Issuu on Google+

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Cabell Midland Show Choir, Page 16

Lady Knights punch tournament ticket 50 Cents

Barboursville Library Manager Linda LaRue (left) gives Judy Morrison a hug during her retirement party. Courtesy photo

Barboursville Library staffer will be missed By Brian Harper For The Cabell Standard

Nearly a quarter century ago, Judy Morrison was looking for a job. “A friend of mine said the Barboursville Library was looking for help,” Morrison said. “So I went on down and put in my application.” She never had to look again. Since then, Morrison has tirelessly devoted her time and energy to the Barboursville Public Library. Earlier this year, Morrison announced her retirement from the library, and a small ceremony was held in her honor last week. Over the course of her time at the library, Morrison has been present for numerous changes. She was an integral part of implementing several programs for both adults and children, such as book clubs, story hours, arts and crafts, and time for after school projects. But perhaps the biggest change over the course of her time at the library had to do with technology, especially with computers and the Internet. SEE LIBRARY ON PAGE 4

HOW TO REACH US PHONE: (304) 743-6731 FAX: (304) 562-6214

l Volume 116 l Issue 10

By Brian Harper For The Cabell Standard

ST. ALBANS – Things were looking bleak for the Cabell Midland girls. With the home St. Albans crowd rocking, the Lady Knights trailed by eight and were on the verge of watching their season slip away. They needed a spark. And they got one from sophomore guards Summer Stephenson and Haley Haggerty. Stephenson knocked down a huge three, and then hit a jump shot after a big defensive stop. Sierra Jordan then had a steal and a layup for a three-point play that capped off an 8-0 run and completely swung momentum the way of the Lady Knights. They rode the wave en route to a 52-42 victory and a trip to the state tournament in Charleston. Cabell Midland is the No. 7 seed and plays No. 3 Greenbrier East at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday. SEE LADY KNIGHTS ON PAGE 7

The Cabell Midland girls basketball team qualified for the state tournament after beating St. Albans and winning Region 4. Members of the Lady Knights include: Taylor Adkins, Rachel Morgan, Allie Bennett, Haley Haggerty, Summer Stephenson, McKenna Adkins, MacKenzie Dillon, Allie Bennett, Karlee Alderman, Sierra Jordan, Emily Pitkin, Savannah Jordan, Stephanie Bias, Head Coach Matt Adkins, Assistant Coaches Dell Adkins and Curry Haggerty, Trainers Nick Dailey and Andrea Smith. Photo by One-Eyed Jack Photography

$39,225 raised at Ham, Bacon & Egg sale Trudy Black trudyblack@thecabellstandard.com

A total of 42 FFA and 4-H members from Cabell and Lincoln counties participated in the 26th annual Ham, Bacon and Egg sale. The event was held last Friday at the Pullman Plaza Hotel, Huntington in front of a packed room. According to Rosella Call, 2014 Cabell Foundation for Agricultural Advancement committee member, most programs around the state are for FFA members only. Cabell County has always included the 4-H members, however. During this year’s sale participants sold 40 hams, 40 bacons and 10 dozen eggs. There were items sold for the foundation with $2,100 going back to support

the program next year. Ron Morrison served as auctioneer for the event with Tom Roten as the announcer. Morrison said he has been a ring-man or auctioneer since the sale began 26 years ago. Once again, he kept the crowd bidding and the ring-men spotted every nod of the head and wave of the hand. Morrison said he wasn't letting anything go for under $200 and he made sure to do just that with items selling from $200 to $3,750. Zachary Call’s Grand Champion Ham set a new sales record. It was purchased by Nelson's Custom Meats for $3,750. He is the son of Stacy and Rosella Call of Milton. SEE SALE ON PAGE 9

Jonathan Black was named the 2014 Scholarship winner. Cabell County Extension Agent Rich Sherman presents the scholarship.

Inside This Week: PROPOSED SCHOOL CALENDAR - PAGE 3 MILTON CITY COUNCIL - PAGE 5 MIDLAND BOYS BASKETBALL - PAGE 8

WWW.THECABELLSTANDARD.COM


Page 2 –Thursday,March 13,2014 Food donations accepted for backpack program Beard Mortuary, 3001 Third Avenue, Huntington, is accepting food donations for the Guyandotte United Methodist Church Grace Food Pantry Backpack program to help ensure that many local children have food. Beard Mortuary will match every food item brought to the mortuary before Friday, March 14. Items will be delivered to the pantry on Saturday, March 15. All items must be individual size and have pulltop opening (no can opener required). Please view the Beard Mortuary Facebook page at www.facebook.com/beardmortuarywv or call 304-522-8253 for a complete list of needed items. St. Patrick's Dance A St. Patrick's Dance with Dick Newman as music host will be held Friday, March 14 from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Underwood Center, 632 9th Ave., Huntington. Cost is $10 per person. Bring a treat and receive a chance for the door prize. The Underwood Senior Center is across the street from the Junior League building. Free parking is available on-street, front, rear and there is a spacious parking lot on the corner just a few steps east of the Underwood Senior Center. Questions: dnbl@msn.com. Future Dances: Jimmy Stevens - March 21; and the Junior League dance - March 28. Mountaineer Opry House welcomes Dale Ann Bradley Mountaineer Opry House, just

Community Calendar

off the I-64 exit in Milton, is pleased to welcome back to its stage Dale Ann Bradley on Saturday, March 15. Bradley is a five-time award winner having been named IBMA Female Vocalist in 2007, 2008, 2011 & 2012 and SPBGMA Female Vocalist of the Year (traditional) in 2014. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. Admission: Adults $15; Seniors $12; Children, 12 and under, $5. For more information, call 304743-5749. CWAB March events 15 – Kiwanis pancake festival 18 – Monthly meeting, 1-3 p.m. 29 – All-4-One disabilities fair For more information, call the Cabell-Wayne Association of the Blind at 304-522-6991. Live music returns to the Creekside The Creekside is not just a bar. It is now a live music venue. It will host a new event each week featuring local musicians and artists who perform original music. “Wednesdays Unplugged” begins 8 to 9 p.m. March 19 when Progressive Country artist Corey Ryan Hagar takes the stage. The events are held bi-weekly, and feature acoustic styled music of all genres, rock/pop, country/progressive country, bluegrass, jazz, blues etc. To get more information, check out the Creekside on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/page s / C r e e k s i d e Cafe/220767664782107 for updates on Unplugged Wednesdays

and other live music events. Renaissance Exhibit Mother and Son The art work of Clarice Kumlien and her son Eric Kumlien will be on exhibit at the Renaissance Art Gallery, 900 Eighth Street, Suite #20 Huntington, WV from March 7 to April 19. Clarice Kumlien is an active 86year-old artist and is President of the Ironton Artists Association. A retired nurse instructor, she has been teaching a yoga class for the past twenty-five years. She produces watercolor paintings of country landscapes and still life paintings of flowers and vegetables that she grows in her garden. Eric Kumlien attended Marshall University where he earned a degree and studied many things including art. He is currently making ceramics at the Huntington Museum of Art under Kathleen Knefskey, the artist in residence. Goodwill offers Computer Basics Goodwill Industries of KYOWVA Area Inc. will offer a sixweek course in computer basics beginning Monday, March 24. Classes will be conducted from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 1005 Virginia Ave., Huntington. The course aims to teach students how to perform basic computer skills such as typing/keyboard/mouse, word processing, computer terminology, Internet browsing/email, navigating the desktop, storage devices. Those who successfully

complete the course will leave with the skills necessary to perform many of the basic functions of computer use. The cost of the class is $99. To enroll, contact Andrea Lupson, Career Center Instructor, at 304523-7461. Women of Color program rescheduled Marshall University’s Women of Color Program has been rescheduled for Tuesday, March 25 at noon. The program will take place in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall’s Huntington campus. For further information, please call Fran L. Jackson at 304-6966705. New beginning digital photography class Putnam County Parks & Recreation Commission is hosting a photography class instructed by Laura Moul. Classes will be in the community center by the wave pool for three consecutive Tuesday’s on March 25, April 1, and April 15 from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. For more information please contact Laura at 743-8281, check out her website at www.moulphotography.com or call the park office at 304-5620518 ext. 10 to register. Spring craft show Women of the Moose chapter of the Barboursville Moose will be hosting a Spring Fling Craft Show/Vendor Event March 29, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Barboursville Moose located in East-

The Cabell Standard ern Heights Shopping Center. Lunch and snacks will be available for purchase. There will also be hourly drawings (must be present to win), a 50/50 drawing, and local vendors and artisans. Proceeds from the event will support Moose charities and the local community. Annual Easter egg sale The Cabell-Wayne Association of the Blind is now taking orders for hand-made Easter eggs. The $5 eggs are dark or milk chocolate with creamy peanut butter filling and colorfully decorated on top. Call 304-522-6991 to place your order. Order deadline is April 4. Goodwill offers Microsoft PowerPoint Goodwill Industries of KYOWVA Area Inc. will offer a sixweek course in Microsoft PowerPoint beginning Thursday, April 10. Classes will be conducted from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 1005 Virginia Ave., Huntington. The course aims to teach students how to perform basic PowerPoint skills such as: navigating PowerPoint, creating/editing/saving/printing/opening a presentation, formatting/animating slides, using templates, and inserting media. Those who successfully complete the course will leave with the skills necessary to perform many of the basic functions of Microsoft PowerPoint. The cost of the class is $99. To enroll, contact Andrea Lupson, Career Center Instructor, at 304523-7461.

Cabell Huntington Hospital March 2014 events March 14 Free Women’s Health Screening - Women can receive free health screenings at the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center on the campus of Cabell Huntington Hospital including pelvic exams and clinical breast exams for all

women over age 21. Pap smears and free mammograms will be available for those who qualify. Local physicians from Marshall Health, Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center and Huntington Women’s Health Obstetrics & Gynecology will perform the exams.

March Birthdays! Happy Birthday to ALL

Caleb Ash - Mar. 15 Rachele Scott Jeffries - Mar. 19 Carol Gay Bill Unger Noreen Unger Katie Oxley Bud Gibson Andrew Colegrove Jina Hayes Debbie Huffman Deborah Liptrap Donna Moore

Michael Mullins Melissa Nash Lillian Nelon Alisa Proklevich David Redman Cynthia Reuschel Loyce Rutan Patricia Lee Millie Dotson John Gibbs Jackie Warner Bassil Snodgrass

If you - or someone you know - will be celebratrating a birthday in the coming months... Call 304-743-6731 and give us their name - OR just email the information to trudyblack@thecabellstandard.com

Appointments preferred, walkins welcome. Location: Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center. Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. More information/appointments: 304-5262379 March 15 Childbirth Class - Pre-registration is required for this free class for soon-to-be parents. Location: Cabell Huntington Hospital. Time: 9 a.m. More information: 304-526-BABY (2229) March 17 “Sisters of Hope” Breast Cancer Support Group. Location: Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center. Time: 5:30 p.m. More information: 304-526-2443 March 18 Parkinson's Disease Support Group - The Senior Services Department invites anyone affected by Parkinson’s disease as a patient, caregiver or family member, to participate in this monthly support group focused on coping with the disease. Everyone is welcome. Location: Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center Resource Room. Time: 6 p.m. More information: 304-526-2695 or e-mail seniors@chhi.org Infant CPR Class - Pre-registration required. Location: Cabell

Huntington Hospital. Time: 6 to 8 p.m. More information: 304-526BABY (2229) March 19 Epilepsy Support Group Meeting - The Cabell Huntington Hospital Epilepsy & Seizure Center and Neurophysiology Lab and the Epilepsy Foundation will host its bi-monthly Epilepsy Support Group for those with epilepsy and their family members or caregivers. Location: Cabell Huntington Hospital – Private Dining Rooms 1 & 2 (ground floor). Time: 6 p.m. More information: 877804-2241 March 24 Stroke Recovery and Support Group - The Cabell Huntington Hospital Stroke Recovery & Support Group’s monthly meeting is for anyone who has suffered a stroke and for friends and loved ones of those recovering from a stroke. Location: Please call 304526-6317 for meeting location. Time: 6 p.m. More information: 304-526-6317 Seniors and Eye Health - Cabell Huntington Hospital Senior Services presents Seniors and Eye Health, a free event to teach those 50 and older about the importance of being proactive with eye

health to prevent eye disease and vision problems as they age. A special presentation will feature Jose S. Pulido, MD, a national eye expert from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, who will discuss blinding eye disease in the past, present and future. Location: Harless Auditorium on the campus of the Marshall University Medical Center at Cabell Huntington Hospital. Time: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. More information: 304526-2695 March 25 Breastfeeding Class - Pre-registration required. Location: Cabell Huntington Hospital. Time: 6 to 8 p.m. More information: 304-526BABY (2229) Welcome to Medicare Workshop - Cabell Huntington Hospital Senior Services presents this monthly free workshop series to bring together Medicare experts with those who are eligible to enroll —or already enrolled— in the federal health insurance program. Cabell Huntington’s Welcome to Medicare Workshop will take place on the fourth Tuesday of each month. Location: Cabell Huntington Hospital. Time: 2 p.m. More information: 304-5262695


Thursday,March 13,2014 – Page 3

Community News

The Cabell Standard

School board presents case for Aug. 6 start date By Amanda White

PROPOSED PRO POSED 2014-2015 2014-2015 SC SCHOOL HOOL YEAR YEAR C CALENDAR ALENDAR

For The Cabell Standard

The calendar debate continues as the Cabell Board of Education was presented with factual evidence to support starting the school year on Aug. 6 rather than a later date. Dr. Jeff Smith, assistant superintendent of Cabell County Public Schools, said the early date is due to a one week long Thanksgiving break and a two week long Christmas break. Thanksgiving break was chosen to be a week long due to the influx of students and teachers who miss days due to hunting season. In 2011, 13.4 percent of students were absent the day before Thanksgiving, in 2010 16.6 percent of students were absent the day before Thanksgiving and in 2009, 10.8 percent of students were absent the day before Thanksgiving. Employees had similar absence rates, with 683 absences the day before Thanksgiving in the three years combined. "When you look at the number of absentees and the number of substitutes, it is difficult for the substitutes to carry on the same standard of education the teacher would have," said William Smith, superintendent. "The continuity of instruction is one of the most important things." The calendar proposal was developed by a calendar committee led by Lenora Richardson, Director of Assessment and Curriculum for Cabell County Schools. The committee included three representatives from the central office, five high school representatives, two middle school representatives and three elementary representatives. Representatives included a mix of teachers/administrators, students and parents.

