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THE EDUCATION ISSUE

Bro. Dr. Henry Shannon Chancellor St. Louis Community Colleges

Sigmas in Academia Bro. Dr. Tyrone Bledsoe’s S.A.A.B. Program

Affrilachian Brother: Bro. Frank X. Walker Words, Beats and Life Hip Hop For Education

FALL 2006

Photo by Tracy A. Hawkins

From Deutschland to Dixie: The Amazing Life of Bro. Dr. Georg Iggers


Editorial Staff The Crescent Magazine is published twice annually by Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., Paul L. Griffin, Jr., President. Postmaster, please send address changes to: The Crescent Magazine Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. 145 Kennedy Street, NW Washington, DC 20011-5294

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ron Lewis

GRAPHIC DESIGN, LAYOUT AND ART DIRECTION Ron Lewis

REGIONAL EDITORS Dr. Ernest Miller - Western Region Martin B. Currie - Southwest Region Calvin B. Glover - Southern Region Jerry W. Green - Gulf Coast Region Ralph J. Eichelberger - Great Lakes Region Christia V. Rey - Southeast Region Greville H. French - Eastern Region

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Bro. Kevin Christian Bro. Todd LeBon Bro. Ikenna Anyanwu Bro. Omari Swinton Bro. Earl Davis Ms. Inez Saki-Tay Ms. Beth Newberry

FOUNDERS A. Langston Taylor Leonard F. Morse Charles I. Brown

F e a t u r e s

10 16 20

Hip Hop For Education Affrilachian Brother Cover Story: Dr. Henry Shannon

From Deutschland to Dixie: The Amazing Life of Bro. Georg Iggers

26 30

Dr. Alain Leroy Locke: The First Black Rhodes Scholar

45 48 52

FOUNDING DATE January 9, 1914 2 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 Howard University Washington, DC

Sigmas in Academia

Miami’s Sigma Betas S.A.A.B.


Departments 4

President’s Message

5

Editor’s Message

22

Book Review

41

Sigma/Zeta Connection

54

Our History

52

26

41 16 45

THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 3


Bro. Paul L. Griffin, Jr. International President Greetings! There is nothing more central to our existence, purpose and potential as an organization of college men than education. Since 1914, our revered Founders made scholarship a core aspect of Phi Beta Sigma’s mission. It was at Conclave St. Louis, Missouri, in 1945, that the Fraternity officially adopted Education as one of its premiere perpetual programs. Sigma men have made their mark in championing the right of all to access education, the great equalizer that makes possible a level playing field. Through civil-rights and public-policy advocacy, through personal example excelling in all walks of academia, by donating resources and leadership to develop the brightest minds of our times, this Fraternity has been in the forefront of education, producing many of the most committed educators this nation has known. Consider the late Bro. Dr. Alaine Leroy Locke, for whom Locke Hall on the campus of Howard University is named, the first black Rhodes Scholar. Recall the late Bro. George Washington Carver, that renown scientist, who developed over 300 uses for the peanut. Think of the late Bro. Dr. Parlette Moore, Past President of Coppin State University, Baltimore, MD and founder of our youth mentoring organization the Sigma Beta Club. Fondly remember the late Bro. John E. Westberry, Registrar of Texas Southern University for more than 30 years. Now, fast forward to Sigma educational leaders of today: Brother Rod Paige, Former U.S. Secretary of Education, under President George W. Bush; Dr. Edison Jackson, President of Medgar Evers College, Brooklyn, NY, and the list goes on. Throughout these pages, you will read about Sigma Brothers committed to education. The cover proudly portrays Bro. Dr. Henry D. Shannon, Ph.D., Chancellor, St. Louis Community College System, a man with enormous responsibitlies and a sense of purpose in leading this educational system of over 32,000 students. My friend, Phyllis C. Hunter, President of Phyllis C. Hunter Consulting, Inc., an esteemed educator and international educational consultant, coined the phrase, “Reading is the new Civil Right”. She asserts: “reading allows students to access the remainder of their rights”. Likewise, students who are provided with a strong educational foundation gain access to opportunities that would otherwise elude them. We must, therefore, begin early to make sure education continues to be a top priority. We congratulate Sigma Brothers and chapters for all you do to develop the mind, promote scholarship and learning, to create greater opportunities for understanding and goodwill among men. Enjoy the pages within and be proud of our history of education and giving so others can realize their greatest potential through scholarship. Fraternally, Paul L. Griffin, Jr. International President 4 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006


Bro. Ron Lewis Editor-In-Chief Greetings Brothers, This is an exciting time to be a Sigma. As Editor-In-Chief of the Crescent Magazine, I am extremely honored to write to you on behalf of the talented brothers who contribute their time and talents to making this great publication of ours even greater. As predicted, writers have emerged who, until now, were undiscovered. It’s exciting to watch as these budding Cullens, Ellisons, Hughes, and Bontemps, find their literary voices. One thing’s for sure; the love for Sigma shines through in their writing and photography. This issue focuses on Sigma brothers in academia. Many have made their marks as chancellors, presidents, provosts, deans, principals, superintendents, and administrators. Let us not forget the countless instructors who give of themselves to educate others. Many teachers, those of the formal and informal type, have made an impact on the lives of young people by being positive role models. By reading their stories it is my hope that we all become inspired. I have long maintained that access to higher education has been one of the most cherished accomplishments coming out of the Civil Rights era. Many of our brothers and sisters endured extreme hardship and duress in order to earn degrees and thereby open up opportunities to future generations. Many of us reading this now can reflect back on our experiences in college. As Sigmas, we should all summon a collective expression of gratitude to the pioneers who paved the way for us. In this issue, you will read about some of those pioneers. Sigma men like Dr. Alain Leroy Locke, the first African-American Rhodes Scholar and Dr. Georg Iggers who, along with his wife Wilma surreptitiously collected data and prepared the report that lead to the landmark Supreme Court case that dismantled segregated Central High School in Little Rock, AR in 1957. Featured in this issue are other inspiring stories. Our next issue will profile brothers in politics and government. Proverbs 4:7 states: “Wisdom [is] the principal thing; [therefore] get wisdom: and with all thy getting get understanding.” As Sigma moves forward let us prepare to meet the challenges that lie ahead by first preparing ourselves with wisdom believing that understanding will follow. With a right spirit and a firm conviction that education at all cost is the right course, we can follow the advice of Thoreau who said, “Go confidently in the direction of our dreams, live the life you’ve imagined.”

Fraternally, Bro. Ron Lewis Editor-In-Chief

THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 5


news SAXOPHONIST BRO. Brother Dr. George EVERETTE Carver HARP IS Washington BILLBOARD’S NO. 1 Monument Dedicated Congratulations to The Birmingham saxoaccomplished Alumni (Tau phonist Chapter Bro. Everette Sigma) of Phi BetaNorth Harp (Zeta Beta, Sigma Inc. Texas),Fraternity, who has the No. unveiled spectacle 1 album aon Billboard’s monument in memory Top Contemporary Jazz of George list.Brother Bro. Dr. Harp’s new Washington Carver on album, In The Moment, January 25, 2005. was released in May.The The monument which Billboard list, also sits f e in a -

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6 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL SPRING 2006 2006

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Saxophonist Bro.amet Everette Harp wiscing elit utpat, venim diam, velenim incil illaWissent autpat lobor lore facidunt Debuts at #1 on Billboard’s Jazz metumsan volore faccummy nis am,Top veroContemporary ea faccum aliquissed entList adip et, quisl ut nismoloborem zzrit delenis modigna at. Sum in utet nostisc iduipisisim iriliqu ismolut ad estin Congratulations to accomplished saxophonist Bro. Everette Harp (Alpha Beta henis nonsectet, venim veliquam, con euisl iureetum vel ip erat lumsandre consendip exeSigma chapter), has the 1 album Billboard’s Contemporary rostrud molutpat.who Ut nibh eumNo. vulla faccumon zzriureril utetTop volore conum nullan et praese feuisl eui blaor sit niscilnew in utpat adigna con eu feuislwas eliscin ciduisinaliquat vel iurer sum ing Jazz list. Bro. Harp’s album, In The Moment, released May. The eugiamcon velis aute delit non esed ming elit venim vulputpat niam ilis num zzriure magnisi. Billboard list, also features artists like Herbie Hancock and Gerald Albright.

