you, and you are in the 53rd percentile of your class. Class rank offers a way for colleges to see how your academic achievements compare to those of your classmates. For example, you may attend a high school that gives very few A’s and you have a transcript with mostly B’s and C’s, this may make your GPA lower than the average applicant’s GPA at some colleges. However, admissions officers will see by your high class rank that you were one of the best students in your grade, and this will strengthen your application. Conversely, if you have straight A’s but only took easy classes or went to a high school that gave many A’s, you may have a great GPA but your class rank may not be particularly high because a lot of your classmates received the same grades you did. How is class rank calculated? The following criteria apply to all students in calculating GPAs used in determining class rankings: 1. Students shall receive weighted grade points corresponding to the level of difficulty of the courses taken. 2. A GPA is determined mathematically using all grades earned. 3. The GPA is based on high school courses taken in middle and high schoool through 11th grade and the first semester of the senior year. Recognition for academic honors shall be given to the following graduating seniors: 1. Valedictorian—highest ranking student 2. Salutatorian—second-highest ranking student 3. Third Honor -- third-highest ranking student Students must be enrolled full time at the home base school and meet the minimum composite score of 21 on the ACT or equivalent score on the ACT to be eligible for ranking.

Every class taken for high school credit and having a recognized TN course code will be counted in the weighted ranking of students based on a maximum grade of 100 before the weight factor. To become valedictorian, salutatorian, a student must be enrolled in the high school at least five (5) consecutive semesters preceding the final semester. The final semester shall not be used in determining class standing. In the event of a tie, class rank will be determined by using weighted numerical grades in Advanced Placement and Honors courses and numerical grades in all other courses according to the grading system. Should there still be a tie, the ACT composite score will be used to determine rank.

Graduation Recognition PCSS is pleased to announce that beginning with the Class of 2017, students will be recognized at graduation using the Latin Honors system. This system is widely used in the United States and around the world to recognize academic achievement. This method of recognition uses three levels of honors, Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, and Summa Cum Laude. The highest level of honor is Summa Cum Laude which means “with highest honor”. The next level of honor is Magna Cum Laude which means “with great honor”. The other level of honor is Cum Laude meaning “with praise or with honor”. The GPA range for attaining each level of honor is established by each school. Students graduating with any of these levels of recognition will will wear stoles as part of their academic regalia during the graduation ceremony. Students attaining these honors will also be recognized in the local newspaper and in the graduation program. All of these students will also be part of a photograph taken prior to the graduation ceremony at each school. This method of recognition at the graduation ceremony in no way impacts class rank. Students who have an ACT Composite score of 21 or higher will be ranked in accodance with PCSS Board Policy 4.602. Class rank will be noted on the student’s academic records and final transcripts.

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Earning Credits That Meet Graduation Requirements General Information about Credits Awarding of Credit High school graduation course credit may be earned only if the student receives a grade equivalent to or higher than 70 on a 100-point scale, based upon the essential knowledge and skills of each course. A student who successfully completes only one semester of a two-semester course is awarded partial credit. However, for full year courses required for graduation, students must earn the remaining credit through a credit restoration method. The Tennessee Department of Education has specified nine (9) courses for which an End of Course (EOC) assessment is required: English I, English II, English III, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, Integrated Math III, Biology, Chemistry, and US History and Geography. Ways to Earn Credits Original credit is earned when a student takes a course for the first time and successfully meets the course requirements to earn a passing semester or year average. Recovery credit is earned when a student retakes a course for which credit was not awarded the first time because of a failing semester/year average. The recovery may occur by retaking the entire course in its standard format or by retaking it in an alternate format. Several of the ways to earn credit described below can be used for either original or recovery credit. The school counselor must be consulted before a final decision is made about how to earn the credit. High School Credit Courses in Middle School (Original Credit) The star symbol shown alongside course descriptions in the middle school section denotes high school credit courses available to middle school students. Students can select core courses that yield high school credit during middle school. These options are described on pages 116 of the course catalog. Some courses have entrance criteria that must be met based on either a readiness assessment or performance on MAP or state assessments.

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Students in courses for high school credit are required to take the EOC for the course.

Students will have a two-week grace period at the beginning of the school year to be able to drop the class.

Students must maintain an 85 average for each

marking period during the course in order to remain in the class. •

The course cannot be repeated at the High School once the credit is earned.

Upon entering high school, students are mandated by the State of Tennessee Diploma Project requirements to take 4 years of Math (1 math per their 4 year high school tenure) even if high school math credits are earned in middle school.

The state progression is Integrated Math I (3132), Integrated Math II (3133), Integrated Math III (3134), Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry (3124), PreCalculus (3126), Statistics (3136), and Calculus (3113). Advanced placement mathematics courses include Calculus AB (3127), Calculus BC (3128), and Statistics (3129).

All high school school credit courses taken in middle will become a permanent part of the student’s transcript and will count toward the student’s high school grade point averages (GPA). Fall and Spring Semesters, Grades 9 – 12 (Original Credit and Credit Recovery) Students can earn all 22 required graduation credits for the Regular Diploma, Honors Diploma, Distinction Diploma, TN Scholars Recognition, or IB Diploma during the ?-period school day at each high school. VITAL (Virtual Instruction to Accentuate Learning) Online Program The PCSS Virtual School, VITAL, offers fee-based online courses for students in grades K-12. The courses are taught by PCSS teachers through an online learning management system. Courses are offered both during the regular school day and as an extension to the regular school day to allow students to earn credit while participating in extracurricular activities, exploring courses of interest, and benefitting from flexible scheduling. VITAL courses count towards the student GPA just as all other PCSS courses. Grades are reported on Progress Reports and Report Cards and follow the PCSS Academic Calendar. VITAL online courses allow you to: 1) Take courses that are not currently offered at your school 2) Recover a credit if you are behind and want to graduate on time 3) Earn credit at an accelerated pace to graduate early 4) Earn dual enrollment credits to begin college work early How is it similar? Online classes are similar to traditional classes in that you will have a “real” teacher, read and work on assignments, interact with other students and your teacher, complete assignments, conduct experiments, meet deadlines, and study for tests.


How is it different? You will do most of this online. You probably will not ever meet your online instructor faceto-face but he/she is a real person. Instead, you will use e-mail, online discussions, and phone conversations during virtual office hours to get help. What are the procedures for signing up? Each campus has an online learning facilitator. See the OnsiteFacilitator at your school to get started. He/she will talk with you, check your transcript and ask you to complete a short, simple self-assessment. • If you, your counselor, and your parents determine that you can be a successful online learner, you will complete the registration and other forms needed to proceed. •

Click on the links located at vital.pcsstn.com to open and print your registration materials.

Complete all required forms (Registration, Academic Integrity, and Letter of Agreement) and take all forms to the onsite facilitator at your school

All information on the forms must be completed and all signatures in place before your registration can be processed.

Incomplete forms will be returned and may delay your registration and eligibility for a priority enrollment seat.

You will be notified if you are accepted and what fees are due. Your registration will be completed when you have paid your fees.

After registration, you will be required to attend an orientation session to receive your login information, password, and access to a special e-mail account before you begin work in your class.

Credit Recovery and Credit Intervention District-supported Credit Recovery in Compass Learning Odyssey software (semester level) is limited to the following courses: Integrated Math I

English III

Integrated Math II English IV

Government World Geography

Biology

Lifetime Wellness World History

Chemistry

Physics

English I

US History

English II

Economic

Credit Intervention Student Requirements: In order to qualify to enter credit recovery, a student must first participate in Credit Intervention: 1. Have made a diligent effort to submit all graded assignments for the 4.5 weeks of the grading

period. If a student reaches the end of the 4.5 weeks with zeros for work not attempted, he must submit those assignments or complete alternative assignments assigned by the course teacher in Compass Learning covering the same concepts or standards by the end of the following 4.5 week grading period. Grades earned on these assignments will replace the missing grades. This work must be submitted or documentation of effort/extenuating circumstances must be provided before credit recovery can begin. Documentation can be verified by either the counselor or Onsite Facilitator by communicating with the course teacher. 2. Teachers will strongly encourage students to use the Credit Intervention option but students cannot be required to participate unless time is provided during the regular school day.

Credit Recovery Should it be necessary after Credit Intervention to recover a grade: 1. Students must complete an application which will require both student and parent signatures and the principal or principal’s designee. An applicant to the online credit recovery must have achieved a grade of 50 or above to be considered for the online credit recovery option through VITAL. The procedure for the credit recovery option must be presented in writing to the parent and the student attached to the student and parent signature agreement documentation. 2. Complete recovery work in before or after school recovery sessions or during the school day in an assigned remedial lab time. Sttudents may work on credit recovery work away from school, The same guidelines apply to Summer School credit recovery. 3. Complete recovery assignments before the end of the semester following the failing grade. (Fall semester failure recovery should be completed in the spring semester. Spring semester failure recovery should be completed by the end of the fall semester of the next school year.) 4. Complete all lessons and assignments, quizzes, and tests within the learning path. 5. Complete all post-tests required for the semester for that subject. 6. Achieve an average of 70 or above on recovery activities as follows per semester: • 10% of the score will be based on an average of all post-tests for the semester. The post test score is found in the class progress report. • 90% of the grade will be an average of remaining activities in Compass software, the Notebook and Soft Skills. The weight of each group

39


of activities within that 90% will be determined and be uniform across the district. 7. Recovered grades will be entered in addition to the original failing grade and posted under the name of the original teacher as the teacher of record. 8. Credit Recovery student will take course EOC at the scheduled EOC timeframe IF, the EOC was not taken during the original initial credit class offering, if the EOC was missed or not taken.

PCSS Summer School (Original Credit and Credit Recovery)

To insure consistency across the district, students will test using the Compass Odyssey course for these subjects at grade level. Compass Odyssey will generate a learning path for students based on their performance that can be used for remediation of standards as needed.

PCSS offers an online summer term for grades 7-8 and high school students. There is an enrollment fee for most secondary PCSS Summer Academic Term courses. Course selection and enrollment in summer courses is limited and contingent upon teacher availability.

A student will be deemed proficient and receive credit if a score of 70% mastery is attained. The percentage score earned on the test will be the course grade entered on the student’s record for credits earned for ELA, Math, and Science. Students will be placed in the appropriate sequential course level. Students may validate their previously earned credits by maintaining a 2.0 GPA in ELA, Math, and Science.

Course selection and enrollment forms are available in the campus counselors’ offices in the spring. Enrollment in any of the VITAL courses requires approval of the student’s home campus counselor, diagnostician and/or principal.

Other credits/grades will be evaluated on the basis of comparability to local courses in terms of course length and content and will if deemed comparable transfer and count toward graduation as reported.

Dates, times, fees and locations of the PCSS Summer school are announced each spring.

Registration for these courses is separate from regular school enrollment and is announced in the spring. A limited number of courses are offered for original credit in High School Summer Term. Students wishing to enroll in the PCSS Summer Academic Term original credit courses must meet the requirements of the course. TN End of Course (EOC) assessments are requirements alter summer course offerings.

Credit from Home School or Non-accredited Private Schools It is our policy to welcome new students to the PCSS. Per SBE Chapter 0520-01-03 (Minimum Requirements for the Approval of Public Schools), students receive credit for work from transferred schools if it is substantiated by official transcripts. Non-public School Transfers - Categories 1-SP, 2, and 3 All evidence of work or credits earned at another public school, community college, university or Categories 1-SP, 2, and 3 recognized by the TN Department of Education offered for acceptance shall be based on an official transcript authenticated by the principal (or designee) and accepted at face value. Non-public School Transfers - Categories 4, 5, and 6 Students transferring into PCSS high schools from non40

public schools that are not recognized by the TN Department of Education (Categories 4, 5, and 6, see http://www. tn.gov/education/schools/non_public_schools.shtml) will be tested for appropriate grade level placement in ELA, Math, and Science prior to enrollment.

Homeschool Transfers Students transferring into PCSS high schools from home education programs (see http://www.tn.gov/education/ schools/homeschool.shtml) will be tested for appropriate grade level placement in ELA, Math, and Science prior to enrollment. To insure consistency across the district, students will test using the Compass Odyssey course for these subjects at grade level. Compass Odyssey will generate a learning path for students based on their performance that can be used for remediation of standards as needed. A student will be deemed proficient and receive credit if a score of 70% mastery is attained. The percentage score earned on the test will be the course grade entered on the student’s record for credits earned for ELA, Math, and Science. Students will be placed in the appropriate sequential course level. Students may validate their previously earned credits by maintaining a 2.0 GPA in ELA, Math, and Science. Parents of students transferring from a home education program shall provide to the school a detailed course description for each course indicating objectives, instructional materials, and methods of student performance evaluation. Courses will be evaluated on the basis of comparability to local courses in terms of course length and content.


Preparing for College What Should I be Doing Now? College for TN.org http://www.collegefortn.org • Connects students by clarifying steps needed on the path to college and career, from taking the right classes and tests to applying to colleges and then finding the money to pay for school. Know How to Go • Advice on how to go to college from people who know all about it.

http://knowhow2go.acenet.edu

Adventures in Education http://www.aie.org • College application and admissions process as well as tips on choosing the college that’s right for you. Searching For a College Campus Compare http://www.campuscompare.com • 4000 community colleges, state colleges, traditional colleges, universities, and more with College Current featuring videos, student reviews, and college information on Twitter. College Answer https://www.collegeanswer.com • Information about college, including preparing, selecting, applying, paying, deciding, and financing Campus Tours http://www.campustours.com • Video tours, interactive maps and custom multimedia apps for higher education, non-profit, and government clients Career Planning College and Career Quest Exercise http://www.njsca.org/col/colquest.htm • Web-based career exploration designed to develop skills for researching potential majors and colleges Kuder Navigator kudernavigator.com • Career exploration and guidance with college, career, and financial aid planning Financial Aid and Scholarships FAFSA • Free Application for Federal Student Aid Fast Web • Scholarship information

http://www.fafsa.ed.gov http://www.fastweb.com

College Goal Tennessee https://www.tn.gov/collegegoaltn/topic/information • College Goal Tennessee is a non-profit program that provides free information and assistance to Tennessee families applying for financial assistance for higher education. Tennessee Promise http://tnpromoise.gov • Seniors may apply for the Tennessee Promise scholarship, which will provide two years of tuition-free attendance at a community or technical college in Tennessee. TN Education Lottery Programs (HOPE Scholarship and others) • Gateway to the multiple scholarshp opportunities provided by the TN Education Lottery

https://goo.gl/9gLR8E

Mapping Your Future mappingyourfuture.org • Mapping Your Future is a nonprofit organization committed to helping students, families, and schools navigate the higher education and student loan processes through trusted career, college, and financial aid counseling and resources. 41


College Entrance Exams College Board http://www.collegeboard.org • SAT and career/college information ACT • ACT and career/college information

http://www.actstudent.org

Career/Workplace Preparation Tennessee College and Career Planning System The Tennessee College & Career Planning System steps students through learning about themselves; exploring career options; making a plan for education; preparing for the world of work; and more. Educators can use the system to monitor progress, plan curriculum, and support career guidance. Sponsored by Edsouth, every Tennessee school can access the system free of charge. The system features Kuder® Navigator for middle and high schools and Kuder® Journey for colleges. To get started, visit: planningyourdreams.org Step 1 • Students: Contact your school counselor or advisor for your free activation code. Educators: Contact Kuder for your free access code. Step 2 • Create your own account by clicking on “New Users.” If you have already created an account, click on “Log In” to begin.

Career Resources

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America’s Career InfoNet

www.acinet.org

American Libraries Association Job List

https://joblist.ala.org

Labor Market Information

www.jobs4tn.gov

Occupational Outlook Handbook

www.bls.gov/oco


Career and Technical Education (CTE) Tennessee’s Careerand Technical Education (CTE) programs of study are meant to provide a relevant framework of industry-aligned, rigorous courses that progress a student in knowledge and skills year over year. They provide invaluable opportunities for students to experience a subject they are passionate about and explore interests that lead to postsecondary learning and future career paths. These sequenced courses also reflect and support the three credit elective focus requirement for graduation. Level one courses are encouraged to be taken by students in ninth grade. Career Clusters Tennessee’s career clusters are organized into 16 broad categories that encompass virtually all occupations from entry through professional levels and are aligned with the U.S. Department of Education’s structure of career and technical education (CTE). Career clusters identify the knowledge and skills needed to follow a pathway toward career goals and provide a context for exploring the many occupational options available. Note that each cluster is divided into different pathways that are grouped by the knowledge and skills required for occupations in these career fields. PCSS offers 12 of the 16 career clusters. Not all career clusters are offered at all schools, however, students at MHS and UHS may have the option of taking courses in career clusters at CHS.

Career & Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs) Career & Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs) recognize and promote the concept of well-rounded students as being essential for all students in order for them to assume successful roles in society and in the labor market. In general, CTSOs help to improve the quality and relevance of classroom instruction, develop student leadership, enhance citizenship responsibilities, and serve students of special populations. Students are encouraged to actively participate in the CTSO for their career cluster or program of study.

43


PCSS currently has active CTSOs in the following areas: CTSO

Available at

Associated Career Clusters

DECA - Marketing, Finance, Hospitality, CHS and Management Student Organization

• • • •

Business Management & Administration Finance Hospitality & Tourism Marketing

FBLA - Future Business Leaders of America

CHS, MHS

• Arts, A/V Technology, & Communications • Business Management & Administration • Finance • Information Technology • Marketing

FCCLA - Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America

CHS, MHS

• Architecture & Construction (Interior Design Program of Study) • Arts, A/V Technology, & Communications (Fashion Design Program of Study) • Education & Training • Hospitality & Tourism • Human Services

FFA - Future Famers of America

CHS, MHS, UHS

• Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

HOSA - Future Health Professionals

CHS, UHS

• Health Science

SkillsUSA

CHS, MHS, UHS

Advanced Manufacturing • Architecture & Construction • Arts, A/V Technology, & Communications • Government & Public Administration • Hospitality & Tourism (Culinary Arts POS) • Information Technology • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics) • Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics

Student Industry Certification Industry certifications (IC) are earned through secondary and postsecondary career and technical education programs and courses. High school students are encouraged to focus their elective credits on robust, career-aligned learning pathways. Robust learning pathways should culminate with the achievement of nationally recognized industry certifications, meaningful work based learning experiences, and/or attainment of postsecondary credit hours through early postsecondary opportunities.

44


45


CTE Programs of Study Tennessee’s career clusters are organized into 16 broad categories that encompass virtually all occupations from entry through professional levels and are aligned with the U.S. Department of Education’s structure of career and technical education (CTE). Career clusters identify the knowledge and skills needed to follow a pathway toward career goals and provide a context for exploring the many occupational options available. Note that each cluster is divided into different pathways that are grouped by the knowledge and skills required for occupations in these career fields. Not all career cluster programs of study are available at all schools. The CTE Programs of Study available in PCSS are listed below indicating which programs and course are offered at each school. Career Cluster

Program of Study

CHS

Advanced Manufacturing

Mechatronics

All Mechatronics courses are Dual Enrollment only 1. Mechatronics I 4063 2. Mechatronics II 4063 3. Mechatronics III 4063 4. Mechatronics IV 4063

Agriculture, Food Veterinary and & Natural ReAnimal Science sources

1. Agriscience 5957 2. Small Animal Science 5958 3. Large Animal Science 6116 4. Veterinary Science 5961

Agicultural Engineering and Applied Technologies

Agribusiness

46

MHS

UHS

1. Agriscience 5957 2. Small Animal Science 5958 3. Large Animal Science 6116

1. Agriscience 5957 2. Small Animal Science 5958 3. Large Animal Science 6116

1. Agriscience 5957 2. Principles of Agricultural Mechanics 5944 3. Agricultural Power and Equipment 5945 1. Agriscience 5957 2. Principles of Agribusiness 5946 3. Organizational Leadership and Communications 5956 or DE Agribusiness 4067 4. Intro to Agribusiness 4270 Statewide Dual Credit


Career Cluster

Program of Study

CHS

Horticulture Science

1. Agriscience 5957 2. Concepts of Greenhouse 6119 3. Greenhouse Management 5954 and/or Statewide Dual Credit Course - Introduction of Plant Science 4269

Architecture & Construction

Structural Systems

1. Fundamentals of Construction (NCCER Core Curriculum Certification) 6073 2. Structural Systems I (NCCER Carpentary Level One Certification) 6164 3. Structural Systems II (NCCER Carpentry Level Two Certification) 6165 4. Construction Practicum 6160 or Dual Enrollment Structural Systems 4073

Arts, Audio/ Visual Technology & Communications

Digital Arts & Design

1. Digital Arts & Design I 6084 2. Digital Arts & Design II 6086 3. Digital Arts & Design III 6087

Business Management & Administration

Business Management

1. Introduction to Business & Marketing 5905 2. Accounting I 5910 3. Business Management 5889 4. Virtual Enterprise 5900

Health Services Administration

Education & Training

Teaching as a Profession (K-12)

MHS

UHS 1. Agriscience 5957 2. Concepts of Greenhouse 6119 3. Statewide Dual Credit Course Introduction of Plant Science 4269 Greenhouse Management - 5954

1. Fundamentals of Construction (NCCER Core Curriculum Certification) 6073 2. Structural Systems I (NCCER Carpentary Level One Certification) 6164 3. Structural Systems II (NCCER Carpentry Level Two Certification) 6165 4. Construction Practicum 6160 or Dual Enrollment Structural Systems 4073

1. Fundamentals of Construction (NCCER Core Curriculum Certification) 6073 2. Structural Systems I (NCCER Carpentary Level One Certification) 6164 3. Structural Systems II (NCCER Carpentry Level Two Certification) 6165 4. Construction Practicum 6160 or Dual Enrollment Structural Systems 4073

1. Introduction to Business & Marketing 5905 2. Accounting I 5910 3. Business Management 5889 1. Introduction to Business & Marketing 5905 2. Health Information Technology 5997 3. Business Management 5889

1. Fundamentals of Education 6123 2. Teaching as a Profession I 6010 3. Teaching as a Profession II 6125 (DE 4086)

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Career Cluster

Program of Study

CHS

MHS

UHS

Early Childhood 1. Early Childhood EduEducation Careers cation Careers I 6015 2. Early Childhood Education Careers II 6016 3. Early Childhood Education Careers III 6017 (option to earn Dual Credit) Health Science

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Diagnostic Services

1. Health Science Education 5998 2. Anatomy and Physiology 5991 3. Diagnostic Medicine 5994 4. Clinical Internship 5993

1. Health Science Education 5998 2. Anatomy and Physiology 5991 3. Diagnostic Medicine 5994 4. Clinical Internship 5993

Nursing Services

1. Health Science Education 5998 2. Anatomy and Physiology 5991 (DE available for Jrs. ad Srs.) 3. Medical Therapeutics 5999 (Dual enrollment Nursing Services 4099 available for Jrs. and Srs.) 4. Nursing Education 6000 (Dual enrollment Nursing Services 4099 available for Jrs. and Srs.)

1. Health Science Education 5998 2. Anatomy and Physiology 5991 (DE available for Jrs. ad Srs.) 3. Medical Therapeutics 5999 (Dual enrollment Nursing Services 4099 available for Jrs. and Srs.) 4. Nursing Education 6000 (Dual enrollment Nursing Services 4099 available for Jrs. and Srs.)