S

M

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

S 3 10 17 24 31

JULY ‘14 JULY T W Th 1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30 31

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

AUGUST ‘‘14 AUGUST 14 T W Th F 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

M

SEPTEMBER SEP TEMBER ‘14 ‘1 4 M T W Th F 1 2 3 4 5 8 9 10 11 12 15 16 17 18 19 22 23 24 25 26 29 30

S 6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

OCTOBER OC TOBER ‘‘14 14 M T W Th F 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30 31

S 4 11 18 25 5

S

NOVEMBER NO VEMBER ‘14 ‘14 1 M T W Th F

S 7 14 21 28

S

2 9 16 23 30 S 7 14 21 28

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

DECEMBER DE CEMBER ‘14 ‘1 4 M T W Th F 1 2 3 4 5 8 9 10 11 12 15 16 17 18 19 22 23 24 25 26 29 30 31

-;\-Z"

S0" <)800C"

@

!"#$% !" #$ ! # $%&'('%&'%)'"*+," $%&'('%&'%)' *+, &"'"()% &"'"() - . /0%12%32%4"5&3)+120%" /0%12%32%4 5&3)+120% ! . /0%12%32%4"5&3)+120%" /0%12%32%4 5&3)+120% 6 . 7'+)8'9":9'(+9+120%" 7'+)8'9 :9'(+9+120% ; . <13&'%1=">29=1"*+," <13&'%1= >29=1 *+, ?@"#"7A0.B039"5+9C,"D'C'+='"E09":90E'==20%+C"*'F'C0(G'%1H" ?@ # 7A0.B0 039 5+9C, D'C'+=' E09 :90E'==20%+C *'F ' 'C0(G'%1H *+,)+-.+/% *+,)+-.+/ "-"#"I+J09"*+," - # I+J09 *+, -@"#"7A0.B039"5+9C,"D'C'+='"E09":90E'==20%+C"*'F'C0(G'%1H% -@ # 7A0.B0 039 5+9C, D'C'+=' E09 :90E'==20%+C *''F'C0(G'%1H 01)2.+/% 01)2.+/ K # 7A0.B039"D'C'+='"E09">+)3C1,"<'%+1'"L''12%4=" 7A0. 0 B039 D'C'+=' E09 >+)3C1, <'%+1' L' L ' 1 2% 4 = 324+-.+/% 324+-.+/ ! # M'%'9+C"5C')120%" M'%'9+C 5C')120% --"#"N'1'9+%="*+," --"# N'1'9+%= *+, ?!.?K"#"78+%O=42F2%4"P9'+O% ?!.?K"# 78+%O=42F2%4 P9'+O 5+1+-.+/% 5+1+-.+/ -Q"."7A0.B039"D'C'+='"E09">+)3C1,"<'%+1'"L''12%4=" -Q . 7A0.B039 D'C'+=' E09 >+)3C1, <'% %+1' L' L ' 12% 4 = ??.R-"#"/892=1G+="P9'+O% ??.R-"# /89 8 2=1G+= P99'+O !67"6/$% !67"6/$ - # S'A"T'+9U="*+," S'A T'+9U= *+, ? . 7'+)8'9":9'(+9+120%" 7'+) + 8'9 :9'(+9+120% 6 . /0%12%32%4"5&3)+120%" /0%12%32 32%4 5&3)+120% -Q"#"*9V"L+912%"I318'9"W2%4X"Y9V"*+," -Q"# *9V L+912% I318'9 W2%4X Y9V *+, ?K"."7A0.B039"5+9C,"D'C'+='"E09":90E'==20%+C"*'F'C0(G'%1H% ?K . 7A0.B0 039 5+9C, D'C'+=' E09 :90E'==20%+C *''F'C0(G'%1H 1 8+./"6/$% 8 ./"6/$ 8+ --"."7A0.B039"5+9C,"D'C'+='"E09":90E'==20%+C"*'F'C0(G'%1H" -- . 7A0.B0 039 5+9C, D'C'+=' E09 :90E'==20%+C *' * ' F ' C0 ( G ' % 1H 96/1:% 966/1: -Z"."7A0.B039"D'C'+='"E09">+)3C1,"<'%+1'"L''12%4=" -Z . 7A0.B0 B 39 D'C'+=' E09 >+) > 3C1, <'%+1' L' L ' 12% 4 = -;.?Z"#"<(92%4"P9'+O% -;.?Z"# <(92%4 P9'+O ' &,/;#% &,/;# R # [<5"*+," [<<5 *+ * , 96$% 96$ ?Z # 7A0.B039"D'C'+='"E09">+)3C1,"<'%+1'"L''12%4="\<13&'%1=U"I+=1"*+," 7A0.B0 B039 D'C'+=' E09 0 >+)3C1, <'%+1' L''12%4= \<13&'%1=U I+=1 *+, ?-"#"[<5"*+," ?-"# [<5 *+, ??"#"[<5"*+," ??" ? # [<5 *+, ?6"#"L'G092+C"*+," ?6"# L'G092+C *+, ?;"."[<5"*+," ?;". [<5 *+, ?@"."[<5"*+," ?@". [<5 *+, ?K"."[<5"*+," ?K". [<5 *+, ?Q"#"7'+)8'9":9'(+9+120%% ?Q"# 7'+)8'9 :9'(+9+120% !"7+% !"7+ -.6"#"5]1'%&'&"<)800C"*+,=" -.6 # 5]1'%&'& <)800C *+,= K.-?"#"5]1'%&'&"<)800C"*+,=" K.-?"# 5]1'%&'& <)800C *+,= -Q"#"[J='9F+%)'"0E"^N"*+,"_?Z -Q"# [J='9F+%)' 0E ^N *+, _?Z18`

S 1 8 15 22 29

S 6 13 20 27

B0C2&+," S0" <)800C"

"The committee decided to go with a spring break at the same time as Marshall and Mountwest," Richardson said. "A lot of

/0%12%32%4" 5&3)+120%"

R

:9'(" *+,"

;

[<5" *+,"

-

parents either have kids in both systems or they themselves work for Marshall, so it is better for those families to have them at

Band Under Surveillance releases CD A band with strong local roots has released a new CD and plans to play several local venues in the upcoming months. Under Surveillance is a 1980s influenced, self-described “power pop” band. The group recently released “Between the Lines” featuring core members Philip Hatfield (songwriter/guitarist) and Randy Brown (drummer), with new vocalist John Mullins and bassist Phil “X” Crace. Hatfield, a Hurricane resident, said the band has its origins in the early 1980s, with Brown and Hatfield going back to the late ’70s, and those two formerly playing with Crace as part of the band The Score. Hatfield said critics are comparing “Between the Lines” to

groups like The Replacements, Cheap Trick, The Knack and The Shoes. According to Rudy Pannuci of Pop Cult, “The musicianship is crisp and punchy throughout ... One of the best things about ‘Between the Lines is that it doesn’t sound contemporary. This CD has more of a timeless quality...” Also, Lynne Sandy, former vocalist/guitarist from 1980s new wave powerhouse The Defectors, described Under Surveillance as a “determined and well-rehearsed band” with poignant lyrics, hard driving guitar riffs and thumping rhythm section, and vocal harmonies “that work together to produce their signature sound.” The CD is available on all

major digital distribution networks including iTunes, Spotify, Amazon MP3, Google Play, Xbox Music, Rhapsody, iHeartRadio and Shazam Digital. Locally the CD can be purchased for $12 at Budget Tapes and Records in Kanawha City and at the Fret-n-Fiddle in St. Albans. For information on live performances or other details on the band, check out their Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/w vundersurveillance Hatfield, Brown and Crace are lifelong friends, and all have played in bands over the past three decades. Under Surveillance released a new CD and plans to play at several local venues in the coming months.

5C')120%" *+,"

S 3 10 17 24 31

S 1 8 15 22

FEBRUARY FE BRUARY ‘15 ‘1 5 M T W Th F 2 3 4 5 6 9 1 10 0 11 12 13 16 1 17 7 18 19 20 23 24 2 25 26 27

S 7 14 21 28

S 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

S M 5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

S M 3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

HL+,"J'")0%F'91'&"10"+"E3CC"&+,"10"G+O'"3("E09"+"?.8039"&'C+,"&3'"10" HL +, J' )0%F'91'& 10 + E3CC &+, 10 G+O' 3( E09 + ?.80399 &'C+, &3' 10 A'+18'9""09"018'9"'G'94'%), A' + 1 8 ' 9 0 9 0 1 8 ' 9 ' G ' 94 ' % ) , "

R

JANUARY JA NUARY ‘15 ‘1 5 S M T W Th F 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 1 13 3 14 15 16 18 19 20 2 21 22 23 25 26 27 2 28 29 30

!

MARCH ‘15 MARCH M ‘1 5 T W Th F 3 4 5 6 10 1 0 11 12 13 17 1 7 18 19 20 2 25 26 27 24 3 31 APRIL ‘‘15 APRIL A 15 T W Th 1 2 7 8 9 14 1 4 15 16 2 22 23 21 2 29 30 28

S 7 14 21 28

F 3 10 17 24

S 4 11 18 25

MAY ‘‘15 MAY M 15 T W Th F 1 5 6 7 8 12 1 2 13 14 15 19 1 9 20 21 22 2 27 28 29 26

S 2 9 16 23 30

JUNE ‘15 JJUNE ‘1 5 T W Th 2 3 4 9 10 11 16 1 6 17 18 2 24 25 23 3 31 30

:90E'==20%+C" *'F'C0(G'%1" *+,"

!

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

>+)3C1," <'%+1'"

the same time." The proposed calendar will start Aug. 6 and end May 28. According to data provided by

Smith, the start date has crept slowly closer to the beginning of August, with 2010 - 2014 start dates being Aug. 26, Aug. 19, Aug. 15, Aug. 13 and Aug. 8, respectively. The proposed calendar was voted on by teachers and the central office, with the central office being the only group to favor a different calendar. "If you look at the numbers, over half the staff voted on it," said Past President Dennis Chapman, Cabell County Education Alliance. "Contrary to popular belief, the teachers do discuss what they vote on before the vote. There are things the teachers consider that not many, not even the parents, consider." Other than the calendar, the board had reduction in force (RIF) on its mind. The board approved the automatic transfers of 24 teachers for the upcoming school year in order to prevent them from losing their jobs. In past years, the board was required to take their jobs and then allow them to bid on upcoming vacancies, but a new state law allowed central office to place them automatically. "During the last meeting, you approved RIF and transfers for next year," said Todd Alexander, assistant superintendent. "This will fill a lot of vacancies. This is where we're placing them now, but of course, in the future, they have the right to bid on other jobs." Combined, there are 10 teachers and service personnel who will be a part of RIF this year. Traditionally, they have been given first priority when any positions open up. Alexander said this number is much less than previous years. The Cabell County Board of Education meets on the first and third Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. All meetings are open to the public.


Page 4 –Thursday,March 13,2014

Commentary

West Virginia Legislative Update By Del. Carol Miller Cabell District 16 The last week of the regular session was filled with long evenings and nights at the Capitol as the Legislature considered several bills before the clock struck midnight on Saturday. Two bills that received the most attention in the House the last week of session were the water bill and the pseudoephedrine bill. The water bill, as passed by the Senate, would do a number of things including establish the Aboveground Storage Tank Water Protection Act. This Act would require registration of aboveground storage tanks and would direct the Secretary of the West Virginia DEP to write rules to develop a program to regulate new and existing aboveground storage tanks. It would also require that storage containers must be annually inspected to ensure that they are structurally sound. When the House received the bill, it was the intention to make sure that the bill that was passed would be one of substance so that an incident like the one that occurred in January would not happen again. As stated previously, the bill was sent to three House committees; Health and Human Resources, Judiciary, and Finance. After many experts, long committee meetings, and a long floor session, the House amended and passed the water bill. The bill passed by the House goes a little further than the Senate’s version by adding new requirements for medical monitoring, early detection technology at water plants, protection plans against pollutants in drinking water supplies and new oversight for above-

ground storage tanks. Amendments adopted on the floor included: * Long-term medical study of the residents affected by January’s chemical leak which will be conducted by the West Virginia Bureau for Public Health. * All public water utilities in the state serving more than 100,000 customers would be required to install and monitor for containments by the same detection capabilities utilized by the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission. The water bill went back to the Senate where the Senate agreed to the changes made by the House. The water bill will now go to the Governor. Once it is signed, the bill will officially go into effect. The pseudoephedrine bill was another bill the House took much time on considering not only in committee but also on the floor. The bill that passed the Senate would require pseudoephedrine be prescription only. The House passed a version of the bill that would allow counties to hold a referendum as to whether they would require pseudoephedrine as prescription only or to remain over-the-counter. The Senate did not concur to the House’s version and the bill went to a conference committee made up of three Senators and three Delegates. However, the bill died in the last hour of the session. The regular session may have ended but the legislature has one more important matter to attend to and that is the state’s budget. As always, I will continue to keep you apprised of what is going on as the legislature begins work on the state’s budget.

Barboursville Rotary Club honors Midland students The following students from Cabell Midland High School were selected as students-of-themonth by the Rotary Club of Barboursville. They were recognized at the club's weekly luncheon meeting on, Feb. 19: Senior – Justin Hesson, Junior – Hannah

Martin, Sophomore – Ryan Kingery, Freshman – Paige Dehart and Freshman – Brooke Dehart. For more information, please contact Jack Dilley, Secretary of the Rotary Club of Barboursville by calling (304) 302-6014 or by email at JackD@fsb-wv.com.

Culloden, West Virginia USPS 082-160 The Cabell Standard (ISSN, 10412255) is published weekly at P.O. Box 186, Culloden, WV 25510. Yearly subscription rates: In-County $22.00; In-State $38.00; Out-of-State $48.00. Chris Stadelman, Publisher and Kelly Stadelman, President. Periodical Postage paid at Main Post Office, Culloden, WV, and additional mailing offices under the act of March 3, 1979. Postmaster: Send address changes to the Cabell Standard, P.O. Box 186, Culloden, WV 25510. We reserve the right to accept, reject and to edit all news and advertising copy.