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Howard University Moves Up in U.S. News Rankings Improvements at Howard University were key to the school moving up five positions in U.S. News & World Report’s annual ranking of “America’s Best Colleges” -- securing the 88th spot in the 2007 guidebook, according to Howard officials. “It’s a result of previous investments,” said Alvin Thornton, vice provost. “Rankings don’t come from what you did last year.” Among other historically black colleges and universities, Dillard University in New Orleans tied for 17th among “Comprehensive Colleges-Bachelor’s (South),” Johnson C. Smith University in North Carolina tied for 30th, Winston-Salem State University in North

Carolina and Stillman College in Alabama tied for 35th; Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina was 41st; Miles College in Alabama tied for 44th and Oakwood College in Alabama tied for 44th.

THE THE CRESCENT CRESCENT MAGAZINE MAGAZINE • SPRING • FALL 2006 | 7


Schools Under Fire, Student Achievement Down: Solution Begins With Parents by Corine Douthard James Research tells us that the amount of parental involvement has a direct effect on student achievement. When schools work together with parents to support learning, children succeed not only in academics, but throughout the course of their lives. How can you solve a problem in the classroom if the root of the issue originates at home with the parents? If a child is sick every day due to contaminated water at home, would you try to solve the problem by installing water purifiers throughout the school and send the child home each day with a bottle of spring water? Or would you find a way to teach the parent how to purify the drinking water at home to eliminate the problem altogether? Bro. Daron Barker, founder and president of Parentpoints, Inc. has developed a phenomenal parenting system that is sweeping the nation with educators, churches and parents. Daron is an alumni of Lambda Eta chapter at Arkansas State University. He is currently a financial member of Phi Beta Sigma Sigma Chapter in Atlanta, GA. Daron is true blue, through and through, and the proof is evident in the colors of his company logo. “One should not overlook the potential of this training program for primary prevention of problems in social adjustment,” says Dr. George Jones, a psychologist from Clemson University. Barker’s new book entitled Back to the Basics: The Points Method™ Guide to Healing the Family is creating quite the buzz. Professor Alfred Powell of the Human Motivation Council, an active child advocate, says, “It is an easy, solution-oriented read. There may not be a bluebook on parenting, but there is a yellow one.” Barker says the Parentpoints Points Method™ system gives children back to their parents. “It untangles years of parenting errors, miscommunications and misunderstandings that have caused a discon-

8 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006

nect in the relationship between parents and their children, which carries over into every facet of their lives, especially education.” Barker, who created his system to restore this gap, also says contributing to this ‘disconnect’ is the tendency for most parents to form behaviors that work against them and undermine their ability to guide and teach their children. “Over time even the smallest problem can become a major barrier between parents and their children.” “Many parents have forgotten the basics. They don’t know what to do or they have simply been convinced [that] they are inadequate and incapable of getting the job done.  Hence, the responsibility of training and guiding their child becomes everybody else’s responsibility. That is why schools are suffering. Instead of teaching academics, they have to teach what used to be taught at home.” In March of this year, PowerSchool commissioned an online survey of over 1,550 parents with at least one child represented in each level kindergarten through 12th grade. The survey, conducted to determine the frequency and manner of communication parents currently have with their child’s school. The survey revealed that an overwhelming preponderance of parents want to be more involved in their child’s development. If most parents want the best for their children and want to play an active role in shaping their development and to promote higher student achievement, why aren’t we seeing better results? “If you plan a parent involvement event at a middle school of 1100 adolescent students and you have 12 parents participate in the event, the evidence is beyond dispute, something is broken and it behooves us all to get with the solution.” Barker urges everyone to be part of the solution.


“Brothers and Sisters of Phi Beta Sigma and Zeta Phi Beta, Superintendents, Directors, Senators, Teachers, Ministers, we all are the vital link that must carry a message of renewed commitment to bridging the gap and level the playing field of academic achievement. Our very fraternity was founded on the principal of truth. True to be who we are, true to the motto of Culture for service and service for humanity. We must continue to provide outstanding leadership and service to our most precious human resource, our children.” In the fall of 2006, Parentpoints is launching the Generation S.N.A.P. (Stimulating Natural Analytical Processes) Campaign. This campaign is aimed at going out,

getting our people, and empowering them to become the driving force in the life of their child and community. “The time is Now! Parentpoints is on the move. Men of Sigma, Our Cause Speed on Its Way, united as the power of one and take back control of our families and communities at its core: THE PARENTS.” You can contact Brother Daron Barker via email at dbarker@parentpoints.com or visit them online at www.parentpoints.com or www.generationsnap.org. Be prepared show our numbers and strength by supporting our brother when the Power The Parent Campaign comes to your town.

JOB OPPORTUNITY: MEMBERSHIP SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR The International Headquarters of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. is currently seeking a Membership Services Administrator in Washington, DC. This position serves as a single point of contact for responding to all aspects of individual member requests and those from Chapters, Regional and/or National Officers. This position reports to the International Executive Director. Responsibilities include (but are not limited to): • • • • •

Processing membership orders Maintaining member/chapter files Answering member questions and resolving disputes Production of membership reports Process Improvement – Seeks out process and technology improvements and develops business case supporting implementation • Maintains up-to-date processes and procedures This position requires a strong sense of urgency and creative problem solving skills. Additionally, this position requires empathy towards members, effective communication and interpersonal skills. Customer relations experience preferred. Exceptional verbal and written communications skills, exceptional customer service experience with Access Database and Report Writer. Proficient with Microsoft Office software. Experience supporting or leading the design of enabling technology that supports process improvement. Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university is required. Salary range commensurate with experience. Please send cover letter and resume to: Donald J. Jemison International Executive Director 145 Kennedy Street, NW Washington, DC 20011 Attn: Membership Service Administrator Position THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 9


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By: Inez saki-tay ILLUSTRATION BY: BRO. RON LEWIS In January January, 2006, the the show show 20/2020/20 aired aired a a segment on oneducation educationcalled called“Stupid “StupidininAmerica: America: How We Cheat Our Kids” which was dedicated to looking at education models that work and others that often fail. The majority of successful schools shown stressed “old fashioned values” and often academically surpassed school districts that spent three times as much money per child. According to the report, where there was an excessive amount of money spent on children, the end result was often not academic success. THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 11


The most successful places of education were schools with programs like the Washington; D.C. based hip-hop non-profit Words Beats and Life (WBL). These successful programs integrated teachers who care, an interactive approach to education and, most importantly, programs that meet students where they are. The approach to community development employed by Words Beats and Life is drastically different from most traditional educational institutions. Not only does WBL work through the arts, but it also begins with the medium of hip-hop culture and its five basic elements -- graffiti (visual arts), MC’ing/Poetry (oral communication), DJ’ing (technology), B-boying/B-girling (dance) and Knowledge (business).

Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: The Foundation Upon the completion of the second annual Words Beats and Life Hip-Hop Conference, in 2002, at University of Maryland, organizers of the conference understood the power of hip-hop culture as an effective means to educate and engage youth in dialogue and support direct action. In 2002, Mazi

Mutafa, a brother of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. (Epsilon Psi SU 01) became a co-founder and executive director of WBL. WBL was designed to continue the legacy of the fraternity by promoting the principles of Phi Beta Sigma -brotherhood, scholarship and service. Early on, Mutafa consulted brothers in the fraternity such as Gerald Smith and Michael Husban, who later became the managing editor of the Journal and now serves as a WBL university advisor, about the direction of WBL. WBL is a living testament of the power of the motto “Culture for Service and Service to Humanity.” WBL takes a multifaceted approach to education through the D.C. Urban Arts Academy, Words. Beats. Life.: Global Academic Journal of Hip Hop, hiphop conferences and the Express Yourself Campaign to Prevent Youth Violence (a multimedia violence prevention campaign). The Journal and Academy are both the anchor program and publication, respectively, of the lasting social change which Word Beats and Life was founded to create.

D.C. Urban Arts Academy in Southeast Washington, D.C. “To actually have a brother get

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people together to actually put programs on Saturday for kids?  In the ‘hood’? You don’t find that too often in New York or D.C. maybe even L.A. I don’t know, but not too many 28-year-olds are going to give up their Saturday. And then, getting their boys together, and getting their friends to teach kids to do graffiti, MC’ing and DJ’ing in the community is impressive,” explained Chris Etienne, WBL graphic designer and brother of Phi Beta Sigma. Teachers involved with the D.C. Urban Arts Academy volunteer their time at the Benning Park Reaction Center in southeast Washington, D.C. The recreation center is located in one of the District’s most economically devastated and most under serviced communities. It’s for this reason that the work of the Academy becomes so important. It brings hope into the hearts and minds of a generation of youth abandoned by the institutions created to nurture and develop them. It gives practical skills and provides mentors who care to children forgotten by the more affluent parts of the city. Academy instructors agree that there is nothing traditional about WBL’s approach. Kids who attend the Academy benefit from aca-


demic and cultural enrichment. They are given transferable skill sets through a series of interactive 12-session workshops. Encouraged by his mother to attend, Kamau, a student at a DC area high school, says the Academy has helped to expand his skills and interest in the arts generally and advanced his

and sponsored by the Sigma Sigma Sigma Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma. The academy caught John’s attention because “We don’t get these kind of opportunities at my old school. Mazi came to my high school, Hyde Public Charter School, to talk about the program. And when he started talking about

interest in higher education specifically. Students of the Academy are encouraged to be themselves.  John, now a freshman at Marshall University in West Virginia, enrolled in the Academy during his senior year in high school. John is a visual artist and is also the second recipient of a textbook scholarship created by the Journal

t-shirts, internships and apprenticeships, I was like sign me up. So I came to one of the programs and I’ve been coming ever since.” John says, “The Academy helped me to speak my mind and build self-confidence.” The creative experience through hip-hop helps students of the Academy expand their mind, accentuate their unique potential

and speak with purpose about their own ability and future. Participants share the sentiment of being taught perseverance. “‘Can’t’ is a curse word here,” explained Kelsi, a student in the Academy. Volunteers of the D.C. Urban Arts Academy are driven by purpose. Jamel Muhammad, a volunteer teacher at the Academy, stresses the need for dialogue between youth and adults, reminiscent of his childhood. He finds it imperative to pass on the knowledge of the arts and sense of community through being involved and doing programs. “Youth need mentorship. You have to give back,” he says. “The bottom line is we are a creative people. Kids need to be shown that creativity can be productive, even if it’s through hiphop, and that it’s okay to express your creativity,” Academy instructor Korji Knuit said. According to the Executive Director, WBL “students are being taught life skills. Skills that will help them to be successful in the future as well as in the present. However, the teachers all agree that limited finances limit resources and the number of kids that can be involved in the Academy.”

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Community Financing vs. Grant Funding for Social Change Although the non-profit has received some grant moneys and

corporate funding from socially conscious businesses, Mutafa believes that most non-profits are overly dependent on grant money. What makes WBL different is that most of its revenue comes from its conferences and Journal. Last year the organization saw a 50 percent increase in sales service and has the potential to double that amount this year. According to Chris Etienne,  WBL graphic designer, “Words Beats and Life is the future of hip-hop … and recording what hip-hop is and will be. Not only does WBL not accept payment for ad’s in the publication, it doesn’t do what the Vibe or Source does.” Etienne says.

Executive Director Mazi Mutafa is adamant about not accepting money from everyone, for everything. This is in part because for things like the journal, WBL wants complete editorial freedom for its contributors. However, in the case of the Academy, WBL sees it as the responsibility of good corporate citizens to support the work its staff is doing in Ward 7. “We are committed to being responsible to the community itself, and for that reason, want to always have individual donations as the financial foundation.” To that end WBL often engages in individual giving campaigns and Combined Federal Giving Campaigns and site visits for potential funders. WBL also depends on the sale of its Journal and being booked to deliver hip-hop conferences on university campuses nationwide. As Mutafa says, “It’s not just about doing good work, but about being

sustainable. We need to play as much of a role as possible in insuring that we can finance the work we know we must do.” WBL is in the midst of its first aggressive development campaign that involves government, private and public foundation grants. The Board of Directors has also begun to develop corporate partnerships on a project-by-project basis.

Service to Humanity: From the University to the Streets Currently, the Journal is being used as a primary text in courses at the University of Maryland College Park, The Community College of Baltimore County, Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania, among others. The Journal can be purchased online and in various university bookstores, as well as at WBL conferences and during WBL workshops. The WBL Journal, as a body of independent academic hip-hop research, chronicles the transformations and critiques the byproducts within hip-hop culture. This is especially important because part of the goal of the publication is to encourage strategic thinking among readContinued on page 40

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n a i h c a l i r f Af t o r B

Bro. Frank X. Walker 16 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006


Poet,

author, author,

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inspired approach to art, art, teaching teaching

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Walker, 44, grew up in Danville, Kentucky, a small town in the state’s central central bluegrass region. Walker was initiated into the Mu Theta chapter of Phi Beta Beta Sigma Sigma Fraternity, Inc. at the

Lexington. Kentucky. He

University of Kentucky in currently lives in Lexington, Lexington,

Kentucky and is a member of Eta

Alpha Sigma chapter. Walker is

on the faculty of Transylvania

University, a small liberal arts

university in Lexington, KY.

By Beth Newberry

THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 17


W

alker has published three collections of poetry that traverse the landscape of family, community, politics and the search for personal and cultural identity. One of his most significant and recognized contributions to contemporary culture is his role in founding the poetry collective, the Affrilachian Poets, in 1991. The word Affrilachian takes the word Appalachian, typically defined as white residents from the mountains, and replaces the letters P with F — a visual and verbal link to Walker’s African heritage. The catalyst for the invention of this self-defined label was a literary event Walker attended in 1991 in Lexington featuring four white Kentucky writers and one African-American poet from South Carolina. The reading had been first titled “The Best of Appalachian Writing” but was renamed “The Best of Southern Writing.” Walker questioned this change when he could name several African-American and non-Caucasian writers from the greater Appalachia region who could have easily fit the original criteria of the event. Soon after he coined the term “Affrilachia” in the title poem of his first collection (Old Cove Press 1999). “Some of the bluegrass/is black/ enough to know/ that being ‘colored’ and all/ is generally lost/ somewhere between/ the dukes of hazzard/ and the beverly hillbillies/ but/ if you think/ makin’ shine from corn/ is as hard as kentucky coal/ imagine being/ an Affrilachian/ poet.” In the 15 years since the group’s inception, the term Affrilachian has transcended a small group of writers in Kentucky and is used as a term to define a personal identity or heritage by anyone who identifies with it. Walker’s visionary examination of contemporary culture, politics and community is seen in other work as well. In the poem “Li’l Kings” Walker re-imagines the life and impact of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. if he was a contemporary rapper. He writes, “what if/ the good reveren doctah/