Emergency Services

1. Health Science Education 5998 2. Anatomy and Physiology 5991 3. Emergency Medical Services 5995

1. Health Science Education 5998 2. Anatomy and Physiology 5991 3. Emergency Medical Services 5995

Hospitality and Tourism

Culinary Arts

1. Culinary Arts I 5979 2. Culinary Arts II 5980 3. Culinary Arts III 5981

Human Services

Social Health Services

1. Intro to Human Services 6137 2. Lifespan Development 6013 3. Family Studies 6136

1. Intro to Human Services 6137 2. Lifespan Development 6013 3. Family Studies 6136

1. Intro to Human Services 6137 2. Lifespan Development 6013 3. Family Studies 6136

Dietetics and Nutrition

1. Introduction to Human Studies 6137 2. Food Prep I 6005 3. Food Prep II 6007

1. Introduction to Human Studies 6137 2. Food Prep I 6005 3. Food Prep II 6007

1. Introduction to Human Studies 6137 2. Food Prep I 6005 3. Food Prep II 6007

Cosemetology

1. Cosmetology I 2. Cosmetology II 3. Cosmetology III


Career Cluster

Program of Study

CHS

Information Technology

Coding

1. Computer Science Foundations 6095 (CompTIA IT Fundamentals Certification) 2. Coding I 6098 3. Coding II 6099 (Comp TIA A+) 4. Coding Practicum 5908 or AP Computer Science Principles 3634

Web Desgin

1. Computer Science Foundations 6095 (CompTIA IT Fundamentals) 2. Web Design Foundations 6100 3. Web Site Development 6101 (CIW Web Design Specialist Certification) 4. Web Design Practicum 6171 or AP Computer Science Principles 3634

Marketing

Marketing Management

1. Introduction to Business and Marketing 5905 2. Marketing and Management I: Principles 5931 3. Marketing and Management II: Advanced Strategies 5932 4. Advertising and Public Relations 5936 and/or School Based Enterprise 6105

STEM

Project Lead the Way

1. Introduction to Engineering 6054 2. Principles of Engineering 6052 3. Computer Integrated Manufacturing 6055 4. Engineering Design and Development 6059 (Capstone / Internship)

MHS

UHS

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Career Cluster

Program of Study

CHS

Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair

1. Maintenance and Light Repair I 5879 (Snap On Balancer and Changer National Certification; ShopKey Cerification) 2. Maintenance and Light Repair II 5880 (ShopKey Cerification) 3. Maintenance and Light Repair III 5881 (Snap On Tire Alignment National Cerification; ShopKey Cerification) 4. Maintenance and Light Repair IV 5882 (ShopKey Cerification)

MHS

Distribution and Logistics

Work Based Learning

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UHS

1. Foundations of Transportation, Distribution, Logistics 6069 2. Distribution and Logistics I 6072 3. Distribution and Logistics II 6024 or Dual Enrollment 4132 Work - Based Learning - Available as a Level 3 or 4 Course in all areas Academic and CTE for Juniors and Seniors ** See Counselors for WBL Criteria

Work - Based Learning - Available as a Level 3 or 4 Course in all areas Academic and CTE for Juniors and Seniors ** See Counselors for WBL Criteria

Work - Based Learning - Available as a Level 3 or 4 Course in all areas Academic and CTE for Juniors and Seniors ** See Counselors for WBL Criteria


Career Technical Education Course Fees School fees are optional. Elective focus area course fees are required, if applicable. • If a fee is Non-Required (NR), all documentation sent home to parents must indicate to parents that these fees are “discretionary and not required”. •

If a fee is required, Fee Waiver funds may be applicable according to Board policy.

Course

Fee

School

Required/Not Required (R/NR)

Child Development

$ 10.00

UHS

NR

Cosmetology - Hair

125.00

CHS

R

Cosmetology - Nails

75.00

CHS

R

Culinary Arts I

50.00

CHS

R

Culinary Arts II

50.00

CHS

R

Culinary Arts III

50.00

CHS

R

Family and Consumer Science

30.00

CHS

R

Family and Consumer Sciene

20.00

UHS

NR

Networking Technology

20.00

CHS

R

Nutrition and Foods

20.00

MHS

NR

Nutrition and Foods

25.00

UHS

NR

Nutrition and Foods

40.00

CHS

R

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Catalog of Courses: High School, Grades 9 - 12 Career Technical Education (CTE)

to ensure hands on experience for better understanding of the functionality of these core areas. Upon completion students will be on their way in becoming well-rounded, multi-craft technicians. Mechatronics II (10-12) #4063

Mechatronics This program of study is designed for students interested in becoming a Mechatronics Technician, Mechanical Engineering Technician, Robotics Technician, or Mechatronics Engineer. Course content focused on the components of manufacturing systems, collection and analysis of quality data, electronics, mechanics, fluid power systems, computers and control systems, industrial robotics and their programming along with technical documentation and troubleshooting. This program offers the opportunity to receive up to 12 college credit hours along with 4 certifications in Safety, Quality, Manufacturing Production & Processes, and Maintenance Awareness. Upon mastering these certifications the student will become a fully Certified Production Technician through the Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MMSC). This program is partnered with TCAT Livingston as a dual enrollment and dual credited class. Students will have the opportunity to join the Cookeville High School CAV-Tronic club that deals with this program of study along with participating in the Skill USA competitions. Mechatronics I (9-12) #4063 Prerequisite: Integrated Math I

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This course covers digital electronics and provides an introductory level to safety within a manufacturing environment. The course outlines the necessity of a safe work place while teaching students the fundamental and correct procedures to follow during the operation of an industrial setting. Each student will become familiar with the basic setup of electrical components, mechanical drives, pneumatics, and hydraulic functions . Students will be able to; (1) describe basic functions of digital components (including resistors, transformers, capacitors, and other devices upon which larger systems are designed. (2) use these devices as building blocks to understanding larger more complex circuits. Training equipment is utilized

This course in which students will be familiarized in quality practices and measurements within a manufacturing environment. This course builds on the knowledge gained in the previous course of instruction. Each student will be engaged with the intermediate setup of electrical components, mechanical drives, pneumatics, and hydraulics. Training equipment is utilized to ensure hands on experience for better understanding of the functionality of these core areas. Upon completion students will have advanced their knowledge as a well-rounded, multi-craft technicians. Mechatronics III (10 - 12) # 4063 This is a course that will cover manufacturing production and processes. This class builds on the knowledge gained from the previous two courses of instruction. This advanced course will also begin to teach the student to troubleshoot electrical, pneumatic, hydraulic, and mechanical drive systems. Students will gain a greater understanding of electrical circuits and implement these circuits using programmable devices and effectively communicate designs and systems. The troubleshooting skill set is used every day in the career of a Mechatronics Technician, Maintenance Technician, and Electromechanical Technician, and these skills will also prepare the student for the Mechatronics IV course. Mechatronics IV (10-12) #4063 Mechatronics IV is a course in which the student will learn all aspects of maintenance awareness, introduction to Mig welding and introduction to basic machine tooling on a drill/mill machine. Students will begin to learn PLCC and robotic automation. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to describe and explain basic functions of physical properties and electrical components within a mechatronic system. They can logically trace the flow of energy through a mechatronic system and can communicate this process to others. They will know how to effectively use technical documentation such as data sheets, schematics, timing diagrams, and system specifications to troubleshoot basic problems with equipment. Throughout the course of study, the students will develop an understanding of the general steps involved in the manufacturing process and master the essential skills to be an effective team member in a manufacturing production setting through the MSSC program.


within this field. Principles of Agribusiness, Level II (10 - 12) #5946 (Offered 2017-2018 school year)

Agriscience, Level I (9 - 11) #5957 Agriscience consists of standards that prepare students for biology, subsequent science courses and post-secondary pursuits. The content area includes ecology, biological processes, sexual and asexual reproduction and a study of the chemical and physical laws that govern life processes. This course helps students understand the important role agricultural science serves as industry moves into the 21st century. Agriscience-Honors, Level I (9-11) #5957H Prerequisites: A in 8th Grade Science Agriscience consists of standards that prepare students for biology, subsequent science courses and post-secondary pursuits. The content area includes ecology, biological processes, sexual and asexual reproduction and a study of the chemical and physical laws that govern life processes. This course helps students understand the important role agricultural science serves as industry moves into the 21st century. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. *Either class (Agriscience or Agriscience-Honors) would count towards the first class for any Program of Study

Prerequisites: (Agriscience #5957) Principles of Agribusiness teaches students to apply the economic and business principles involved in the sale and supply of agricultural products to a wide range of careers across the industry and builds foundational knowledge of finance and marketing principles. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee Common Core State Standards in Mathematics, as well as National Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Career Cluster Content Standards. Organizational Leadership and Communications, Level III (10-12) #5956 (Offered 2018-2019 school year) Agriculture Leadership is an applied-knowledge course for students interested in learning more about the attributes and skills of successful leaders in the Agriculture industry. This course covers organizational behavior, communication, management, and leadership topics. Students in this course participate in activities that will assist them in the development of communication and interpersonal skills transferable to any agribusiness application. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects as well as National Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Career Cluster Content Standards. Agribusiness, Level IV/Dual Credit (11 - 12) #5943 (Offered 2018-2019 school year) Dual Credit Agriculture Business is an applied knowledge course that addresses the economic and business principles necessary to operate a successful agribusiness. The course covers a wide range of topics in business, finance, economics, and management. Students will learn to apply the principles drawn from these topics toward activities that support their own business aspirations in the agriculture industry. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects, Tennessee Common Core State Standards in Mathematics, and National Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Career Cluster Content Standards. Agriculture Business is a dual credit course with statewide articulation. Students will be given a College Challenge Exam at the end of the semester to determine if they will receive a College credit for this course. Students must earn at least a 75 on the test to receive the credit. Concepts of Greenhouse, Level II (10-12) #6119 (Offered 2018-2019 school year) 53


Concepts of Greenhouse focuses on essential knowledge and skills related to the science of plant growth. This course covers principles of plant health, growth, reproduction, and biotechnology, as well as fundamental principles of hydroponics and aquaponics. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects, Tennessee state standards for Biology I, Biology II, Ecology, and Environmental Science, and National Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Career Cluster Content Standards. Small Animal Care, Level II (10 - 12) #5958 (Offered 2018-2019 school year) Small Animal Care contains objectives to prepare students for careers in managing and caring for specialty and companion animals. As our population raises more specialty and companion animals for production purposes and personal value, careers that work with these animals in a safe environment will continue to expand. Large Animal Science (11-12) #5958 Large Animal Science is an applied course in veterinary and animal science for students interested in learning more about becoming a veterinarian, vet tech, vet assistant, or pursuing a variety of scientific, health, or agriculture professions. This course covers anatomy and physiological systems of different groups of large animals, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for success in the level-four Veterinary Science course and further postsecondary training. This is the third course in the Veterinary and Animal Sciences program of study. Principles of Agricultural Mechanics (10-11) #5944 Principles of Agricultural Mechanics is an intermediate course introducing students to basic skills and knowledge in construction and land management for both rural and urban environments. This course covers topics including project management, basic engine and motor mechanics, land surveying, irrigation and drainage, agricultural structures, and basic metalworking techniques. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in agricultural mechanics. Agricultural Power and Equipment (11-12) #5945

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Agricultural Power and Equipment is an applied course in agricultural engineering with special emphasis on laboratory activities involving small engines, tractors, and agricultural equipment. The standards in this course address navigation, maintenance, repair, and overhaul of electrical motors,hydraulic systems, and fuel-powered engines as well as exploration of a wide range of careers in agricultural mechanics. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to pursue advanced training in agricultural engineering and related fields at a postsecondary

institution. Introduction to Agricultural Leadership - Dual Enrollment (11 - 12) The Introduction to Agricultural Leadership course will introduce students to the dynamic relationship of leaders and followers. Students will explore personal characteristics, technical skills, goals, interpersonal influence, and power inherent in being a leader. Strategies for promoting positive change in organizations will be examined. Various self-assessments will be administered to allow students to construct a comprehensive professional growth plan.


the full sequence of courses in this program of study.

Fundamentals of Construction (9-11) #6073 Fundamentals of Construction is a foundational course in the Architecture & Construction cluster covering essential knowledge, skills, and concepts required for careers in construction. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various construction fields and outline the steps necessary to advance in specific construction careers. Students will be able to employ tools safely and interpret construction drawings to complete projects demonstrating proper measurement and application of mathematical concepts. Standards in this course also include an overview of the construction industry and an introduction to building systems and materials. Structural Systems I (10-12) #6164 Structural Systems I prepares students for careers in residential and commercial carpentry. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and skill in framing buildings. Students will be able to frame floors, walls, ceilings, roofs, and stairs while safely employing tools and interpreting construction drawings to complete projects. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating proper measurement and application of mathematical concepts. Standards in this course also include principles of the construction industry and business and project management. Students will continue compiling artifacts for inclusion in their portfolios, which they will carry with them throughout the full sequence of courses in this program of study. Structural Systems II (11-12) #6165 Structural Systems II is an advanced- level course that builds on the introductory skills learned in the Fundamentals of Construction and Structural Systems I courses. This course will explore advanced framing, the physics of structural loads, and the coverings and finishes of structural systems. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to install interior and exterior finishing, including roofing, siding, thermal and moisture protection components, drywall, doors, and trim. Throughout the course, students will interpret construction drawings to complete projects, implementing material estimating procedures and safe working practices. Standards in this course also expand on principles of the construction industry and delve deeper into business and project management strategies. Students will continue compiling artifacts for inclusion in their portfolios, which they will carry with them throughout

Digital Arts & Design I (9 - 12) #6084 This course in the Arts, A/V Technology & Communications cluster is for students interested in art and design professions. The primary aim of this course is to build a strong understanding of the principles and elements of design and the design process. Students will learn to utilize industry tools to conceptualize and create print and video communications for targeted audiences. Students will acquire basic skills in computer design, photography and video creation. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for ELA in Technical Subjects and in Mathematics and Visual Arts. Digital Arts & Design II (10 - 12) # 6086 This is a course that builds on the basic principles and the design process learned in Digital Arts & Design I. Students will learn to perform advanced software operations to create photographs and illustrations of increasing complexity. Students will employ design principles and use industry software to create layouts for a variety of applications. Students will continue compiling projects for inclusion in their portfolio. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for ELA in Technical Subjects and in Mathematics and Visual Arts. Digital Arts & Design III (11 - 12) #6087 This is the third course in the Digital Arts & Design program of study. Applying design skills developed in prior courses, students will expand their creative and critical thinking skills to create comprehensive multimedia projects and three-dimensional designs. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to use industry-standard software to create multimedia projects. Each student will have a completed portfolio for prospective employers and higher education goals. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for ELA in Technical Subjects and in Mathematics and Visual Arts.

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Virtual Enterprise International (VE), Level IV (11 - 12) #5900 Prerequisites: Computer Applications or Accounting I

Introduction to Business & Marketing, Level I (9 - 12) #5905 Introduction to Business and Marketing is an introductory course designed to give students an overview of the Business Management and Administration, Marketing, and Finance career clusters The course helps students prepare for the growing complexities of the business world by examining basic principles of business, marketing, and finance in addition to exploring key aspects of leadership, ethical and social responsibilities, and careers. Students’ academic skill in communications, mathematics, and economics are reinforced with activities modeled in the context of business topics.

The VE experience will weave together several academic disciplines and occupational subjects, there by overcoming fragmentation of subjects. The course will link learning to application and real life experiences. The goal is to create a learning environment that, through a series of activities, integrates school and workplace to enhance learning. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in business and industry.

Accounting I, Level II (10 -12) #5910

Health Information Technology (11-12) #5997

Accounting I introduces concepts and principles based on a double-entry system of maintaining the electronic and manual financial records for a sole proprietorship, a partnership, and a corporation. It includes analyzing business transactions, journalizing, posting and preparing worksheets and financial statements. (This course provides access to a computerized workstation for each student to complete financial applications using accounting and spreadsheet software.)

Health Information Technology is a third- level applied course in the Health Informatics program of study intended to prepare students with an understanding of the changing world of health care information. With the inclusion of electronic medical records, electronic billing, and electronic prescriptions, students in all healthcare professions must increasingly demonstrate competency in health information and health informatics. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to differentiate among the types of health information/informatics, code and manage medical records, retrieve crucial data from health information systems and indexes,and understand the implications for careers in a range of health care fields.

Business Management, Level III (11 - 12) #5889 Business Management focuses on the development of the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling functions required for the production and delivery of goods and services. This applied knowledge course addresses the management role of utilizing the businesses’ resources of employees, equipment, and Approved April 10, 2015 Page 2 capital to achieve an organization’s goals. Students will participate in a continuing project throughout the course in which, individually or in teams, they will present recommendations to improve an existing business. Local business partnerships are encouraged to provide resources for faculty and students. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to complete a full review of an existing business and offer recommendations for improvement as would a management consultant. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects, Tennessee State Standards for Mathematics, as well as Tennessee Economic standards.

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Virtual Enterprise International (VE) is a simulated business environment. The VE students will be involved in actual on the job work experiences, including accounting, personnel administration, management and marketing. The only difference between the VE and an actual business is that no material goods are produced or legal tender exchanged. However, services will be provided. Working in a team, the student will develop and enhance oral and written communication skills through initiative, responsibility, and creativity.

Work Based Learning: Career Practicum SBE-School Based Enterprise, Level IV (11 - 12) #6105 Prerequisite: Marketing & Management I & II Work-Based Learning: Career Practicum is a capstone course intended to provide students with opportunities to apply the skills and knowledge learned in previous CTE and general education courses within a professional work environment. The course allows students to earn high school credit through managing the production, accounting, marketing and sales functions in our school bookstore. Throughout the course, students will create and maintain a portfolio of completed course projects.


Health Science Education, Level I (9 - 10) #5998 This course is an introduction to broad standards that serve as a foundation for health care professions. Units included are academics in health care, communications systems, legal responsibilities, ethics, teamwork, and safety practices. Biweekly medical terminology quizzes are administrated throughout the semester. All students present a display at CHS Health Fair. Medical Therapeutics, Level II (10 - 12) #DE 4099 Prerequisite: Health Science Education This course provides knowledge and skills to maintain or change the health status of an individual over time. It includes hands-on activities of patient care. This includes careers such as dental, dietetics, medical assistance, home health, nursing, pharmacy, respiratory, social work, and others. After completion of this course, students may apply to enroll in clinical internship class. Use of correct medical terminology is stressed daily. At the end of the semester, students have the option of taking an online Medical Therapeutics exam at a cost of $10.00. If the student passes the exam, 3 hours of college credit will be awarded for Medical Terminology. Anatomy & Physiology, Level III (11 - 12) #5991 Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry This course is designed for the student to develop an understanding of the human body in health and disease. Medical terminology is a focus of the course. This course is recommended for any student who plans to study a professional health career (including, but not limited to, dental careers, medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, nursing or nutrition). Nursing Education, Level IV (11 - 12) #6000 Nursing Education is a capstone course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the field of nursing. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to implement communication and interpersonal skills, maintain residents’ rights and independence, provide care safely, prevent emergency situations, prevent infection through infection control, and perform the skills required

of a nursing assistant. At the conclusion of this course, if students have logged 40 hours of classroom instruction and 20 hours of classroom clinical instruction, and if they have completed 40 hours of site based clinical with at least 24 of those hours spent in a long-term care facility, then they are eligible to take the certification examination as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA). Prior to beginning work at a clinical site, students must be certified in Basic Life Support (BLS) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and deemed competent in basic first aid, body mechanics, Standard Precaution guidelines, and confidentiality. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards in English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects, Tennessee State Standards for Anatomy & Physiology, and Tennessee Nursing Education Training Program requirements. Diagnostic Medicine, Level II (10 - 12) #5994 Prerequisite: Health Science Education Diagnostic Medicine creates a picture of an individual’s health status at a single point in time. This could include following careers and career areas: audiologist, cardiology, imaging, medical laboratory, radiography, nuclear medicine, stereotactic radiosurgery, cytotechnology, clinical laboratory technician, pathologists, medical physician, histotechnologist. Clinical Internship (11-12) #5993 Clinical Internship is a capstone course and work-based learning experience designed to provide students with realworld application of skills and knowledge obtained in a prerequisite Health Science course. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to pursue certification in the pre-requisite course of Cardiovascular Services or Pharmacological Science once they have graduated and reached 18 years of age. Prior to beginning work at a clinical site, students must be certified in Basic Life Support (BLS) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation(CPR), and deemed competent in basic first aid, body mechanics, Standard Precaution guidelines, and confidentiality. Business Management & Administration concentrators may also take this course as part of a career practicum/work-based learning placement within the Health Services Administration program of study. Emergency Medical Services (11-12) #5995 Emergency Medical Services is a capstone course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the fields of emergency medicine. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to: identify careers and features of the EMS system; define the importance of workforce safety and wellness; maintain legal and ethical guidelines; correlate anatomy and physiology concepts to the patient with a medical or traumatic injury; and perform EMS skills with a high level of proficiency. If taught with an EMT instructor, students will be given the opportunity to

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sit for the National Emergency Medical Responder certification. In addition, students will continue to add artifacts to a portfolio, which they will continue to build throughout the program of study. Each standard presumes that the expected knowledge and behaviors are within the scope of practice for that EMS licensure level, as defined by the National EMS Scope of Practice Model. Each competency applies to patients of all ages, unless a specific age group is identified. The standards also presume there is a progression in practice from the Emergency Medical Responder level to the Paramedic level. The descriptors used to illustrate the increasing complexity of knowledge and behaviors through the progression of licensure levels originate, in part, from the National EMS Scope of Practice Model.

Culinary Arts I, Level I (9 - 11) #5979 Class Fees: $50.00 This introductory course prepares students for gainful employment and/or entry into postsecondary education in the food production and service industry. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by examining both the industry and its career opportunities and by developing food preparation and service and interpersonal skills. Laboratory facilities and experiences, which simulate commercial food production and service operations, offer school-based learning opportunities. There is a $50 lab fee for this course. Dual college credit is available for students who complete course requirements. Culinary Arts II, Level II (10 - 12) #5980 Class Fees: $50.00 Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I This course prepares students for gainful employment and/ or entry into postsecondary education in the food production and service industry. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by demonstrating the principles of safety and sanitation, food preparation skills, and teamwork to manage an environment conducive to quality food production and service operations. Laboratory facilities and experiences, which simulate commercial food production and service operations, offer school-based learning and work-based learning opportunities. There is a $50 lab fee for this course. Dual college credit is available for students who complete course requirements. Culinary Arts III, Level III (12) #5981 Class Fees: $50.00 Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I & II This course serves as a capstone course as it prepares students for gainful employment and or entry into postsecondary education in the food production and service industry. Content provides students the opportunity to apply the marketable culinary arts skills they have acquired by assuming increasingly responsible positions including participation in a cooperative education experience. There is a $50 lab fee for this course. Dual college credit is available for students who complete course requirements.

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class before or after school or during the 1-hour lunch to make up any work missed. Chemistry of Cosmetology Level III (11-12) TBD Prerequisites: Principles of Cosmetology, Design Principles of Cosmetology (3 credit max) Principles of Cosmetology I (9 - 11) TBD Prerequisite: Good attendance record Material Fee: Cosmetology Kit, $100.00-$125.00 (Required by the State Board of Cosmetology) Student on Fee Waiver will receive a kit to use while enrolled in the class. Kits may be paid for in installments or all at one time. Students are required to have a social security number in order to receive credit with the state board of cosmetology. Principles of Cosmetology is an introduction into the field of Cosmetology. The curriculum is designed to follow the State Board of Cosmetology Training program. Students receive hours for each day they attend school, which will transfer to a private or post secondary school. Student may transfer these hours and continue their education after graduation to acquire a cosmetology license in the state of Tennessee. 1500 Hours of training are required to take the state board exam. Attendance is extremely important to learn the skills necessary to succeed in this field.

Material Fee: None, students will use kit from previous classes. This course is a continuation of training working toward the 1500 hours required by the State Board of Cosmetology to obtain a state license. This course prepares students to perform work-related services using chemicals in the cosmetology industry. Con- tent provides students the opportunity to acquire foundation skills in both theory and practical applications. Laboratory facilities and experiences will be used to simulate cosmetology work experiences. The hours of training that a student acquires will transfer to a private or post secondary school where they may complete their training. Attendance is extremely important to succeed in this course. Intro to Human Studies (9) #6137

Class content includes history of Cosmetology, job opportunities available, state law, sanitation, safety, hair design, hair cutting, shampooing, nail disorders and diseases, manicuring and pedicuring. Laboratory facilities and experience simulate those found in the cosmetology industry.

Introduction to Human Studies is a foundational course for students interested in becoming a public advocate, social worker, dietician, nutritionist, counselor, or community volunteer. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will have an understanding of human needs, overview of social services, career investigation, mental health, and communication. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout the program of study.

Design Principles of Cosmetology, Level II (10 - 12) TBD

Family Studies (10 - 12) #6136

Prerequisite: Principles of Cosmetology. (3 credit max)

This course is for students interested in examining the diversity and ever-changing structure of the modern family as well as its impact on individuals. Course topics include family structure, family crisis, relationships, and aspects of parenting. Students will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of family-focused projects including, but not limited to the use of infant simulators/computerized babies.