Velma’sView By Velma Kitchens Who do you trust? I feel really bad for all of you who are still having water issues because of the chemical spill in the Elk River. Here in Culloden the water is fine - I guess(?) Our hot water no longer smells, but on occasion it does. No one will ever be sure the water is safe,

but we can use some common sense. If your water still has a smell, I would not drink it. I did talk to some people who took showers all the time there was a no use order. I heard someone say that the chemical just might be the new fountain of youth! Since no one

seems to know anything about the chemical, nothing about the long-term effects of the chemical, nothing about the reactions people have had with the burning skin and one lady said her hair turned colors. Since no one on this earth can tell us for sure what it is, who in this world compiled this chemical and what was the use? Some say drink, others say use your own judgment. Well, I guess you can tell what most are doing, they are not drinking it. I guess we are fortunate we live down river of the water plant, but then again who do you trust?

where heat indexes reach 120 degrees? No shoes and barefoot all the day. I think God places us where he wants us to be, to do what he wants us to do for other mankind. Romans 8:28 - And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose. We are not all teachers of his word, that’s not what he wants. You may have helped someone in this past snow storm fix a tire or maybe got them help in some way. And that was doing God’s work. Like the man who passed in his truck as another man walking on the road in this cold, wearing no shoes, just garbage bags wrapped around his feet. The driver returned with shoes and a coat to offer, only to be hastily refused, but the driver did

what God wanted him to do. We need to pray for those souls who have been so hurt by others in the world that they are heart and mind sick. How do you measure up in God eyes? Not everyone reads the bible or knows who God is; as a result, we live in an age of misinformation about who God is. There are enough churches within every few miles, but still they are not filled. Places we could learn of his forgiveness and security and gift of eternal life. Let the snow continue to blow - less and less we hope. Because we know just under that white crust lays the dainty purple crocus ready to peep out and the age old, long slender green leaves of bright yellow daffodils. We will so eagerly welcome them once again to watch as they bob and move their heads, almost as if to say come on sunshine warm me up. Spring - you can surely smell it… soon as this snow all melts away. Prayer: It been a long winter season this year Father, we thank you, that you may send the most beautiful springtime just ahead. Amen.

While Morrison’s knowledge of computers and the library system will be missed, it is her friendly disposition and kindliness that her colleagues will miss the most. “We’ll miss her sense of humor,” Willa Midkiff added. “She is our family.” “She would do anything for us,” added Ellie Baumgardner. Although she will be retired, Morrison will certainly be keeping busy. She is a lover of animals, and has several different types of pets to care for. In addition to her pets, she and her husband Dale sell a variety of items on eBay. Morrison also spends a lot of her spare time with arts and crafts. She quilts, draws, paints, and even carves eggshells with a high-speed drill. Her most recent project involved an ostrich egg, which she purchased online. Morrison said she will miss the people associated with the library

the most. “The people I work with are family, the people that come in are like family,” she said. “I love them all. I don’t think all of this is going to sink in until a couple weeks from now.” The Barboursville Public Library is open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays, with more than 40,000 books, videos, DVDs, CDs, magazines and newspapers. In addition, it offers free Internet access, notary services, and fax and copier services for patrons. Morrison’s outstanding service to the library’s many patrons over the years was evident, but it was the effect of the library system on her that she considers more profound. “I do love the library system,” she concluded. “It’s been a wonderful place to work.”

WeeklyDevotional By Mary Jane “Snow, snow, let it blow” Thought for the week: Proverbs 3:13 - Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understanding. This has been the worst winter in WV... since March 1872, according to records. We have the weather to talk about; less sunshine and more confinement has made us a bit irate, when we don’t need to be. Soon the snow will all go away for another year. Soon the days will be lighter and the sun will shine brighter - warming us up, giving us a happier outlook on coming days. I’ve often thought about a friend whose husband was in the military stationed in Alaska for years… with short days and long cold nights every day for eight months out of the year. They became adapted to it. Did you ever think what if you had been born and lived in Africa

The Cabell Standard

LIBRARY FROM PAGE 1 “It’s a lot of fun,” she said. “When I first started, there were no computers, and now we have several computers with Internet access for our patrons. We are open for more hours now (until 7 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday), which is an improvement because we have a lot of people who like to come in in the evening.” Morrison’s colleagues at the library noted that her aptitude with computers was exceptional, as well as her knowledge of the various references and topics housed in the library. “She’s very smart,” said Cindy Hull. “She knows the computers better than anyone I know. She’s like a detective, always searching out ways to solve things” “She knows all the references,” added Heather Blackburn, “and she’s not afraid to break anything on the computer (by hitting a button).”


The Cabell Standard

Community News

Thursday,March 13,2014 – Page 5

Police report featured in Milton City Council meeting By Brian Harper For The Cabell Standard

Congresswoman Shelley Moore Capito talks about the need for the remaining stretch of U.S. 35 in Putnam and Mason counties widened and finished as a four-lane highway. Capito rode the 14.6-mile two-lane with Joe Stanley, a truck driver trainer for Con-way Freight in Belle.

Capito calls for completion of U.S. 35 upgrades By Kelly Stadelman kelly@theputnamstandard.com

Congresswoman Shelley Moore Capito wants to see the remaining stretch of U.S. 35 in Putnam and Mason counties widened and finished as a four-lane highway. A member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Capito said she knows that funding is the biggest obstacle to upgrading the road. “I’m going to push to make sure we get funding and get the road completed,” she said Friday. “When you are up on a truck you can really see how dangerous the two-lane road can be.” Capito was speaking from experience. Prior to meeting with Putnam County Commissioners and media, she rode the 14.6-mile two-lane with Joe Stanley, a truck driver trainer for Con-way Freight in Belle. “I learned a lot about truck safety from Joe during our trip,” she said. “You can have all the safety features you want on a truck, but if you don’t have a safe highway it does no good.” U.S. 35 is the primary artery from Columbus, Ohio, to Charleston for tractor-trailers. “The percentage of truck traffic on the road is above average,” Capito said. “Anytime you have more trucks on a two-lane road, the visual is different and the road is more dangerous. I learned that on a four-lane you don’t have that. “When you are going 55 mph in a truck on a two-lane and have a truck coming at you, you have a different feeling than when you are in a car.” In addition to being concerned for drivers, she also expressed concern for children. “The two-lane is also a bus route and a safety hazard for our

kids,” she said. Stanley said after settling on a radio station, he spoke with Capito about the old two-lane during the drive from Point Pleasant to Winfield. “We talked about the road and the need for it to be improved,” he said noting that Con-way puts about 50 trucks a day on Route 35. “Our drivers have no way to get out of the way on the two-lane if there is a problem. There is no shoulder or place for trucks to go.” He also echoed Capito’s concerns about the dangers for tractor-trailers on the unfinished portion of U.S. 35. “It doesn't matter if you have the best drivers and best technology in a truck,” he said. “If you put them on a road that should have been improved 30 years ago, it’s dangerous.” The state Division of Highways has estimated it would take $187 million to complete the road. Capito said that she is currently working to get federal money for West Virginia highways. “With the gas tax declining because of more efficient vehicles on the road, it means the trust fund is not as large,” she said. Jan Vineyard, president of West Virginia Trucking Association, said the state has tried to make the two-lane safer by installing rumble strips and improving bridges on the old stretch. “The upgrading of 35 is something that everyone can agree needs to be done,” she said. The Republican congresswoman, who currently representing the 2nd District, is expected to face Democrat Secretary of State Natalie Tennant in November’s general election for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by Jay Rockefeller.

The 2013 Milton Police Department’s annual report highlighted the most recent meeting of the Milton City Council. Council met March 4 amidst the most recent rash of bad weather to hit the area. After Mayor Tom Canterbury called the meeting to order, the first item of business was the discussion of payment of several bills owed by the city. City Recorder Phyllis Kirtley Smith read the amounts of the various bills, and the motion to approve the funds for payment was passed by the council. Next, Milton City Police Chief Chuck Zerkle presented the 2013 Police Report of the Milton Police Department, which included various statistics and details that the

police department encountered last year. “I found several interesting things in the report,” Zerkle said as he presented the report. He noted that the Milton Police Department was dispatched for a total of 4,442 calls in 2013, a staggering number considering there are only five full-time officers. Zerkle also pointed out that the number of dispatches exceeded the number of West Virginia State Police dispatches in Milton, which totaled around 3,000 calls. “It’s not all bad things,” Zerkle concluded, stating that the number of calls increased by 25 percent in 2013. The council then approved the report. Canterbury next displayed the award given to the city by the Cabell County Commission for its response efforts during the recent

water crisis. The mayor showed the commemorative plaque that was presented to the city by the commission, and read aloud the letter of thanks from the county. The final item of business on the agenda was the announcement of several upcoming events taking place in Milton over the next few weeks. Among the events named by Canterbury included: the Old Tire Take Back event, the Milton Rotary Spaghetti Dinner, and the United Wrestling Association event presented by the Milton Volunteer Fire Department. With the items of business concluded, Canterbury adjourned the meeting. Milton City Council will have its next meeting on Tuesday, March 18. Meetings are open to the public.

Skiing conditions excellent this spring West Virginia’s ski areas, after enduring perfect winter conditions, are relishing in perfect spring skiing conditions. The mountains of West Virginia have received over 12 feet of natural snow this season and temperatures have been perfect for snowmaking operations. The official first day of spring is only a few days away and West Virginia Ski Resorts continue to provide the most open terrain of any state in the southeast or mid-Atlantic regions. The reason is the snowmaking capabilities at West Virginia Ski Resorts. This winter’s cold weather has allowed the resorts’ snowmakers to make snow around the clock this season thereby providing excellent

snow conditions. The resort’s snowmakers use the cold temperatures to create manmade blizzards, producing 20,000 tons of snow per hour when the temperature drops into the teens (when combining all five resort’s snowmaking efforts at once), that’s enough snow to cover a football field with twenty feet of snow each hour. Due to that, the ski slopes continue to be covered in the mountains of West Virginia. The mountain state’s resorts have experienced an up tick in visitation this season, as skiers and snowboarders in the Southeast’s metro areas have seen snow all winter, keeping their minds on winter sports. Skiers and snowboarders have come

g n i t r a St Now!

to rely on West Virginia ski resorts to provide excellent conditions when weather conditions permit and this spring skiing season is going to be no exception. There is still a few more weeks of skiing, riding and tubing left and the conditions are fantastic in the mountains of West Virginia. The ski and snowboard season is expected to last through the first week of April. The five-month long ski season in West Virginia has an estimated economic impact of over $250 million and 5000 jobs at the resorts. For more information on skiing and snowboarding in West Virginia go on-line at goskiwv.com.

All Subscribers Get 1 FREE Classified Ad each Month!

Great way to advertise your Yard Sales, Automobiles, or Misc. Items.

We will also put your ad on our Facebook page for FREE! Personal Use Only. 20 Words or Less.

Call Today! 304-743-6731


Page 6 –Thursday,March 13,2014

Community News

The Cabell Standard

Christian's Sports Beat: Behind the scenes with a story teller

By: Christian Deiss

When most people watch sporting events they are either in the stands or in front of their televisions, which is usually how I watch sports. Recently I got a got a chance to go behind the scenes for the Mountain State Athletic Conference (MSAC) Boys and Girls Basketball Championships, as my dad’s company, The Media Center, was broadcasting the games live on his company’s internet sports website, RNR Sports from the South Charleston Community Center. My dad, Joe Stevens, served as the courtside reporter during both the Spring Valley Timberwolves vs. the George Washing-

ton Patriots girls contest and the South Charleston Black Eagles vs. the Woodrow Wilson Flying Eagles and I was his floor director throughout both games. Directing and producing the games was my dad’s partner Dan Shreve. I already know why my dad likes sports broadcasting, so I wanted to know what made broadcasting sports interesting for Shreve, “It’s an untold story, as the game develops, it’s not like something has been pre-produced, no one knows how it’s going to come out. Tonight was a perfect example of that because each team got up a little and down a little bit, it was a see-saw battle and nobody knew when the clock went to zero who was going to win.” In the boys match-up, South Charleston edged Woodrow Wilson in an exciting overtime game, 92–86; in the girls game, Spring Valley topped GW, 73-59. My responsibilities during the evening’s broadcast were making sure all of the people my dad was scheduled to interview was in place at the right time. At halftime and at the end of the games I had to run onto the court get the leading coaches at halftime

RECIPE OF THE WEEK:

and the winning coaches at the buzzer. I was a little nervous about my role but Shreve explained everything I needed to do, which calmed me down, because I have done on-field interviews with coaches during the high school football season, “Things would not happen if it wasn’t for the floor director, they pull things - including the interviews together - because everyone is so busy with other things we need the floor director to be the other eyes and ears to get things done and on the air.” During the live courtside interviews, I also served as camera security making sure nobody walked in front of the camera. There were 12 people on the crew. Shreve and Stevens are veterans of the media relations world, with over 70 years of experience between them. Shreve was a Vice President and General Partner of a Video Production company in Charleston for over 20 years after a stint as a news photographer and production in TV news. Stevens was Director of Communications at Snowshoe Mountain Resort for 15 years with another 15 years prior to that in Richmond, Virginia newsrooms. When it comes to production, Shreve is an awarding winning

Christian behind the scenes observing Dan Shreve direct and produce the recent MSAC Basketball Championship. photographer and producer and has had projects that have aired worldwide. Shreve told me he considers himself a story teller, “I feel like I have been doing this type of thing all my life, because when I was eight or nine my dad gave me a still camera and I started telling stories using that camera. Then my cousin and I would do little movies, writing the scripts and my dad would buy us some film and we would go out and shoot it. So I guess

you can say I have wanted to do this pretty much all my life.” Shreve once rented the entire Shea Stadium in New York City to produce a commercial that featured former Marshall quarterback Chad Pennington. So the next time you watch a sporting event just know there are a lot of people that are behind the scenes doing their best to bring you the coverage of the event and I just might be one of those crew members.

Cream Puffs Ingredients 2 (3.5 ounce) packages instant vanilla pudding mix 2 cups heavy cream 1 cup milk 1/2 cup butter 1 cup water 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup all-purpose flour 4 eggs Directions: Mix together vanilla instant pudding mix, cream and milk. Cover and refrigerate to set. Art by Natalie Larson Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. In a large pot, bring water and butter to a rolling boil. Stir in flour and salt until the mixture forms a ball. Transfer the dough to a large mixing bowl. Using a wooden spoon or stand mixer, beat in the eggs one at a time, mixing well after each. Drop by tablespoonfuls onto an ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes in the preheated oven, until golden brown. Centers should be dry. When the shells are cool, either split and fill them with the pudding mixture, or use a pastry bag to pipe the pudding into the shells. Original recipe makes 20 to 25 cream puffs

Like us on Facebook for current news and events in the area!

Pictured with Congressman Nick Rahall in his Washington, DC office are: Medal of Honor Recipient Woody Williams of Ona; VFW National Council Member Chuck Haney of Fairmont; Legislative Committee member and Past State Commander Randy Bare of Sandyville; Legislative Committee member and Past State Commander Jim Talerico of Clarksburg; State Adjutant/Quartermaster Kevin Light of Charleston; Judge Advocate and Past State Commander Kelly Goddard of Rainelle; and Marine Corps League representative Daniel J. Martin of Ravenswood.