18 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006

mlk jr/ was just marty/ or li’l king/ not a pastor/ but a little faster/ from the streets/ quoting gangta rap/ not Gandhi.” In another poem, “We Real Crunk,” he revisits the Gwendolyn Brooks poem “We Real Cool,” after realizing that the 21st-century youth he taught didn’t identify with the original work. His style captures attention in audiences (many who might not have read poetry otherwise) and his approach to literature creates hope for readers and students alike. While inducing optimism is a signature trait to Walker’s work, it is also a key to his approach to education. Walker’s personal educational philosophy references the W.E.B. DuBois statement, “Education is the key to success in America. Without it individuals are relegated to a lower quality of life and with it an increased chance for a quality of life.” Walker identifies with this philosophy. “It is a holistic view that reinforces humanity,” he says. “It doesn’t leave out the arts or [exclude] students or any age. Without art, education is incomplete.” Many professional educators have stories about teachers that impacted their lives and encouraged them to go into a career in teaching, but Walker has a different one. Walker was encouraged by many teachers growing up. But one negative experience as a senior at Danville High School in 1982 served as a touchstone for Walker during his college career. Walker’s calculus teacher asked each student in the class what their plans were for after graduation. When she reached Walker, “I said, ‘I’m going to the University of Kentucky on an engineering scholarship,’” he recounts. “She laughed and said, ‘What? You’re not going to play basketball like the rest of them?’” Instead of taking her demeaning comments to heart Walker used her words as a challenge. “She questioned my potential to succeed in higher education. Part of me always heard her when I considered not finishing. I wanted to prove her wrong,” he says. Walker did gradu-


ate in 1987, but not with a degree in engineering. After dropping out for a year, he returned to the University of Kentucky in Lexington at first majoring in journalism and eventually switching to his first artistic passion, studio art, and then to English. “I was interested in art and writing (since childhood) but no one encouraged me to pursue it in higher education,” he says. Walker credits his mother, Faye Walker, who passed away in 2005, as the primary educator in his life. The oldest son of nine children, Walker describes his mother as “ the ultimate example [of a teacher]. She taught me to survive, to interact with all people and to be genuine,” he says. “She taught me to give openly and honestly — that it was the proper thing to do and when you do that you will get things back.” These home-taught values complement the principles he values as a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. “The choice to become a Sigma was easy. The philosophy was parallel with what I believed,” he says. “The motto ‘Culture for Service and Service for Humanity’ reflected a priority of being involved in the community and of being part of a community.” In 2004, Walker published his second collection, ‘Buffalo Dance: The Journey of York’ (University Press of Kentucky, 2004). The poems are written in the imagined voice of York, the slave of explorer William Clark, as he journeyed west on the Lewis & Clark expedition. The poems are based on historical research and archival materials from the era. In the years since receiving his bachelor’s degree Walker has gone on to teach in a variety of classroom settings, some the traditional brick and mortar classrooms but a large portion of the classes Walker has taught have been in non-traditional settings. In his career Walker has taught poetry workshops in 30 states and three countries including GED classes, elementary schools in Northern Ireland, incarcer-

ated youth in Alabama, mental hospital patients in Louisiana, community centers across Appalachia, the Urban Appalachian center in inner city Cincinnati and on the Nez Perce Indian reservation in Idaho. Walker likes to connect with “students that wouldn’t find themselves in college classrooms, private schools or even public schools,” he says. “I enjoy watching them fall in love with words. [I like working with] people who are exposed to poetry for the first time and discover they can write it.” Walker’s passion for this kind of poetic intervention-meets-populist-education comes from his own experience. He wants the gulf between people who don’t have art in their lives and those who can create it to disappear. “I have been part of both worlds and have a commitment to bring them closer together.” Walker is currently balancing teaching with writing and publishing pursuits. In 2003 he was the first poet to graduate with a Master of Fine Arts in Writing degree from Spalding University in Louisville, KY. Since then he has published his third collection of poems entitled Black Box (Old Cove Press, 2005) and received the internationally esteemed Lannan Literary Fellowship in Poetry with a $75,000 honorarium. He has read at the Lincoln Center in New York and has been invited to read at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC next winter. This summer he will return to the Nez Perce Reservation to research the life of York further through the tribe’s transcribed oral histories archive. He also has plans to establish Duncan Hill Press (named after the neighborhood of his childhood) to publish a poetry anthology of work by writers of varied racial and cultural backgrounds entitled America, What’s My Name? To contact Frank X Walker or to learn more about his work visit www.frankxwalker.com. Beth Newberry is associate editor of Louisville Magazine in Kentucky and a former student of Frank X. Walker’s.

THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 19


Dr. Henry Shannon’s Vision: Community Colleges That Educate Everybody Article provided by the St. Louis Community College System’s Public Information Office

W

hen he was only a boy, Henry Shannon’s grandmother used to call him “little professor.” Her words inspired a child reared among the Mississippi cotton fields to aim high and plan for success early.

At the age of eight, Henry left behind the escalating racial tensions in Clarksdale, MS, for St. Louis, MO, a town that would embrace him and offer great opportunity. He went on to earn a doctorate in education and a master’s degree in counseling education from Washington University and a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Harris-Stowe State College. Though the academic credentials were important, Dr. Shannon credits his self-imposed plan for professional growth with guiding him into the executive offices. “When I was younger, I set out to grow my strengths so I would get the jobs I wanted,” Dr. Shannon says. “I had a wealth of experience and that gives you the breadth and depth that you need, especially in running an institution. The more experience you have, the greater your comfort level in dealing with challenges. I also met with a number of college presidents, half a dozen or so. I would phone

them and then meet with them to interview them about how they became a president. Learning from others who are already there – that is invaluable.” In 1992, Dr. Shannon became president of the Forest Park campus. After a stint as interim chancellor in the late 1990s, he was appointed chancellor in 2000 – taking the helm of a district that has accepted the mission of “expanding minds, and changing lives.” The district is the largest community college system in Missouri and second only in size to the University of Missouri system. Its budget is approximately $145 million and it employs nearly 3,000. The St. Louis Community College system offers a much different experience than Saint Louis University, an affluent Jesuit education institution where he had served as assistant director of the Student Education Services Center and director of the Upward Bound program. From 1975 to 1979, he was a counselor and director of the Counseling Center at Harris-Stowe State College. He also has worked as a counselor and teacher with the St. Louis Public Schools. His affectionate relationship with community colleges began in 1983 when he became dean of stuContinued on page 23

20 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006


THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 21


Book Review

The Unfinished Agenda of Brown v. Board of Education Reviewed by Bro. Todd D. Le Bon

The Brown v. Board of Education decision was handed down by the U. S. Supreme Court in May 1954. Fifty years later the editors of Black Issues in Higher Education compiled the book The Unfinished Agenda of Brown v. Board of Education to foster a dialog on the issue of equal education in today’s America. Through the use of historical references, commentary, personal reflections and contributions from various professionals, the editors are encouraging the community to participate in the discussion. The book’s contributors assist the reader in evaluating the progress made since 1954, while suggesting some possible ways we might proceed on the issue. The book provides a wealth of historical information for readers not familiar with the background of the Brown v. Board case. Readers are introduced to the lawyers who played a pivotal role in the fight for equality in education and those cases preceding Brown v. Board. The editors do not wish for the dialogue to be limited to the book’s contributors. They feel any meaningful agenda should include input from the community. Contributors to the book include educators, psychologists, and journalists, members of the Asian and Mexican American communities, as well as the daughter of one of the plaintiffs. Each chapter opens with commentary from Tavis Smiley. Dialog resulting from the book is intended to assist us as we complete the unfinished agenda of Brown v. Board. This book is a great resource for those seeking a better understanding of the fight for equality in the American educational system. Readers also receive an inside view of the environment existing, during the time of the trial, from those who lived it. The book is a valuable source for parents seeking a better educational environment for their children. The information, analysis and ideas within will give them a solid foundation to draw from as they attempt to make changes to the system. The question now, where do we go from here? THE AUTHORS: Dr. James A. Anderson is Vice President and Associate Provost for Institutional Assessment and Diversity as well as professor in the Department of Psychology at Texas A& M University. Dr. Dara N. Byrne is a professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice of CUNY in the Department of Speech, Theatre and Media Studies. Tavis Smiley is host of the Tavis Smiley Show on PBS (Public Broadcasting Service), ABC Radio Network’s The Smiley Report, The Tavis Smiley Show on PRI (Public Radio International), and the author of six books. Tavis Smiley also appears twice weekly on the Tom Joyner Morning Show.