Material Fee: Acrylic Nail Kit Cost: $75 Design Principles of Cosmetology is a continuation of cosmetology training, working toward the goal of 1500 hours to take the state board exam. Students will review and practice skills learned in the Principles of Cosmetology class. Students will spend time in the classroom and in a lab situation- serving clients from the community three days a week. They will study nail extensions, hair color, permanent waving, facials, salon management, skin disorders, hair removal, chemical relaxing, electricity, chemistry, and communication skills. Students will continue to practice new skills throughout the year to develop better techniques as they continue in the course. Students who acquire 300 hours of training are eligible to take the State Board of Cosmetology shampoo exam and receive a license to shampoo in the state of TN. Attendance is extremely important for students to learn and practice the skills needed to be successful. Since much of the classroom is spent in the lab, students must attend

Child & Lifespan Development TTU Dual Credit (10 -12) #6013 Exam Fee: $75.00 This course prepares students to understand the physical, social, emotional and intellectual growth and development of individuals throughout the lifespan. Students will engage in experiences such as observations, job shadowing, and service learning that will enhance the learning process. Course topics include child development theories and research, prenatal development, infants and toddlers, preschool years, middle childhood, adolescence, adulthood, geriatrics, death and dying, and careers related to child and

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lifespan development. Dual college credit is available for students who complete course requirements. Food Prep I (10) #6005 Food Prep I is for students interested in learning more about becoming a dietitian, nutritionist, counselor, or pursing a variety of scientific, health, or culinary arts professions. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will understand human anatomy and physiological systems, nutrition requirements, as well as social, cultural, and other impacts on food preparation and integrity. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout the program of study Food Prep II (11) #6007 Food Prep II is an applied knowledge course in nutrition for students interested in the role of nutrition in health and disease. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to develop a nutrition care plan as part of the overall health care process, use methods for analyzing the nutritional health of a community, and understand the relationship of diet and nutrition to specific diseases. The course places emphasize on the role of diet as a contributor to disease and its role in the prevention and treatment of disease. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout the program of study

Early Childhood Education Careers I (9 - 10) #6015 Materials Fee: $10.00 This introductory course prepares students for various child-related careers including, but not limited to childcare providers, preschool teachers and directors, nannies, early childhood specialists and interventionists, childcare referral counselors, and family specialists. Through in-depth academic studies in child growth and development, students gain a solid understanding of the early childhood years and a working knowledge of children in this critical stage of their development. Students work directly with pre-school children within the on-campus facility as well as participate in a field-site placement practicum in the community to acquire skills and confidence in teaching. Dual college credit is available for students who complete course requirements. “Industry Certification awarded through TECTA upon a “B” or higher.” Early Childhood Education Careers II (10-11) #6016 Materials Fee: $10.00 Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education I This course prepares students for various child-related careers including, but not limited to childcare providers, preschool teachers and directors, nannies, early childhood specialists and interventionists, childcare referral counselors, and family specialists. Through in-depth academic studies in child growth and development, students gain a solid understanding of the early childhood years and a working knowledge of children in this critical stage of their development. Students work directly with pre-school children within the on-campus facility as well as participate in a field-site placement practicum in the community to acquire skills and confidence in teaching. Dual college credit is available for students who complete course requirements. “Industry Certification awarded through TECTA upon a “B” or higher.” Early Childhood Education Careers III (11 - 12) #6017 Materials Fee: $10.00 Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education I and II

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This course prepares students for various child-related careers including, but not limited to childcare providers, preschool teachers and directors, nannies, early childhood


specialists and interventionists, childcare referral counselors, and family specialists. Through in-depth academic studies in child growth and development, students gain a solid understanding of the early childhood years and a working knowledge of children in this critical stage of their development. Students work directly with pre-school children within the on-campus facility as well as participate in a field-site placement practicum in the community to acquire skills and confidence in teaching. Dual college credit is available for students who complete course requirements. Work-Based Learning Practicum (11-12) #6105 Prerequisite: Application Only. Students must have completed two or three CTE courses in a program of study. Work-Based Learning is a capstone course that provides Juniors and Seniors with the opportunity to apply skills learned in previous CTE courses within a professional work environment. Students earn a high school credit while gaining experience in the industry related tot he students’ CTE program of study and post-secondary career goals. Fundamentals of Education, Level I (9 - 10) #6123 Fundamentals of Education is a foundational course for the Teaching as a Profession program of study. This course is designed for students who plan to become teachers or work in an education-related career Students will have the opportunity to job shadow a Putnam County Schools teacher for a day-long field trip to observe teachers’ day to day activities. Course topics include the history of education, careers in education, structure of public school system, theories of learning, and the influence of human development on learning. Teaching as a Profession I Level II (10 - 12) #6010 Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Education TAP I is a course for students desiring to further their learning and preparation for a career in teaching. /Students will be required to participate in two off-campus field experiences in Putnam County school with a grade/subject area of their choosing. This course covers the components of instruction, teaching strategies, types of assessments, student learning, special education, and educational technology. Teaching as a Profession II Level III (10 - 12) #DE4086 Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Education & TAP I TAP II is the final course in the Teaching as a Profession program of study designed to give students the most indepth experience into the teaching profession. Students in this course will demonstrate their skills in an off-campus classroom setting while building a course portfolio of work. Developing and implementing lesson plans and teaching mini-lessons will be required of students in this course.

Computer Science Foundation, Level I (9 - 10) #6095 Computer Science Foundations is a course intended to provide students with exposure to various information technology occupations and pathways such as Networking Systems, Programming and Software Development, and Web Design. As a result, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two of three focus areas. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various information technology (IT) occupations and professional organizations. Moreover, they will be able to demonstrate logical thought processes and discuss the social, legal, and ethical issues encountered in the IT profession. Depending on the focus area, proficient students will also demonstrate an understanding of electronics and basic digital theory; project management and teamwork; client relations; causes and prevention of Internet security breaches; and writing styles appropriate for web publication. Upon completion of the ITF course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision about which Information Technology program of study to pursue. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee State Standards in Mathematics. Coding I, Level II (10 - 11) #6098 Coding I is a course intended to teach students the basics of computer programming. The course places emphasis on practicing standard programming techniques and learning the logic tools and methods typically used by programmers to create simple computer applications. Upon completion of this course, students proficient in programming and logic can solve problems by planning multistep procedures. They are able to write, analyze, review, and revise programs, converting detailed information from workflow charts and diagrams into coded instructions in a computer language. Students completing this course will be able to troubleshoot/debug programs and software applications to correct malfunctions and ensure their proper execution. Standards in this course are aligned with the Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts Standards and Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Coding II, Level III (10- 12) #6099 Coding II challenges students to develop advanced skills in problem analysis, construction of algorithms, and computer implementation of algorithms as they work on program-

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ming projects of increased complexity. In so doing, they develop key skills of discernment and judgment as they must choose from among many languages, development environments, and strategies for the program life cycle. Students will enhance their foundation skills learned in earlier courses in object-oriented programming language skills using high-level languages such as FOCUS, Python, or SAS. Course content is reinforced through numerous shortand long-term programming projects, accomplished both individually and in small groups. These projects are meant to hone the discipline and logical thinking skills necessary to craft error-free syntax for the writing and testing of programs. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects. Coding Practicum (11-12) #5908 Programming & Software Development Practicum is a capstone course intended to provide students with the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge learned in previous Programming & Software Development courses toward the completion of an in-depth project with fellow team members. Students who have progressed to this level in the program of study take on more responsibilities for producing independent work and managing processes involved in the planning, designing, refinement, and production of original software applications. The course is designed to allow students to choose their specific application of interest, be it the development of a mobile application (app), an animation package, a game or other educational tool, or any other approved program that requires coding and development skills. Upon completion of the practicum, proficient students will be prepared for postsecondary study and career advancement in programming and software development, and will be equipped to market their finished product should they choose. Information Technology Foundations, Level I (9 - 10) #6095

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Information Technology Foundations (ITF) is a course intended to provide students with exposure to various information technology occupations and pathways such as Networking Systems, Programming and Software Development, and Web Design. As a result, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two of three focus areas. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various information technology (IT) occupations and professional organizations. Moreover, they will be able to demonstrate logical thought processes and discuss the social, legal, and ethical issues encountered in the IT profession. Depending on the focus area, proficient students will also demonstrate an understanding of electronics and basic digital theory; project management and teamwork; client relations; causes and prevention of Internet security breaches; and writing styles appropriate for web publication. Upon completion of the ITF course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision about which Information Technology program of

study to pursue. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee State Standards in Mathematics. Web Design Foundations, Level II (10 - 11) #6100 Web Design Foundations is a course that prepares students with work-related web design skills for advancement into postsecondary education and industry. The course is intended to develop fundamental skills in both theory and practical application of the basic web design and development process, project management and teamwork, troubleshooting and problem solving, and interpersonal skill development. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the web design and development industry; where interaction with a “client� is indicated in the standards, it is expected that students’ peers or the instructor may serve as mock clients in lieu of an actual relationship with an industry partner. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in the Web Design program of study. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee State Standards in Mathematics. Web Site Development , Level III (11 - 12) #6101 Web Site Development builds on the skills and knowledge gained in Web Design Foundations to further prepare students for success in the web design and development fields. Emphasis is placed on applying the design process toward projects of increasing sophistication, culminating in the production of a functional, static website. As students work toward this goal, they acquire key skills in coding, project management, basic troubleshooting and validation, and content development and analysis. Artifacts of the work completed in this course will be logged in a student portfolio demonstrating mastery of skills and knowledge. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared to pursue a variety of postsecondary programs in the computer sciences, sit for industry certification, or apply their skills in a capstone Web Design Practicum. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee State Standards in Mathematics. Web Design Practicum (11-12) #6171 Web Design Practicum is a capstone course intended to provide students with the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge learned in previous Web Design courses toward the completion of an in-depth project with fellow team members. Students who have progressed to this level in the Web Design program of study take on more responsibilities for producing independent work and managing processes involved in the planning, designing, refinement, and launch of a website. In addition to developing an understanding of the professional and ethical issues encountered by web design professionals in the workplace, students learn to refine


their skills in problem solving, troubleshooting, teamwork, marketing and analytics, and project management. Upon completion of the practicum, proficient students will be prepared for postsecondary study and career advancement in web design. AP Computer Science Principles #3634 Exam Fee: $93.00 (approximately) AP Computer Science Principles introduces students to the central ideas of computer science, inviting students to develop the computational thinking vital for success across multiple disciplines. The course is unique in its focus on fostering students to be creative and encouraging students to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts. Students design and implement innovative solutions using an iterative process similar to what artists, writers, computer scientists, and engineers use to bring ideas to life. All students enrolled in AP Computer Science Principles must take the AP exam for this course at the end of the year in May. Cost for the exam is approximately $93.00, payable when school begins for the fall term. Students who qualify for free/reduced lunch may apply for scholarships to cover the AP exam fees. Student must have FRL approval yearly by Aug. 1 to qualify for this scholarship.

Introduction to Business & Marketing, Level I (9 - 10) #5905 Introduction to Business and Marketing is an introductory course designed to give students an overview of the Business Management and Administration, Marketing, and Finance career clusters. The course helps students prepare for the growing complexities of the business world by examining basic principles of business, marketing, and finance in addition to exploring key aspects of leadership, ethical and social responsibilities, and careers. Students’ academic skills in communications, mathematics, and economics are reinforced with activities modeled in the context of business topics. Marketing and Management I, Level II (9 - 11) #5931 Marketing and Management I: Principles focuses on the study of marketing concepts and their practical applications. Students will examine the risks and challenges that marketers face to establish a competitive edge in the sale of products and services. Topics covered include foundational marketing functions such as promotion, distribution, and selling, as well as coverage of economics fundamentals, international marketing, and career development. Marketing & Management II, Level III (10 - 12) #5932 Marketing & Management II: Advanced Strategies is a study of marketing concepts and principles used in management. Students will examine the challenges, responsibilities, and risks managers face in today’s workplace. Subject matter includes finance, business ownership, risk management, marketing information systems, purchasing, promotion, and human resource skills. Advertising & Public Relations, Level IV (11 - 12) #5936 Advertising and Public Relations is an applied knowledge course focusing on the concepts and strategies associated with promoting products, services, ideas, and events. This course addresses skills essential to the creative side of the industry and explores consumer behavior patterns and motivations for buying. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to demonstrate understanding in fundamental advertising and public relations concepts by creating an electronic portfolio of representative course projects. Work Based Learning: Career Practicum SBE-School 63


Based Enterprise, Level IV (11 - 12) #6105 Prerequisite: Marketing & Management I & II Work-Based Learning: Career Practicum is a capstone course intended to provide students with opportunities to apply the skills and knowledge learned in previous CTE and general education courses within a professional work environment. The course allows students to earn high school credit through managing the production, accounting, marketing and sales functions in our school bookstore. Throughout the course, students will create and maintain a portfolio of completed course projects.

Engineering (PLTW) Introduction to Engineering, Level I (9-10) #6054 Prerequisite: Grade appropriate Math/Science Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) is a high school level course that is appropriate for students who are interested in design and engineering. The major focus of the IED course is to expose students to design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards, and technical documentation. IED gives students the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of course concepts through activity-, project-, and problem-based (APPB) learning. Used in combination with a teaming approach, APPB-learning challenges students to continually hone their interpersonal skills, creative abilities and understanding of the design process. It also allows students to develop strategies to enable and direct their own learning, which is the ultimate goal of education. The course assumes no previous knowledge, but students should be concurrently enrolled in college preparatory mathematics and science. Students will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. In addition, students use the most current issued 3D solid modeling design software package to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges that increase in difficulty throughout the course. Students will also learn how to document their work, and communicate their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community. Introduction to Engineering Design is one of three foundation courses in the Project Lead The Way high school pre-engineering program. The course applies and concurrently develops secondary level knowledge and skills in mathematics, science, and technology. Principles of Engineering, Level II (10 - 11) #6052 Prerequisite: IED and grade appropriate Math/Science Principles Of Engineering (POE) is a high school-level survey course of engineering. The course exposes students to some of the major concepts that they will encounter in a post secondary engineering course of study. Students have

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an opportunity to investigate engineering and high tech careers. POE gives students the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of course concepts through activity-, project-, and problem-based (APPB) learning. Used in combination with a teaming approach, APPB learning challenges students to continually hone their interpersonal skills, creative abilities, and problem solving skills based upon engineering concepts. It also allows students to develop strategies to enable and direct their own learning, which is the ultimate goal of education. To be successful in POE, students should be concurrently enrolled in college preparatory mathematics and science. Students will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students will also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community. Principles Of Engineering is the second of two foundation courses in the Project Lead The Way high school engineering program. The course applies and concurrently develops secondary level knowledge and skills in mathematics, science, and technology. Computer Integrated Manufacturing, Level III (11 - 12) # 6055 Prerequisite: IED, POE and grade appropriate Math/Science Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) is the study of manufacturing planning, integration, and implementation of automation. The course explores manufacturing history, individual processes, systems, and careers. In addition to technical concepts, the course incorporates finance, ethics, and engineering design. This reflects an integrated approach that leading manufacturers have adopted to improve safety, quality, and efficiency.

CIM is one of the specialization courses in the Project Lead The Way high school engineering program. The course applies and concurrently develops secondary-level knowledge and skills in mathematics, science, and technology. Engineering Design & Development, Level IV (11-12) #6059 (Offered 2017-2018 school year) Prerequisite: IED, POE, and application Engineering Design and Development (EDD) is the capstone course in the PLTW high school engineering program. It is an engineering research course in which students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. The course applies and concurrently develops secondary level knowledge and skills in mathematics, science, and technology. Utilizing the activity-project-problem-based (APPB) teaching and learning pedagogy, students will perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams of students will design, build, and test their solution. Finally, student teams will present and defend their original solution to an outside panel. While progressing through the engineering design process, students will work closely with a community mentor and experts and will continually hone their organizational, communication and interpersonal skills, their creative and problem solving abilities, and their understanding of the design process. Engineering Design and Development is a high school level course that is appropriate for 12th grade students. Since the projects on which students work can vary with student interest and the curriculum focuses on problem solving, EDD is appropriate for students who are interested in any technical career path. EDD should be taken as the final capstone PLTW course since it requires application of the knowledge and skills from the PLTW foundation courses.

Utilizing the activity-project-problem-based (APPB) teaching and learning pedagogy, students will analyze, design, and build manufacturing systems. While implementing these designs, students will continually hone their interpersonal skills, creative abilities, and understanding of the design process. Students apply knowledge gained throughout the course in a final open-ended problem to build a manufacturing system. Computer Integrated Manufacturing is a high school level course that is appropriate for 10th, 11th,or 12th grade students interested in manufacturing and automation. It is recommended that students are concurrently enrolled in grade level mathematics and science courses and have successfully completed the Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) course.

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how they function within the dynamics of the supply chain. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will explore career options; demonstrate an understanding of the historical, current, and future significance of the distribution and logistics industries; and plan for the effective and efficient flow of goods and services.

Maintenance & Light Repair I, Level I (9 - 10) #5879 The Maintenance and Light Repair I course prepares students for entry into Maintenance and Light Repair II. Students explore career opportunities and requirements of a professional service technician. Content emphasizes beginning transportation service skills and workplace success skills. Students study safety, tools, equipment, shop operations, basic engine fundamentals, and basic technician skills. Upon completing all of the Maintenance and Light Repair courses, students may enter automotive service industry as an ASE Certified MLR Technician. Maintenance & Light Repair II, Level II (10 - 12) #5880 The Maintenance and Light Repair II (MLR II) course prepares students for entry into Maintenance and Light Repair III. Student study automotive general electrical systems, starting and charging systems, batteries, lighting, and electrical accessories. Upon completing all of the Maintenance and Light Repair courses, students may enter automotive service industry as an ASE Certified MLR Technician. Maintenance & Light Repair III, Level III (11 - 12) #5881 The Maintenance and Light Repair III Course prepares students for entry into Maintenance and Light Repair IV. Students study suspension and steering systems and brake systems. Students will service suspension and steering systems and brake systems. Upon completing industry as an ACE Certified MLR Technician. Maintenance & Light Repair IV, Level IV (12) #5882 The Maintenance and Light Repair IV (MLR IV) course prepares students for entry into the automotive workforce or into post secondary training. Students study and service automotive HVAC systems, engine performance systems, automatic and manual transmission/transaxle systems, and practice workplace soft skills. Upon completing all of the Maintenance and Light Repair courses, students may enter automotive service industry as ASE Certified MLR Technician. Foundations of Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics (9-10) #6069

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Foundations of Distribution & Logistics exposes students to careers and businesses involved in the planning, management, and movement of people, materials, and products by road, air, rail, and water. As an introduction to this important and globally evolving field, this course covers the basic principles of logistics, reviews the history and development of distribution networks, and examines

Distribution and Logistics I ( ) #6072 Distribution & Logistics I prepares students for entry into the warehouse and distribution career field. Course content emphasizes a deep understanding of the dynamics of distribution and logistics operations, the warehousing skills needed for the tracking and managing of inventory, and the problem-solving skills used by logisticians in today’s complex business environments. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be have a thorough understanding of safety, tools, equipment, operations, processes, customer fulfillment, product lifecycle, future trends, and regulatory issues in the industry. Distribution and Logistics II : Management #6024 (1112) #4132 Dual Enrollment Distribution & Logistics II: Management prepares students for a capstone learning experience in logistics, planning, and management systems. A range of business tasks will be undertaken to support the operation of supply chain processes including coordinating and controlling the order cycle and associated information systems. Through exposure to crucial business activities such as project management, analyzing logistical problems, and producing new solutions, students will acquire advanced skills related to business professionalism, ethics, policies, and communication. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be prepared for further education and careers in the distribution and logistics industry.


English Language Arts (ELA) English Language Arts Course Options 9

10

11

12

English I

English II

English III

English IV DE English 1010/1020

English I - Honors

English II - Honors

English III AP English Language & Composition IB English SL DE English 1010/1020

English IV AP English Literature & Composition IB English HL DE English 1010/1020 or DE English 2110/2120

English II - Honors

English III AP English Language and Composition

IB English SL (IB courses cannot be taken prior to the junior year) or AP English Literature and Composition DE English 1010/1020

AP English Literature & Composition (if not taken in 11th grade) or IB English HL DE English 1010/1020 or DE English 2110/2120

English I, English II, English III, and English IV or equivalent courses are required for all students. All English I, II, and III students must take the TN Ready EOC tests. Students taking an AP/IB/DE course equivalent are not required to take the TN Ready tests. A Humanities Focus can be completed by earning three elective credits in addiiton to English I, II, III, and IV from the following courses: •

AP English Language and Composition

AP English Literature and Composition

IB English SL/HL

IB Theory of Knowledge I and II

Journalism - Yearbook

Journalism - Newspaper

English as a Second Language

English I (9th) #3001 Material Fees: $5.00 Students study the fundamental skills of grammar, writing, and literature in this course. Emphasis is placed on the following study areas: vocabulary development, spelling, grammar usage, sentence structure, basic writing skills, general literacy, and use of reference tools through writing and computer technology. Literary terminology and interpretation are included in the study of fiction (short stories and novels), poetry, drama, and nonfiction. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS English I Honors - Pre AP/IB (9th) #3001H Prerequisite: B or higher in ELA-8 with teacher recommen-

dation and completion of summer reading assignment. English I Pre-AP/IB offers a combination of advanced grammar and composition skills along with a survey study of litera- ture including selections from American, English, and world literature. Honors students study advanced vocabulary in beginning their preparation for the ACT/ SAT college entrance exams through weekly units of study. Students in this class read and write daily. Students who anticipate a transfer to a PCSS school from another school are responsible for checking with the school officials on duty during the summer break to make arrangements for picking up information pertaining to the required summer reading for a course. All honors level teachers leave instruction packets and materials with the main office staff and/or the guidance office, and the sum- mer assignments are also posted on the individual teacher web sites.Questions about summer reading should be directed to individual teach- ers of the class in question through the teacher web site or via email. English I Honors - Pre AP/IB is designed for the serious student who is able to manage time well and to commit to working through a vigorous course of study. A comprehensive nine-week and a comprehensive eighteen-week exam are given for each semester of the course. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the 67


specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS English II (10th) #3002 English II begins with a short review of basic elements of grammar and introduces those advanced elements of grammar not completed in EnglishI. Composition skills in usage, punctuation, and sentence structure are reinforced through writing assignments and comprehensive grammar exercises designed to aid students in successful completion of the state mandated English II End of Course examination. Literature study includes elements of the short story and the novel, drama, and nonfiction. The course also includes the organization, development, and construction of paragraphs, and essay development. Literary terminology is studied within each of the literature units. Vocabulary study, problem-solving strategies, communication skills, and the gathering and usage of information are all elements of the course goals. Computer technology is used through- out the course to enhance writing and research skills. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS English II Honors - Pre AP/IB (10th) #3002H Prerequisite: B or higher in Pre-AP/IB English I with teacher recommendation and completion of summer reading assignment. Acceptable attendance record is also required.

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Honors English II - Pre AP/IB follows the premise that advanced sophomore students can perform at a rigorous academic level in order to master the reading, analysis,

and synthesis of complex texts with understanding and enhancement. Students enrolled in this class should already possess a strong foundation in the mechanics of grammar and writing, Therefore, concentration in the course centers around the development of writing voice and writing style through mastery of sentence variety, transition, and diction. Students will read, annotate and analyze numerous literary works, conduct formal research, and learn to write college readiness essays such as the argumentative essay, literary analysis essay, andthe informative/explanatory essay. In addition to a strong grammar and writing background, students are expectedto read advanced literature selections in great depth and manage a variety ofindependent reading selections outsideof class at times. A comprehensive nine weeks exam and a semester exam are required for all students. Students can expect to purchase some of the paperback reading selections during the year beginning with the summer readingrequirement, which is a pre-requisite for the course. Students who do not complete the summer reading will be dropped from the course. Students who anticipate a transfer to a PCSS school from another school are responsible for checking with the school officials on duty during the summer break to make arrangements for picking up information pertaining to the required summer reading for a course. All honors level teachers leave instruction packets and materials with the main office staff and/or the guidance office, and the sum- mer assignments are also posted on the individual teacher web sites.Questions about summer reading should be directed to individual teachers of the class in question through the teacher web site or via email. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study.