Rahall meets with W.Va. Veterans WASHINGTON, D.C. – In a meeting last week with the West Virginia Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) delegation, U.S. Rep. Nick Rahall (D-W.Va.) lauded the service and sacrifice of West Virginia veterans, and praised Medal of Honor recipient Woody Williams and all veterans’ advocates for their unwavering commitment to the men and women of our nation’s military.

“When the promise to leave no soldier behind is kept without fail on the hallowed battlefields upon which our veterans fought, how can we do any less than to keep that promise in the halls of Congress?” said Rahall. “In my estimate, we can never repay the sacred debt our nation owes our veterans and I will continue to champion the veteran, our military retirees and their families,”

said Rahall. Rahall has been active and vocal in supporting expanded and enhanced services and benefits for West Virginia veterans. Most recently, he supported and voted in favor of legislation to protect veterans’ programs from budget cuts and improve Post9/11 GI Bill education benefits for veterans and their families, both VFW priorities.


The Cabell Standard

Community News

Thursday,March 13,2014 – Page 7

LADY KNIGHTS FROM PAGE 1 “We weren’t really meshing in the first half,” an ecstatic Stephenson said after the game. “But in the second half, we adjusted and started attacking gaps. I wasn’t really thinking, I just found myself open and shot.” The game was back and forth all night, especially in the first half. The Lady Knights took an early lead, getting several good looks through the high post on offense and forcing the Lady Red Dragons with a full-court press on defense. However, senior forward Jordan picked up two early fouls in the first, which limited her for much of the half. St. Albans came back with physical, harassing defense that stifled the Midland attack, and the game was tied at 11 after one. The Lady Knights went with a smaller lineup in the second quarter, continuing to force turnovers and errant passes. The teams traded the lead back and forth throughout the quarter, but St. Albans took a 23-19 lead into halftime. Before Midland’s big third quarter spark, they found themselves on the wrong end of a quick 5-0 run by the Lady Red

Dragons. After a quick timeout by the Lady Knights, they took over on defense, forcing several key stops and turnovers that gave them a 35-34 lead going into the fourth quarter. Stephenson and Haggerty struck again with back-to-back three pointers to open the fourth quarter with a 6-0 run by the Lady Knights. St. Albans battled back, going into desperation mode on defense. The Lady Red Dragons went to a full-court man-to-man defense, but the Lady Knights withstood the pressure, breaking the press several times for layups, and made things difficult for St. Albans on the defensive end. The Lady Red Dragons went cold toward the end of the game, and were forced to foul to stop the clock. Although the Lady Knights struggled from the free throw line, they made them when they had to, and were able to stretch the lead and run out the clock for a 52-42 win. “We knew we were in for a battle,” Coach Matt Adkins said after the game. “Our sophomore guards played well. I’m just proud of my girls.”

Sophomore guard Summer Stephenson goes to the basket for two of her 15 points in the game against St. Albans. Stephenson led the Lady Knights with 15 points, while Emily Pitkin added 12, and Jordan pitched in with 10 points. Haggerty also had all nine of her points in the second half. Lexie Cooper and Breanna Propst each had nine points for the Lady Red Dragons. “I’m proud of our team,” Stephenson said. “We played hard and I’m just happy we pulled

Senior Stephanie Bias drives down the court against the Lady Red Dragons in the regional championship game. Photos by One-Eyed Jack Photography it out.” With the win, the Lady Knights avenge a loss to St. Albans earlier this season, and now look toward bigger and better things at the state tournament. Still, the win

feels good for the senior laden squad. “My four seniors came in together as a crew,” Adkins said. “I’m just happy for them, I’m happy for my whole team.”

Runyon competes in West Virginia Poetry Out Loud competition Twenty-six students from across West Virginia will recite poems by Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson and others during the 2014 state Poetry Out Loud competition set for March 14-15, at the Culture Center in Charleston. The winner will represent West Virginia at the national Poetry Out Loud competition in Washington, D.C., on April 29-30. Alexandria Runyon, Cabell Midland High School will be reciting “Prayer for My Father” by Robert Bly, “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus, “Time Does Not Bring Relief: You All Have Lied” by Edna St. Vincent Millay.

Television and screen actor Chris Sarandon of Beckley will serve as master of ceremonies for the state competition again this year. Sarandon guest starred on such television series as Chicago Hope, The Good Wife, The Practice and Law and Order SVU. His movie performances include Dog Day Afternoon, The Princess Bride, Child’s Play, The Nightmare Before Christmas and Loggerheads. Sarandon has been the West Virginia Poetry Out Loud master of ceremonies since 2007. West Virginia author Colleen Anderson, Affrilachian poet Crystal Good, West Virginia poet laureate Marc Harshman and

American cellist, singer-songwriter and composer Ben Sollee will perform during the two-day event. The semi-final competition begins at 10 a.m. on Friday, March 14. Saturday’s final competition begins at 1 p.m. Anderson, Good and Harshman will serve as judges along with Mark Davis, a former Kanawha County Teacher of the Year who supervises and manages the county’s K-12 arts programs; and Caleb Stacy, the runner-up from the 2010 West Virginia Poetry Out Loud competition. The state champion receives

$200 and an all-expense-paid trip to the national finals. The school receives $500 to purchase poetry books. The runner-up receives $100, while the school receives $200 for poetry books. This year, the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and the West Virginia Commission on the Arts commissioned Gilmer County artist Matt Thomas to create the West Virginia Poetry Out Loud champion award and a traveling award that will be displayed at the winning school. For more information, contact Renée Margocee, director of Arts, at (304) 558-0240 or email her at

Renee.Margocee@wv.gov. The West Virginia Division of Culture and History is an agency within the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts with Kay Goodwin, Cabinet Secretary. The division, led by Commissioner Randall Reid-Smith, brings together the past, present and future through programs and services focusing on archives and history, arts, historic preservation and museums. For more information about the division’s programs, events and sites, visit www.wvculture.org. The Division of Culture and History is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

LOCAL DIRECTORY O Beautiful Single and Double Wide Spaces Available O Quiet Country Setting, Minutes from the Huntington Mall O 3 Months Free Rent and $1,000 to you. O On-Site Clubhouse and Family Environment

304-743-0103 PHONE 304-743-0263 FAX GA015

632 13th Street • Huntington, WV 25701 Call 304-529-6636 • Dr. Ben Brown

Dentures In One Day

All Dentistry Available! By Appointment

Founder Dr. A.H. ‘Pete’ Yarbrough

Main Office • 2761 Main Street, Hurricane 304-562-9931 • 304-562-2642 (fax)

Main Office Loan Center Office 2761 Main Street • Hurricane, WV 25526 2761 Main Street, Hurricane 304-562-5055 • 304-562-9109 (fax)

Interstate Office 300 Hurricane Rd. • Hurricane, WV 25526 304-562-9005 • 304-562-7092 (fax) Valley Office 3058 Mount Vernon Rd. • Scott Depot, WV 25560 www.putcobk.com 304-757-2477 • 304-757-2503 (fax)

304-562-9931 304-562-2642 (fax)


Page 8 –Thursday,March 13,2014

Sports

The Cabell Standard

Knights beat Lincoln County, fall to Huntington High By Brian Harper For The Cabell Standard

The best part about tournament basketball is that the slate from the regular season is wiped clean. That was especially true for the Cabell Midland Knights, who finished the regular season with a 418 record. None of that mattered, though, as the Knights opened sectional tournament play March 5 with a 68-48 victory over the Lincoln County Panthers. Midland controlled the game throughout. “I thought we came out motivated,” said Knights Coach Matt Stead, “We wanted to win tonight." Cabell Midland began the game strongly and jumped out to a 6-0 lead. The Knights’ ball movement was crisp and led to many open looks early on. The Panthers battled back midway through the first quarter with outside shooting, but they could not sustain any consistent pressure on offense. Defensively, the Knights utilized a full court press that forced several Panther turnovers that led to some easy baskets. The Knights also heavily outrebounded the Panthers in the first, and led 16-12 at the end of the quarter. The Panthers continued to struggle offensively in the second quarter, turning the ball over to the Knights on a few early possessions. Cabell Midland’s half court defense was also stellar, as they con-

Keegan Adkins had 10 points in the Knights sectional game against Lincoln. File Photo tested a majority of Lincoln County’s shots. After Midland stretched its lead to nine points, the Panthers tried to slow down the momentum with a timeout, but the Knights were able to close the quarter with a 13-4 run and led 34-23 at halftime. During the third quarter, the Knights picked up right where they left off, using a 10-2 run that

essentially put the game away. Another quick timeout by Lincoln County slowed the pace down slightly, as the teams traded baskets back and forth until the end of the quarter, but the damage had already been done. The Knights led 46-32 going into the fourth. Midland continued to outwork the Panthers on the boards in the fourth quarter, getting several

For Tickets or Information Online: www.miltonpac.com

Or Contact: (304) 654-1339 • (304) 634-5857

Junior Coy Pettit led the Knights with 17 points in both sectional games. File photo second chance opportunities that allowed them to cushion their lead. They were also methodical on offense, executing their base offense with good ball movement that led to open shots. The Knights’ lead got as high as 23 points, but the Panthers continued to play hard. However, they simply could not take care of the basketball, as Midland ran out the clock with a 68-48 victory. Coy Pettit led the Knights with 17 points, followed by Keegan Adkins with 10 and Sawyer Beckett with eight. The Panthers were led

by Jake Reynolds with 15 points and Schylar Kelley with 13 points. “Our offense was really clicking tonight,” Pettit said. “This win could give us some confidence.” With the win, the Knights moved on to face top seeded Huntington High Thursday night at Cabell Midland, where they lost to the Highlanders 81-51. Pettit again led the Knights with 17 points, while Sawyer Beckett added 11 points. Tavian DunnMartine led the Highlanders with 22 points, followed by John Dawson with 12 points.

UPCOMING EVENTS GREATER VISION April 14th - 7:00 PM THE ISAACS May 10th - 7:00 PM

TRIUMPHANT QUARTET March 15th - 6:00 PM

Senior Sawyer Beckett had eight points in the Lincoln game and 11 points in the Huntington game. File photo


The Cabell Standard

Community News

Thursday,March 13,2014 – Page 9

Sisters Faith and Chloe Irwin participated in the annual Ham, Bacon, and Egg Show/Sale.

Reserve Champion Ham, shown by Andrew Linville, was purchased by John Wilson of Putnam County Bank.

Brooke Holley, showing the Grand Champion Bacon, is pictured with buyer Andy Nelson of Nelson’s Custom Meats. SALE FROM PAGE 1 The old record was set in 2008 when $3,000 was paid for a Grand Champion ham exhibited by Andrew Linville. Farm boys and girls, commitment, hard worker and good work ethics are just a few of the words heard from folks as they described the boys and girls participating in the sale. So much work is put into each project. "This is a worthwhile event, a learning process for the kids, said Anita Robinson, Ham Bacon and Egg Committee member and Town & Country 4-H leader. “The committee gives guidance and direction along with suggestions. But, it's the kids who do the work. "As a committee we are thankful to all of the supporters... we get a lot of support." Linville, a Town and Country 4H and Cabell Midland FFA member, has participated in the sale for the past 12 years. The 19-yearold said his older sister, Tabitha, along with several cousins are the ones who got him involved with the program. The money Linville raised at the sale will go toward his education, with a little money going to purchase parts for his truck, he said. He is the son of Michelle Linville of Milton. Jonathan Black, son of Jeff and Kim Black of Milton, is a senior at Cabell Midland High School, a member of the Ridge Runners 4H and the Cabell Midland FFA. During the sale, he was named

the 2014 Scholarship winner. Rich Sherman, Cabell County Extension Agent, presented the scholarship. "My cousin was in the project and helped me get started," Black said. He said any money that he made at the sale will go to further his education but he will put back a little extra to purchase a steer for the 2014 Cabell County Fair. Chloe Irwin, Ridge Runners 4H Club member, was enjoying her first year at the sale. "I got into it through my sister, Faith," she said. The Irwin sisters are the daughters of Kevin and Staci Irwin of Culloden. Lincoln County senior Marie Brumfield said her first year at the Ham Bacon and Egg Sale was fun. "I really wanted to do this project,” she said. “My Ag teacher, Ashley Butler, got me into it and I've liked it." Brumfield has participated in Lincoln County FFA for four years. She said money raised at the sale will go for her education as she plans to go to college after graduation. She has applied for and been accepted to Marshall. She said she also plans to purchase a feeder steer to take to the 2014 Cabell County Fair. Brumfield is the daughter of Russell and Michele Brumfield of Branchland. Projects began in October 2013. Egg participants must own their chickens and keep records on egg

Reserve Champion Bacon, shown by Abby Black of Barboursville, was purchased by Kanawha County Farm Bureau.

Zachary Call sold his Grand Champion Ham for $3,750, a record price.

Marie Brumfield of Branchland, participates in the show and sale.

Grand Champion Brown Eggs shown by Chelsea Smith sold for $1,000. They were purchased by John Wilson of Putnam County Bank. Reserve Eggs shown by Jake Hill were purchased by Del. Doug Reynolds (picture unavailable). production. They learn about the different types of feed that will get 'shell quality' necessary for uniform eggs. Meat participants have the option of raising their own pig or buying a pig and having it delivered to Andy's Custom Meats. By doing this, it lets participants that do not live on a farm participate. They cut the meat from the side of the hog, then learn the salting process to preserve the meat,

smoke the meat and trim each piece to its final shape. The meat participants do a minimum of 70% of the work to prepare the meat. The Ham, Bacon and Egg project helps 4-H and FFA members have a better understanding of the business of agriculture, improves their marketing skills, and teaches them a basic knowledge of record keeping. See page 10 for list of sale results

Jonathan Black is pictured with one of 40 hams that were auctioned. Photos by Rosella Call


Page 10 –Thursday,March 13,2014

Community News

The Cabell Standard

MU starts basketball radio program Schray named 2013 Professor of the Year

A new high school sports radio program that began recently from the studios of WMUL-FM on Marshall University’s Huntington campus has gained listeners from across the Mountain State. The Fast Break Sports Network’s Basketball Friday Night in West Virginia runs from 9 p.m. to midnight every Friday night during the high school basketball season. Hosts Ryan Epling, Ric Morrone, James Collier, Rudi Raynes and guests provide fans with continual score updates, interviews and analysis of the evening’s games along with a review of games played earlier in the week. “The FM 88 sports staff was approached with the idea of helping create a program for high school basketball and making it available to radio stations throughout West Virginia earlier this year,” said Dr. Chuck Bailey, faculty manager of WMUL-FM and a full-time RadioTelevision Production and Management professor. “Everyone at WMUL-FM is excited to be part of it.” Epling is the main host of the

show, which runs weekly through March 21. He is a graduate of Marshall and has been the voice of the Wayne High School Pioneers since he was 16. Morrone is in his 21st year as head coach of the Tolsia Lady Rebels’ basketball team. A graduate of Marshall, Morrone is employed by the Wayne County Board of Education as both a coach and educator. Collier is sports director for WMUL-FM. He provides play-byplay and color commentary for eight Marshall sports. Raynes is a former West Virginia all-state basketball player and coach at Poca High School. She earned a degree in broadcast journalism at Concord University and went on to become an award-winning news anchor for WCHS-TV. Participants agree that a statewide basketball program is long overdue. “I’ve coached basketball for 24 years,” Morrone said, “and until now there has not been a place where high school basketball enthusiasts could come together. It

is good to do a program that encompasses the whole state. Everyone is dedicated to making this a success and Ryan does a great job as the main host.” Epling said the program is caller-driven and “has filled a void in our state.” “This program celebrates high school sports with folks who have the same interests in the games as we do,” he said. Bailey added, “WFGH in Fort Gay supplies most of the equipment for the networking of the stations, it provides the laptops, and the station management there provides the affiliate contacts. This is not just WMUL-FM’s program alone.” Lynn Hurt, superintendent of Wayne County Schools, said they are excited the partnership between Marshall University’s WMUL and Wayne County’s WFGH has created such a popular broadcasting program for the entire state. “Wayne County is very proud to help provide a platform where all the school systems of West Virginia can collaborate,” she said.