22 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006


Continued from page 20

dents at the Forest Park campus. As chancellor, he continues to serve on boards and pursue initiatives that can provide new tools and strategies. He has served as chairman of the American Association of Community Colleges Board of Directors since July 2004, and is president-elect of Renewal and Change 2000, a membership organization of selected community colleges. Dr. Shannon’s roles as teacher, leader, college president, civic citizen, and problem-solver have prepared him for the difficult challenges facing community colleges. At a time when the world economy is powered by knowledge and creativity, policy makers are questioning whether higher education is a privilege or a right earned by promising students. “It is difficult to move forward or be progressive at a time when finances are not the best,” Dr. Shannon says. “How do we get the public to see the value of education when some think it is a private matter not a public good?” Dr. Shannon suggests that community colleges must grow their strengths in much the same way he did during his rise to the chancellor’s office. Each must develop a plan, think big, and use limited resources wisely.

“In our system, we find that is easier to retain a student than to recruit a student,” Dr. Shannon says. “There are so many variables in a student’s life that we can’t control: family, finance, jobs, job loss. . . . We are trying to do more upfront with orientation.” In addition, administrators have zeroed in on academic preparedness. Students who are not proficient in reading and unable to read college textbooks are no longer admitted in regular classes. St. Louis decided, as Dr. Shannon explains, that students have a right to succeed. If they can’t read, they can’t do their work. “A student who can read effectively will be successful in the class,” he says. The district also has set up a retention task force to look at late registration and student advising during the start of the semester. “We typically lose a student in the first four weeks. The stronger they are academically, the more likely they are to succeed. By working to strengthen their skills, we are increasing their chances for success.” In St. Louis Community College and its students, Dr. Shannon sees the same potential for greatness that his grandmother saw in him.

“Our vision is to be world class,” he says. “We have globally competent citizens coming out of our institution with the skills to be lifelong learners. We have talented staff and faculty. . . .Two-thirds of our staff turned over in 10 years and the leadership baton passed to people who understand community college.” Dr. Shannon says he thinks that the best thing we can do is provide accessible and affordable education as close as possible to where people work and live. “I want us to be the first choice for all the students coming out of high school. We want them to feel that, first and foremost, whether they are scholars or they need remediation, the benefits offered by St. Louis Community College are critical to their future success. We have diversity of programs and people, and both are assets in today’s global workplaces,” Dr. Shannon says. “Our students can learn how to be assertive and successful. We can ill afford to have illiterate folk off the highway of success. If this country is to survive, education has to be for everybody.”

THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 23


Distinguised Service Chapter Members

* deceased

1929 - 1951 *

No.

Year

First Name

Last Name

Chapter

1

1929

Honorable Brother Atty. Jesse W.

Lewis

Alpha Sigma

*

2

1930

Honorable Brother Dr. Alain Leroy

Locke

Alpha Sigma

*

3

1930

Honorable Brother Dr. I. L.

Scruggs

Theta Sigma

*

4

1930

Honorable Brother Dr. Cornelius V.

Troup, Sr.

Lambda Sigma

*

5

1930

Honorable Brother Dr. Robert R.

Moton

Gamma Sigma

*

6

1930

Honorable Brother Augustin A.

Austin

Epsilon Sigma

*

7

1930

Honorable Brother Atty. Arthur W.

Mitchell

Alpha Sigma

*

8

1934

Honorable Brother A. Langston

Taylor

Alpha Sigma

*

9

1934

Honorable Brother Dr. Clarence L.

Roberts

Epsilon Sigma

*

10

1935

Honorable Brother Dr. John

Ashurst

Epsilon Sigma

*

11

1935

Honorable Brother Dr. R. A.

Billings

Lambda Sigma

*

12

1936

Honorable Brother H. S.

Crawford, Sr.

Iota Sigma

*

13

1936

Honorable Brother Atty. James W.

Johnson

Epsilon Sigma

*

14

1937

Honorable Brother James A.

Jackson

Epsilon Sigma

*

15

1937

Honorable Brother Hugh Fisher

Lewis

Upsilon Sigma

*

16

1937

Honorable Brother Dr. Leonard F.

Morse

Nu Beta Sigma

*

17

1937

Honorable Brother Dr. George Washington

Carver

Gamma Sigma

*

18

1939

Honorable Brother Thomas W.

McCormick

Gamma Sigma

*

19

1939

Honorable Brother Dr. A.T.R.

Weathers

Member-at-Large

*

20

1940

Honorable Brother Atty. George W.

Lawrence

Upsilon Sigma

*

21

1941

Honorable Brother Elmo N.

Anderson

Epsilon Sigma

*

22

1941

Honorable Brother Dewey W.

Roberts

Phi Sigma

*

23

1942

Honorable Brother Dr. Felix J.

Brown

Iota Sigma

*

24

1946

Honorable Brother Clarence L.

Townes, Sr.

Iota Sigma

*

25

1946

Honorable Brother Dr. Edward C.

Mitchell

Gamma Sigma

*

26

1946

Honorable Brother Dr. Clarence

Muse

Phi Beta Sigma

*

27

1946

Honorable Brother Dr. Charles W.

Hill

Phi Beta Sigma

*

28

1946

Honorable Brother George F.

Robinson, Sr.

Epsilon Beta Sigma

*

29

1947

Honorable Brother John W.

Woodhous

Zeta Sigma

*

30

1947

Honorable Brother Zaid D.

Lenoir

Kappa Sigma

*

31

1947

Honorable Brother Atty. George A.

Parker

Alpha Sigma

*

32

1948

Honorable Brother Dr. George L.

Hightower

Lambda Sigma

*

33

1949

Honorable Brother William E.

Dear, Jr.

Kappa Beta Sigma

*

34

1949

Honorable Brother Dr. John A.

Turner

Alpha Sigma

*

35

1949

Honorable Brother John E.

Smith

Upsilon Sigma

*

36

1950

Honorable Brother Dr. Edward P.

Jimson

Theta Beta Sigma

*

37

1951

Honorable Brother Dr. Ras O.

Johnson

Lambda Sigma

*

38

1951

Honorable Brother Dr. Rivers

Fredericks

Theta Beta Sigma

24 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006


Distinguished Service Chapter Members

* deceased

1952 - 1973 *

No.

Year

First Name

Last Name

Chapter

39

1952

Honorable Brother John F.

Lewis

Delta Sigma

*

40

1952

Honorable Brother James A.

Grant

Xi Beta Sigma

*

41

1953

Honorable Brother Dr. Robert J.

Hill

Zeta Sigma

*

42

1953

Honorable Brother Dr. M.T.

Walker

Alpha Sigma

*

43

1954

Honorable Brother Woodrow W.

Carter

Epsilon Sigma

*

44

1954

Honorable Brother Maurice A.

Moore

Upsilon Sigma

*

45

1955

Honorable Brother Richard A.

Hester

Omicron Sigma

*

46

1955

Honorable Brother Atty. Hutson L.

Lovell

Kappa Beta Sigma

*

47

1955

Honorable Brother Dr. W. Sherman

Savage

Phi Beta Sigma

*

48

1956

Honorable Brother R.H.

Beasley

Delta Gamma Sigma

*

49

1957

Honorable Brother Atty. Oliver C.

Eastman

Epsilon Sigma

*

50

1958

Honorable Brother Edger B.