7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS English III (11th) #3003 In English III the student reinforces his/her prior knowledge of writing mechanics through a variety of writing styles, with an emphasis placed upon argumentative, analytical, and narrative writing. Emphasis is also placed upon strengthening vocabulary skills, including but not limited to academic vocabulary. Writing focus includes constructed response, reason, example, description, incident, and point of view in preparation for the required writing portion of the state assessment. A chronological survey of American literature is the core course of study. Units of study move from the beginnings of American literature in the Puritan Period to as far in the 20th century modern American literature as time permits. Authors studied include (but are not limited to) Bradford, Edwards, Irving, Cooper, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Fitzgerald, Steinbeck, Wilder, Miller, Burns, and Masters. All elements of the course are taught with the state standards and state assessment requirements in mind for language, communication, writing, research, logic, informational text, media, and literature. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS AP English Language & Composition #3013 11th Grade Exam Fees: $93.00 (approximately) Prerequisite: AP English Language and Composition is an open enrollment course; however, students must complete the summer reading requirements to gain a seat in the class. Note 1: All students enrolled in AP English Language and Composition must take the AP exam for this course at the end of the year in May. Cost for the exam is approximately $93.00, payable when school begins for the fall term. Students who qualify for free/reduced lunch may apply for scholarships to cover the AP exam fees. Student must have FRL approval yearly by Aug. 1 to qualify for this scholarship. Fees: Students and parents bear the cost of the AP examination fees (approximately $93.00 per exam). Additionally, students will purchase some paperback editions of the specified AP English Language and Composition course guide and some of the paperback novels/plays essential to

complete the course requirements. AP English Language and Composition course cultivates the reading and writing skills that students need for college success and for intellectually responsible civic engagement. The course guides students in becoming curious, critical, and responsive readers of diverse texts, and becoming flexible, reflective writers of texts addressed to diverse audiences for diverse purposes. The reading and writing students do in the course should deepen and expand their understanding of how written language functions rhetorically : to communicate writers’ intentions and elicit readers’ responses in particular situations. The course cultivates the rhetorical understanding and use of written language by directing students’ attention to writer/reader interactions in their reading and writing of various formal and informal genres (e.g., memos, letters, advertisements, political satires, personal narratives, scientific arguments, cultural critiques, research reports). Reading and writing activities in the course also deepen students’ knowledge and control of formal conventions of written language (e.g., vocabulary, diction, syntax, spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, genre). The course helps students understand that formal conventions of the English language in its many written and spoken dialects are historically, culturally, and socially produced; that the use of these conventions may intentionally or unintentionally contribute to the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of a piece of writing in a particular rhetorical context; and that a particular set of language conventions defines Standard Written English, the preferred dialect for academic discourse. Required summer- and nine-weeks-breaks reading, writing, and research assignments must be expected. The AP English III student is expected to read advanced literature selections of great depth and to manage a variety of independent readings outside of the regular class time. Students can expect to purchase some of the paperback reading selections themselves during the year beginning with the summer reading requirement. Summer reading is a prerequisite to the course. Students who do not complete the summer reading assignment will be dismissed from the course and assigned to a standard level English III class. Students who anticipate a transfer to a PCSS school from another school are responsible for checking with the school officials on duty during the summer break to make arrangements for picking up information pertaining to the required summer reading for a course. All honors level teachers leave instruction packets and materials with the main office staff and/or the guidance office, and the summer assignments are also posted on the individual teacher web sites.Questions about summer reading should be directed to individual teachers of the class in question through the teacher web site or via email. AP English III/Language and Composition is designed for the serious student who is able to manage time well and

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to commit to working through a vigorous course of study. Therefore, careful consideration is necessary before reserving a seat in this class. All AP English III/Language and Composition students will take comprehensive nine-weeks exams and a comprehensive semester exam each term. Available: CHS, UHS English IV (12th) #3005 English IV is a chronological survey course of British Literature including the following literary periods: Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and 18th century, Romantic, Victorian, and Modern (late 20th century). Historical background information is included as a reference point for each literary period since the development of the English language and English literature evolved in relation to the historical events and the geographical movement of people and cultures taking place in Europe over a vast time span. In addition to the selections included in the survey text such as Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Macbeth, and excerpts from the Iliad, Gilgamesh, Candide, Le Morte d’Arthur, Paradise Lost, Don Quixote, and Gulliver’s Travels , students will read novels and dramas to supplement and enhance their learning experience. Poetry and drama include works by the Renaissance poets, the metaphysical poets, the Romantic poets, the Victorian poets, and notable playwrights including Shakespeare, Wilde, and Shaw. All senior students in English IV are required to complete a senior research paper as assigned by the class instructor. Students will use library and electronic resources as the primary means of conducting research for the senior paper, and they will be instructed in the details of research data gathering, constructing a preliminary outline, writing a rough draft, and composing a finished draft of their research paper according to either MLA style or APA style (depending on the topic of the research paper). Writing is a major focus of English IV that is integrated into the study of literature. Literary essays as well as expository and persuasive essays are key components of the course of study. Oral expression activities, vocabulary development, and computer technology are utilized to the fullest extent throughout the year. DUAL ENROLLMENT ENGLISH 1010/1020 WILL SATISFY THE REQUIREMENT FOR ENGLISH IV. SEE YOUR COUNSELOR FOR MORE INFORMATION. AP English Literature & Composition #3104 12th Grade Prerequisite: AP Language and Literature grade of B and a score of 3 or higher on the AP Language and Literature Exam or a minimum of ACT Composite score of 24. Exam Fee: $93.00 (approximately) 70

Prerequisite: AP English IV/Literature and Composition is an open enrollment course; however, students must complete the summer reading requirements to gain a seat in the class. Note 1: All students enrolled in AP English IV/Literature and Composition must take the AP exam for this course at the end of the year in May. Cost for the exam is approximately $93.00, payable when school begins for the fall term. Students who qualify for free/reduced lunch may apply for scholarships to cover the AP exam fees. Student must have FRL approval yearly by Aug. 1 to qualify for this scholarship. Fees: Students and parents bear the cost of the AP examination fees (approximately $93.00 per exam). Additionally, students may purchase a paperback edition of the specified AP English IV/Literature and Composition course guide and some of the paperback novels/plays essential to complete the course requirements. The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works. The AP English IV student is expected to read advanced literature selections of great depth and to manage a variety of independent readings outside of the regular class time. Students can expect to purchase some of the paperback reading selections themselves during the year beginning with the summer reading requirement. Summer reading is a pre-requisite to the course. Students who do not complete the summer reading assignment will be dismissed from the course and assigned to a standard level English IV class. Students who anticipate a transfer to a PCSS school from another school are responsible for checking with the school officials on duty during the summer break to make arrangements for picking up information pertaining to the required summer reading for a course. All honors level teachers leave instruction packets and materials with the main office staff and/or the guidance office, and the summer assignments are also posted on the individual teacher web sites.Questions about summer reading should be directed to individual teachers of the class in question through the teacher web site or via email. AP English IV/Literature and Composition is designed for the serious student who is able to manage time well and to commit to working through a vigorous course of study. Therefore, careful consideration is necessary before


reserving a seat in this class. All students will take a nineweek comprehensive exam and an eighteen-week comprehensive exam at the end of each term. Available: CHS, UHS IB English SL / IB English HL #3004/#3006 Exam Fees: $300.00 (approximately) Prerequisite: Pre-AP/IB II (10th) or teacher recommendation indicating a strong work ethic and writing skills as well as a high level of interest in reading and learning about other cultures. This class is an open enrollment course. Students commit to the two-year study program when they register for the course in the spring of their sophomore year of high school. Note 1: All students enrolled in IB English SL/IB English HL must take the IB English A Literature exam for this course at the end of the senior year in May. Students who qualify for free/reduced lunch may apply for scholarships to cover the IB exam fees by Aug. 1. Student must have FRL approval yearly by Aug. 1 to qualify for this scholarship. Note 2: Students enrolled in the IB English SL/IB English HL course will be required to complete all components of the overall IB assessment, written and oral, as part of their course requirements which extend over the two years of the program. Fees: Students and parents bear the cost of the IB general registration fee and the individual IB examination fees. Because the exact amount of the fees varies each year, parents and students should contact the IB Coordinator at CHS for information about the fees. Additionally, students will purchase some paperback editions of novels/plays essential to complete the course requirements. IB English A Literature/HL is a two-year course of study consisting of 240 classroom hours. It is designed for self-motivated 11th and 12th grade students with a strong work ethic who desire an academic challenge in reading and understanding classic and contemporary American, European, and World Literature. Students must possess strong written and oral communication skills for success in this course. In IB English, students develop reading and writing strategies that enable them to respond both critically and analytically to literary works, practice written and oral expression that develops and encourages independent voices, and explore similarities and differences among a variety of literary genres, periods, styles, cultures. A major goal of the course is fostering a lifelong appreciation of literature by students. The course offers a significant range of American, European, and World Literature that embodies internationalism. This range, divided into four parts, allows students to gain insight about their own culture and language while expanding their knowledge of other cultures and languages to develop an appreciation of

diversity. Independent study and summer reading is required of students enrolling in the course. The possibility of reading assignments falling during the designated weeks of vacation time during the school year exists; however, IB instructors are aware of the academic load carried by IB students, and they work together to avoid creating unnecessary stressful situations by planning long-term assignments with students well in advance of due dates to IB for assessment. Students bear the responsibility of managing their time so that they are not overloading an already crowded academic schedule. Students who do not complete the summer reading assignment will be dismissed from the course and assigned to a standard level English class. Literature selections for the IB English course are selected by instructors from two prescribed lists of international novels, dramas, poetry, nonfiction, and autobiography. Locally required representative selections from American literature (grade 11) and British literature (grade 12) are incorporated into the course content. In some instances prescribed IB works serve as local requirements. To get a current list of the selections being studied in the two-year course, parents and students may contact the IB Coordinator at CHS. Assessments for the IB English course include both required IB internal and external assessments as well as locally required non-IB assessments. A full course of study for the two-year period is distributed to students who choose to commit to the course. IB English instructors and the IB Coordinator are available to answer questions about the assessment components. The IB written and oral exam assessments require students to critically analyze, comment upon, and synthesize familiar and unfamiliar texts. Local monitoring includes reading quizzes, unit tests, reader response journals, extended journal responses, writing journals, proposal writings, commentaries, in-class timed essays, comparative essays, descriptive writings, literary critical analysis, oral presentations, oral commentaries, and dramatic readings. Students who anticipate a transfer to CHS from another school are responsible for checking with the CHS school officials on duty during the summer break to make arrangements for picking up information pertaining to the required summer reading for a course. All honors level teachers leave instruction packets and materials with the main office staff and/or the guidance office, and the summer assignments are also posted on the individual teacher web sites accessed through http://www.cookevillecavaliers. com. Questions about summer reading should be directed to individual teachers of the class in question through the teacher web site. IB English SL/HL (11/12) is designed for the serious student who is able to manage time well and to commit to working through a vigorous course of study. Therefore, careful consideration is necessary before reserving a seat

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in this class. All students will take a nine-week comprehensive exam and an eighteen-week comprehensive exam at the end of each term. All students enrolled in the course are required to take the IB English A Literature/HL exam at the end of the senior year in May. Manuscript Writing Rules Cookeville High School strives to develop competent writers within the student population. In that effort, teachers may stress the importance of certain rules to perpetuate student growth in essay or other writings. Some of the guidelines may include use of ink, use of formal grammar, use of formal manuscript styles, among others. While teachers may vary in their individual styles and requirements, students should and must adapt accordingly since the goal of producing strong writers remains the same. Available: CHS IB Theory of Knowledge I & II #3079 Course Fee: Approximately $50 (plus IB registration fees that are approximately $194.00 per year. ) Prerequisite: Students must be concurrently enrolled in at least one other IB course to enroll. It is the first course in the Theory of Knowledge sequence. Ideally, students should enroll in Theory of Knowledge 1 in the junior year and Theory of Knowledge 2 in the senior year. Beginning fall 2017, all students who enroll in Theory of Knowledge 2 must have successfully completed Theory of Knowledge 1. *Theory of Knowledge is required for all IB Diploma Candidates. Note: All students enrolled in IB Theory of Knowledge must complete an internal assessment (oral presentation) and write an essay based on prescribed titles elected by IB in spring of the senior year. Students who qualify for free/ reduced lunch may apply for scholarships to cover the IB exam fees. Theory of Knowledge 1 is an introductory course in critical thinking and inquiry-based learning. Rather than focus on a specific body of knowledge, this course challenges students to examine the process of knowing. Students will learn how to examine knowledge claims and explore knowledge questions across the multiple disciplines. Students will learn to differentiate between shared knowledge and personal knowledge, and they will complete at least one research project culminating in an oral presentation. Theory of Knowledge 2, will explore the ways of knowing and areas of knowledge (as defined by IB). As a senior level course, students are provided an opportunity to reflect on the nature of knowledge. They will be challenged to question, explore, and analyze theories and claims made in their other high school courses. They will also be challenged to examine multiple perspectives regarding world issues. In a capstone essay, students will demonstrate their understanding of their own roles as “knowers” and their relationship to the world. Both courses challenge students to question the traditional bases of knowledge, to be aware of subjective and ideolog72

ical biases, and to develop the ability to analyze evidence that is expressed in rational argument. Students who anticipate a transfer to CHS from another school are responsible for checking with the CHS school officials on duty during the summer break to make arrangements for picking up information pertaining to the required summer reading for a course. All honors level teachers leave instruction packets and materials with the main office staff and/or the guidance office, and the summer assignments are also posted on the individual teacher web sites accessed through http://www.cookevillecavaliers. com. Questions about summer reading should be directed to individual teachers of the class in question through the teacher web site. Available: CHS Journalism-Yearbook #3008YF 10-12th Grades 4 credits maximum Prerequisite: Application to Advisor. Applications are taken in the spring of the previous year. Announcements will be made regarding application process. Criteria for students considering this course are: recommendation from previous year’s English teacher or other academic class teacher, C average or above in English, willing to work after school for even coverage and ad sales, good work ethic with strong people skills, and a good attendance record.. The objective of the yearbook journalism class is to produce the Cavalier yearbook. Students are responsible for planning, developing, producing, and distributing the book. The course content involves the study of page design, copy writing, usage of graphics, basic photography, digital photography, desktop publishing, and type styles. Staff members must be willing to assume full responsibility for a three-day summer workshop and afterschool meetings. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Journalism-Newspaper #3008FN 10-12th Grades 4 credits maximum Prerequisite: Applications and writing samples are submitted and interviews are conducted in the Spring. Members are chosen by the Advisor based on recommendations by academic teachers from previous year. Announcements will be made in the Spring regarding application process and criteria. Only students who complete an application and meet certain criteria will be allowed to register for the course. The objective of this course is to publish the school newspaper. As newspaper reporters, students learn the fundamentals of writing different types of stories, conducting interviews, organizing a story, and doing page layout and design. Students learn the importance of working as a team as publication deadlines approach. In this activity-


oriented class, maturity, responsibility, creativity and writing ability are characteristics that must be exhibited by staff members. Extra time after school is required from staff members to meet deadlines. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS English as a Second Language 2 Credits Maximum English as a Second Language follows the State of Tennessee Curriculum Framework adopted by the State Board of Education on July 18, 1997. Instruction starts where the student needs to begin, perhaps with basic survival skills. Instruction in standard English continues in the areas of speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken English. American cultural practices, customs and more are discussed. Non-English speakers may get 2 credits in English. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Speech and Communication #2906 Speech and Communication is aimed at introducing students to the basic concepts of communication. It aims to make students not only better communicators, but better rhetoricians; people capable of using sound and ethical rhetoric and of analyzing other forms of communication for subtle usage of logos, ethos and pathos. Available: UHS

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Mathematics Math Course Sequences 9 Integrated Math I

10 Integrated Math II

11 Integrated Math III

12 Bridge Math Applied Math Concepts Statistics IB Math Studies SL

Integrated Math I - Honors Integrated Math II - Honors Integrated Math III Honors

Statewide Dual Credit Pre-Calculus AP Statistics IB Math Studies SL

Integrated Math II - Honors Integrated Math III Honors

AP Calculus AB AP Statistics

Statewide Dual Credit Pre-Calculus IB Math Studies SL

Integrated Math III Honors

Statewide Dual Credit Pre- AP Calculus AB Calculus AP Statistics

AP Statistics AP Calculus BC AP Calculus AB

Statewide Dual Credit Pre-Calculus

AP Calculus AB

AP Statistics Online or Off Campus Dual Enrollment Math Course

AP Calculus BC

Students are required to take math during all four years of high school. Integrated Mathematics I-Honors #3132H 9 Grade Prerequisite: Placement is determined by student data For a description of course topics, see the description for Integrated Math I. In honors mathematics courses, Integrated Mathematics I-Honors #3132H 9 Grade Prerequisite: Placement is determined by student data Integrated Mathematics I (9 - 12) #3132 A: # 31323, B: #31324

For a description of course topics, see the description for Integrated Math I.

The fundamental purpose of Mathematics I is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas, organized into units, deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Mathematics I uses properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge from prior grades. The final unit in the course ties together the algebraic and geometric ideas studied. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

In honors mathematics courses, students are expected to exhibit a deeper understanding of mastered concepts making use of higher order thinking and application skills routinely demonstrating superior problem solving strategies beyond the basic algorithmic approaches.

Available: CHS, MHS, UHS 74

Students must complete a mandatory summer assignment. Students are responsible for picking up the assignment from their guidance counselor at the end of the school year. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and


extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Integrated Mathematics II #3133 9-12th Grades Prerequisite: Integrated Math I The focus of Mathematics II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Mathematics I as organized into 6 critical areas, or units. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises and real and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratic equations can be solved. The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability and counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships. Circles, with their quadratic algebraic representations, round out the course. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Integrated Mathematics II - Honors #3133H 9 - 12th Grades Prerequisite: Integrated Math I - H For a description of course topics, see the description for Integrated Mathematics II. In honors mathematics courses, students are expected to exhibit a deeper understanding of mastered concepts making

use of higher order thinking and application skills routinely demonstrating superior problem solving strategies beyond the basic algorithmic approaches. Students must complete a mandatory summer assignment. Students are responsible for picking up the assignment from their guidance counselor at the end of the school year. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Integrated Mathematics III #3134 11-12th Grades Prerequisite: Integrated Math I and II It is in Mathematics III that students pull together and apply the accumulation of learning that they have from their previous courses, with content grouped into four critical areas, organized into units. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data. Students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles. And, finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics

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as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Integrated Mathematics III-Honors #3134H 10-12th Grades Prerequisite: Integrated Math I-H and Integrated Math II-H (with a B or above) For a description of course topics, see the description for Integrated Math III. In honors mathematics courses, students are expected to exhibit a deeper understanding of mastered concepts making use of higher order thinking and application skills routinely demonstrating superior problem solving strategies beyond the basic algorithmic approaches. Students must complete a mandatory summer assignment. Students are responsible for picking up the assignment from their guidance counselor at the end of the school year. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Bridge Math/SAILS #3181 12th Grade Enrollment in this course will be determined by the student’s ACT score taken during their junior year. For students that qualify, the Bridge Math Class will be taught utilizing the Sails Program. A brief description of the programs follows.

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SAILS (Seamless Alignment and Integrated Learning Support) introduces the college developmental math curriculum in the high school senior year. By embedding the Tennessee Board

of Regents (TBR) Learning Support Math program in the high school Bridge Math course, students can get a head start on their college career. Students who successfully complete the program are ready to take a college math course, saving them time and money while accelerating their path to graduation. Students who take the ACT their junior year and score less than a 19 in Math are required to take the Bridge Math course their senior year. In SAILS, these students can complete the college Learning Support Math program, preparing them for a college-level math course, which will give them a jump-start on their college career. If a student is required to take Bridge Math but does not qualify for the Sails Program, the student will be enrolled in a traditional class. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Applied Mathematical Concepts #3183 10-12th Grades Prerequisite: Integrated Math I, II and III This course is designed to prepare students for both college and the workplace. Students enrolling in this course should be interested in careers that use applied mathematics such as banking, industry, or human resources. Topic will include an in-depth study of financial mathematics, linear programming, basic probability and statistics beyond prior courses, counting techniques and combinatorial reasoning, problem solving approaches, logic and Boolean algebra, sets, and analysis of arguments. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Statistics/Statewide Dual Credit Statistics #3136 1112th Grades Prerequisite: Integrated Math I, II and III Statistics is an advanced mathematics course that uses meaningful problems and appropriate technologies to use statistical concepts developed in previous courses to develop more advanced means of statistical analyses, interpretations, and predictions. Students will design and conduct statistical experiments. Students will also select and use appropriate statistical methods to analyze data and to develop and evaluate inferences and predictions based on the data. Students will be given a College Challenge Exam at the end of the semester to determine if they will receive a College credit for this course. Students must earn at least a 75 on the test to receive the credit. Available: CHS AP Statistics #3129 11-12th Grades Prerequisite: Integrated Math I-H, II-H, and III-H Exam Fee: $93.00 (approximately)


Note: The AP program requires all students have a graphing calculator. Teacher recommendations for calculators will be made at the beginning of the year. AP Statistics is designed to be comparable to one semester of an introductory non-calculus based college statistics course. Successful completion and satisfactory performance on the AP test can earn student’s college credit at the discretion of the individual college or university. The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. An introductory statistics course, similar to the AP Statistics course, is typically required for majors such as social sciences, health sciences, and business. Science, engineering, and math majors usually take an upper-level calculus-based course in statistics, for which the AP Statistics course is effective preparation.

Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Pre-Calculus - Honors/Dual Credit #1730 Grades

11-12th Grades

Prerequisite: Integrated Math I-H, II-H, & III-H This course involves a detailed study of trigonometry including circular and trigonometric functions, polar coordinates and complex numbers, graphs, theory of equations, sequences and series, exponential and logarithmic functions, and analytic geometry. Students are required to complete an independent study project and take periodic cumulative tests at midterm and end of course. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which con-

11-12th

Prerequisite: Integrated Math I-H, II-H, & III-H This course involves a detailed study of trigonometry including circular and trigonometric functions, polar coordinates and complex numbers, graphs, theory of equations, sequences and series, exponential and logarithmic functions, and analytic geometry. Students are required to complete an independent study project and take periodic cumulative tests at midterm and end of course. Students will be given a College PreCalculus-H Challenge Exam at the end of the semester to determine if they will receive a College Pre-Calculus -H Credit for this course. Students must earn at least a 75 on the test to receive the credit. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS AP Calculus AB

Available: CHS, UHS Pre-Calculus - Honors #3126

nect class study to the world of work.

#3127 11-12th Grades

Prerequisites: Integrated Math I-H, II-H, and III-H, and PreCalculus-H Exam Fee: $93.00 (approximately) Note: The AP program requires all students have a graphing calculator. Teacher recommendations for calculators will be made at the beginning of the year. An Advanced Placement course in calculus AB consists of a full academic year of work comparable to Calculus I in college. AP Calculus is primarily concerned with developing the student’s understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The course emphasizes a multi representational approach to calculus with concepts, results, and problems being expressed geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Technology is used regularly by students and teacher to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results. AP Calculus AB is designed to prepare the student for the AB level of the AP exam which could earn the student a college credit in Calculus I. Actual placement of the student is at the discretion of the individual college or university. Available: CHS, UHS AP Calculus BC #3128 11-12th Grades Prerequisites: Integrated Math I-H, II-H and III-Hand PreCalculus-H Exam Fee: $93.00 (approximately)

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Note: The AP program requires all students have a graphing calculator. Teacher recommendations for calculators will be made at the beginning of the year. Calculus BC is designed to prepare the student for the BC section of the AP exam. Topics will be covered in depth and will go beyond the scope of the AB course described above. The course is taught with the rigor of a college course, and students will be required to complete a unit of review topics during the preceding summer. Calculus BC - AP is designed to prepare the student for the BC level of the AP exam which could earn the students college credit in Calculus I and II. Actual placement of the student is at the discretion of the individual college or university. Available: CHS, UHS IB Mathematical Studies #3104 11-12th Grades Exam Fee: $300.00 (approximately) Prerequisites: Integrated Math I, II, and III Note: The IB program requires all students have a graphing calculator. Teacher recommendations for calculators will be made at the beginning of the year. This class is designed for an International Baccalaureate Diploma Candidate to meet their math requirement for the IB Diploma program. Anyone else enrolled is trying to earn an IB math certificate, only, by virtue of their performance on the project and the exams in May. Students likely to need mathematics for the achievement of further qualifications should be advised to consider an alternative math course. If you are enrolled in Calculus you should not take this class. The IB candidates most likely to select this course are those whose main interests lie outside the field of mathematics. This course is designed for IB Diploma Candidates with varied background and abilities. More specifically, it is designed to build confidence and encourage an appreciation of mathematics in students who do not anticipate a need for mathematics in their future studies. Students taking this course need to be already equipped with fundamental skills and a rudimentary knowledge of basic processes.