The Faculty Merit Foundation presented the 2013 Professor of the Year award to Kateryna A.R. Schray, Ph.D., English professor for the Marshall University College of Liberal Arts, during a banquet held in the Great Hall of the Culture Center in Charleston on Tuesday evening. Schray received a B.A. in both German and English from La Salle University, an M.A. in British Literature from Georgetown University, and a Ph.D. in English from the University of North CarolinaChapel Hill. She has been teaching at Marshall University since 1996. The University previously awarded Professor Schray with its top two awards: the Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award in 2013 and the Reynolds Outstanding Teaching Award in 2009. According to MU Provost and Senior Vice President Dr. Gayle Ormiston, “Dr. Schray is well recognized for her gift of connecting with students of diverse backgrounds and motivating them to achieve the highest levels of per-

Kateryna A.R. Schray, Ph.D. formance. The impact of her contributions to the University, its students, and the broader community Marshall serves is without question significant.” The foundation each year honors an outstanding faculty member at a West Virginia college or university. The award winner receives a $10,000 cash prize, with smaller awards to the other finalists. The Professor of the Year award is presented with financial support from United Bank.

Results from the ham, bacon, and egg sale Results from ham sale The following is in order of place, name, ham, price, and buyer. GRAND - Zachary Call, Prime, $3,750, Nelson's Custom Meats RESERVE - Andrew Linville, Prime, $1,000, Putnam County Bank 3 - Jake Hill, Prime, $500, Del. Doug Reynolds 4 - Marie Brumfield, Prime, $225, Kanawha County Farm Bureau 5 - Annie Jeffers, Prime, $200, The Herald-Dispatch 6 - Jenna Floyd, Prime, $425, Putnam County Bank 7 - Mariah Rowsey, Prime, $500, Dr. Jeanne K. Bailey / Wolpert Farms 8 - Jonathan Black, Prime, $500, A Michael Perry 9 - Brooke Holley, Prime, $275, Sheriff Tom McComas 10 - Whitlee Clagg, Prime, $1,200, Putnam County Bank 11 - Michael Chapman, Choice, $250, ML Dillon 12 - Lexi Slone, Choice, $250, Lincoln Co Farm Bureau 13 - Jon Cremeans, Choice, $500, Cabell Co Fair 14 - Scott McCallister, Choice, $225, Ohio Valley Bank 15 - Christopher Black, Choice, $400, JR Farm Equipment 16 - Katie Short, Choice, $275, A-1 Wrecker 17 - Cheyne Freeman, Choice, $325, Drew Mills 18 - Adrianna Burton, Choice, $225, H&H Rodeo 19 - Marlee Norris, Choice, $600, Dutch Miller Chevrolet

20 - Abby Black, Choice, $300, ML Dillon 21 - Ashton Knight, Choice, $275, K&S Auto Detail & Variety Store 22 - Savannah Phelps, Choice, $300, J&L Clearing 23 - Lydia Appleton, Choice, $250, Ron Morrison Auctioneering 24 - Jeremy Smith, Choice, $225, A-1 Wrecker 25 - Haley Vaughan, Choice, $300, SS Logan 26 - Madison Parsons, Choice, $250, Call Farm 27 - Megan Adkins, Choice, $475, The Herald-Dispatch 28 - Breanna Miller, Choice, $200, Rt 60 Hardware 29 - Faith Irwin, Choice, $350, Ohio Valley Bank 30 - Orin Jackson, Choice, $450, Ohio Valley Bank/Stacy & Rosella Call 31 - Chloe Irwin, Choice, $450, Putnam County Bank 32 - Ashton Sheppard, Choice, $475, Cabell County Farm Bureau 33 - Johnathan Childers, Choice, $425, Milton Save-A-Lot 34 - Travis Swann, Choice, $400, ML Dillon 35 - Jacob Hicks, Good, $275, Kim's Greenhouse 36 - Elizabeth Nicholas, Good, $200, JR Farm Equipment 37 - Nolan Appleton, Good, $300, Cabell County Farm Bureau 38 - Kellen Appleton, Good, $200, The Herald-Dispatch 39 - Kylar Adkins, Good, $325, Putnam County Bank 40 - Chandra Vaughan, Good,

$400, Drew Mills Foundation – proceeds go to foundation - $300, Rusty Gate Farm Total ham sales: $18,750 Results from bacon sale The following is in order of place, name, bacon, price, and buyer. GRAND - Brooke Holley, Prime, $1,500, Andy's Custom Meats RESERVE - Abby Black, Prime, $475, Kanawha County Farm Bureau 3 - Zachary Call, Prime, $400, Bland & Bland Attorneys at Law 4 - Dusty Grose, Prime, $425, Dutch Miller Chevrolet 5 - Cheyne Freeman, Prime, $300, Cabell Co Farm Bureau 6 - Jon Cremeans, Prime, $350, Cabell County Fair 7 - Scott McCallister, Prime, $300, Scott Orthopeadics 8 - Whitlee Clagg, Prime, $550, Putnam County Bank 9 - Jenna Floyd, Prime, $325, Putnam County Bank 10 - Kylar Adkins, Prime, $350, Awam Mini Storage 11 - Andrew Linville, Choice, $325, Putnam County Bank 12 - Elizabeth Nicholas, Choice, $325, The Herald-Dispatch 13 - Ashton Sheppard, Choice, $300, The Herald-Dispatch 14 - Orin Jackson, Choice, $350, Cabell County Farm Bureau 15 - Megan Adkins, Choice, $400, The Herald-Dispatch 16 - Jonathan Black, Choice,

$525, Putnam County Bank 17 - Lexi Slone, Choice, $250, Dutch Miller Chevrolet 18 - Haley Vaughan, Choice, $225, The Herald-Dispatch 19 - Travis Swann, Choice, $350, ML Dillon 20 - Jacob Hicks, Choice, $325, Dutch Miller Chevrolet 21 - Savannah Phelps, Choice, $450, J&L Clearing 22 - Kellen Appleton, Choice, $300, Twin Ridge Farms 23 - Jeremy Smith, Choice, $250, Philip Mills Auctioneering/Joe Arrington Auctioneering 24 - Christopher Black, Choice, $325, ML Dillon 25 - Johnathan Childers, Choice, $250, ML Dillon 26 - Jake Hill, Choice, $325, Dutch Miller Chevrolet 27 - Ashton Knight, Choice, $425, Nelson's Meat Processing 28 - Mariah Rowsey, Choice, $400, Dr. Jeanne K. Bailey/Wolpert Farms 29 - Annie Jeffers, Choice, $225, The Herald-Dispatch 30 - Marlee Norris, Choice, $425, Milton Piggly Wiggly 31 - Michael Chapman, Choice, $400, Del Jim Morgan/Senator Bob Plymale 32 - Chloe Irwin, Choice, $425, Putnam County Bank 33 - Breanna Miller, Good, $350, JR Farm Equipment 34 - Katie Short, Good, $350, RT 60 Hardware 35 - Nolan Appleton, Good, $275, Sheriff Tom McComas 36 - Adrianna Burton, Good, $225, Mil-Ton Farms 37 - Lydia Appleton, Good,

$225, Kim's Greenhouse 38 - Madison Parsons, Good, $300, Wood Farm 39 - Marie Brumfield, Good, $200, Sherriff Tom McComas 40 - Chandra Vaughan, Good, $350, Putnam County Bank Total bacon sales: $14,825 Results from eggs sale The following is in order of place, name, eggs, price, and buyer. Foundation – proceeds go to foundation – Ham - $1,500.00, Dutch Miller Chevrolet GRAND - Chelsea Smith, Brown Eggs, $1,000.00, Putnam County Bank RESERVE - Jake Hill, Brown Eggs, $400.00, Del Doug Reynolds 3 - Jon Cremeans, Brown Eggs, $375.00, Putnam Co Bank 4 - Zachary Call, Brown Eggs, $375.00, Milton Piggly Wiggly 5 - Chelsea Smith, White, $375.00, Irv Johnson 6 - Zachary Call, White, $225.00, Cabell County Fair 7 - Nolan Appleton, Brown Eggs, $325.00, Andy's Custom Meats 8 - Kellen Appleton, Brown Eggs, $225.00, ML Dillon 9 - Savannah Phelps, Brown Eggs, $325.00, Putnam County Bank 10 - Lydia Appleton, Brown Eggs, $225.00, Kim's Greenhouse / Whitts Farm Supply Foundation – proceeds go to foundation - Brown Eggs $300.00, Dutch Miller Chevrolet Total egg sales: $5,650.00


The Cabell Standard

Community News

Thursday,March 13,2014 – Page 11

Dealer sentenced to four Barboursville Park identified as Macy’s fundraising program years in federal prison Barboursville Community Park has been selected for “Heart Your Park,” a program introduced as part of Macys “Secret Garden” campaign, that aims to raise awareness and dollars for local parks across the country. From now to March 31, customers at Macy’s Huntington Mall can donate $1 or more at the register, with 100 percent of the donations benefiting The Barboursville Community Park. To further spread the love, Macy’s will match the total customer donation across all stores, dollar for dollar, up to $250,000 in total. Barboursville Community Park is one of more than 550 parks nationwide that will benefit from

Macy’s “Heart Your Park” this spring. In partnership with the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), the national non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of community parks, recreation and conservation, Macy’s stores across the country have each selected a local park or green space in their community to support through the program. Donations will go toward making improvements, such as maintain trails, playgrounds, and ball fields, and everything in between. “We are thrilled to partner with Macy’s and NRPA for ‘Heart Your Park’ this spring,” said Jack McKenna, Park Board Chairman. “Through this wonderful pro-

gram and donations by Macy’s customers, we are excited about the increased awareness and additional funding for Barboursville Community Park. This park is a great asset to the community and we greatly appreciate Macy’s support.” “Heart Your Park” is part of Macy’s “Secret Garden” spring campaign that come to life at Macy’s stores and on macys.com with an infusion of garden-inspired merchandise, special promotions and events. For more information on “Secret Garden,” visit macys.com/secretgarden. For a full list of the park benefiting from Macy’s “Heart Your Park,” visit macys.com/parks.

Tschantz among artists in University of Ohio Proctorville Center show Scott Depot resident Susan Tschantz will be among the artists showing work at the University of Ohio Proctorville Center in March. The show, Many Faces of Art : Artists of the Renaissance Art Gallery will open Tuesday March 18 with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. The public is welcome. “Many Faces of Art, The Artists of the Renaissance Art Gallery” will run from March 18 to April 29. Ohio University Proctorville Center is located at 111 Private Drive, Proctorville, OH 45669. Photographer, painter and

teacher, Tschantz uses a multitude of mediums. She is gaining a reputation for her fine art drawings in several mediums and is always exploring new mediums. Historic and even ancient mediums and techniques have always fascinated her, and compel her to keep expanding her knowledge and experience. She teaches three classes each week on Wednesday, starting with a Fine Arts Class, “How Pictures Work” helping students understand all the fundamental of fine art and painting, “Getting to know the Pencil” a junior art class

for school aged artist and an evening “Drawing Fundamentals” an adult drawing class. All classes are open studio and continuing. Call Tschantz for more information at 304-552-2006. The Renaissance Art Gallery is a local artist co-operative gallery. It is run by nine local artists, Fern Christian, Susan Tschantz, Janet Lester, Linda Helgason, Laura Moul, Pati Payne, Gary Lapelle, Ron Haeberle and Leona Mackey. Each of these artists will have 4 pieces on display at Ohio University, Proctorville Center.

A Huntington man was sentenced to four years in federal prison for his role in a heroin distribution conspiracy, announced United States Attorney Booth Goodwin. Forty-nine-year-old Rickey Ray Rockwell previously pleaded guilty in November 2013 to conspiracy to distribute heroin before Chief United States District Judge Robert C. Chambers in Huntington federal court, Booth said. Between Nov. 2010 and July 2011, Rockwell participated with convicted felons Kevin Luthor Robinson and Jermaine D. Dickerson to distribute heroin in and around the Huntington area, Booth said. According to the report, Rockwell told police that during the illegal drug scheme, he controlled the door to a Huntington residence that was primarily used as a place to distribute illegal drugs. Rockwell also completed illegal heroin transactions on behalf of Robinson and Dickerson, Booth said. Afterward, Rockwell gave the drug proceeds to his co-conspirators at the completion of the drug transactions. Robinson, 44, was sentenced to

11 years and three months in prison in March 2013 for his role in the illegal drug conspiracy and Dickerson, 36, was also sentenced in March 2013 to 15 years and nine months in federal prison, Booth said. Robinson and Dickerson, both of Columbus, previously pleaded guilty in December 2012 to conspiracy to distribute heroin and 28 grams or more of crack cocaine, according to the report. According to the report during the scheme, Robinson and Dickerson arranged frequent trips to Columbus to purchase heroin and cocaine. The illegal drugs were then brought to Huntington and sold, Booth said. The defendants also utilized several Huntington residences to store, prepare and package illegal drugs during the fall of 2010 through July 2011, Booth said. This case was investigated by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration, the Huntington Police Department, and the Appalachia High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Task Force. Assistant United States Attorney Joseph F. Adams handled the prosecution.