Felton

Epsilon Sigma

51

1959

Honorable Brother Atty. Roswell O.

Sutton

Lambda Sigma

*

52

1959

Honorable Brother J. Benjamin

Horton, Jr.

Epsilon Beta Sigma

*

53

1960

Honorable Brother Dr. E. Rhudolphus

Clemons

Mu Beta Sigma

*

54

1960

Honorable Brother Dr. George D.

Flemmings

Omicron Sigma

*

55

1961

Honorable Brother Dr. William H.

Pipes

Epsilon Tau Sigma

*

56

1962

Honorable Brother Dr. James A.

Clark

Eta Sigma

*

57

1963

Honorable Brother Dr. Alvin J.

McNeil

Alpha Beta Sigma

*

58

1963

Honorable Brother Charles I.

Brown

Alpha

*

59

1963

Honorable Brother Dr. Parlett L.

Moore

Zeta Sigma

*

60

1964

Honorable Brother Andrew J.

Childress

Member-at Large

*

61

1964

Honorable Brother H. A.

Howard

Phi Beta Sigma

*

62

1966

Honorable Brother Dr. Lawrence D.

Reddick

Nu Sigma

*

63

1966

Honorable Brother Atty. Fred G.

Minnis, Sr.

Delta Omicron Sigma

*

64

1967

Honorable Brother Major Ephraim E.

Person

Upsilon Sigma

*

65

1967

Honorable Brother Edward M.

Baker

Nu Sigma

*

66

1969

Honorable Brother Atty. James T.

Horton

Alpha Sigma

*

67

1969

Honorable Brother S. Edward

Gilbert, Sr.

Kappa Sigma

*

68

1969

Honorable Brother Richard E.

Alleyne, Sr.

Kappa Beta Sigma

*

69

1970

Honorable Brother William J.

Nicks, Sr.

Alpha Beta Sigma

*

70

1970

Honorable Brother Oscar M.

Morgan

Phi Beta Sigma

*

71

1972

Honorable Brother Atty. Richard M.

Ballard, Jr.

Iota Sigma

*

72

1972

Honorable Brother J. Niel

Armstrong

Gamma Beta Sigma

73

1972

Honorable Brother Judge Joseph D.

Roulhac

Delta Rho Sigma

74

1973

Honorable Brother Dr. Gilbert H.

Francis

Kappa Beta Sigma

*

75

1973

Honorable Brother C. Melvin

Patrick

Epsilon Sigma

*

76

1973

Honorable Brother William

Perry

Phi Beta Sigma

Continued on page 37 THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 25


The The Amazing Amazing Lifeofof Life

Brother Dr. Georg Iggers Brother Dr. Georg Iggers Picture this, Conclave 1955, Louisville, Picture this, 1955,speaker Louisville, Kentucky, andConclave the keynote is a Kentucky, and the keynote speaker brother who is believed to be one of isthea brother whomen is believed be one the first white initiatedtointo PhiofBeta first white men initiated PhionBeta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Heinto went to Sigma Fraternity, Inc. He went on to become one of the preeminent activists of become preeminent activists of his time.one He of is the a world renowned histohis time. He professor, is a worldcivil renowned rian, author, rights histoactivrian, author, professor, civil rights activist and sought after lecturer. He recently ist and the sought after of lecturer. He Univerrecently visited campus American visited campus ofDC American University in the Washington, to recount his sity in Washington, DC to recount story. In attendance were members his of story. In attendance were members of the student body and Sigmas and Zetas the student body and Zetas from the campus andSigmas local and chapters. from inthe campusGermany and local chapters. Born Hamburg, December 7, Born in Hamburg, Germany December 7,

1926, Georg Gerson Igersheimer fled Nazi 1926, Georg Gerson Igersheimer fledcame Nazi Germany, with his family in 1938 and Germany, withStates. his family 1938 and came to the United Heinwas educated in to the United States. He was educated in Richmond, Virginia, and in 1944 at age Richmond, Virginia, and degree in 1944 at the age 17, received his bachelor’s from 17, receivedofhis bachelor’sHe degree University Richmond. laterfrom wentthe to University of Richmond. He later went to Chicago and received his doctorate degree Chicago receivedof hisChicago doctorate from theand University indegree 1950. from the University of Chicago in In 1951, Iggers and his wife Wilma 1950. (who In 1951, Iggers and his wife Wilma (who emigrated from Czechoslovakia) moved emigrated from Czechoslovakia) to Little Rock, Arkansas. Theymoved both to Little Rock, Arkansas. They both secured teaching positions at Philansecured at Philander Smithteaching College,positions a historically black der Smith College, a historically black college in the heart of the city. While college in theSmith, heart of city. became While at Philander thethe Iggers at Philander Smith, the Iggers became

By Bro. Kevin Christian 26 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL SPRING 2006 2006


While a faculty member at Philander Smith College in Little Rock, AR in 1954, 1954,Dr.Bro. Bro. Georg Dr. Georg Iggers,Iggers, shownshown here at ahere November at a November 2005 lecture 2005 at lecture American at American University University in Washington, in Washington, DC is believed DC is believed to be one oftothe befirst the first White White members member to join Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.

THE THE CRESCENT CRESCENT MAGAZINE MAGAZINE • SPRING • FALL 2006 | 27


members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Bro. Iggers was appointed the Director of Education for the Little Rock NAACP Branch.

conviction, financed the initial lawsuit which led to the landmark case integrating Little Rock’s Central High School in 1957. Daisy Bates also played a significant role in the integra-

Posing as graduate students conducting research, the Iggers were able to secure documentation showing the disparity in the services between the white high schools and the black high school. Working side by side with civil rights leaders such as Daisy Bates, Georg and Wilma, with strength and

tion of the public schools, and would later serve as an advisor to the Little Rock Nine. In 1954, Bro. Iggers, under the guidance of Brother Bro. W.W. W.W.Pipes Pipes (a (a dean dean at atPhilander Philanderatat the the time and a past Editor of the Crescent Magazine), was initiated into Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. He was reluctant to join

28 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL SPRING 2006 2006

at first, but Dr. Pipes and the brothers on campus, convinced him to become a member. Iggers Bro. Iggers said “The said “The Sigma’s Sigma’s at Phiat lander Smith Philander Smith werewere strongly strongly committed to civil committed to rights, civil rights, education, eduand the community, cation, and the community, that is one of the that is one main of the reasons mainIreasons becameI a member”. became a member.” He served He served Sigma well from Sigma well 1954-1964, from 1954-1964, fighting for civil fighting forrights civil and rights working and at the national, working at the national, state and statelocal and levelslevels local to to promote promote brotherhood, scholarship and service. One of the highlights was his keynote address at the 1955 Conclave in Louisville, KY. “During my speech to the brothers I urged them to get involved with efforts to combat discrimination and to promote civil rights in their communities”, Iggers said. The communities,” Our Cause Speeds On history book notes that “Dr. Iggers was a hit among the brothers.” brothers”. In 1964, the Iggers left Little Rock and moved to New Orleans, LA. He became a professor at Dillard University. He became inactive in the fraternity at this time and remained inactive for almost 40 years. Bro. Mark “Mallet” Pacich stumbled upon an article in


the Arkansas Gazette, dated 1954, which read “White Man Initiated into a Black Fraternity”. Bro. Pacich decided to research this information and in 2001 found Bro. Iggers alive and well in Buffalo, NY. They developed a bond and began corresponding via email, phone calls and letters. Bro. Pacich was instrumental in bringing Bro. Iggers back to Sigma. In 2004 2004Bro. Bro. Iggers Iggers rejoined rejoined the Fraternity the Fraternity afterafter a visit a from visit from Bro. Clayton Bro. Clayton Epsteen Epsteen of the of Theta the Sigma Chapter Theta Sigma Chapter (Buffalo,(BufNY graduate falo, NY). chapter). AccordingAccording to Iggers, to Iggers, “Brothers, “Brothers, like Christian, like ChrisEpstian, Epsteen, teen, LeBon, Pacich LeBon,and Pacich oth-