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The course concentrates on mathematics that can be applied to contexts related to other subjects being studied, to common real-world occurrences, and to topics that relate to home, work, or leisure situations. The course includes project work, a feature unique within the group of IB math courses. Students must produce a project, a piece of written work based on personal research, guided and supervised by the teacher. The project provides an opportunity for students to carry out a mathematical investigation in the context of another course

being studied, a hobby, or an interest of their choice using skills learned before and during the course. This process allows students to ask their own questions about mathematics and to take responsibility for a part of their own course of studies in mathematics. Available: CHS


Science Science Course Sequences BASIC 9

REGULAR

HONORS/ADVANCED

Agriscience OR Environmental Science

Intro to Science - Physical Science

Science I - Physical World Concepts (Honors) AND/OR Biology Honors

10

Intro to Science - Physical Science

Science II - Chemistry

Science II - Honors - Chemistry AND/OR Biology Honors

11

Biology

Science III - Biology

Select from: AP Bio - IB Bio HL AP Chem - IB Chem HL Biology II IB HES Physics Honors AP Physics C

Select from: AP Bio - IB Bio HL AP Chem - IB Chem HL Biology II IB SHES Physics Honors AP Physics C

Select from: AP Bio - IB Bio HL AP Chem - IB Chem HL Biology II IB SHES Physics Honors AP Physics C

12

Advanced Science courses require that students meet the existing prerequisites. See the individual course descriptions and speak with your counselor when making your selections. Science Curriculum Sequence Notes: - Courses may be taken as concurrently as corequisites, but students may not go backward. - 3 credits required for graduation

tism. These concepts are discussed, explored in lab and applied to our daily lives. Students will develop their skills in problem-solving, analysis, laboratory work and mathematical reasoning.

Environmental Science (Remedial Science, elective credit, based on test data) #3202 9th Grade

Available: CHS, MHS, UHS

Environmental Science is a laboratory science course that enables students to develop an understanding of natural and man-mand environments and environmental problems that the world faces. Available: UHS Intro to Science (Physical Science) - Resource SE #3202 9-12 Grades Same description as Intro to Science above. However, this course requires placement through an IEP. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Science I ( Physical Science) #3202 9-10th Grades Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in Integrated Mathematics I concurrently or have completed the course. This course explores Newtonian mechanics, vectors, gravitation, energy, wave motion, light, electricity and magne-

Science I- Honors( Physical World Concepts-Honors) #3231H 9th Grade Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in Integrated Mathematics I concurrently or have completed the course. This course explores Newtonian mechanics, vectors, gravitation, energy, wave motion, light, electricity and magnetism. These concepts are discussed, explored in lab and applied to our daily lives. Students will develop their skills in problem-solving, analysis, laboratory work and mathematical reasoning. Students will complete independent research and projects. A comprehensive exam will be given for each semester. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power 79


point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Science II (Chemistry) #3221 9-12th Grades Prerequisite: Integrated Mathematics I & Science I In this course, students will gain an understanding of the atomic and molecular structure of matter and energy and applications of chemistry to daily life. The student will also develop methods of evaluation and interpretations of laboratory observations. Students will apply knowledge and higher-level thinking skills to analyze situations and solve problems. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Science II-Honors (Chemistry-Honors) # 3221H 9-10th Grade Prerequisite: Integrated Mathematics I & Science I Recommended: Integrated Mathematics I final average of B or better; otherwise Honors is not recommended. Honors Science II is a more advanced study of chemistry. The student will be involved in independent research, projects, and competitions. Students are expected to apply information, calculations, and higher level thinking skills to demonstrate a more in-depth understanding of chemistry. A comprehensive 9 week and 18 week exam will be given for each semester and students complete at least 2 independent projects.

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Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Con-

nection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Science III (Biology) #3210 10-12th Grades Prerequisite: Science I and II This course provides the student with an understanding of the diversity and unity of living things by studying cell structure and function, photosynthesis, genetics, classification of organisms, microbiology and ecological relationships. The student will have an opportunity to develop a curiosity for science through laboratory work. This class does have a state required End of Course Exam. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Science III (Biology I A and B) - Resource SE (2 Year Course) 10-12th Grades Same description as Science III (Biology) above. However, this course requires placement through an IEP. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS

Science III-Honors (Biology-Honors) #3210H 10th Grade Prerequisites: Science I and Science II This course will cover the same topics as the regular Science III (Biology) course. In addition students will be involved in independent studies and at least two special projects and will take a comprehensive 9 week exam and 18 week exam each semester. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS AP Chemistry IB/SL #3225 11-12th Grades Prerequisite: Science I, II and Teacher Recommendation Exam Fee: $93.00 (or $300.00 for IB Exam) (approximately) This is an advanced study course covering the composi-


tion, properties and reactions of substances; behaviors of solids, liquids and gases; acid/base and oxidation/reduction reactions; atomic structure; chemical formulas and equations. Additional topics may include nuclear reactions, classes of organic compounds, organic reactions, and biochemistry. This curriculum requires extensive laboratory work as well as an outside research project. Students in this course will take the Advanced Placement exam in the spring ($93.00). This course is designed for the serious student who is willing to devote extra hours to complete the work. A comprehensive nine-week exam and a comprehensive eighteen-week exam will be given for each semester. Additionally, juniors and seniors may take the exam for IB-SL Chemistry credit (HL credit requires an additional year course). Assessments for the course include required IB internal and external assessments as well as locally required non-IB assessments. See International Baccalaureate page for more information. Available: CHS, UHS IB Chemistry - HL #3228 12th Grade Prerequisite: IB Chemistry SL and Teacher Recommendation Exam: $300.00 (approximately) This course builds logically on topics studied in AP Chemistry It is an in depth study of chemical theories, their application, and laboratory procedures following the IB curriculum. A minimum of 25% of the course is devoted to practical work. The course allows for an intensive, broad study of the field of chemistry and is designed for the serious student who is motivated to learn scientific knowledge. Included in the course of study are structure of matter, chemical bonding, atomic theory, equilibrium, acid and base behavior, and many other topics. Assessments for the course include required IB internal and external assessments as well as locally required nonIB assessments. The student who enrolls in this course will register for and take the IB Chemistry HL exam if a senior, SL exam if a junior. See IB page for further information. Available: CHS AP Biology IB/SL #3217 11-12 Grades Prerequisite: Science I, Science II, Science III, and a teacher recommendation Supplemental workbook: $20.00 Exam Fee: $93.00 (or $300.00 for IB Exam) (approximately)

This is a full year course of study covering biological systems in more detail than General Biology. Extensive work will take place in the laboratory. Topics that may be explored include the cell’s organization, function, and reproduction; energy transformation; human anatomy; and organisms’ evolutionary and adaptive processes. An outside research project will be required. Students in this course will take the Advanced Placement exam in the spring ($93.00). This course is designed for the serious student who is willing to devote extra hours to complete the work. Careful consideration should be made before reserving a seat in this class. Students and parents are required to sign a contract and meet with the teacher to receive further instructions and a detailed course syllabus. A comprehensive nine-week exam and a comprehensive eighteen-week exam will be given for each semester. This is a full year course of study focusing on biological systems in more detail than a general biology study. The objective of this course is to prepare students in their study of biology to achieve an international standard of excellence. To achieve this standard of excellence, the student must prepare in areas of his or her strengths as well as in areas of his or her weaknesses. The primary method of teaching will be classroom lecture; however, extensive work will take place in the laboratory and outside research to reinforce topics studied. Concepts covered in the class will be equivalent of curriculum generally covered in college-level courses. Exams are based on a broad general understanding of concepts and fundamental themes. Furthermore, exam questions will place a heavy emphasis on essay writing. Since internationally accepted principles have been contributed by many culturally diverse sources, global perspectives and issues are inherent in the study of biology. Additionally, juniors and seniors may take the exam for IB-SL Biology credit. (HL credit requires an additional year course). Assessments for the course include required IB internal and external assessments as well as locally required non-IB assessments. See page 23 for further information. Available: CHS AP Biology #3217 11-12 Grades Prerequisite: Science I, Science II, Science III, and a teacher recommendation Supplemental workbook: $20.00 Exam Fee: $93.00 This is a full year course of study covering biological systems in more detail than General Biology. Extensive work will take place in the laboratory. Topics that may be explored include the cell’s organization, function, and reproduction; energy transformation; human anatomy; and organisms’ evolutionary and adaptive processes. An outside research project will be required. Students in this course 81


will take the Advanced Placement exam in the spring ($93.00). This course is designed for the serious student who is willing to devote extra hours to complete the work. Careful consideration should be made before reserving a seat in this class. Students and parents are required to sign a contract and meet with the teacher to receive further instructions and a detailed course syllabus.

Prerequisites: PWC or Physical Science

A comprehensive nine-week exam and a comprehensive eighteen-week exam will be given for each semester.

Physics is a lab science course that examines the relationship between matter and energy and how theyinteract. This course will have a strong emphasis on the mathematics of physics. Students will explore physics concepts through an inquiry approach.

Available: UHS

Available: UHS

IB Biology - HL #3218 12 Grade

Physics- Honors

Prerequisite: IB Biology SL and teacher recommendation

Prerequisites: Integrated Math II, Science I, Science II, and Science III

Exam Fee: $300.00 (approximately) This is a full year course of study that builds logically onto the topics of the Standard Level biology. The course reviews many of the topics listed under the standard level course in greater depth and detail. The high level curriculum includes many topics that deal with the human body in great detail and is recommended for those students who wish to study medicine. This course will also focus on the importance of laboratory investigation as well as an emphasis on writing about biological concepts. In addition to the Standard Level concepts, the following topics will be explored in this second year of study: cell respiration and photosynthesis, genetics, human reproduction, defense against infectious disease, nerves, muscles, and movement, excretion, and plant science. Optional topics for this course are evolution, neurobiology, animal science and ecology. The aim of IB biology is to provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students. Assessments for the course include required IB internal and external assessments as well as locally required nonIB assessments. The student who enrolls in this course will register for and take the IB Biology HL exam if a senior, SL exam if a junior. See IB page for further information. Available: CHS Biology II #3216 11-12th Grades Prerequisite: Science I, Science II, and Science III This course provides an in-depth view of living things while exploring cellular functions, interdependence, genetics, biotechnology, evaluation, microbiology, comparative anatomy/ physiology and botany. Students will develop deeper understanding through inquiry activities and laboratory work. 82

Physics #3231 11-12th Grades

Available: MHS

#3231H

11-12th Grades

Honors Physics is a more advanced study of Physics. The student will be involved in independent research, projects, and competitions. Students are expected to apply information, calculations, and higher level thinking skills to demonstrate a more in-depth understanding of Physics. Trig functions are applied to Physics problems. A comprehensive 9-week and 18-week exam will be given for each semester. Available: CHS Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. AP Physics C - Mechanics #3238

11-12th Grades

Prerequisite: Integrated Mathematics II, Teacher Recommendation, Science I, Science II, and Science III Co-requisite: Calculus A/B Exam Fee: $93.00 (approximately)


This is an advanced study course covering Algebra and Calculus based Mechanics topics. This curriculum requires extensive laboratory work as well as an outside research project. Students in this course will take the Advanced Placement exam in the spring, ($93.00). This course is designed for the serious student who is willing to devote extra hours to complete the work. A comprehensive nine-week exam and a comprehensive eighteenweek exam will be given for each semester. Available: CHS Anatomy & Physiology-Honors #3251 11-12th Grades Prerequisite: Science I, Science II, and Science III An in-depth, lab-based analysis of the correlation between structure and function of the human body in health and disease. Medical terminology is a focus in the course. This course is recommended for students intending to major in pre-medicine. Available: CHS

IB Sports, Exercise & Health Science Grades

#3470 11-12th

Prerequisites: Biology and Teacher Recommendation Exam: $300.00 (approximately) The course incorporates the traditional disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology and nutrition, which are studied in the context of sport, exercise and health. Students will cover a range of core and option topics and carry out practical investigations in both laboratory and field settings. This will provide an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and critically analyze human performance. There will be an IB fee/exam at the completion of the course. Assessments for the course include IB internal and external assessments as well as locally required non-IB assessments. Students enrolled in this course must take the IB exam in May.

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Social Studies World History and Geography: The Industrial Revolution to the Contemporary World #3401 9-12th Grades Students will study the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and the economic and political roots of the modern world. They will examine the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, nineteenth century political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They will explain the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past century, including the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the Russian and Chinese Revolutions. Finally, students will study the rise of nationalism and the continuing persistence of political, ethnic, and religious conflict in many parts of the world. Relevant Tennessee connections will be part of the curriculum, as well as appropriate primary source documents. Students will explore geographic influences on history, with attention given to political boundaries that developed with the evolution of nations from 1750 to the present and the subsequent human geographic issues that dominate the global community. Additionally, students will study aspects of technical geography such as GPS and GIS, and how these innovations continuously impact geopolitics in the contemporary world. Lecture, cooperative learning, authentic learning, class presentations, and individual and group projects will be included. Students will develop writing skills, note taking and organization skills as well as social skills. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS AP World History #3449 9-12th Grades Exam Fee: $93.00 (approximately) The AP World History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of world history from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. The course has students investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; development and transformation of social structures) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places encompassing the five major 84

geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania. Available: CHS, UHS Humanities - Honors #3497 10-12th Grades (1/2 credit) This course provides the student with a chronological survey of western man’s exploration of his nature through the arts, philosophy, history, and literature. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in critical thinking, recognition of varying styles in the arts, comparison of philosophies, and successful essay testing. It is designed for the most serious student and careful consideration should be made before reserving a seat in this class. The student must be willing to devote extra time to complete the course work. Humanities is suggested for students planning to take AP European History. Available: CHS, MHS United States History and Geography: Post-Reconstruction to the Present #3405 11th Grade *Required for Graduation Students will examine the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and America’s growing role in world diplomatic relations, including the Spanish- American War and World War I. Students will study the goals and accomplishments of the Progressive movement and the New Deal. Students will also learn about the various factors that led to America’s entry into World War II, as well as its consequences for American life. Students will explore the causes and course of the Cold War. Students will study the important social, cultural, economic, and political changes resulting from the Civil Rights Movement, the Cold War, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America. Additionally, students will learn the causes and consequences of contemporary issues impacting their world today. Students will continue to use skills for historical and geographical analysis as they examine American history since Reconstruction with special attention to Tennessee connections in history, geography, politics, and people. Students will continue to learn fundamental concepts in civics, economics, and geography within the context of United States history. The reading of primary source documents is a key feature of United States history standards. Finally, students will focus on current human and physical geographic issues important in contemporary America and the global society. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS


AP U.S. History #3440 11th Grade

Contemporary Issues Grades 10 - 12

Exam Fee: $93.00 (approximately)

Students will use inquiry skills to examine the issues that impact the contemporary world. Included in the course will be analysis of the historical, cultural, economic, and geographic factors that have raised certain issues to levels of concern in our nation and around the globe. Students will engage in research and problem solving in order to better understand and assess significant current issues.

The AP U.S. History program reflects a commitment to what teachers, professors, and researchers of history teaching and learning have agreed is the main goal of a college-level survey course in U.S. history: students should learn to analyze and interpret historical facts and evidence in order to achieve understanding of major developments in U.S. history. To accomplish this goal, the AP U.S. History Curriculum Framework defines concepts, skills, and understandings required by representative colleges and universities for granting college credit and placement. With the goal of practicing the kinds of thinking skills used by historians, students must engage in study of primary and secondary source evidence, analyze a wide array of historical facts and perspectives, and express historical arguments in writing. Available: CHS, UHS Psychology/Sociology #3433 11-12th Grades (1/2 credit each)

This elective course gives the student an overview of the two subjects. Both subjects are studied for 18-weeks each. Psychology: Students will study the development of scientific attitudes and skills, including critical thinking, problem solving, and scientific methodology. Students will also examine the structure and function of the nervous system in human and non-human animals, the processes of sensation and perception, and life span development. Students will study social cognition, influence, and relations. Students will examine social and cultural diversity and diversity among individuals. Students will study memory, including encoding, storage, and retrieval of memory. Students will also study perspectives of abnormal behavior and categories of psychological disorders, including treatment thereof. Students will elaborate on the importance of drawing evidence-based conclusions about psychological phenomena and gain knowledge on a wide array of issues on both individual and global levels. Throughout the course, students will examine connections between content areas within psychology and relate psychological knowledge to everyday life. Students will explore the varietyof careers available to those who study psychology. Sociology: Students will explore the ways sociologists view society, and also how they study the social world. In addition, students will examine culture, socialization, deviance and the structure and impact of institutions and organizations. Also, students will study selected social problems and how change impacts individuals and societies. Available: CHS, UHS

Available: UHS United States Government and Civics #3407 12th Grade (1/2 credit)

Students will study the purposes, principles, and practices of American government as established by the Constitution. Students are expected to understand their rights and responsibilities as citizens and how to exercise these rights and responsibilities in local, state, and national government. Students will learn the structure and processes of the government of the state of Tennessee and various local governments. The reading of primary source documents is a key feature of United States Government and Civics standards. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS U.S. Government-Honors and Civics (1/2 credit) Portfolio required The same areas of study will be covered as those listed in U.S. Government. Additional topics and library research will include the study of contemporary issues such as terrorism, U.S. foreign policy, political parties, and selected global issues. Students will complete several projects that will enlarge their perspective concerning our government and how it works. All students are required to take comprehensive exams at midterm and at the end of the course. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of 85


study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work.

nect class study to the world of work.

Available: CHS

Exam Fee: $93.00 (approximately)

Economics #3431 12th Grade (1/2 credit)

The AP European History program reflects a commitment to what teachers, professors, and researchers of history teaching and learning have agreed is the main goal of a college-level survey course in European history: students should learn to analyze and interpret historical facts and evidence in order to achieve understanding of major developments in European history.

Students will examine the allocation of scarce resources and the economic reasoning used by government agencies and by people as consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, and voters. Key elements of the course include the study of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, national income determination, money and the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade. Students will examine the key economic philosophies and economists who have influenced the economies around the world in the past and present. Informational text and primary sources will play an instrumental part of thestudy of economics where it is appropriate. world. Topics such as inflation, economic growth/recession and their corresponding relationship to the economy will be included. Economics-Honors #3431H 12th Grade (1/2 credit) In addition to basic Economics, this course will focus on more student directed learning activities. The students will be required to focus on current events that pertain to the areas of study. Presentations, research, simulations, and projects will be incorporated as a part of the course. Students will be encouraged to work independently and cooperatively in various projects.

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Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which con-

Available: CHS AP European History #3441F & 3441S 10-12th Grades Prerequisite: AP World History (with B or higher)

To accomplish this goal, the AP European History Curriculum defines concepts, skills, and understandings required by representative colleges and universities for granting college credit and placement. With the goal of practicing the kinds of thinking skills used by historians, students must engage in study of primary and secondary source evidence, analyze a wide array of historical facts and perspectives, and express historical arguments in writing. Available: CHS IB History of the Americas - SL or HL #3406 11-12th Grades Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Exam Fee: $300.00 (approximately) The IB History program at Cookeville High School is a twoyear course. The course is designed to prepare students for either the standard or higher-level IB assessments. The first year will consist of 150 hours of instruction and will examine the following topics: the United States from 18761928, U.S.-Latin American relations from 1890-1928, World War I as it relates to the United States, African-Americans in U.S. 1870’s-1920’s, The Great Depression and response to it, U.S. role in WWII , and U.S. during Cold War era to 1962. The second year of the course will consist of a wide variety of 20th century topics - including the causes, practices, and effects of war, and the Cold War, and the collapse of communism. Topics studied during the 2nd year will reinforce things learned during the first year ideally. An auxiliary purpose of the two year program is to introduce students to historical thinking - formulating questions, resolving conflicting interpretations, recognizing values and how they play a part in historical understanding. The two year program will provide students with the analytic and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in a study of the Americas. Stu-


dents will develop the skills to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. Students will also write research projects in accordance with IB regulations. A passing score on the IB Exam does not satisfy required US History course at the university level. This two year course is open to any junior who wants to sign up for it, but it should not be a decision arrived at lightly. The students who typically perform well have strong reading and writing skills and a willingness to devote their time to their studies rather than part time jobs. Students who take the two year series will receive credit for U.S. History, Economics, and Government. Any senior may elect to take the second year of the course as a challenging elective. If you intend to take the second year as a senior elective, designate this as IB History of Americas SL, 2nd year option. Assessments for the course include required IB internal and external assessments as well as locally required nonIB assessments. Available: CHS Nurturing the Needs of the Exceptional Learner #3499 11-12th Grades (formerly Peer Buddy) Prerequisites: Students must meet the following criteria: (a) an interest in the peer tutoring program, (b) an adequate GPA, (c) good attendance, (d) a recommendation from a teacher or counselor, and (e) a program of study which allows for an elective course (f) application. This course is designed to enable regular education students to develop peer relationships while acting as peer buddies and positive role models for students with special needs. The buddies will receive instruction about various types of disabilities and learning problems, instructional techniques for students with disabilities, and ideas on how to help increase the social skills, interactions, and participation of their peers with special needs in the day-to-day activities at their school and in their community. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS

Personal Finance Personal Finance #3767 11-12th Grades Personal Finance is a course designed to inform students how individual choices directly influence occupational goals and future earnings potential. Real world topics covered will include, money management, spending and credit, as well as saving and investing. Students will design personal and household budgets; simulate use of checking and saving accounts; demonstrate knowledge of finance, debt and credit management; and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions. This course is a graduation requirement and is taken online. Please see your counselors for more information. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS

Other Courses Work Based Learning 12th Grade Work-based learning (WBL) is a proactive approach to bridging the gap between high school and high-demand, high-skill careers in Tennessee. Students build on classroom-based instruction to develop employability skills that prepare them for success in postsecondary education and future careers. Through experiences like internships, apprenticeships, and paid work experience, seniors (16 years or older) may earn high school credit for capstone WBL experiences. WBL Coordinators are educators who are trained and certified by the state to coordinate these WBL experiences for students. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Placement in any Special Education class, program or related service requires that students meet state eligibility requirements and be served by an Individual Education Plan (IEP). Options for service are determined by the IEP team which includes the following: special education teacher, regular education teacher, school administrator and parents. It is the intent of the Special Education program to provide services to each student in the Least Restrictive Environment providing inclusion with same age peers to the maximum extent possible.

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SPED and Related Services

Related Services for Special Education Students

Resource SE 9-12th Grades

Consultation Services

Classes are offered in the core curriculum that prepare students for End of Course exams. These classes are based on state guidelines for high school curriculum in English, Math, Science and Social Studies and are designed to meet the requirements of a regular high school diploma. Individual descriptions of courses are located in each departmental sections.

Consultation is provided to special education students in classrooms who require accommodations or modifications to the regular program. The consultation teacher meets with the classroom teacher, monitors student progress and provides direct interventions where required.

Life Skills Program

Educational interpreters and/or assistive listening devices are provided for students with significant hearing impairments as determined by the IEP team. Interpreters may be assigned to students to attend classes and other events during the school day. Consultation to the regular classroom teacher regarding modifications and accommodations is provided by the teacher of the hearing impaired each semester.

Life Skills classes are for those students with moderate to severe disabilities. Emphasis of this program is placed on functional and vocational skills needed for independent living. Curriculum incorporates functional academic, daily living, personal-social and occupational goals and objectives. This program includes transition services to prepare students for work and other postsecondary issues. Work Skills I 10-11th Grades This class for 10th or 11th grade students covers employability skills, work maturity and vocational exploration. Students participate in the classroom and the PAES lab. They are supervised on the job, on field trips, and to job sites and post-secondary training facilities. This course requires placement through an IEP. Work Skills II 11-12th Grades This class for 11th and 12th grade students includes developing a portfolio containing a final resume, sample job applications, biographical information, cover letters, W-2 forms, and sample work items. Students practice job interview skills, finalize a career plan, and make preparations for post-secondary training or employment. This course requires placement through an IEP.

Hearing Impairment Services

Social Work Services Social workers promote improved behaviors and successes of students by providing social skills training, personal counseling, and crisis intervention. Social workers provide family services through parent support groups and counseling to families. A licensed social worker is responsible for developing and implementing individual goals and objectives. Identified students may receive services as determined by the IEP team. Speech & Language Services Students who have been identified as speech and/or language impaired may receive services as determined by the IEP team. Services may include individual or group therapy to students or consultative services to teachers regarding classroom modifications or strategies. A certified speech therapist/pathologist is responsible for developing and implementing individual goals and objectives. Physical & Occupational Therapy Services

Work Based Learning/SE (Terms and credits determined by IEP team.) Students who are taking or have completed Work Skills I or II gain valuable work experience and high school elective credit. Students may work 1 period per semester in their junior year and 1-2 periods per semester in their senior year. The WBL coordinator monitors the program through student weekly check-ins and meetings with employers. 88

Students who have been identified for services by a physical or occupational therapist must be referred by a physician and may receive services as determined by the IEP team. Licensed therapists enhance fine and gross motor functioning if the students’ disability impedes progress in the educational environment. Therapists provide both direct services to students and consultative services to teachers regarding classroom modifications or strategies.