Blenko hosts spring open house, warehouse sale Blenko Glass will be having a Spring Open House Event at the Blenko Visitor Center and the annual Blenko Warehouse Sale. These events will be taking place from March 15 to 19. Warehouse hours are Monday through Friday 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.; the warehouse will be closed on Sundays. Warehouse sale includes factory over-runs and one of a kind pieces discounted 30-70 percent off regular prices and also Dalle de Verre art glass slabs Buy one get one free along with Blenko Sheet Glass discounted 50 percent.

The Blenko Visitor Center will maintain normal hours. Blenko Visitor Center Open House includes specials, Walter Blenko & Andy Blenko Signing Events, make your own glass Easter eggs, make your own mini water bottles, stained glass mosaic art, and the Limited Edition “Pink Peony” Vase and Ivy Bowl and the Blue Swirl Pitcher available on a first come first serve basis while supplies last on March 15 and refreshments on Saturday, March 16. For more information on this event please call (304) 743-9081 or visit www.blenko.com

Barboursville Housing Authority

Joyce McCracken of Ona completed Mentor Training at the Mountaineer ChalleNGe Academy. At the academy cadets are matched with volunteer mentors from their home communities representing all 55 counties of West Virginia. Pictured above is Cadet Hannah McCracken of Putnam County with the Mentor and Post Residential Staff from MCA. The next class of Cadets is now forming. Call 1-800-529-7700 or visit the website at www.wvchallenge.org for enrollment or Mentor information. The Mountaineer ChalleNGe Academy, which is sponsored by the WV National Guard, is now on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Is seeking an experienced preferred Building Manager for a 12 unit residential property, located in the Village of Barboursville. This position is responsible for overall property maintenance including HVAC, basic plumbing, electrical, painting, cleaning, and refurbishing units.In addition, this position is also responsible for ordering, contractor prioritizing and supervision.The building Manager will work closely with the Secretary and Treasurer to meet occupancy and retention goals, collect rent, and make deposits.Send resume to Barboursville Housing Authority, Attention Chairman Seay,P.O. Box 243 Barboursville, WV25504 no later than 3/24/14. This is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


Page 12 –Thursday,March 13,2014 DONALD EUGENE BARCROFT ROSEANN "COOKIE" GREEN JUANITA GAY JUDE NORA JEAN MCCALLISTER CLARA LOUISE SMITH OTIS ODELL "BUTCH" SOWARDS JR. OLIN JAMES SPENCER SR. SAMUEL DALE VAUGHN SR. SUSIE ANN BLACK JENKINS WALLACE

DONALD EUGENE BARCROFT Donald Eugene Barcroft, 79, of Hurricane, passed away March 3, 2014. He was retired from Union Carbide, was a U.S. Army veteran and a retired Navy Seabee. He was a member of Forrest Burdette United Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Tene Barcroft; daughters, Dawn Barcroft of Ona and Laura (Robert) Dent of Pensacola, Fla.; grandchildren, Keyria (Nate) Jones, Todd Tarvin and Kinnison (Garry) Lewis; great-grandchildren, Zane Franklin, Brody Franklin and Syler Lewis; and sister, Lynda (Durwood) Register. Funeral services were held March 6, at Forrest Burdette United Methodist Church with the Rev. Dan Hogan officiating. Burial was in Forest Memorial Park, Milton. Donations may be made to Back Pack Buddies at Forrest Burdette United Methodist Church. Please visit allenfuneral-

homewv.com to share memories and condolences. ROSEANN "COOKIE" GREEN Roseann "Cookie" Green, 64, of Barboursville, passed away Feb. 28, 2014. She was born March 17, 1949 in Logan, W.Va. She was preceded in death by her parents Dennie and Dela Cheek; her husband Harry Green; two brothers Donald Cheek and Bob Cheek. She is survived by one daughter and son-in-law Andrea Dawn Green-Jarrell and Ryan P. Jarrell of Lesage, W.Va.; one grandson James Patrick "Champ" Jarrell; one brother Jim (Margie) Cheek of Mt. Airy, N.C.; her best friend, her dog Banjo; and many wonderful nieces and nephews. There were no services. Hall Funeral Home, Proctorville, Ohio assisted the family with arrangements. Condolences may be expressed to the family at www.timeformemory.com/hall. JUANITA GAY JUDE Juanita Gay Jude, 88, of Milton, Feb. 28, 2014 at Rose Terrace Heath and Rehabilitation. A memorial service was held March 8, 2014 at the Wallace Funeral Home, Milton, by Pastor Kim Stone. She was born April 30, 1925 in Mingo County, a daughter of the late James E. and Minnie Diamond Gilliam. She was preceded in death by her husband, Leo Lester Jude, and her son, Leo Lester, Jr., two brothers, Everett and Glenn Gilliam.

Camelot Computers Affordable PC Repair & Web Services 304-729-4446

www.camcompwv.com

er t s i g Re ow! N

5K Run/Walk Saturday April 5, 2014 Charleston, WV RRace ace Pre-Registration Pre-Regist R i tration i $20 / FFun un RRun $8 Registr Registration/Check ation/Check In aatt 7 a.m. aatt Univ University ersity of CCharleston haarleston RRace ace BBegins e aatt 8:30 a.m. egins FFor or mor moree inf information formatioon and ttoo rregister egister online goo ttoo w www.TriStateRacer.com ww.TriSt riSSttateRacerr.com E-mail questions ttoo ccapitalband@hotmail.com apitalband@hotmaill.ccom PProceeds roceeds bbenefit enefit the Capital Capital Highh SSchool chool “P “Pride ride of CCapital apital High” High” Marching Marrching BBand and

Obituaries She was a member of Liberty Missionary Baptist Church. Memorial contributions may be sent to Liberty Baptist Church, P.O. Box 8, Milton, WV 25541. NORA JEAN MCCALLISTER Nora Jean McCallister, 80, of Culloden, passed away, Feb. 27, 2014. She was born Nov. 23, 1933 in Charleston, W.Va. She was preceded in death by her husband Donald McCallister; parents Don and Inez Burcham Stephens; and son John Clinton McCallister. She is survived by a son Joseph Allen McCallister; three grandchildren Bryan and Amber McCallister, and Stacey Snyder; two sisters Frances King and Katherine Danford; brother Don F. Stephens, II; and a special caregiver Marie Popham. She retired from St. Mary's Medical Center, Huntington. At her request, there were no services. Contributions may be made to Hospice of Huntington. Hall Funeral Home, Proctorville, Ohio assisted the family with arrangements. Condolences may be expressed to the family at www.timeformemory.com/hall.

The Cabell Standard love and sacrifice are his faithful wife, Golda L. Sowards of Hurricane, W.Va.; daughter Amy (CJ) Pifer; son Joshua (Desiree) Sowards; sisters Reba (Edwin) Rivera, Janet (Wayne) VanClief and Vicki (Keith) Freeman; and his brother Joseph Sowards. Also bringing joy to Butch's life were his grandchildren Christian Hill and Maddie Pifer and Aslyn and Lila Sowards. He was preceded in death by his father Otis Odell Sowards Sr., mother Jo Ann Sowards and brother Richard. Services were held March 1, 2014, at Allen Funeral Home, Hurricane, W.Va., with brothersin-law Richard Runyan and Eddie McClure officiating. Burial was at Sowards Family Cemetery. Memorial donations can be made to the Cancer Treatment Center of America, 600 Parkway North Newnan, GA 30265. Visit www.allenfuneralhomewv.com to share memories and condolences.

CLARA LOUISE SMITH Clara Louise Smith, 65, of Lesage, passed away March 4, 2014, at the Emogene Dolin Jones Hospice House in Huntington. Graveside services were held March 8, 2014, at Pete Meadows Cemetery, Glenwood with Pastor Don Reynolds officiating. She was born Sept. 10, 1948, in Mason County, W.Va., a daughter of the late Hershel C. and Bertha I. Cremeans Meadows. She was also preceded in death by one brother, Hershel A. Meadows. Clara was a member of Guyan Creek Church. She is survived by one brother, Lonnie W. Meadows and his wife Pam of Ona; one sister-in-law, Patricia Meadows of Point Pleasant, W.Va.; two nieces, Jessica L. Meadows of Charleston, S.C., and Miranda G. Meadows of Point Pleasant, W.Va.; and one greatniece. Heck Funeral Home, Milton, was in charge of arrangements. Online condolences may be expressed to the family at www.heckfuneralhome.com.

OLIN JAMES SPENCER SR. Olin James Spencer Sr., 72, of Culloden, WV, passed away Feb. 27, 2014. Funeral services were held March 4, 2014 at the Wallace Funeral Home, Milton, by Pastor Rob Laukoter. Burial was in Valley View Memorial Park. He was born June 7, 1941 in Sissonville, WV, a son of the late Joseph Arnold and Mabel Blanch Spencer. He was preceded in death by a grandson, Christian and a half-sister, Ivy. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy Marshall Spencer; two daughters and sons-in-law, Kim Marie and Paul Marcum, Jr., of Culloden, and Libby and Kevin Salisbury of Teays Valley; two sons, Olin Spencer, II and his wife, Katie Spencer of Hurricane, and Wesley Allan Spencer and his companion, Jay Striker of Dunbar; three sisters, Wilma Nolder of CA, Delores Hawks of FL, and Naomi Hudson of Winfield; two brothers, Offie Spencer of Buffalo, and Linville Spencer, of Red House; and four grandchildren, Sollie, Clarice, Luke, and Maylee. Online condolences may be expressed to the family at www.timeformemory.com/wallace.

OTIS ODELL "BUTCH" SOWARDS JR. Otis Odell "Butch" Sowards Jr., of Hurricane passed away Feb. 26, 2014. Left to carry on his legacy of

SAMUEL DALE VAUGHN SR. Samuel Dale Vaughn Sr., of Lesage, W.Va., died Feb. 28, 2014. Funeral services were held March 2, 2014, at Chapman's

Mortuary, Huntington with Pastor Charlie Spears officiating. Burial was in Union Hill Cemetery, Chesapeake, Ohio. Sam was born Sept. 3, 1958, in Huntington, W.Va., a son of the late Loren Garland and Edna Louise Barker Vaughn. Two sisters and two brothers preceded him in death. Survivors include his wife Margaret Ray Vaughn; one daughter, Beth Ann Ellixson and husband Shawn of Greenup, Ky.; one son, Samuel Dale Vaughn Jr. and wife Heather of Lavalette, W.Va.; one sister, Sheron Payne of Burlington, Ohio, four brothers, Hershel Vaughn and Bill Vaughn, both of Burlington, Carl Vaughn of Scottown, Ohio, and Randy Vaughn of Wayne, W.Va.; six grandchildren, Shawn Ellixson Jr., Amber Vaughn, Edna Ellixson, Morgan and Madison Vaughn and Colby Ellixson. Donations may be made to Chapman's Mortuary to help with expenses. Online condolences may be sent to www.chapmans-mortuary.com. SUSIE ANN BLACK JENKINS WALLACE Susie Ann Black Jenkins Wallace, 86, of Milton, W.Va. passed away Feb. 27, 2014. She was born on Dec. 31, 1927 in Milton, W.Va., to the late Nardia Black and Essie Setliff Black Faulkner (Frank). She retired from Perry Norvel in Huntington and was a longtime member of Mount Olive Church. She is survived by her twin daughters, Donna Lou Wallace Clagg (Charlie Holley) and Linda Sue Wallace; four grandchildren, Lisa Jenkins Hagley (Don), Leslie Jenkins Donahoe Damon (Gary), Missy Clagg Browning (Jimmy), and Jimmie Clagg; six greatgrandchildren, Carrie Ann Donahoe Bowers (Mitch), Kristen Donahoe Banks, Kaleigh Hagley, Luke Dempsey, Mason Dempsey, and Lexi Browning; and five greatgreat-grandchildren, Kaycin Banks, Khaine Wilson, Keighly Bowers, Karlie Bowers, and new arrival Kannon Cantrell. Susie is also survived by five siblings whom she loved, Jimmy Faulkner (Coweta), Bonnie Faulkner Rainey (Tom), Opal Faulkner Byrd, Frank "Dune" Faulkner, Janice "Cookie" Faulkner Johnson (Homer), and Drema Faulkner Lane. She also leaves behind a life-long best friend Mary Holley; and two special caregivers, Nancy Meadows and Tammy Hutchinson. Susie was preceded in death by her husbands, Sesco Jenkins and Pete Wallace; sons Calvin Jenkins and infant Billy Wallace; granddaughter Amy Smith Dempsey; siblings Pansy Black Chapman (Alvin), Floyd "Toy" Black (Reba) and infant brother Henry Black. Services were held March 2, 2014, at Wallace Funeral Home, Milton with Don Reynolds officiating. Burial was at Forest Memorial Park.


LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL Notice is hereby given that on the 24th day of March, 2014 at 7:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, the Council of the City of Huntington, in Council Chambers, at City Hall, Huntington, WV, proposes to finally vote on the adoption of an ordinance, the subject matter of which is as follows: AN ORDINANCE OF COUNCIL AMENDING, MODIFYING AND REENACTING ARTICLE 363 OF THE CODIFIED ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF HUNTINGTON, AS REVISED, REGARDING PARKING METERS Such ordinance is filed in the City Clerk’s office, Room 16, City Hall, Huntington, WV, where the same may be inspected by the public, and interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. Dated: 3/11/2014 Barbara Nelson, City Clerk 1t 3-13 cs ___________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CABELL COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA CHRISTOPHER D. CHILES, PROSECUTING ATTORNEY CABELL COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA on behalf of THE HUNTINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT, Petitioners VS. CIVIL ACTION NO. 14-C-90 JUDGE F. JANE HUSTEAD FIFTY THOUSAND AND EIGHT HUNDRED DOLLARS ($50,800.00) IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, ROBERT CRUTCHER, AND ANY OTHER KNOWN OR UNKNOWN CLAIMANT, Respondent ORDER OF PUBLICATION NOTICE OF FILING PETITION FOR FORFEITURE The object of this suit is to seek an Order forfeiting the herein described property pursuant to the West Virginia Contraband Forfeiture Act, Chapter 60A, Article 7, of the West Virginia Code as amended. II. TO: Any claimant of a right or interest in said property.