ers convinced and others convinced me to me rejoin, to rejoin, and I am andglad I amthat gladI that did. I The did. The out out pouring pouring of ofemails emails from brothers has been wonderful.” Bro. Iggers was instrumental in tearing down the Berlin Wall and building bridges in the midst of the Cold War. He has received numerous awards and accolades, too numerous to name. In October of 2005, he was the keynote speaker at the fraternity’s New England States Meeting, and with his wife Wilma by his side addressed the students at the University of Hartford about his life and legacy. New England States Director, Bro. Leonard Lock-

hart told Iggers, “You are a testament to all that Phi Beta Sigma stands for, and your work in the area of social action makes me proud to call you brother”. brother.” Georg and Wilma recently released their memoirs with Berg Hahn Hahn Books Books entitled entitled “Two LivesLives Two in Uncertain in UncertainTimes”. Times. This remarkable story takes a look at the Iggers as they have spanned six decades as advocates for justice and civil rights. Dr. Iggers Iggers can canbebereached reached at iggers@buffalo. via email at iggers@buffalo. He and Wilma spend He edu. six months and Wilma a year inspend Buffalo,months six NY and the a year otherinsixBuffalo, months in and NY Goettingen, the other six Germany. months in Goettingen, Germany.

THE THE CRESCENT CRESCENT MAGAZINE MAGAZINE • SPRING • FALL 2006 | 29


Sigmas in Academia Counseling from Howard University, and the Doctorate in Education from Rutgers University with academic emphasis on the philosophy, function, role and administration of urban educational institutions.

Dr. Edison O. Jackson Presidemt Medger-Evers College Brooklyn, NY Dr. Edison O. Jackson was born in Heathsville, Virginia. He received the Bachelor of Science degree in Zoology, the Master of Arts degree in

After serving for four years as a Senior Counselor/Instructor at Federal City College, in 1969 Dr. Jackson assumed the position of Dean of Student Affairs at Essex County College in New Jersey. Promoted to Vice President for Student Affairs, he was soon appointed Executive Vice

30 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006

President and Chief Academic Officer of Essex County College in September of 1983. In 1985, Dr. Jackson accepted the challenge to lead Compton Community College in Compton, California, assuming the position of President/Superintendent, remaining there until his assumption of the presidency of Medgar Evers College of The City University of New York in 1989. Dr. Jackson holds membership in a number of civic, educational and community organizations. Likewise, Dr.

Jackson has served as a member of the Board of Directors of numerous social, political, and economic organizations. Service has included the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO); the American Association of State Colleges and Universities Millennium Leadership Institute; and, the Commission on Educational Credit and Credentials of the American Council on Education. A college president, educator, and community activist, Dr. Jackson has


written extensively on issues of concern to educators with particular concentration on minority students and the community, academic preparation and student performance. It is his genuine concern for the upliftment of people of color in the borough of Brooklyn and the City of New York that has resulted in Dr. Jackson’s selection as the recipient of numerous awards for community service; and, his work has been featured in numerous publications. Among the publications in which his work has been featured are: Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Black Issues in Higher Education, July, 1989; ERIC Clearinghouse, Study of Attrition: Non-returning Students for 1975-76, with Robert L. McMillan, 1976; other publications include: Essex County College: Dynamics of Governance - The Decision-Making Process of a Public Education Institution, Disserta-

tion, 1983; In Relentless Pursuit of Excellence, Medgar Evers College Press, 1992; Educating Our Students for A New World Order, Medgar Evers College Press, 1992; A Crucial Agenda: Making Colleges and Universities Work Better for Minority Students; Educating Our Students for a New World Order, Medgar Evers College Press, 1992; and, Religion, Education, and the American Experience: Reflections on Religion and American Public Life, College President As Spiritual Leader, University of Alabama Press, 2002. A motivational speaker and spiritual leader, Dr. Jackson is an ordained minister who serves on the ministerial staff of Bridge Street African Wesleyan Methodist Episcopal Church. Residing in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, Dr. Jackson is married to Florence E. Jackson. Dr. and Mrs. Jackson are the proud parents of two children, and one granddaughter.

I came from Madison, Wisconsin, a beautiful place that shares many of the same ideals as Portland—but a cold and icy place for someone who grew up in northern California’s mild clime.

Dr. Dan Bernstine President Portland State University Like many people, I came to Oregon during the 1990s for a career opportunity. And like so many others, my decision to stay was based on Oregon’s unique character and the rich quality of life that it provides. I first moved to Oregon in 1997 to take the job of president at Portland State University. It was an opportunity for me to pursue my dream of a career in public service, at an urban institution that embodied my personal ideals of access to education blended with excellence and community engagement.

As a university president, I have a deep commitment to higher education. To me, few things are as important as access to a quality education. That’s something I learned from my parents, and something I’ve tried to make available to as many people as possible. Students at Portland State learn the value of a quality and accessible education both in the classroom, where they work with some of the top thinkers and practitioners in their disciplines, and in the field, where every student has the chance to share skills and knowledge in community-based projects with fellow students and community members. When they graduate, PSU students are able to apply that real-world experience to what-

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ever opportunities life may present to them. Community service is integral to Portland State’s curriculum, and to the people that live here. One of the great things I’ve found about living in Portland is that so many people are willing to give something back and work toward a better future for all. Personally, I have been involved in organizations that support individual achievement, build strong communities, and serve children and families: the Urban League of Portland, the United Way, the Portland Business Alliance, and the Children’s Institute. Living in Oregon has many rewards, and one of mine is that when the sun comes out (and it does more often than a kid raised in California might think) I find myself behind the wheel of my car, top down, golf clubs in the trunk, and on my way to 18 holes of some of the world’s best golf with some of its most interesting people.

Dr. David Swinton President Benedict College Columbia, SC Born in New Haven, Connecticut, Dr. Swinton moved with his family to Timmonsville, South Carolina at the tender age of three months where he attended the Brockington School. He moved to New York City at 12 years of age and graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School in Brooklyn. In 1968, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics from New York University; in 1971, he was awarded a Master of Arts degree in Economics from Harvard University; and in 1975 Harvard University awarded him a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Economics.

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He is recognized for his academic achievements, his intellectual excellence, and his devotion to higher education. Dr. Swinton’s professional experience includes a seven-year tenure as Dean of the School of Business at Jackson State University where he led the successful effort to gain AACSB accreditation for the Business School. Prior to his appointment at Jackson State, he was Director of the Southern Center of Studies in Public Policy and Professor of Economics at Clark College (now Clark Atlanta University) in Atlanta, Georgia. President Swinton is renowned for his scholarly writings; most notably his analysis of the economic status of African Americans, which has been published in the National Urban League’s The State of Black America. His works have also been published in such professional journals as the American Economics Review, The Review of

Black Political Economy, Minority Youth Employment, Public Administration Review, Journal of Urban Analysis, and Business and Society. In 1998, Dr. Swinton became the first African American Chairman of the Greater Columbia Chamber of Commerce Board in the organization’s 92-year history. In 1999, Dr. Swinton helped organize a group of 50 investors to create South Carolina Community Bank, to preserve the only minority-owned bank in South Carolina. Dr. Swinton has served as Economic Advisor to the National Urban League since 1980, and has been a member of Black Enterprise Magazine’s Board of Economists since 1990. His honors and awards include Phi Beta Kappa, Coat of Arms Society, and Honors in Economics from New York University, Ford Foundation Fellow, Graduate Prize Fellowship from Harvard, the Order of the Palmetto,


and an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the University of Bridgeport. Recently, he received the Luther Wesley Smith Award for distinguished service in strengthening college or seminary programs. Since assuming the presidency of Benedict College, he has led an impressive program to improve the academic and physical environment of the college. Under his direction the college has implemented the first of three phases to develop a multimillion-dollar state-of-theart sports complex, which will feature a 10,000-seat football stadium as its centerpiece. Situated on a newly acquired 60 acres of land, the complex will also include an outdoor track, baseball and softball fields, tennis courts, a soccer field, and a football practice field. The Complex will be the site of attractive town homes for students along with Shoppe’s on Read commercial development.