Psychological Evaluations School psychologists provide evaluations to students to determine initial and continued eligibility for special education services. Schools psychologists attend IEP meetings of eligible students to interpret testing results and to provide educational recommendations. Visual Impairment Services This program provides direct services, materials and equipment necessary for visually impaired students to function in their home school. The vision teacher provides direct services through academic interventions and navigational training in the school building and community. Consultative services are provided to classroom teachers regarding modifications or strategies. Types of services and interventions are determined through the IEP team. Vocational Rehabilitation Special education students are referred to Vocational Rehabilitation for services during their junior year through their Transition Plan. Eligible students may participate in training programs during the 11th and 12th grade and following graduation. Services include work adjustment training, vocational evaluation, job placement, and tuition reimbursement for post-secondary education. For more information regarding the Special Populations programs at Cookeville High School, contact the Special Education Office at: 520-2119. Gina Hale, Special Populations Building Coordinator haleq@pcsstn.com

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Fine Arts Visual Arts Art I #3501 9-12th Grades This course introduces students to the elements and principles of art. Students learn drawing, design, color, and composition. A variety of painting techniques is stressed in conjunction with art history. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Art II #3502 10-12th Grades Prerequisite: Art I Basic drawing, painting, and sculpting skills and techniques will be reviewed with an emphasis on students taking a creative and individual approach to each. Clay, pottery and wheel throwing will be introduced. Students will explore the essential techniques of each discipline and use a wide variety of media to complete assignments. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Art III #3503 1112th Grades Prerequisite: Art II Art III will focus on two-dimensional and three-dimensional design. The basic elements of art, principles of design and color theory will be taught and experimented with through various design projects. Students will maintain a portfolio that details individual approaches to design problems.

Theatre Arts Drama I, Intro to Theatre Arts,#3520 9-12th Grades Theatre Arts I is a broad overview of the world of theatre. This class includes theatre history, basic vocabulary, script analysis and play writing. Students will be expected to perform in small group and individual performances in class. The objective of Theatre Arts I is to promote self-esteem while developing creative thinking and communication skills through ensemble work. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Drama II, Technical Theatre, #3521 10-12th Grades Prerequisite: Intro To Theatre Arts, application and instructor approval

Available: CHS, MHS

Maximum 1 credit

Art IV-H #3504 11-12th Grades

Stage Craft and Set Design is a class which teaches the techniques of staging including set design and construction, lighting design, and costume design through lecture, demonstration, and hands-on experience.

Prerequisite: Art III and teacher recommendation 1. Painting/Drawing 2. Clay

Available: CHS, MHS, UHS

Available: CHS

Drama III, Acting & Performance, #3522 10-12th Grades

IB Visual Arts - SL/HL #3509 11-12th Grades

Prerequisite: Intro To Theatre Arts, application and instructor approval

Prerequisite: Art I for SL IB Art SL for HL 90

The IB Visual Arts Program at Cookeville High School will offer students a distinctive approach to the study of art appreciation, art history, the place of art in society and practical studio work. Through personal research, students will demonstrate an understanding of the cultural influences of the visual arts both internationally and in their own geographic region. Students will research a variety of artists, artistic styles and movements in the visual arts. The individual research will develop within each student an understanding of the cross-cultural influences of each movement studied. The course is designed for both the art student and the student who wishes to pursue an interest in art but does not desire extensive studio work. The combined research and studio work will total 150 hours of instruction. Assessments for the course include required IB internal and external assessments as well as locally required nonIB assessments. Available: CHS

Exam Fee: $300.00 (approximately)

Maximum 1 credit Drama III focuses on a performance based study of the


process of acting. Emphasis will be placed on a student’s audition skills as well. Students will perform multiple pieces from various literary works. Scene writing and directing will also be explored. Available: CHS Drama IV, Speech Team, #3520 9-12th Grades Prerequisite: Appplication required Speech (Drama IV) is a designed for students interested in competitive forensics. Speech events range from limited preparation events that require extensive knowledge of current events to dramatic and humorous interpretation, which challenge them to find powerful moments in literature and recreate them for an audience. Speech Team members are required to participate in three tournaments each semester. Students must have teacher approval to take this class. Available: CHS, MHS

Instrumental Music 4 Credits Maximum

Freshman Band #3530 9th Grade Please see the description listed below in the “Symphonic Band-Honors.” Available: CHS Concert Band #3530C 9 - 12th Grades Enrollment in the fall semester includes rehearsal and performance responsibilities that include the marching band, concert band, and pep band. Attendance is required at all extra functions, including “band camp” (in late July-early August), after-school rehearsals, and performances. Enrollment in the spring semester includes rehearsal and performance responsibilities that include the concert band and pep band. Attendance is required at all extra functions including after-school rehearsals and performances. Available: UHS Symphonic Band- Brass - Honors # 3530BH 10-12th Grades Symphonic Band Brass is an instrumental music course designed to provide instruction to brass instrumentalists in basic musicianship, music theory, music history, and instrumental performance skills. Woodwind instruments include trumpet, horn, trombone, baritone / euphonium, and tuba. Color Guard students who also play brass instruments should enroll as well. The band also provides entertainment support for various school and community events through its co-curricular activities. Enrollment in the fall semester includes rehearsal and per-

formance responsibilities that include the marching band, concert band, and pep band. Attendance is required at all extra functions including our “band camp” in late July, afterschool rehearsals, and performances. Additional performance opportunities include jazz ensemble and other small chamber ensembles. Enrollment in the spring semester includes rehearsals and performance responsibilities that include concert band and pep band. Attendance is required at all extra functions including after-school rehearsals and performances. Additional performance opportunities continue from the fall semester. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS Symphonic Band - Percussion - Honors #3530PH Symphonic Band Percussion is an instrumental music course designed to provide instruction to percussion instrumentalists in basic musicianship, music theory, music history, and instrumental performance skills. Percussion instruments include drums, mallet keyboards, and other accessory percussion instruments. Color Guard students who also play percussion instruments should enroll as well. The band also provides entertainment support for various school and community events through its co-curricular activities. Enrollment in the fall semester includes rehearsal and performance responsibilities that include the marching band, concert band, and pep band. Attendance is required at all extra functions including our “band camp” in late July, afterschool rehearsals, and performances. Additional performance opportunities include jazz ensemble and other small chamber ensembles.

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Enrollment in the spring semester includes rehearsals and performance responsibilities that include concert band and pep band. Attendance is required at all extra functions including after-school rehearsals and performances. Additional performance opportunities continue from the fall semester. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS Symphonic Band - Woodwinds - Honors #3530PH 1012th Grades Symphonic Band Woodwinds is an instrumental music course designed to provide instruction to woodwind instrumentalists in basic musicianship, music theory, music history, and instrumental performance skills. Woodwind instruments include flute, oboe, bassoon, clarinet, and saxophone. Color Guard students who also play woodwind instruments should enroll as well. The band also provides entertainment support for various school and community events through its co-curricular activities. Enrollment in the fall semester includes rehearsal and performance responsibilities that include the marching band, concert band, and pep band. Attendance is required at all extra functions including our “band camp� in late July, afterschool rehearsals, and performances. Additional performance opportunities include jazz ensemble and other small chamber ensembles. Enrollment in the spring semester includes rehearsals and performance responsibilities that include concert band and pep band. Attendance is required at all extra functions including after-school rehearsals and performances. Additional performance opportunities continue from the fall semester. 92

Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS Piano I #3540 9th-12h Grades Piano I is an introductory class for beginners who are interested in learning fundamental piano skills. Students will learn to sight-read, play familiar melodies and accompaniments, and learn chord progressions and beginning song writing techniques. Classes meet in a 30 station piano lab in which each member of the class has his her own 88 key digital piano, headphones, and materials. Available: CHS

Vocal Music

Music History Grades 9 - 12 Music History is a survey course in which three main areas are studied: 1) Instrument Familites, 2) History of classical Western music from ancient Greece to modern day, and 3) the history of popular music in the U.S. Basic music theory will also be taught to enable students to develop an appreciation for a wide variety of musical styles. Available: MHS Chorus/Vocal Music #3531C 9 - 12th Grade This course seeks to give students an experiences in the study and performance of a diverse repertoire of vocal/ choral music. The chourse will include instruction in proper vocal technique, musicianship skills, and the cultural and historical context of choral literature.


Available: MHS, UHS CAVS Freshman Choir #3531 9th Grade All incoming 9th graders are eligible for enrollment in this class, which specifically emphasizes music reading, part singing, and appropriate vocal development for young singers. All freshman in the class are required to perform in multiple concerts, and many are encouraged to audition for Mid State and other honor ensembles. Uniform requirements for all singers (CHS):

performances in the school and throughout the community over the course of the academic year. This ensemble is expected to represent the school in community programs and is frequently asked to perform in collaboration with other choral groups. Students in Select Choir are expected be at an advanced level of singing and are expected to have good sight-reading skills. Enrollment is subject to teacher approval. Available: CHS IB Music - SL #3508 11-12th Grades

•

Men: Full tuxedos/black dress shoes

Exam Fee: $300.00 (approximately)

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Female: Floor length black dresses/black dress shoes.

The IB Music Program is a unique course combining the study of music history, music theory, music appreciation, music performance and composition. Students study music from a historical and an analytical perspective in order to understand how music is constructed and how it is to be performed. Students are also exposed to the various musical genres and styles present throughout the world in order to gain an appreciation for the similarities and differences in music and musicians. The course is designed both for experienced musicians who want to improve their performance and / or compositional skills as well as less experienced musicians who want to improve their performance skills through ensemble participation. Ensemble participation for band and choir members is expected.

Uniforms are purchased once and new sizes can be traded in at no cost, for the remaining time in the choral program. Available: CHS Treble Choir-Honors #3531H Treble Choir is designed for any female singer grades 1012. This class is well focused on the development of the female voice and will specifically addresses vocal health, technique, and sight-reading/music theory. Many performances and tour opportunities exist for this class, some of which will include collaborative concerts with Advanced Chorale. Uniforms are purchased once and new sizes can be traded in at no cost, for the remaining time in the choral program. Available: CHS Advanced Choral-Honors #3531 (2 classes) Prerequisite: Approved by instructor; based on vocal audition. This class is an advanced group that will focus on period music, advanced vocal development, and will involved multiple performances. The group will be limited in size according to balance. Students will be required to attend extra rehearsals and all concerts. Students in Advanced Chorale will represent CHS in the community and in other functions as the year progresses. There will be a spring concert/competition tour for all students in the class. Uniforms are purchased once and new sizes can be traded in at no cost, for the remaining time in the choral program. Availalbe: CHS Select Choir-Honors #3531CC 10-12th Grades Select Choir is an honors choral ensemble of mixed voices in grades 10-12. The select choir prepares challenging performance repertoire and participates in a number of

Assessments for the course include required IB internal and external assessments as well as locally required nonIB assessments. Dance Dance I #3525 9-12th Grades Class attire: Solid black yoga pants (or sweat pants for male students) and solid black T-shirt. This course is designed to meet the needs of all students, both male and female, who wish to increase their coordination skills, physical endurance, flexibility, and muscular strength through classes in theatrical and social dance techniques. Emphasis is placed on understanding the elements of dance, on communicating through movement, and on developing a cultural and historical perspective of dance as an art form. Performance and field trips opportunities are available for all students. In the winter and spring, all students perform in a required end of course recital. Students may take this class more than once but will not earn additional Fine Arts credits with teacher approval. Available: CHS 93


Dance II #3526 9-12th Grades Prerequisite: Dance I or teacher approval Class attire: Solid black yoga pants (or sweat pants for male students) and solid black T-shirt. This course is designed for students to increase and build upon the technical and academic skills introduced and achieved through their involvement in Dance I. Students will be involved in activities which focus on the development of a greater level of coordination skill, physical endurance, flexibility, and muscular strength through technique classes in theatrical and various social dance styles. Performance and field trips opportunities are available for all students. In the winter and spring, all students perform in a required end of course recital. Available: CHS Dance III-Honors #3527 10-12th Grades Prerequisite: Dance I and Dance II or teacher approval Class attire: Solid black yoga pants (or sweat pants for male students) and solid black T-shirt. This course is designed for students who wish to continue building technical and artistic abilities in all theatrical dance forms. At this level, students will study the basics of dance composition. All students will participate in choreography workshops, and student works will be performed at the end of course recital. Strong leadership qualities and selfdiscipline are necessary to be successful in this course. Performance and choreography opportunities are available for all students. Performance and field trips opportunities are available for all students. In the winter and spring, all students perform in a required end of course recital. Available: CHS Dance IV-Honors

#3528 11-12th Grades

Prerequisite: Dance I, Dance II, Dance III and an audition. If a student is a senior, he/she may also audition for the class without having completed the pre-required courses. Auditions do not guarantee every student a place in the class. Class attire: Solid black yoga pants (or sweat pants for male students) and solid black T-shirt.

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This class is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in dance. Students will study ballet, modern, lyrical-jazz, improvisation, and choreography. In addition, students will learn about various dance career paths, and explore college dance programs and professional compa-

nies. Students will have opportunities to have headshots made, develop a resume, create an audition tape, take master classes with various local dance teachers, perform, and teach a class. Strong leadership qualities and selfdiscipline are necessary to be successful in this course. Students must be able to participate in after school projects/rehearsals. Performance and field trips opportunities are available for all students. In the winter and spring, all students perform in a required end of course recital. Available: CHS


JROTC (JROTC) Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps

Notes: 1) Three credits in JROTC will meet the requirements needed for the JROTC Focus area. 2) Two additional credits in JROTC will substitute for Lifetime Wellness. 3) Three additional credits in JROTC will substitute for Lifetime Wellness and PE. 4) Four additional credits in JROTC will substitute for Government and Lifetime Wellness and PE. The curriculum is designed to teach high school students the value of citizenship, leadership, service to the community, personal responsibility, and a sense of accomplishment, while instilling in them self-esteem, teamwork, and self-discipline. Its focus is reflected in the program’s mission statement, “To motivate young people to become better citizens.” The curriculum prepares students for responsible leadership roles while making them aware of their rights, responsibilities, and privileges as American citizens. The program is a stimulus for promoting graduation from high school, and it provides instruction and rewarding opportunities that benefit the student and community. The JROTC curriculum consists of several programs of instruction. Mandatory classes consist of six (6) major blocks under Leadership Education Training (LET): Citizenship in Action; Leadership Theory and Application; Foundations for Success; Wellness, Fitness, and First Aid; Geography, Map Skills and Environment Awareness; and Citizenship in American History and Government. These six areas complement students’ required secondary education curriculum with primary focus on the development of citizenship skills in a structured interactive environment. There are four (4) LET classes that students take in sequence each year. Cadets can take LET 1-4 contingent upon their curriculum track and total number of electives allowed. Additionally, the JROTC program will continue to attend JROTC summer camp to supplement the on-campus curriculum for selected upper class students. For those attending, added focus is placed on developing student’s character and leadership skills. Summer Camp is a practical application of course curriculum taught throughout JROTC that challenges students with hands-on leadership duties and responsibilities. LET I- Basic Leadership Development #3331 9-12th Grades This first term of JROTC curriculum develops better citizenship, self-reliance, leadership, and responsiveness to constituted authority in each student. Additionally, students gain knowledge of basic military skills, an appreciation

of the role of the Armed Forces in support of the national objectives, an appreciation of the importance of physical education to the accomplishment of these objectives, and life long skills of character and discipline. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS LET II- Intermediate Leadership Development #3332 10-12th Grades Prerequisite - JROTC/ LET I The second term of JROTC program will prepare the student to become a better leaders within the cadet battalion. Techniques of communication are highlighted to enhance the student’s ability to convey a message through writing and instructing. Leadership skills training are taught to focus on leadership values and good judgment. Career opportunities are explored through both military and civilian channels. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS LET III- Advanced Leadership Development #3333 11-12th Grades Prerequisite - JROTC/ LET II The third term of JROTC further involves students as leaders. In developing leadership skills, students will learn: 1) to display leadership potential through problem-solving and supervisory situations and 2) to demonstrate the basic management skills and decision-making processes. As a LET 3 cadet, a student will be required to demonstrate all aspects of close order drill to junior cadets. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS LET IV-Expanded Leadership Development & Mentoring #3334 11-12th Grades Prerequisite - JROTC/LET III The fourth term of JROTC will primarily emphasize the practical application of the cadet’s leadership duties and responsibilities within Cookeville High School and the cadet battalion. The course focuses on creating a positive leadership situation, negotiating, decision-making, problem solving, planning, team development, project management, and mentoring. This course also provides the opportunity to demonstrate leadership potential in an assigned command or staff position within the cadet battalion’s organizational structure. Note: * Subjects such as Leadership, Citizenship, Character Development, Wellness, Financial Management, Communication Skills, and Computer Literacy are developed and sustained throughout each course and LET level. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS 95


Health and Wellness Lifetime Wellness #3303 10-12th Grades This class is a combination of classroom work and physical fitness. The course content consists of seven interrelated strands which include the following: nutrition, personal fitness and related skills, mental health, disease prevention and control, substance use and abuse, sexuality and family life, and first aid. Note: Two credits in JROTC will substitute for one credit of Lifetime Wellness. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Physical Education I - Team Sports #3301 9-12th Grades In this course, students will learn the rules, regulations and skills necessary to perform the following activities: flag football, tennis, pickleball, badminton, lacrosse, basketball, volleyball, softball, and soccer. Students are required to dress out in gym clothes. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Physical Education II - Strength and Conditioning #3302 9-12th Grades This course is designed to teach the fundamental skills, techniques and safety aspects of weight training and conditioning. Students will use the equipment in the weight room and also engage in strenuous physical conditioning such as running. It is recommended that all varsity athletes enroll in this course dependent on academic career path requirements. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Physical Education II - Strength and Conditioning for Student Athletes This course is designed to instill in students the lifelong benefits of physical fitness, athletic competition, and conditioning. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Physical Education III - Crossfit

9- 12th Grades

This course is designed to assist students in discovering the value and benefits of intense physical activity to enhance competency in all physical tasks. The goal of this course is to introduce students to CrossFit, commonly known as the “Sport of Fitness”. The CrossFit prescription is “constantly varied, high intensity, functional movement”. This course will help increase everyone’s work capacity across broad time and modal domains. Available: CHS 96

Physical Education IV - Lifetime Fitness Activities 12th Grades

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The objective of this course if to introduce students to an arrangement of fitness activities that they can perform during high school, into college, and for the rest of their lives. Activities such as walking, jogging, yoga, and other aerobic activities will be performed daily. Topics such as general health, stretching & mobility, as well as nutrition will also be covered. Available: CHS


World Languages French I #3041 9-12th Grades French I deals with the basics of the language. Students learn vocabulary used in everyday conversation and grammar needed to conduct simple dialogues. Writing and listening skills in French are also stressed. Moreover, students are exposed to a culture and way of life that is, at times, very different from life in the United States. This study enables students to broaden their points of view and to become more tolerant of things and people different from themselves. The instructor primarily uses story telling and body movement to develop listening, speaking, and writing skills. Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups to practice oral and written language. Available: CHS French II #3042 10-12th Grades Prerequisite: Passing grade in French I A more in-depth study of the French language continues in French II for the student to become more proficient in comprehension. Students continue to further develop listening, speaking, and writing skills. A variety of classroom activities is used to reinforce these skills, and students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups. Frequent oral activities allow students an opportunity to develop their own individual speaking skills. The target language is used as much as possible with a combination of English to insure that all students understand the material being presented. During each class period a variety of activities is used to help students understand and master the material being studied. Student progress is monitored by homework checks, quizzes, partner and group presentations, and tests.

course. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS IB French SL #3044 11-12th Grades Prerequisite: French I, French II, and French III and teacher recommendation Year 1 of IB French Standard Level is a year-long course that emphasizes advanced communication in all areas of the language through debates, discussions, essays, and authentic texts and situations. Emphasis is placed on internationalism, global issues, and cross-cultural connections. Immersion instruction and participation in French is required.

French III - Honors #3043 10-12th Grades

Students still continue to expand comprehension and refine listening and speaking skills. Class will be conducted primarily in French, and students will be required to speak in French as much as possible.

Prerequisite: French II or teacher recommendation Students in French III continue to hone speaking and listening skills. Classroom work continues to emphasize these skills with a wide variety of activities.

The text provides advanced grammar concepts and practice. Reading selections on numerous topics are provided. Also, students will read a novel in French that is structured for this level. In addition, whenever available, students will use audio-visuals that are in French or have French sub-

Available: CHS

Much of the class is conducted in French. Speaking skills are emphasized much more than in French I and II. A novel is read in French to expand comprehension of the written language and to introduce French literature Throughout the semester, students write in French to further develop their grammatical skills. All students are required to take a comprehensive exam at the end of the 97


titles. Students will also continue to work on their writing skills in French.

be used througout the course. All students are required to take a comprehensive exam at the end of the course.

All students in IB French SL are required to sit for the IB French SL exam in May. Students will also be required to complete internal and external assessments for IB as well as locally required non-IB assessments

Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work.

Available: CHS German I #3051 9-12th Grades German I deals with the basic language of 120 million people around the world. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are the four essential skills emphasized in beginning German. Students develop everyday vocabulary and grammar skills. German is the international language used in science, engineering, mathematics, sports, literature and psychology. Due to the increase in world competition and to the European Union’s growth, exposure to the diverse culture, the language and the history of German countries expands the students’ tolerance of a lifestyle very different from the United States. A variety of individual, small group, and group activities is used to practice oral and written language. Available: CHS German II #3052 9-12th Grades Prerequisite: Passing grade in German I

Available: CHS

German II students continue developint German language listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Various strategies are used to reinforce communication skills. Frequent oral activities allow students an opportunity to improve pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar skills. Reading short stories, asking and answering questions, and listening to CDs, streaming videos, and DVDs in German further students’ adquisition of the target language. German II students may create skits, recipes, video presentations, travel brochures, and/or roleplays as special projects for test grades. Oral grades are taken each quarter. Students will expand their tolerance and exposure of various cultures different from that of the United States.

Spanish I focuses on the development of basic reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Students learn basic vocabulary used in everyday conversations and the grammar needed to conduct simple dialogues. Students hear and watch native speakers talking about school, home, family, and friends on a DVD that accompanies the text. The computer lab is used to reinforce various skills. Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups to practice oral and written language. The history and culture of Spanish-speaking countries are introduced through various projects, videos, and hands-on learning opportunities.

German III - Honors #3053 10-12th Grades

Please note: All native/heritage speakers will be administered a placement test to determine the best possible level to begin study. No native/heritage speaker will be permitted to enroll in level 1 unless he or she possesses little or no English-speaking ability.

Prerequisite: Passing grade in German II

Available: CHS, MHS, UHS

German III students will complete a summer assignment to review material in preparation for German III. German III students will cultuvate German proficience with comprehensive strategies. The learning pace will be more rigorous than German II. Reading, writing, and acting out German short stories will be practiced along with advanced grammar skills. Practical communication topics such as travel, shopping, and describing opinions with explanations will

Spanish II #3022 9-12th Grades

Available: CHS

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Spanish I #3021 9-12th Grades

Prerequisite: A passing grade in Spanish I Spanish II continues with the development of reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The computer and listening labs are used to reinforce and practice these skills.


Comprehension and discussion of selected reading passages are also incorporated. The target language is used as much as possible with a combination of English to ensure that all students understand the material being presented. The history and culture of Spanish-speaking countries will continue to be explored through various projects, videos, and hands-on learning opportunities. Available: CHS, MHS, UHS Spanish III - Honors #3023 10-12th Grade Prerequisite: A passing grade in Spanish II or teacher recommendation In Spanish III Honors, students work to improve their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. The textbook provides advanced grammar practice, and students learn to use a variety of verb tenses and moods. Online exercises and lab activities provide additional practice. As much Spanish as possible is used in class. The textbook contains short literary excerpts to help students improve reading skills and they will read a short novel in Spanish. Listening skills are reinforced with a program that uses native speakers from a variety of countries. Throughout the year students write in Spanish, beginning with descriptive paragraphs and ending with short writings on their choice of topics. All students are required to take a comprehensive exam at the end of the course. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. *** Spanish I, II, and III may be taken by prospective 9th grade IB Diploma students with IB Coordinator and Administrator approval - CHS Only.