You have the right to file a claim to the herein described property on or before the 16th day of April, 2014. Any such claim must clearly state the identity of the claimant and an address where legal process can be served on said claimant. The property seized and the subject of this suit is described as follows: FIFTY THOUSAND AND EIGHT HUNDRED DOLLARS ($50,800.00) IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY The law enforcement agency responsible for the seizure is the Huntington Police Department, located in Huntington, Cabell County, West Virginia. The subject property was in the possession of Robert Crutcher and was taken into custody on the 17th day of December, 2013, at #36 27th Street, Huntington, Cabell County, West Virginia. That after the date for filing the said claims, an Order of the Court directing forfeiture of the seized property to the State and vesting ownership of said property in the State shall be sought. If you fail to file a claim, thereafter an Order upon property hearing may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. A copy of said petition can be obtained from the undersigned Clerk of this Court. Entered this 27th day of February, 2014, by the Clerk of the Court. JEFFREY E. HOOD Clerk of the Circuit Court, Cabell County, West Virginia 2t 3-13, 3-20 cs ___________________ LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Administration/to Creditors Notice is hereby given that the following estate(s) have been opened for probate in the CABELL County Clerk’s Office at 750 5TH AVENUE, HUNTINGTON, WV 25701-2019. Any person seeking to impeach or establish a will must make a complaint in accordance with the provisions of West Virginia Code 41-5-11 through 13. Any interested person objecting to the qualifications of the personal repre-

Thursday,March 13,2014 – Page 13

Legal Notices

The Cabell Standard

sentative or the venue or jurisdiction of the court, shall file notice of an objection with the County Commission within 90 days after the date of the first publication or within 30 days of the service of the notice, whichever is later. If an objection is not filed timely, the objection is forever barred. Settlement of the estate(s) of the following named decedent(s) will proceed without reference to a fiduciary commissioner unless within 90 days from the first publication of this notice a reference is requested by a party of interest or an unpaid creditor files a claim and good cause is shown to support reference to a fiduciary commissioner. Publication Date: 2014/03/13 Claim Deadline Date: ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 3106 ESTATE NAME: ASA HOWARD BOWEN EXECUTRIX: ANGELA LEIGH ADKINS 3532 HOWELLS MILL ROAD ONA, WV 25545************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 2982 ESTATE NAME: ROWENA TURLEY NAPIER EXECUTRIX: CAROL ANN THACKER 6249 EDENS BRANCH ROAD BARBOURSVILLE, WV 25504-9513 ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 2981 ESTATE NAME: JUDITH ANN SHERMAN E X E C U T R I X : THERESA ANNE M C B R E A R T Y SCHEIER 483 FOXBOROUGH DR BRUNSWICK, OH 44212-4336 ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 2961 ESTATE NAME: HALEY LYNN SINES ADMINISTRATRIX: MARGARET SINES C/O PO BOX 2185 HUNTINGTON, WV 25722************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 2962 ESTATE NAME: JEFFREY LYNN SINES ADMINISTRATRIX: MARGARET SINES C/O PO BOX 2185 HUNTINGTON, WV 25722************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 2963 ESTATE NAME: ZOEY GRAY ZINES ADMINISTRATRIX: MARGARET SINES C/O PO BOX 2185 HUNTINGTON, WV 25722************************ ESTATE NUMBER:

LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE

3012 ESTATE NAME: SAMUEL L SMITH EXECUTRIX: DIANA CHILDERS 3675 STALLINGS ROAD HARRISBURG, NC 28075-9320 ************************ Subscribed and sworn to before me on 03/07/2014 Karen S. Cole Clerk of the Cabell County Commission By: Regina M. Meade Deputy Clerk 2t 3-13, 3-20 cs ___________________ LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Administration Notice is hereby given that the following estate(s) have been opened for probate in the CABELL County Clerk’s Office at 750 5TH AVENUE, HUNTINGTON, WV 25701-2019. Any person seeking to impeach or establish a will must make a complaint in accordance with the provisions of West Virginia Code 41-5-11 through 13. Any interested person objecting to the qualifications of the personal representative or the venue or jurisdiction of the court, shall file notice of an objection with the County Commission within 90 days after the date of the first publication or within thirty days of the service of the notice, whichever is later. If an objection is not filed timely, the objection is forever barred. Claims against the estate(s) must be filed in accordance with the West Virginia Code 44-2-2 if assigned to a fiduciary commissioner. If no reference to a fiduciary commissioner is listed herein, claims against the estate(s) must be filed in accordance with West Virginia Code 44-1-14A(10). ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 2783 ESTATE NAME: KAREN LEIGH BROWN E X E C U T O R : WILLIAM M FRAZIER 401 10TH STREET PO BOX 2808 HUNTINGTON, WV 25701-2200 ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 2822 ESTATE NAME: JOEY LEONARD CONARD ADMINISTRATRIX: C A T H E R I N E CONARD 2623 NORWOOD ROAD HUNTINGTON, WV 25705************************ Subscribed and sworn to before me on 03/07/2014

Karen S. Cole Clerk of the Cabell County Commission By: Regina M. Meade Deputy Clerk 2t 3-13, 3-20 cs ___________________ PUBLIC NOTICE The County Commission of Cabell County, West Virginia, does hereby adopt the following changes to the voting precincts as listed below: Precincts 41A & 41B Christ the King Lutheran Church 5700 US Route 60 Huntington, WV 25705 Has been permanently moved to: Cabell County 4-H Camp 6040 Booten Creek Rd Barboursville, WV 25504 I hereby certify the foregoing “PUBLIC NOTICE” is correct as designated by the County Commission of Cabell County, West Virginia. Given under my hand and seal this 27th day of February, 2014. Karen S. Cole Cabell County Clerk 2t 3-13, 3-20 cs ___________________ PUBLIC NOTICE The County Commission of Cabell County, West Virginia, does hereby adopt the following changes to the voting precincts as listed below: Precincts 29 & 30 Beverly Hills Middle School 2901 Saltwell Road Huntington, WV 25705 Has been temporarily moved to: Huntington East Middle School 1 Campbell Drive Huntington, WV 25705 I hereby certify the foregoing “PUBLIC NOTICE” is correct as designated by the County Commission of Cabell County, West Virginia. Given under my hand and seal this 27th day of February, 2014. Karen S. Cole Cabell County Clerk 2t 3-13, 3-20 cs ___________________

All persons having claims against the above referenced estates, whether due or not, are notified to exhibit the same, with supporting vouchers, legally verified, to the undersigned at Woelfel & Woelfel, LLC, 801 Eighth Street, Huntington, West Virginia 25701, on or before the 23rd day of May, 2014, otherwise they may by law be excluded from all benefit of said estates. All beneficiaries of said estates may appear on or before said day to examine said claims and otherwise protect their interest. GIVEN under my hand this 23rd day of February, 2014. MATTHEW J. WOELFEL Fiduciary Commissioner for Cabell County, West Virginia 2t 3-6, 3-13 cs ___________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CABELL COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA CHRISTOPHER D. CHILES, PROSECUTING ATTORNEY CABELL COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA on behalf of THE HUNTINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT, Petitioners VS. CIVIL ACTION NO. 14-C-112 JUDGE F. JANE HUSTEAD TWENTY THOUSAND TWO HUND R E D THIRTY-SEVEN DOLLARS ($20,237.00) IN UNITED STATES C U R R E N C Y , COLLINS HARRIS, AND ANY OTHER KNOWN OR UNKNOWN CLAIMANT, Respondent ORDER OF PUBLICATION NOTICE OF FILING PETITION FOR FORFEITURE The object of this suit is to seek an Order forfeiting the herein described property pursuant to the West Virginia Contraband Forfeiture Act, Chapter 60A, Article 7, of the West Virginia Code as amended. II.

NOTICE To the Creditors and Beneficiaries of the Estates of: Re:

Estates of:

Nolan Layne Grubb, Deceased Alphon E. Conner, Deceased

TO: Any claimant of a right or interest in said property. You have the right to file a claim to the herein described property on or before the 28th day of April, 2014. Any such claim

LEGAL NOTICE

must clearly state the identity of the claimant and an address where legal process can be served on said claimant. The property seized and the subject of this suit is described as follows: TWENTY THOUSAND TWO HUND R E D THIRTY-SEVEN DOLLARS ($20,237.00) IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY The law enforcement agency responsible for the seizure is the Huntington Police Department, located in Huntington, Cabell County, West Virginia. The subject property was in the possession of Collins Harris and was taken into custody on the 2nd day of November, 2013, at 1259 26th Street, Huntington, Cabell County, West Virginia. That after the date for filing the said claims, an Order of the Court directing forfeiture of the seized property to the State and vesting ownership of said property in the State shall be sought. If you fail to file a claim, thereafter an Order upon property hearing may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. A copy of said petition can be obtained from the undersigned Clerk of this Court. Entered this 6th day of February, 2014, by the Clerk of the Court. JEFFREY E. HOOD Clerk of the Circuit Court, Cabell County, West Virginia 2t 3-6, 3-13 cs ___________________ LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Administration/to Creditors Notice is hereby given that the following estate(s) have been opened for probate in the CABELL County Clerk’s Office at 750 5TH AVENUE, HUNTINGTON, WV 25701-2019. Any person seeking to impeach or establish a will must make a complaint in accordance with the provisions of West Virginia Code 41-5-11 through 13. Any interested person objecting to the qualifications of the personal representative or the venue or jurisdiction of the court, shall file notice of an objection with the County Commission within 90 days after the date of the

first publication or within 30 days of the service of the notice, whichever is later. If an objection is not filed timely, the objection is forever barred. Settlement of the estate(s) of the following named decedent(s) will proceed without reference to a fiduciary commissioner unless within 90 days from the first publication of this notice a reference is requested by a party of interest or an unpaid creditor files a claim and good cause is shown to support reference to a fiduciary commissioner. Publication Date: 2014/02/27 Claim Deadline Date: ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 3123 ESTATE NAME: WILMA JEANETTE BELL HONAKER EXECUTOR: ROBERT LEE HONAKER 2 PINEY WAY BARBOURSVILLE, WV 25504-2244 ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 3110 ESTATE NAME: WILLIAM D DUKE EXECUTRIX: SANDRA K DUKE 2165 GORDON STREET CULLODEN, WV 25510-9559 ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 3147 ESTATE NAME: KENNETH DALE EDWARD ADMINISTRATRIX: JUDY EDWARDS 319 CLEMENS COURT HUNTINGTON, WV 25704 ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 3161 ESTATE NAME: AGNES TRESS MILLER BACK EXECUTOR: JAMES ALLEN BACK 951 3RD ST WEST HUNTINGTON, WV 25701-2545 ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 3160 ESTATE NAME: ELVIA MOSES SOWARDS JR EXECUTRIX: KATHY L ROBERTS 187 ELVA DRIVE, HURRICANE, WV 25526-6474 ************************ Subscribed and sworn to before me on 02/28/2014 Karen S. Cole Clerk of the Cabell County Commission By: Regina M. Meade Deputy Clerk 2t 3-6, 3-13 cs ___________________ LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Administration Notice is hereby given

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


Page 14 –Thursday,March 13,2014

Legal Notices

The Cabell Standard

LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE

that the following estate(s) have been opened for probate in the CABELL County Clerk’s Office at 750 5TH AVENUE, HUNTINGTON, WV 25701-2019. Any person seeking to impeach or establish a will must make a complaint in accordance with the provisions of West Virginia Code 41-5-11 through 13. Any interested person objecting to the qualifications of the personal representative or the venue or jurisdiction of the

court, shall file notice of an objection with the County Commission within 90 days after the date of the first publication or within thirty days of the service of the notice, whichever is later. If an objection is not filed timely, the objection is forever barred. Claims against the estate(s) must be filed in accordance with the West Virginia Code 44-2-2 if assigned to a fiduciary commissioner. If no reference to a fiduciary com-

missioner is listed herein, claims against the estate(s) must be filed in accordance with West Virginia Code 44-1-14A(10). ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 2805 ESTATE NAME: WILLIAM OLIVER DAVIS EXECUTRIX: WILLA JEAN DAVIS 1002 IRISH RIDGE RD BARBOURSVILLE, WV 25504-9332 ************************ ESTATE NUMBER: 2806 ESTATE NAME: LU-

CILLE PARSLEY AKA EDITH LUCILLE PARSLEY EXECUTRIX: JOYCE MANNON 88 TOWNSHIP RD 1482 CHESAPEAKE, OH 45619-8614 ATTORNEY: AUDY M PERRY JR 611 3RD AVE HUNTINGTON, WV 25701-1313 ************************ Subscribed and sworn to before me on 02/28/2014 Karen S. Cole Clerk of the Cabell County Commission

By: Regina M. Meade Deputy Clerk 2t 3-6, 3-13 cs ___________________ LEGAL NOTICE (2012-S-00000434 – Cabell County – NAR SPECIAL GLOBAL LLC) To: INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, CITY OF HUNTINGTON, WV STATE TAX DEPARTMENT, RESIDENT/ TENANT/ OCCUPANT, PLR INVESTMENTS LLC, PATRICK L REED, CONNIE L REED, or heirs at law, devisees, creditors, representatives, successors, assigns, all unknown heirs, guardians, conservators, fiduciaries, administrators, or lienholders.

You will take notice that NAR SPECIAL GLOBAL LLC, the purchaser of the tax lien(s) on the following real estate, Certificate of Sale: 2012-S00000434, BLK 87 PT LT 6-7 745 7TH AVE, located in HUNTINGTON KYLE CORP, which was returned delinquent in the name of PLR INVESTMENTS LLC, and for which the tax lien(s) thereon was sold by the sheriff of Cabell County at the sale for the delinquent taxes made on the 13th day of November, 2012, has requested that you be notified that a deed for such real estate will be made to him or her on or after April 1, 2014, as provided by law, unless before that day you redeem such real estate. The amount you will have to pay on the last day, March 31, 2014, will be as follows: Amount equal to the taxes

Across 1. Frosts, as a cake 5. Cleansing tub 9. Deep-six 14. 1/500 of the Indianapolis 500 15. Arch type 16. Winged 17. 1415 battle with English longbowmen victors over French forces 19. Offer a revised proposed price 20. Suitable for feeding directly into a computer (2 wds) 22. Laugh-a-minute folks 23. Aggravate 24. Pesky insects 25. “Don’t give up!” 26. Brown-coated ermines 28. “Aladdin” prince 30. Long, long time 31. Bank job 35. Jeans material 38. Ace 39. Cab driver in “It’s a Wonderful Life” 40. Musical sign marking the begin-

March 26-27

ning or end of a repeat 41. Order between “ready” and “fire” 42. Badge-earning girls’ org. (acronym) 43. Victory cheer 45. Dumfries denial 47. Greek word for goddess 50. Amigo 51. 1,000 kilograms 53. House salesperson (3 wds) 57. Pertaining to simple organisms like kelp 58. Early term for locomotive (2 wds) 59. Airs 60. Blue books? 61. Extol 62. ___-cochere (carriage entrance) 63. Fictitious story 64. British beers Down 1. Mosque V.I.P. 2. Humidor item

WEST VI VIRGINIA RGINIA

CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTI RUCTION &

DESIGN DES IGN EXPOSI EXPOSITION TION The Region’s La Largest argest Trade Show for the Construction n & Design Industry

Charleston Ci Civic vic Center Register for FREE E at

3. Educing 4. Portugese Mr. 5. Benefits 6. Chill 7. British unit of nonprofessional soldiers (2 wds) 8. Subjection to the law of another 9. Reddish-brown gem 10. Detergent 11. Browning’s Ben Ezra, e.g. 12. Inclined 13. Technical name for feet 18. Part of N.Y.C. 21. Police blotter abbr. 26. Segregation 27. Not just “a” 28. Infomercials, e.g. 29. “Malcolm X” director 32. Without distinction of one from others (2 wds) 33. ___ boom bah! 34. Oolong, for one 36. Something breathed in 37. ___ juice (milk) 44. Harvest goddess 45. Wyle of “ER” 46. Neighbor of Namibia 47. Bum 48. Prefix with centric 49. Avid 51. Extra inning 52. Arise 54. “... or ___!” 55. Plug 56. “Bill & ___ Excellent Adventure”

wvexpo.com

Abilities Alert Asked Award Badge Barked Comma Copper Dense Dirty Dismisses Dozen Drier Earned Easels Emotion Ended Exact Expense Fiery

Flies Focus Gears Graph Guests Hadn’t Honor Hoped Inches International Lakes Lofty Lungs Moved Nevertheless Obtain Oldest Reeds

Now Hiring!