Available: CHS, , MHS, UHS Spanish IV - Honors #3024 11-12th Grades Prerequisite: Spanish III or teacher recommendation Spanish IV Honors continues to promote development of the four basic skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Students are asked to master these skills at increasing levels of competency especially in the areas of reading and writing. This course introduces students to authentic reading material through the use of a basal text that is primarily cultural in its focus. An introduction to literary and cultural analysis is provided and students use these skills to discuss the works under study in the target language as well as to express themselves in writing short essays and reactions to a variety of renowned Hispanic authors. The main language of instruction is Spanish with occasional reinforcement in English to ensure comprehension. This course provides the literary and grammatical foundation necessary for those students wishing to pursue IB Spanish or advanced language study at the university level. All students are required to take a comprehensive exam at the end of the course. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: CHS, UHS IB Spanish- SL #3029 11-12th Grades Prerequisite: Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish III, and Spanish IV Exam Fee: $300.00 (approximately) 99


The focus of this course consists of improving the students’ abilities as much in listening, reading, writing, and speaking the language as in broadening the students’ knowledge of the various cultures of the Spanish speaking world. The primary objective is to ensure that the student is able to face common and authentic situations taking into account the impact of such situations with respect to the culture and history of the country under study. Above all the emphasis is on the development of the language and its impact in a modern day international setting, as well as the language’s role in the history of other areas of thought. Assessments for the course include required IB internal and external assessments as well as locally required nonIB assessments. See the IB section of the Course Catalog for more information. Available: CHS IB Spanish-HL 11-12th Grades Exam Fee: $300.00 (approximately) IB Spanish HL is a continuation of the materials, techniques, and assessments used in IB Spanish SL. While students of HL will continue to read, analyze, and discuss a variety of everyday texts and materials, they will also expand their repertoire to some of the more significant works of Spanish and Latin American Literature. As a result, HL students will be assessed on a piece of literature both in their formal written and reading assessments given in the Spring as well as those described in SL. Available: CHS

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Dual Enrollment Courses for High School Credit All PCSS Dual Enrollment is handled through the VITAL program. Students must gain admission to the institution of higher learning (IHE) prior to course selection. Tuition assistance is available through the Dual Enrollment grant. All Dual enrollment course decisions need to be made with the student college major in mind. PCSS, the VITAL program, and high school counselors are not responsible for student college course choices and expected transfer of course credit to the college level. Decisions on course choices are the sole responsibility of the student and family and should be made after contacting the college of your choice and researching possible courses related to student projected college major. See full information on page 29-32. Some courses are offered on-site on high school campuses. Other options are online or on the local IHE campus. The courses listed below will substitute for required PCSS high school graduation credits. Students who have previously earned a graduation credit in a subject (regular, AP or IB) cannot also receive weighted credit for a dual enrollment class to meet the same graduation requirement. For example, students cannot receive weighted credit for U.S. History and Civics or AP US History or IB History of the Americas and also receive credit for DE HIST 2010/2020. ART 1030 - Art Appreciation Replaces: Fine Arts Credit Prerequisites: Acceptable placement scores This is a general education course designed to meet the humanities/fine arts requirement. This course provides an introduction to the visual language, the nature of creativity, and the functions and forms of art in our own culture and in selected other cultures in human history. This is a lecture course based on slide presentation and discussion. (Same as TN eCampus ART 1030) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) Available: VSCC, TTU

BIOL 1010-Introduction to Biology I/BIOL 1010L Replaces: Science III - Biology Prerequisites: An acceptable placement score Introduction to concepts of biology and their relationships to current and future social problems. Non-biology majors only. Credit will not be given for both BIOL 1010 and BIOL 1105. Functions of cellular organelles, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, protein synthesis, genetics, cell reproduction, and evolution will be emphasized. Prokaryotes, protists, and fungi will be introduced. (Same as TN eCampus BIOL 1010) COREQUISITES: BIOL 1010L Hours: Three lecture, two laboratory hours per week. General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (4) Available: VSCC, TTU BIOL 1020-Introduction to Biology II/BIOL 1020L Replaces: Science III - Biology Prerequisites: An acceptable placement score and completion of BIOL 1010 This course is a continuation of Introduction to Biology I with emphasis on the Kingdoms Animalia and Plantae including tissues, morphology, evolutionary relationships. Unifying and comparative features will be stressed. Attention will be given to ecology and environmental issues. (Same as TN eCampus BIOL 1020) COREQUISITES: BIOL 1020L Hours: Three lecture, two laboratory hours per week. General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (4) Available: VSCC, TTU CHEM 1110-IGeneral Chemistry I/CHEM 1110L Replaces: Chemistry II Prerequisites: An acceptable placement score This course is a comprehensive study of chemical principles designed for students pursuing a career in chemistry or other scientific areas. Emphasis will be on atomic structure, bonding, formulas, equations, nomenclature and stoichiometry. Also included in the course are states of matter, hybridization, and molecular geometry. The laboratory will consist of a number of quantitative experiments designed

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to teach basic techniques including the use of laboratory instrumentation. (Same as TN eCampus CHEM 11l0)

ing and Writing or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0810 and READ 0810 as determined by placement.

COREQUISITES: CHEM 1110L Hours: Three lecture, three laboratory hours per week.

This course includes writing expository compositions based primarily on analysis of essays and literary works, with an emphasis on rhetorical modes, documentation skills, and revision. (Same as TN eCampus ENGL 1010). Student must earn a grade of C or better to pass.

General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (4) Available: VSCC, TTU CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II/CHEM 1120L Replaces: Chemistry II Prerequisites: An acceptable placement score This course includes the comprehensive study of chemical principles will be continued with emphasis on properties of gases, kinetics, thermochemistry, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry, coordination compounds, oxidationreduction, and electrochemistry.

General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) Available: VSCC, TTU ENGL 1020 - English Composition II Replaces: English III B or IV B (#3003 or #3005) Prerequisite: ENGL 1010

COREQUISITES: CHEM 1110L Hours: Three lecture, three laboratory hours per week.

Builds on writing and research processes taught in ENGL 1010; emphasizes critical reading, critical thinking, and critical writing (persuasion) about a variety of written texts and other media. Student must earn a grade of C or better to pass.

General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (4)

General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3)

Available: VSCC, TTU

Available: VSCC, TTU

ECON 2010 - Macroeconomics (VSCC)/ ECON 2020 Principles of Macroeconomics (TTU)

ENGL 2110 - American Literature to 1865

Replaces: Economics This course introduces the economic dilemma, supply and demand, and the roles of major sectors within the economy. The course explores the process of national income and output determination and the use of monetary and discretionary fiscal policies to control inflation and unemployment. Keynesian economics, the Monetarist School, and modern classical macroeconomics are examined and compared. [This course was previously ECO 211.] (Same as TN eCampus ECON 2010)

Replaces - English III A (#3003) Prerequisite: ENGL 1020 This course includes reading representative and significant works of American literature from the beginning to the Civil War, as well as, a discussion of literature within its social and historical context. (Same as TN eCampus 2110) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3)

General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3)

Available: VSCC

Available: VSCC, TTU

Replaces: English III B (#3003)

ENGL 1010 - English Composition I

Prerequisite: ENGL 1020

Replaces: English III A or IV A (#3003 or #3005)

This course includes reading representative and significant works of American literature from the Civil War to the present, as well as a discussion of literature within its social and historical context. ENGL 2110 is NOT a prerequisite for

Prerequisites: Acceptable placement scores or (VSCC) completion of all Learning Support Competencies in Read102

ENGL 2120 - American Literature Since 1865


ENGL 2120. (Same as TN eCampus 2120) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) Available: VSCC ENGL 2130 - Topics in American Literature Replaces: English III A (#3003) Prerequisites: ENGL 1020. Not for ENG or SEEN majors. Representative authors, periods, or themes from the colonial period to the present. General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) Available: TTU ENGL 2330 - Topics in World Literature Replaces: English III B (#3003) Prerequisite: ENGL 1020 Representative authors, periods, or themes from various world literary cultures. General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3)

cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects before 1877. (Same as TN eCampus HIST2020) Must be taken in addition to HIST 2020 to earn 6 point weight. General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) AVailable: VSCC, TTU HIST 2020 - American History II Replaces: United States History and Civics (#3405) Prerequisites: Acceptable placement scores This course is a survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects since 1877. (Same as TN eCampus HIST2020) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) Must be taken in addition to HIST 2010 to earn 6 point weight. AVailable: VSCC, TTU MATH 1010 - Math for Liberal Arts (VSCC)/Math for General Studies (TTU)

Available: TTU

Replaces: 4th Year Math Option

HED 120(VSCC) - Introduction to Wellness/EXPW 2015 (TTU) - Concepts of Health and Wellness

Prerequisite: ACT Math subscore of 19 (or equivalent)

Replaces: Lifetime Wellness (#3303) This is a general wellness course which promotes individual responsibility for optimal well being. The course will include local and national health concerns, personal health risk factors, cultural and societal influences and preventive health measures. Fitness evaluation and health and nutrition appraisals will be included. (Same as TN eCampus HPRO 2100) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3)

This course is intended for students whose program of study requires one 3-hour mathematics course. This course is designed to provide insight into the nature and applications of mathematics. Topics include but are not limited to the following: Critical Thinking, Set Theory, Logic, Consumer Mathematics and Finance, Counting Methods and Probability Theory, and Basic Statistics. (Same as TN eCampus Math 1010) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) Available: VSCC, TTU

HIST 2010 - American History I

MATH 1130 - College Algebra

Prerequisites: Acceptable placement scores

Replaces: 4th Year Math Option

This course is a survey of the political, economic, social,

Prerequisite: ACT Math subscore of 19 (or equivalent)

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This course is designed for non-science majors, this course includes a study of sets, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, exponents and radicals, functions and graphs, variation, complex numbers, and exponential and logarithmic functions. (Same as TN eCampus MATH 1130)

tions, applications, inverse trigonometric functions. (Same as TN eCampus MATH 1720) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3)

General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3)

Available: VSCC, TTU

Available: VSCC, TTU

Replaces: Calculus (#3113)

MATH 1530 - Introductory Statistics

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ACT Math score of 27 or above and four years of high school mathematics, including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and advanced or pre-calculus mathematics; or, special permission of the Mathematics Department

Replaces: Statistics (#3136) Prerequisites: Acceptable placement scores This course is an introduction to elementary methods and techniques. Topics include sampling, frequency distributions, elementary probability, binomial distributions, normal distributions, and uniform distributions. Tests of hypotheses and significance of data and simple correlation. (Same as TN eCampus MATH 1530) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) Available: VSCC, TTU MATH 1710 - Pre-Calculus I Replaces: Pre-Calculus (#3126) Prerequisite: ACT Math score of 22 or higher Review of algebra; relations and functions and their graphs, including polynomial and rational functions; conic sections; inequalities, arithmetic, and geometric sequences and series. Credit will not be given for both MATH 1710 and MATH 1130 or for MATH 1710 and MATH 1730. General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3)

MATH 1910 - Calculus I

This course includes a study of limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, applications of differentiation, Newton’s Method, definite and indefinite integrals, Mean Value and Fundamental theorems, introduction to integration techniques and applications of integration, will be studied. (Same as TN eCampus MATH 1910) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (4) Available: VSCC, TTU MUS 1030 - Music Appreciation Replaces: Fine Arts Credit Prerequisite: Acceptable placement scores This is a general education course designed to meet the humanities/fine arts requirement . This course provides an introduction to musical aesthetics, the elements of music, musical form, and brief surveys of music in Non-Western cultures, American popular music and European classical music. (Same as TN eCampus MUSIC 1030)

Available: VSCC, TTU

General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3)

MATH 1720 - Pre-Calculus II (Trigonometry)

POLS 1030 (VSCC)/POLS 1000 (TTU)

Replaces: Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry (#3124)

Replaces: United States Government and Civics (#3407)

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ACT Math score of 22 or higher Topics include the trigonometric functions of the acute and general angle, applications of right triangles, identities, related angles and the reduction formula, radian measure, graphs and graphical methods of the trigonometric func104

Prerequisite: Acceptable placement scores This course is an analysis of the democratic values, constitutional framework, and political dynamics of the U. S. political system with emphasis upon an evaluation of the Congress, Presidency, and Supreme Court. [This course


was previously POL 200.] (Same as TN eCampus POL 1010) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) PSYC 1030 - General Psychology (VSCC)/PSY 2010 General Psychology (TTU) Replaces: Psychology (#3433) Prerequisite: Acceptable placement scores General Psychology is a one-semester course designed to provide an overview of the field of psychology and human behavior. The topics of philosophy, history, biology, learning, personality, abnormal behavior, treatment, applied memory, intelligence, motivation, consciousness, perception, and sensory are included. [This course was previously PSY 101.] (Same as TN eCampus PSY 101.) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) SOC 1010 - Introduction to Sociology Replaces: Sociology (#3432) Prerequisite: Acceptable placement scores This course is an introduction to sociology as a science and to basic sociological concepts, social structure, and social institutions, including the family and education. [This course was previously SOC 101.] (Same asTN eCampus SOC 1010) General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) SPCH 1010 (VSCC)/SPCH 2410 - Introduction to Speech Communication Replaces: English Elective -Speech and Communications (#2906) Prerequisite: Acceptable placement score This course is an introduction to the communication process, interpersonal communication, group discussion, and public speaking. Students are required to prepare and deliver speeches. [This course was previously COM 100.] General Education: Course can be used to meet Minimum General Education Core requirements. Credits: (3) Available: VSCC, TTU

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The Middle School Program General Information - Middle School Communication with Parents

Progress Reports

Progress reports are sent home with students at 4-1/2 weeks and 13-1/2 weeks of each term.

offer guidance to students individually and in groups regarding personal, social, educational, and career needs. They work with school staff to provide school-wide counseling and guidance programs.

The Counseling Center houses informational materials such as career opportunities, planning for high school and colReport Cards lege, and other publications. A computer is also available for student use to obtain information in the Family Resource Report cards are sent home with students at the end of each 9-week quarter and at the end of each term. Students Center. with an F in any one class will receive a failure report within Our counselors are dedicated to meeting the needs of all a few days of student distribution. students, faculty, parents, and administrators. We encourage parents to contact their appropriate counselor for any Parent/Teacher Conferences and Open House reason. Counselors are key players during this critical time Parent/Teacher Conferences and Open house are schedof planning course work for the upcoming school year. uled in August and January. The dates are listed on the annual school calendar for PCSS. School Fees Individual Conferences School fees are optional. Core academic course fees may be requested but cannot be required. Individual Conferences with teachers Elective focus area course fees are may be scheduled at any time by callrequired, if applicable. Schools may ing your child’s counselor for help in request an optional registration fee. setting up an appointment time. If an individual conference with • If a fee is Non-Required (NR), all an administrator is needed, please documentation sent home to parents contact the main office to make an apmust indicate to parents that these pointment. fees are “discretionary and not required”. Periodic Newsletters • If a fee is required, Fee Waiver Periodic newsletters from each middle funds may be applicable according to school are available via email. You Board policy. may sign up for emails by updating your student’s records. Call the school office for assistance. Other Information Sources Important information is also posted on Power School bulletins, School Messenger calls and texts, and on each school’s website. We welcome parents to participate in our Family Engagement activities. Family Engagement meetings and activities are scheduled periodically throughout the school year. Call your child’s school for information. Counseling Center Each middle school houses a counseling center that offers many services to the students and faculty. The counselors 106


Middle Years Program - IB

Beginning with the 2017-2018 school year, Avery Trace Middle School is authorized to offer the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program. General information on this program is below and on the following pages. For specific details, contact Avery Trace Middle School at 931-520-2200.

Middle Years Programme

MYP

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Programme (MYP) is an educational framework that encourages students ages 11-16 to make practical connections between their studies and the real world. At a time when students are establishing their identity and building self-esteem, the MYP is uniquely designed to offer a well-rounded education and help students achieve success in school and in life.

Why the Middle Years Programme? • Rigorous learning objectives • a student centered approach to teaching • international perspectives • concern for the whole child • sustained teaching and learning in more than one language • a focus on learning how to learn • the development of flexible thinking that prepares students to evalution information critically and apply knowledge in complex, unfamiliar situations.

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The IB Middle Years Programme Programme at a glance The International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Programme (MYP) is an educational framework that encourages students aged 11 to 16 to make practical connections between their studies and the real world. At a time when students are establishing their identity and building self-esteem, the MYP is uniquely designed to offer a well rounded education and help students achieve success in school and in life.

The MYP around the globe:

Top Countries with MYP schools around the world

Australia China Mexico Spain United States of America

Canada India Russia UK

1,300

MYP schools in 100+ countries*

MYP Schools

7,500

MYP students completed

36,000+

individual examinations and ePortfolios in 2016 *

59%

41%

55,000+

MYP students completed the Personal Project in the final year of the programme**

State

Private

*As of October 2016 *May 2016 exam session only ©International Baccalaureate Organization 2016 International Baccalaureate® | Baccalauréat International® | Bachillerato Internacional®

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The Middle Years Programme: A guide for parents

The IB Middle Years Programme (MYP), for students aged 11 to 16, is designed as an inclusive, whole-school programme by the International Baccalaureate (IB), a not-for-profit organization supporting the education of more than 1 million students every year in over 3,900 schools in 147 countries.

Why the Middle Years programme? Parents who want the best possible education for their children choose the MYP because it includes: • rigorous learning objectives • a student-centred approach to teaching • international perspectives • concern for the whole child • sustained teaching and learning in more than one language • a focus on learning how to learn • the development of flexible thinking that prepares students to evaluate information critically and apply knowledge in complex, unfamiliar situations.

Along with the introduction of mandatory moderation of the personal project, 2016 sees a change in the optional assessment for the MYP. The new optional MYP eAssessment provides external evaluation for students in year 5 (15–16 years old) that leads to the internationally recognized IB MYP certificate. MYP eAssessment represents a balanced, appropriatelychallenging model that comprises examinations and coursework. Two-hour onscreen examinations in four subject groups (language and literature, sciences, mathematics, individuals and societies) and in interdisciplinary learning are individually marked by IB examiners. Portfolios of student work for four subject groups (language acquisition, physical and health education, arts, and design) are moderated by IB examiners to international standards. These innovative assessments focus on conceptual understanding and the ability to apply knowledge in complex, unfamiliar situations. They offer robust and reliable assessment of student achievement in the MYP.

The MYP teaches tools for lifelong learning and fosters responsible attitudes that help students discover how to use what they learn to take principled action. The MYP’s focus on independent learning makes it the ideal preparation for the IB Diploma Programme (DP) and the IB Career-related Programme (CP).

Education for a better world

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Middle School Course of Study This course catalog has been developed to assist you in planning your middle school course of study. It provides a description of required courses, criteria for special programs and a brief description of electives offered. The middle school school course of study allows students to reinforce and extend foundation skills as well as explore and develop interests through the elective courses. Technology skills and competencies are integrated into core course instruction in grades 5-8. Listing a course description in this catalog does not guarantee that the course will be taught during the 2017-2018 school year. Not every middle school school offers the same courses because of the differing demand for courses and the available teachers on each campus. Each campus provides a course selection worksheet for students to indicate the courses they plan to take during the next school year. Refer to your campus’ Course Selection Worksheet for available courses and options. Contact your school counselor or campus administrator at your middle school school if you have questions about course offerings. Required Courses: 5th Grade English Language Arts - 5

Encore Elective(s)

Mathematics - 5 Science - 5 Social Studies - 5 Required Courses: 6th Grade English Language Arts - 6

Encore Elective(s)

Mathematics - 6 Science - 6 Social Studies - 6 Required Courses: 7th Grade English Language Arts - 7

Encore Elective(s)

Mathematics - 7 Science - 7 Social Studies - 7 Required Courses: 8th Grade English Language Arts - 8 Mathematics - 8 Science - 8 Social Studies - 8

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Encore Elective(s)

Course Designations Courses are designated in various ways to meet the skills and interests of students. Many courses are offered as academic or advanced. A student’s course of study may be a combination of courses with different designations. The student, parent, and school will work together to determine the best combination for each learner. Academic Courses These core courses and electives prepare students for college and post-secondary instruction using a variety of teaching strategies, student activities, and assessments. The curriculum requires students to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills as well as master core content. Advanced Courses Advanced courses are designed to challenge motivated students and prepare them for success in college level course work in high school and in college. These advanced or above grade level courses typically move at a faster pace, are more academically challenging, and require more independent learning and homework than academic courses. A few important factors to keep in mind are: • PCSS’s on-level academic curriculum is a collegebound curriculum. • While advanced courses are designed to better prepare students for AP or IB, advanced courses are not a prerequisite for most AP/IB courses. • Some high school AP/IB courses have course prerequisites that must be completed. Check the course description for prerequisites. • For most courses, it is possible to move from academic to advanced sections from one year to the next. In mathematics, it is more difficult due to the acceleration and compacting of the curriculum in 5th, 6th and 7th grades. A student who decides to move from Academic to advanced mathematics will require additional support in making the transition.


Advanced Courses Entry and Exit Guidelines The purpose of the Advanced entry guidelines is to provide information to facilitate placement of students in academically challenging courses.

eligibility. Consult with the school counselor for more detailed information.

1. PCSS recognizes the value of student participation in advanced coursework and encourages students to graduate from high school with at least one advanced academic course credit such as Advanced Placement or dual credit. To this end, PCSS has an inclusive enrollment model for advanced courses that provides support systems for student success. Students are encouraged to access the most rigorous curriculum in which they can be successful, generally defined as earning a B or better semester average.

1. It is expected that students seek assistance when needed to be successful in the course and remain in the advanced course for at least one full semester. 2. Students petitioning to exit an Advanced course must meet the following criteria: conference with the teacher and completion of course assignments and/or attendance at recommended tutorials. The petition for exit may or may not be granted by the campus. Granting the petition is based on input from the teacher, student performance in the course, availability of space in other courses, and the timing of the request. Students experiencing success (able to maintain a B or better SEMESTER average) in the course should remain in the course for the semester. Contact the counselor for more information about documenting these requirements. 3. Students who earn below an 85 at the end of a grading period will be removed from the class unless otherwise recommended by the teacher and administrator.

2. Advanced courses are designed to challenge students beyond grade-level academic courses and prepare them for success in future advanced level coursework. Information provided by student performance in related courses and teacher input are important elements for parents and students to consider in selecting advanced coursework. Students may require additional encouragement and support to be successful in these courses. 3. Students who participate Advanced courses must: • Successfully complete prerequisite courses as specified in the course catalog. • Demonstrate mastery on assessments including MAP. • Recognize the long term benefits of participation, seek assistance when needed, and be committed to staying in the course for a minimum of one semester. Questions about Advanced courses should be directed to the school counselor and/or the subject teacher. NOTE: Due to the curricular differences between academic courses and advanced and for the benefit of students, entry into an advanced course from an academic course is discouraged after the beginning of each term. It is recommended that students enter advanced placement courses at the beginning of the course, typically within the first week of instruction. Exceptions must have principal approval. Exit Guidelines for High School or Middle School Advanced Courses Exit processes are in place to assist students in making sound course selection decisions. Students and parents must be aware that, depending on timeline, grades earned in a advanced course follow the student to the on-level academic course. These grades will be included in calculating the academic course grade and may impact athletic

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High School Courses at the Middle School PCSS offers courses designated for grades 9-12 in grades 7 and 8 and shall verify that students who take these courses have satisfactorily completed the TN Ready End of Course exams for courses that require them.

two parts:

In order to take a high school credit class in lieu of a standard middle school class, the high school credit class must have an End of Course (EOC) assessment.

The test will be proctored and must be taken at school. Students will be allowed one attempt on each segment of the test.

The academic achievement record reflects that students have satisfactorily completed the courses in middle school and have been awarded state graduation credit.

To prepare for the test, students may access a practice test that is untimed and offers questions similar to those found on the test. Students have unlimited attempts on the practice test.

Courses available for high school credit to middle school students are limited. For course descriptions and availablity, see pages 116-117. High school credit courses taken in middle school will become a permanent part of the student’s transcript and will count toward the student’s high school grade point averages (GPA). Middle school students shall receive high school credit only if an 85 or above is earned in the course and shall move in sequential order to the next course level (Board Policy 4.604). Students who are interested in pursuing opportunities in college athletic programs are required by the NCAA to have specific core courses for Division I and II schools. The core course requirements for graduation are aligned with the NCAA required core courses; however, interested students must consult the NCAA website for current information as they create/revise their high school four year plans. Visit http://www.ncaa.org, click on “Rules Compliance” and then “Eligibility”. Please read “Becoming Eligible” for more information.

Part A - No calculator allowed – timed: 15 minutes Part B – Calculator allowed – timed: 45 minutes

In order to qualify to take Integrated Math I at the middle school, students must receive a 75% or above on the Integrated Math I Readiness Assessment. Integrated Math I middle school class: •

Students in Integrated Math I for high school credit class are required to take the EOC Integrated Math I test.

Students will have a two-week grace period at the beginning of the school year to be able to drop the class.

Students must maintain an 85 average for each marking period during the course in order to remain in the class.

The course cannot be repeated at the High School once the credit is earned.

English I

Placement Criteria for High School Courses in Middle School

Student placement in English I is based on completion of 7th grade ELA with a minimum 85 average and teacher recommendation. Other factors that will be considered are MAP scores and TCAP scores.

Integrated Math l

Student placement in English I is based on completion of 7th grade ELA with a minimum 85 average and teacher recommendation. Other factors that will be considered are MAP scores and TCAP scores.

The Integrated Math I Readiness Assessment will be given in early May for all 6th/7th grade students who desire to take Integrated Math I for high school credit. Letters go home to students and parents in early April. Students and parents are responsible for completing an online registration for the test and returning a signed permission form by the deadline designated in the information letter. The Integrated Math I Readiness Assessment will consist of 112

Spanish I


Course Fees - Middle School Courses Each year schools submit a list of fees for board approval. Below are the fees for the 2017-2018 school year that have been approved. School fees are optional. Core academic course fees may be requested but cannot be required. Assessment fees for AP/ IB classes are exceptions. Elective focus area course fees are required, if applicable. Schools may request an optional registration fee. •

If a fee is Non-Required (NR), all documentation sent home to parents must indicate to parents that these fees are “discretionary and not required”.

If a fee is required, Fee Waiver funds may be applicable according to Board policy.

School

Type of Fee

AMS

Pep Band Fee

AMS

Amount

Required (R) or Not Required (NR)

$20.00

R (for band members)

School Fee

20.00

NR

ATMS

School Fee

20.00

NR

BURKS

5th Grade Science Lab Fee

10.00

NR

BURKS

6th Grade Science Lab Fee

7.00

NR

PSMS

School Fee

20.00

NR

UMS

School Fee

20.00

NR

113


Catalog of Courses: Middle School, Grades 5 - 12 MS English Language Arts

English Language Arts, Grade 6 #0601

ELA instruction in grades 5 - 12 is keyed to the TN College and Career Readiness anchor standards below. Together with grade-specific standards they define the skills and understandings that students must demonstrate.

This course is designed to address the TN Standards for ELA Grade 6.

Key Ideas and Details

English Language Arts, Grade 7 #0701

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing orspeaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

This course is designed to address the TN Standards for ELA Grade 7.

Craft and Structure

Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS

4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. English Language Arts, Grade 5 #0501 This course is designed to address the TN Standards for ELA Grade 5. Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, PSMS, UMS 114

Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, PSMS, UMS

Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS English Language Arts, Grade 8 #0801 This course is designed to address the TN Standards for ELA Grade 8.


MS Mathematics

Mathematics instruction in grades 5 -12 is structured to allow students to develop a deep understanding of matematical concepts and practices. Each grade level addresses specific areas of focus. Mathematics, Grade 5 #0506 In Grade 5, instructional time should focus on three critical areas: 1. developing fluency with addition and subtraction of fractions, and developing understanding of the multiplication of fractions and of division of fractions in limited cases (unit fractions divided by whole numbers and whole numbers divided by unit fractions); 2. extending division to 2-digit divisors, integrating decimal fractions into the place value system and developing understanding of operations with decimals to hundredths, and developing fluency with whole number and decimal operations; and 3. developing understanding of volume. •

Students apply their understanding of fractions and fraction models to represent the addition and subtraction of fractions with unlike denominators as equivalent calculations with like denominators. They develop fluency in calculating sums and differences of fractions, and make reasonable estimates of them. Students also use the meaning of fractions, of multiplication and division, and the relationship between multiplication and division to understand and explain why the procedures for multiplying and dividing fractions make sense. (Note: this is limited to the case of dividing unit fractions by whole numbers and whole numbers by unit fractions.) Students develop understanding of why division procedures work based on the meaning of baseten numerals and properties of operations. They finalize fluency with multi-digit addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. They apply their understandings of models for decimals, decimal notation, and properties of operations to add and subtract decimals to hundredths. They develop fluency in these computations, and make reasonable estimates of their results. Students use the relationship between decimals and fractions, as well as the relationship between finite decimals and whole numbers (i.e., a finite decimal multiplied by an appropriate power of 10 is a whole number), to understand and explain why the procedures for multiplying and dividing finite decimals make sense. They compute products and quotients of decimals to hundredths efficiently and accurately.

Students recognize volume as an attribute of three-dimensional space. They understand that volume can be measured by finding the total number of same-size units of volume required to fill the space without gaps or overlaps. They understand that a 1-unit by 1-unit by 1- unit cube is the standard unit for measuring volume. They select appropriate units, strategies, and tools for solving problems that involve estimating and measuring volume. They decompose three-dimensional shapes and find volumes of right rectangular prisms by viewing them as decomposed into layers of arrays of cubes. They measure necessary attributes of shapes in order to determine volumes to solve real world and mathematical problems.

Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, PSMS, UMS Mathematics, Grade 6 #0606 In Grade 6, instructional time should focus on four critical areas: 1. connecting ratio and rate to whole number multiplication and division and using concepts of ratio and rate to solve problems; 2. completing understanding of division of fractions and extending the notion of number to the system of rational numbers, which includes negative numbers; 3. writing, interpreting, and using expressions and equations; and 4. developing understanding of statistical thinking. •

Students use reasoning about multiplication and division to solve ratio and rate problems about quantities. By viewing equivalent ratios and rates as deriving from, and extending, pairs of rows (or columns) in the multiplication table, and by analyzing simple drawings that indicate the relative size of quantities, students connect their understanding of multiplication and division with ratios and rates. Thus students expand the scope of problems for which they can use multiplication and division to solve problems, and they connect ratios and fractions. Students solve a wide variety of problems involving ratios and rates.

Students use the meaning of fractions, the meanings of multiplication and division, and the relationship between multiplication and division to understand and explain why the procedures for dividing fractions make sense. Students use these operations to solve problems. Students extend their previous understandings of number and the ordering of numbers to the full system of rational numbers, which includes negative rational numbers, and in particular negative integers. They reason about the order and absolute value of rational numbers and about the location of points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane.

115


116

Students understand the use of variables in mathematical expressions. They write expressions and equations that correspond to given situations, evaluate expressions, and use expressions and formulas to solve problems. Students understand that expressions in different forms can be equivalent, and they use the properties of operations to rewrite expressions in equivalent forms. Students know that the solutions of an equation are the values of the variables that make the equation true. Students use properties of operations and the idea of maintaining the equality of both sides of an equation to solve simple one-step equations. Students construct and analyze tables, such as tables of quantities that are in equivalent ratios, and they use equations (such as 3x = y) to describe relationships between quantities. Building on and reinforcing their understanding of number, students begin to develop their ability to think statistically. Students recognize that a data distribution may not have a definite center and that different ways to measure center yield different values. The median measures center in the sense that it is roughly the middle value. The mean measures center in the sense that it is the value that each data point would take on if the total of the data values were redistributed equally, and also in the sense that it is a balance point. Students recognize that a measure of variability (interquartile range or mean absolute deviation) can also be useful for summarizing data because two very different sets of data can have the same mean and median yet be distinguished by their variability. Students learn to describe and summarize numerical data sets, identifying clusters, peaks, gaps, and symmetry, considering the context in which the data were collected. Students in Grade 6 also build on their work with area in elementary school by reasoning about relationships among shapes to determine area, surface area, and volume. They find areas of right triangles, other triangles, and special quadrilaterals by decomposing these shapes, rearranging or removing pieces, and relating the shapes to rectangles. Using these methods, students discuss, develop, and justify formulas for areas of triangles and parallelograms. Students find areas of polygons and surface areas of prisms and pyramids by decomposing them into pieces whose area they can determine. They reason about right rectangular prisms with fractional side lengths to extend formulas for the volume of a right rectangular prism to fractional side lengths.

They prepare for work on scale drawings and constructions in Grade 7 by drawing polygons in the coordinate plane. Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, PSMS, UMS Mathematics, Grade 7 #0706 In Grade 7, instructional time should focus on four critical areas: 1. developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships; 2. developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; 3. solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and 4. drawing inferences about populations based on samples. • Students extend their understanding of ratios and develop understanding of proportionality to solve single- and multi-step problems. Students use their understanding of ratios and proportionality to solve a wide variety of percent problems, including those involving discounts, interest, taxes, tips, and percent increase or decrease. Students solve problems about scale drawings by relating corresponding lengths between the objects or by using the fact that relationships of lengths within an object are preserved in similar objects. Students graph proportional relationships and understand the unit rate informally as a measure of the steepness of the related line, called the slope. They distinguish proportional relationships from other relationships. •

Students develop a unified understanding of number, recognizing fractions, decimals (that have a finite or a repeating decimal representation), and percents as different representations of rational numbers. Students extend addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to all rational numbers, maintaining the properties of operations and the relationships between addition and subtraction, and multiplication and division. By applying these properties, and by viewing negative numbers in terms of everyday contexts (e.g., amounts owed or temperatures below zero), students explain and interpret the rules for adding, subtracting,


multiplying, and dividing with negative numbers. They use the arithmetic of rational numbers as they formulate expressions and equations in one variable and use these equations to solve problems. •

Students continue their work with area from Grade 6, solving problems involving the area and circumference of a circle and surface area of threedimensional objects. In preparation for work on congruence and similarity in Grade 8 they reason about relationships among two-dimensional figures using scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and they gain familiarity with the relationships between angles formed by intersecting lines. Students work with three-dimensional figures, relating them to two-dimensional figures by examining cross-sections. They solve realworld and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, and volume of two- and three- dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes and right prisms.

Students build on their previous work with single data distributions to compare two data distributions and address questions about differences between populations. They begin informal work with random sampling to generate data sets and learn about the importance of representative samples for drawing inferences.

rate of change, so that if the input or x-coordinate changes by an amount A, the output or y-coordinate changes by the amount m·A. Students also use a linear equation to describe the association between two quantities in bivariate data (such as arm span vs. height for students in a classroom). At this grade, fitting the model, and assessing its fit to the data are done informally. Interpreting the model in the context of the data requires students to express a relationship between the two quantities in question and to interpret components of the relationship (such as slope and y-intercept) in terms of the situation. Students strategically choose and efficiently implement procedures to solve linear equations in one variable, understanding that when they use the properties of equality and the concept of logical equivalence, they maintain the solutions of the original equation. Students solve systems of two linear equations in two variables and relate the systems to pairs of lines in the plane; these intersect, are parallel, or are the same line. Students use linear equations, systems of linear equations, linear functions, and their understanding of slope of a line to analyze situations and solve problems. •

Students grasp the concept of a function as a rule that assigns to each input exactly one output. They understand that functions describe situations where one quantity determines another. They can translate among representations and partial representations of functions (noting that tabular and graphical representations may be partial representations), and they describe how aspects of the function are reflected in the different representations.

Students use ideas about distance and angles, how they behave under translations, rotations, reflections, and dilations, and ideas about congruence and similarity to describe and analyze two-dimensional figures and to solve problems. Students show that the sum of the angles in a triangle is the angle formed by a straight line, and that various configurations of lines give rise to similar triangles because of the angles created when a transversal cuts parallel lines. Students understand the statement of the Pythagorean Theorem and its converse, and can explain why the Pythagorean Theorem holds, for example, by decomposing a square in two different ways. They apply the Pythagorean Theorem to find distances between points on the coordinate plane, to find lengths, and to analyze polygons. Students complete their work on volume by solving problems involving cones, cylinders, and spheres.

Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS Mathematics, Grade 8 #0806 In Grade 8, instructional time should focus on three critical areas: 1. formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; 2. grasping the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships; 3. analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem. •

Students use linear equations and systems of linear equations to represent, analyze, and solve a variety of problems. Students recognize equations for proportions (y/x = m or y = mx) as special linear equations (y = mx + b), understanding that the constant of proportionality (m) is the slope, and the graphs are lines through the origin. They understand that the slope (m) of a line is a constant

Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS 117


MS Science TN Science standards are currently under revision. Course descriptions will be updated when available. Science in Grades 5 - 8 currently focuses on twelve conceptual strands with Embedded Inquiry and Embedded Technology and Engineering included at all grade levels. Science, Grade 5 #0507

Science, Grade 7 #0707 Conceptual Strands included at this grade level: Embedded Inquiry Embedded Technology and Engineering Life Science 1: Cells 3: Flow of Matter and Energy 4: Heredity

Conceptual Strands included at this grade level:

Earth and Space Science 7: The Earth

Embedded Inquiry Embedded Technology and Engineering

Physical Science 11: Motion

Life Science 1: Cells 2: Interdependence 3: Flow of Matter and Energy 4: Heredity 5: Biodiversity and Change

Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS

Earth and Space Science 6: The Universe 7: The Earth 8: The Atmosphere Physical Science 9: Matter 10: Energy 11: Motion 12: Forces in Nature Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, PSMS, UMS Science, Grade 6 #0607 Conceptual Strands included at this grade level: Embedded Inquiry Embedded Technology and Engineering Life Science 2: Interdependence Earth and Space Science 6: The Universe 8: The Atmosphere Physical Science 10: Energy 12: Forces in Nature Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, PSMS, UMS

118

Science, Grade 8 #0807 Conceptual Strands included at this grade level: Embedded Inquiry Embedded Technology and Engineering Life Science 5: Biodiversity and Change Physical Science 9: Matter 12: Forces in Nature Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS


MS Social Studies The History of America (from 1850), Grade 5 #0519 Fifth grade students will learn about the challenges facing the new nation, with an emphasis on the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War and Industrial America. They will explore the major military, economic, social, and political events of the early twentieth century, such as World War I and the Great Depression. Students will describe the key events and accomplishments of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States and the nation’s growing role in world affairs, from World War II to modern day. In addition, they will analyze structures of power and authority and develop civic efficacy, which requires understanding rights, responsibilities, ethical behavior, and the role of citizens within their community, nation, and world. Students will use geographic tools to locate and analyze information about people, places, and environments in Tennessee and the United States. Students will further study the unique historical, economic, social, and cultural developments of Tennessee, and learn how our state impacted our nation and the world. Students will develop research, analytic, and critical thinking skills through the evaluation of evidence, interpretation of primary sources, and the construction of sound historical arguments and perspectives. Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, PSMS, UMS World History and Geography: Early Civilizations through the Decline of the Roman Empire (5th century C.E.), Grade 6 #0619 Sixth grade students will study the beginning of early civilizations through the fall of the Roman Empire. Students will study the geographical, social, economic, and political foundations for early civilizations progressing through the Roman Empire. They will analyze the shift from nomadic societies to agricultural societies. Students will study the development of civilizations, including the areas of Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Ancient Israel, Greece, and Rome. The study of these civilizations will include the impact of geography, early history, cultural development, and economic change. The geographic focus will include the study of physical and political features, economic development and resources, and migration patterns. The sixth grade will conclude with the decline and fall of the Roman Empire. This course will be the first concentrated study of world history and geography and will utilize appropriate informational texts and primary sources. Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, PSMS, UMS World History and Geography: The Middle Ages to the Exploration of the Americas, Grade 7 #0719 Seventh grade students will explore the social, cultural,

geographical, political and technological changes that occurred after the fall of the Roman Empire and in Medieval Europe. Students will also study the period from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century, including the Islamic world, Africa, China, and Japan, but with a heavier emphasis on western civilization in Europe during the Renaissance and Reformation. Students will compare and contrast the history and geography of civilizations that were developing concurrently throughout these continents during medieval times. They will examine the growth in economic interactions among civilizations as well as the exchange of ideas, beliefs, technologies, and commodities. Students will learn about the resulting spread of Enlightenment philosophies and the examination of new concepts of reasoning toward religion, government, and science that continue to influence our world today. Students will analyze geography’s influence on the development of these civilizations as they continue their study of world history and geography. Seventh grade students will end the year by examining the Meso-American and Andean civilizations, and the age of European explorations. Appropriate informational texts and primary sources will be used in order to deepen the understanding of how these civilizations influence the modern world. Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS United States History and Geography: Colonization of NorthAmerica to Reconstruction and the American West, Grade 8 #0819 : Seventh grade students will explore the social, cultural, Eighth grade students will study the European exploration of North America, along with the geographic features that influenced early settlements and colonies. This course will emphasize the development and maturation of the British colonies, and the political, cultural, and economic influences that led to the American Revolution. The major events and outcomes of the American Revolution will be analyzed, along with the individuals that played influential roles in the development of the new nation. Students will follow the development of the United States and its government, continuing through the early 19th century. The impact of the expansion of the United States will be analyzed, including implications on domestic and foreign policy. Policies that affected the American Indians will also be studied. The events leading up to the Civil War will be examined, along with the individuals and events that were significant during the war. The history, people, government, and geography of Tennessee will be emphasized in order to illustrate the role our state has played in American history. Reconstruction and the development of the American West will conclude this course. Appropriate primary sources and informational texts will be included in order to enhance understanding of the content. Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS 119


MS Encore Encore offerings vary from school to school but can include choices from the following: Visual Arts - Grades 5 - 8 This course is an introduction to the study of visual arts and art history. Students design original work using a variety of materials and tools as they employ a variety of art processes. Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, MHS, PSMS, UMS Beginning Band - Grades 5 - 6 Beginning band emphasizes developing fundamentals of instrumental music. Students listen to a variety of instrumental musical styles as they learn basic elements of music including rhythm, pitch and music symbols. Students receive small group instruction organized by the instruments which they play. Concerts are a part of the band program. Available: AMS, ATMS, PSMS, UMS Intermediate Band - Grades 7 - 8 Intermediate Band builds on the skills developed in beginning band. Students receive small group instruction organized by the instruments which they play. Concerts are a part of the band program. Available: AMS, ATMS, PSMS, UMS Beginning Chorus - Grades 5 - 6 The beginning chorus program serves as an introduction to the performance of choral music with an emphasis on proper vocal technique. Basic elements of music reading are introduced including rhythm, pitch and music symbols. Concerts are a part of the chorus program. Available: AMS, ATMS, PSMS, UMS Intermediate Chorus - Grade 7 - 8 The intermediate chorus program builds on fundamental techniques and skills. The music performed is varied and ranges from classical to popular. Concerts are a part of the chorus program. Available: AMS, ATMS, PSMS, UMS General Music - Grades 5 - 8 General Music is the study of music appreciation, theory, 120

history, and performance. Subject matter will include singing alone and with others, instrumental performances, improvisation, composition, music notation, theory, analyzing and evaluating music and connecting music to history and culture. General music students will engage in group projects, movement activities, playing instruments, listening exercises, and various forms of interactive learning. Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, MHS, PSMS, UMS Physical Education - Grades 5 - 8 The Physical Education program at the middle school level provides each student with the opportunity to participate in a comprehensive program consisting of skill development, lead up games, team sports, and physical fitness activities. The students receive instruction in rules, skills, and strategies associated with the different sports as well as learning experiences involving physical conditioning activities. The students will also have opportunities to become involved in life-long physical activities through individual sport units. The program promotes the spirit of cooperation, leadership, fair play, and friendly competition. Available: AMS, ATMS, Burks, MHS, PSMS, UMS


High School Courses at the Middle School

through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work.

Each middle school offers a full complement of high school credit classes through the VITAL program to challenge students who are willing and able to do advanced work. See information on VITAL on page 34.

Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS

English I #3001H Prerequisite: B or higher in ELA-8 with teacher recommendation and completion of summer reading assignment. English I Pre-AP/IB offers a combination of advanced grammar and composition skills along with a survey study of litera- ture including selections from American, English, and world literature. Honors students study advanced vocabulary in beginning their preparation for the ACT/ SAT college entrance exams through weekly units of study. Students who anticipate a transfer to a PCSS school from another school are responsible for checking with the school officials on duty during the summer break to make arrangements for picking up information pertaining to the required summer reading for a course. All honors level teachers leave instruction packets and materials with the main office staff and/or the guidance office, and the sum- mer assignments are also posted on the individual teacher web sites.Questions about summer reading should be directed to individual teach- ers of the class in question through the teacher web site or via email. Pre-AP/IB honors is designed for the serious student who is able to manage time well and to commit to working through a vigorous course of study. Therefore, careful consideration is necessary before reserving a seat in this class. A comprehensive nine-week and a comprehensive eighteen-week exam are given for each semester of the course. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences

United States Government and Civics #3407 (1/2 credit) Students will study the purposes, principles, and practices of American government as established by the Constitution. Students are expected to understand their rights and responsibilities as citizens and how to exercise these rights and responsibilities in local, state, and national government. Students will learn the structure and processes of the government of the state of Tennessee and various local governments. The reading of primary source documents is a key feature of United States Government and Civics standards. Available: PSMS Economics #3431 (1/2 credit) Students will examine the allocation of scarce resources and the economic reasoning used by government agencies and by people as consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, and voters. Key elements of the course include the study of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, national income determination, money and the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade. Students will examine the key economic philosophies and economists who have influenced the economies around the world in the past and present. Informational text and primary sources will play an instrumental part of thestudy of economics where it is appropriate. world. Topics such as inflation, economic growth/recession and their corresponding relationship to the economy will be included. Available: PSMS Integrated Mathematics I-Honors #3132H Prerequisite: Placement is determined by student data For a description of course topics, see the description for Integrated Math I. In honors mathematics courses, students are expected to exhibit a deeper understanding of mastered concepts making use of higher order thinking and application skills routinely demonstrating superior problem solving strategies beyond the basic algorithmic approaches. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 121


2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS Integrated Mathematics II-Honors #3133H 9-12th Grades Prerequisite: Integrated Math I (with an A) The focus of Mathematics II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Mathematics I as organized into 6 critical areas, or units. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises and real and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratic equations can be solved. The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability and counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships. Circles, with their quadratic algebraic representations, round out the course. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Per State Board policy, honors courses will involve multiple assessment styles, as well as include a minimum of five (5) of the following: 1. Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum. 2. Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum. 3. Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or realworld situations. These may include oral presentations, power point presentations, or other modes of sharing findings. Connection of he project to the community is encouraged. 4. Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research. 5. Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and styles. 6. Integration of appropriate technology into the course of 122

study. 7. Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline. 8. Extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application. 9. Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work. Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS Personal Finance #3767 Personal Finance is a course designed to inform students how individual choices directly influence occupational goals and future earnings potential. Real world topics covered will include, money management, spending and credit, as well as saving and investing. Students will design personal and household budgets; simulate use of checking and saving accounts; demonstrate knowledge of finance, debt and credit management; and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions. This course is a graduation requirement and is taken online. Please see your counselors for more information. Available: AMS, ATMS, PSMS Spanish I #3021 9-12th Grades Spanish I focuses on the development of basic reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Students learn basic vocabulary used in everyday conversations and the grammar needed to conduct simple dialogues. Students hear and watch native speakers talking about school, home, family, and friends on a DVD that accompanies the text. The computer lab is used to reinforce various skills. Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups to practice oral and written language. The history and culture of Spanish-speaking countries are introduced through various projects, videos, and hands-on learning opportunities. Available: AMS, ATMS, MHS, PSMS, UMS


Student Educational and Planning Worksheet

Department of Teaching and Learning PCSS, Cookeville, TN 38501

March 2017

For graduation, students must earn a minimum of 22 credits including 19 core credits and 3 credit in an Elective Focus option. Please complete this form. __________________________________________________________________________________Home Phone __________________ Student Last Name First Name Middle Grade ____________ Birth Date ____/____/____ Email____________________________________ Student ID # __________________ Counselor ___________________________________ Career Interests by cluster:

❏ Advanced Manufacturing ❏ Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources ❏ Architecture and Construction ❏ Arts, Audio/Visual Technology and Communications ❏ Business Management and Administration ❏ Education and Training

❏ Health Science ❏ Hospitality and Tourism ❏ Human Services ❏ Information Technology ❏ Marketing ❏ STEM

Grade !2 Year _________

Total Credits

Grade 11 Year _________

Credit Earned

Grade 10 Year _________

Credit Earned

Grade 9 Year __________

Credit Earned

Middle School Year __________

Credit Earned

Subject Area

Credit Earned

Credit Required

Post-secondary Goal: ❏ 4-year college ❏ 2-year college ❏ Technical training ❏ Military ❏Full-time employment

English

4.0

Math

4.0

Science

3.0

Social Studies Fine Arts

3.0

1.0

Personal Finance Physical Education World Language Elective Focus Other Electives

0.5

0.5

2.0

3.0

123

Pcss course catalog 2017 2018 july 1 2017 final  

The Course Catalog for the Putnam County School System in Putnam County, Tennessee. A listing of courses for Middle- and High-School grades.

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