Deliver Bobtail Semis 22 Pickup Locations Quick Pay Great Rates

www.qualitydriveaway.com or call 574-642-2000 X401

LEGAL NOTICE

and charges due on the date of the sale, with interest, to March 31, 2014. $4,315.68

McComas, Sheriff and Treasurer of Cabell County. $9,086.58

Amount of subsequent years taxes paid on the property, since the sale, with interest to $3,870.61 March 31, 2014.

Cost of Certification of Redemption – cashier check, money order or certified check must be made payable to The Honorable Glen B. Gainer, III, State Auditor. $35.00

Amount paid for Title Examination and preparation of the list to be served and for preparation and service of notice with interest from January 1, 2013 following the sheriff’s sale to March 31, 2014. $900.29 Amount paid for other statutory costs with Interest from following the sheriff’s sale to March 31, 2014. 0.00 Total Amount Payable to Sheriff – cashier check, money order or certified check must be made payable to The Honorable Thomas W.

Senses Spent Splits Steam Stood Studio

You may redeem at any time before March 31, 2014 by paying the above total less any unearned interest. Return to WV State Auditor’s Office, County Collections Office, Building 1, Room W118, Charleston, West Virginia, 25305. Questions please call 1-888509-6568. 3t 3-6, 3-13, 3-20 cs __________________________

Terror These Unload Waste Water

Your Ad Could Be Here!

For more information on advertising your business please call

304-743-6731


CLASSIFIEDS

The Cabell Standard

Classifieds

CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS

Thursday,March 13,2014 – Page 15

CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

ASSISTANT PROSECUTOR - The Cabell County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office seeks a person for the position of ASSISTANT PROSECUTOR. Qualified candidates must have prior experience in criminal cases and be able to perform each essential duty both quickly and satisfactorily, while in a fast paced office setting. Qualified candidates must be admitted to practice law in the State of West Virginia. This full time position offers a benefits package and is salaried commensurate with experience. Interested applicants must submit cover letter, complete resume outprior lining experience, and names of three references to: Sean Hammers, Prosecuting Attorney for Cabell County, West Virginia, 750 5th Avenue, Suite 350, Huntington, West Virginia 25701 by the closing date of March 20, 2014. The Cabell County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and the Cabell County Commission are Equal Opp o r t u n i t y Employers and do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability,

political beliefs, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, or marital or family status. (2tc 3-6 ccpa)

of a transition team in concert with others. Salary: $40,122.00$73,808.40. Closing date for receiving of application: 3/21/2014 @ 4 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). Title I Transition Specialist, The Kenneth “Honey” Rubenstein Center, Davis, WV - Possesses an undergraduate degree in an education or human services field. Possesses the knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully: (a) perjob form requirements; (b) work within the special setting of a secure institution; and (c) work as part of a transition team in concert with others. Salary: $38,010.00 $71,036.40. Closing date for receiving of application: 3/21/2014 @ 4 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). Title I Transition Specialist, Elkins Mt. School, Elkins, WV - Possesses an undergraduate degree in an education or human services field. Possesses the knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully: (a) perform job requirements; (b) work within the special setting of a secure institution; and (c) work as part of a transition team in concert with oth-

ers. Salary: $38,010.00 $70,676.40. Closing date for receiving of application: 3/21/2014 @ 4 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). Reading Specialist, Davis-Stuart School, Lewisburg, WV - Master’s Degree in Reading and certification as reading specialist per State Board Policy 5202 or eligible for or holds a Remedial Reading Authorization. Possess the knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully: (a) perform the job requirements; (b) work within the special setting of an institution for troubled youth; and (c) work as part of a treatment team in concert with others. Salary: $38,610.00 - $71,996.40. Closing date for receiving of application: 3/21/2014 @ 4 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). Reading Specialist, Beckley Center School, Beckley, WV - Master’s Degree in Reading and certification as reading specialist per State Board Policy 5202 or eligible for or holds a Remedial Reading Authorization. Possess the knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully: (a) perform the job requirements; (b) work

within the special setting of an institution for troubled youth; and (c) work as part of a treatment team in concert with others. Salary: $40,470.00 - $73,856.40. Closing date for receiving of application: 3/21/2014 @ 4 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). Title I Transition Specialist, Academy Programs, Fairmont, WV Possesses an undergraduate degree in an education or human services field. Possesses the knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully: (a) perform job requirements; (b) work within the special setting of a secure institution; and (c) work as part of a transition team in concert with others. Salary: $38,058.00 $71,396.40. Closing date for receiving of application: 3/21/2014 @ 4 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). Reading Specialist, Academy Programs, Fairmont, WV - Master’s Degree in Reading and/or Remedial Reading Authorization. Possess the knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully: (a) perform the job requirements; (b) work within the special setting of an institution for trou-

bled youth; and (c) work as part of a treatment team in concert with others. Salary: $38,058.00 $71,396.40. Closing date for receiving of application: 3/21/2014 @ 4 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). Title I Transition Specialist (parttime), Davis-Stuart School, Lewisburg, WV - Possesses an undergraduate degree in an education or human services field. Possesses the knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully: (a) perform job requirements; (b) work within the special setting of a secure institution; and (c) work as part of a transition team in concert with others. Salary: $21.45 - $40.00 per hour. Closing date for receiving of application: 3/21/2014 @ 4 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). (1tc 313 wvbe)

County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office seeks a person for the position of LEGAL SECREQualified TARY. candidates must have prior office experience and be able to perform each essential duty both quickly and satisfactorily, while in a fast paced office setting. Duties include, but are not limited to: general law office duties such as answering telephone calls, greeting visitors, copying, filing, receiving intake inand formation entering into computer database, making files, gathering and obtaining information to aid attorneys in the prosecution of cases, scheduling hearings, preparing court documents and orders for both criminal and civil cases. This full time position offers a benefits package and is salaried commensurate with experience. Send

complete resume which outlines specific prior experience to: Sean Hammers, Prosecuting Attorney for Cabell County, West Virginia, 750 5th Avenue, Suite 350, Huntington, West Virginia 25701 by the closing date of March 20, 2014. The Cabell County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and the Cabell County Commission are Equal Opp o r t u n i t y Employers and do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, or marital or family status. (2tc 3-6 ccpa)

WEST VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VACANCIES - An Equal Opportunity Employer Division of Technical and Adult Education, Office of Institutional Education Programs Application/complete job announcement @ http://wvde.state.w v.us/wvde-vacancies. Application can be mailed, email lbryant@access.k12.wv.us or faxed 304-558-0216 to Liz Bryant, WV Department of Education, Bldg. 6, Rm. 264, 1900 Kanawha Blvd., E., Charleston, WV 25305-0330. Phone: 304-558-2702. School Counselor, Pressley Ridge @ White Oak Village, Walker, WV - Holds or qualifies for a West Virginia certificate as a school counselor for middle school and adolescent students as defined by West Virginia State Board Policy 5202. Possesses the knowledge skills and ability to successfully; (a) perform job requirements; (b) work within the special setting of a secure institution; and (c) work as part

West Virginia Statewide Classified Network Reaching Readers Across West Virginia

HELP WANTED-TRUCK DRIVERS

MISCELLANEOUS

DEDICATED CDL-A TRUCK DRIVERS. $2,000 Sign on Bonus! HOGAN OFFERS: $0.50 CMP! Home Weekly! Newer Equipment Available. Vacation and Holiday Pay. Call Today: 866537-1298.

SAWMILLS from only $4897.00. MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/ DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

CLASS A CDL DRIVERS NEEDED. WS THOMAS Home Weekends 40CPM Plus East Coast Premium. Paper OR Elogs. Full Benefits - $1500 SIGNING BONUS. 304-363-8050 Ext. 11. www.DriveForWSThomas.com Daily Express needs contractors to haul Stepdeck & RGN loads! Fullunit step or RGN’s Welcome. FREE Company Trailers! NEW EXPEDITED FLEET! www.dailyrecruiting.com or 800-669-6414

HELP WANTED-PROFESSIONAL

LIBRARY OPENING: Director, Brooke Co. Public Library & Follansbee Branch. Masters Degree in Library Science with 5+ yrs. public library experience desired. BCPL is an equal opt. employer. Submit resume/references to BCPL Board of Trustees, CAREER TRAINING Brooke Co. Public Library, 945 Main ATTEND COLLEGE AT THE BEACH St., Wellsburg, WV 26070. No Phone - Get trained in months, not years with Calls. small classes. Financial aid for qualified students. Relocation/job placeYOUR AD HERE! ment assistance. Centura College Looking to hire good help or sell an 800-495-6316 item? Place your ad through WV

Press Assoication’s statewide network! Call this newspaper or 1-800235-6881 for more information.

Place YOUR statewide ad today any of three easy ways: Q Call This Newspaper Q Call 1-800-235-6881 Q Visit www.wvpress.org

SERVICES

DANNY’S HILLBILLY DITCHDIGGERS – Water, electric, gas & drain lines installed. 304586-9914, 304-3890715. (rtc 11-29)

SUBSCRIBE TODAY . . .

LEGAL SECRETARY - The Cabell

Have your subscription mailed to you each week!

Mail this form with your payment to: The Cabell Standard PO Box 186 Culloden, WV 25510

One Year Subscription Rates: In County: $22.00 Annually / SPECIAL $17.00 In West Virginia: (Outside County) $38.00 Annually / SPECIAL $33.00

Within Continental 48 US: $48.00 Annually / SPECIAL $43.00

First Name: Last Name: Address: City:

Phone:

State:

Zip:


Page 16 –Thursday,March 13,2014

School News

The Cabell Standard

Rhythm in Red Show Choir hosts big event By Heather Barker For The Cabell Standard

Hundreds of show choir members, stage crew workers and family members gathered at Cabell Midland High School to take part in the 2014 Rhythm in Red Show Choir Invitational. The school was jam packed Feb. 22 with 10 schools ready to take home a Grand Champion award. To accommodate so many people, classrooms at the school were opened to each of the competing show choirs to act as a dressing room and resting area. Though hectic, Rhythm in Red Show Choir members were there to help control the commotion and assist the visiting show choirs. “Each show choir member was assigned to a host room to make all the groups that come to the competition feel welcome,” said show choir member Autumn Diehl. “They decorate the rooms, they baked lots of baked goods for the rooms and concessions and we do star grams, which are like flowers from fans which are then delivered to the rooms.” Like most other show choir competitions, all schools entered performed once then were judged down to the final six. Those final six performed their shows again for the judges to decide who the Grand Champion would be. Though Cabell Midland’s show

Reigning state champions, Rhythm in Red Show Choir took home a grand champion award from the Poca Music Fest on Feb. 1. The ensemble hosted an invitational for area show choirs on Feb. 22. choir did not compete because they were the hosts, they did give a performance right before the awards ceremony. The Rhythm in Red Show Choir recently took home a Grand Champion award from the Poca Music Fest on Feb. 1 and won

Best Choreography, Best Vocals and Best Combo Band. As reigning State Grand Champions, members have been pushing themselves and setting their sights on another State Championship. “It’s not really one specific

group that we are rivals with, we’re just against everybody. We’re our biggest rival,” said show choir member Hannah Martin. “To improve, we have people come in and watch us and critique us. We also practice every day at lunch and every Tuesday,

Thursday and Friday after school.” The Cabell Midland Show Choir was back in action at Fairfield High School’s show choir competition on Saturday and will compete in the State Championship on March 15.

Energy Management Program saves Cabell School millions Cabell County Schools’ Energy Management Program has saved the district in excess of $6 million during the last 11 years. The program, which works to reduce energy consumption in all Cabell County district facilities, is coordinated by a full-time Energy Manager. The manager works to monitor utility usage and to educate staff members and students about resource saving measures.

By saving money on utilities, the district is able to divert funds to instructional programs. “In my opinion, the most important result of the program is being able to help the district fund investments in instructional programs and technology for students,” said John McMillan, Energy Manager for Cabell County Schools. “I’m very proud of the staff and students for all they do

to assist me in managing our utility consumption.” McMillan says the premise of the program is simple. He focuses on teaching staff and students about the importance of turning off energy-consuming devices at the end of the school day or when not in use. This includes computers, lighting, copiers, classroom refrigerators, coffee makers, microwaves, and other small appli-

Loan Center Office 2761 Main Street Hurricane, WV 25526 304-562-5055 • 304-562-9109 (fax)

Main Office 2761 Main Street Hurricane, WV 25526 304-562-9931 304-562-2642 (fax)

Interstate Office 300 Hurricane Rd. Hurricane, WV 25526 304-562-9005 • 304-562-7092 (fax) Valley Office 3058 Mount Vernon Rd. Scott Depot, WV 25560 304-757-2477 • 304-757-2503 (fax)

ances. He also works with principals and custodians to make sure heating and air is only used when the building is occupied, and that water fountains, water heaters, and other fixtures are shut down when school is not in session.In addition, McMillan studies utility bills daily and works to alleviate any problems or usage spikes that may occur. By studying these

bills, he can project the district’s cost avoidance on a monthly basis, and provide reports to Central Office staff and principals at their monthly meeting. “It is our obligation to be good stewards of taxpayer dollars, and the Energy Management program affords us that opportunity.” For information about the Energy Management program, please contact McMillan at 528-5342.


The Cabell Standard, March 13, 2014