To the amazement of the community, Dr. Swinton turned a troublesome “honky-tonk” after hours club into a modern community Health and Fitness Center. Along with the physical development of the College’s surrounding community, Dr. Swinton has been instrumental in administering the College’s community development programs as well. With programs such as the Department of Labor’s Welfare-toWork, it enables Benedict College to create partnerships with local businesses and provide jobs and training to program participants. Among other programs is the Freddie Mac Initiative, which has two major goals: to provide Freddie Mac with information concerning racial minorities perceptions of credit and to improve the credit worthiness of African Americans. For Dr. Swinton, Benedict College is a place where “Learning to Be

the Best: A Power for Good Into the 21st Century” is more than a slogan -- it characterizes his commitment to quality and continuous improvement of the college and its surrounding community.

Dr. Horace Mitchell President California State University, Bakersfield Dr. Horace Mitchell became the fourth President of California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB) in July 2004 after thirty-six years of experience in higher education. Under Dr. Mitchell’s leadership, the University is entering a

period of rapid development, with a vision to extend the excellence and diversity of the faculty and academic programs, enhance the quality of the student experience and strengthen community engagement. Dr. Mitchell came to his current position from the University of California, Berkeley, where he served as Vice Chancellor, Business and Administrative Services (1995-2004) and affiliated professor, African American Studies (1996-2004). Upon leaving UC Berkeley, he was awarded the Berkeley Citation, one of the campus’ highest honors. Also, the title Vice C h a n c e l l o r- B u s i n e s s Affairs, Emeritus was bestowed on him by the President of the University of California system. Dr. Mitchell holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology, a master of arts in education, and a Ph.D in counseling psychology, all from Washington University in St. Louis. He began his professional career at

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his alma mater in 1968, serving as assistant dean of the College of Arts and Sciences (19681973), assistant professor of Education and Black Studies (1973-78), and Chair of the Black Studies Program (1976-78). Dr. Mitchell then spent seventeen years (19781995) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), serving in several faculty and management positions. He was Associate Dean for Student and Curricular Affairs in the UCI College of Medicine from 1980-1984. During his last eleven years at UCI (1984-1995), he was Vice Chancellor-Student Affairs and Campus Life, and Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior. Dr. Mitchell, also a Professor of Psychology at CSUB, has teaching and research interests in the areas of identity construction, multicultural psychology, and psychological assessment. He continues to teach one course each year, and he maintains his California

license for private practice as a psychologist. Dr. Mitchell’s professional memberships include the American Council on Education, the American Psychological Association, the Association of Black Psychologists, and the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development.

Dr. Isiah M. Warner Vice Chancellor for Strategic InitiativesLouisiana State Univ. Baton Rouge, LA After receiving his Ph.D, Brother Warner went into academics because of his love for teaching, and his desire to be an edu-

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cator. However, he feels that he has exceeded his career goals since he is now more than an educator. He is also a mentor to many students all over the world. “Mentoring,” says Dr. Warner, “is one of the mechanisms by which I pay homage to those mentors who were there for me when I was pursuing my educational goals.” He goes on to state that “One of the highlights of my career was receiving the Award for Excellence in Science and Engineering mentoring at a White House ceremony in September, 1997. It was not the award that gave me the greatest sense of achievement. I was most honored by the fact that I was the only recipient of this award who was nominated by former and present students.” Over the years, Dr. Warner has had more than 200 undergraduates work in his laboratory as undergraduate researchers. Half of these students were under-represented minorities. Many of

them have gone on to pursue advanced training in medicine, chemistry, and law. As an administrator, he has brought in more than $20 million dollars in grants since April 2001 to support more than 400 undergraduates, many of whom are minority students. These funds have been used to focus on successful strategies for educating students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. He has won numerous awards for his efforts. Largely through his assistance, LSU is now the number one producer of African American Ph.Ds in chemistry in the entire country. Over the last ten years, the University has averaged about 30 African American graduate students per year working toward Ph.Ds. Before Dr. Warner arrived in 1992, LSU chemistry had never had more than three African Americans working on a Ph.D at any given time. He con-


siders cultural diversity an important component of his own research accomplishments over his career. Diversity is reflected in the thirtyfive Ph.Ds and the three masters students who have graduated from his research group, as well as the 15 graduate students currently studying under him. The ethnic composition of these 53 graduate students is as varied as the country: 21 Caucasians, 20 African Americans, 3 Asians, 6 Africans, 1 Hispanic, 1 Native American, and one student of African origin from Trinidad. This diversity, in Dr. Warner’s opinion, has contributed immensely to the success of his students, who are able to work within and understand a diverse population. In addition to the $20 million in funds for educational activities mentioned above, over the last ten years, Dr. Warner has averaged more than $500,000 per year in external grant funding

to support his research. He has published more than 250 peer reviewed manuscripts in the top journals in his field. He has written several book chapters and has also coedited two books. Furthermore, Dr. Warner has achieved the highest professorial rank within the LSU system (Boyd Professor). Although this distinguished educator has won numerous national awards for his research, he is most proud of the Year 2000 Eastern Analytical Symposium Award For Outstanding Achievements In The Fields Of Analytical Chemistry. This award is unusual in that it is given for outstanding contributions in more than one area of analytical chemistry. In his case, it was given for notable contributions in separations and in analytical spectroscopy.

Dr. Charles T. Edwards, Jr., Professor of Industrial Technology Prairie View A&M

For more than three decades, Bro. Dr. Charles T. Edwards Jr., Life Member No. 345, has been a mainstay in assisting college students with academic, social and professional development. He is one of the most revered men of Sigma in the Alpha Beta Sigma Chapter in Houston. Bro. Edwards has demonstrated exemplary service and leadership at Prairie View A&M University, serving in a number of administrative positions. He is a professor of Industrial Technology and has been recognized for many accreditation activities on behalf of the National Association of Industrial Technology. Bro. Edwards has served on eight accreditation teams and has been chairman of six of the eight. Bro. Edwards, an approved accreditation consultant, earned a BS at Hampton Institute (now Hampton University) in 1954. After being discharged from the Army in 1956, he returned home to pur-

sue a master’s degree. He earned an M.S. from Kansas State College of Pittsburg (now Pittsburg State University) in 1960. Bro. Edwards was admitted into the doctoral program at the University of Houston in 1972 and earned his doctorate in Curriculum and Instruction – Industrial Education in 1977. Bro. Edwards has published and presented papers on technical subjects and management theories to several educational and professional groups. His dissertation, Computer Applications to Engineering Design and Drawing with Basis for Course Content in Teaching Computer Graphics, was of great consequence and accepted by his peers as indicated by the number of copies purchased for three years. Bro. Edwards has held leadership positions in several organizations outside of Sigma, including Phi Delta Kappa, the National Association of Industrial Technology

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and the Southwest region of the National Hampton Alumni Association. As a Sigma, Bro. Edwards is a Distinguished Service Chapter member for the Gulf Coast Region who has won several chapter awards from Alpha Beta Sigma. He most recently was awarded the Presidential “Power of ONE” award as cochairman for the Hurricane Relief Committee, presented by 32nd International President Paul L. Griffin Jr. on April 14.

Dr. Walter E. Davis Superintendent Linden City School District, AL Born in Carson, Washington County, Alabama June 12, 1942. He is the third of six boys born to the late Sidney and Betty Davis. Bro. Davis graduated from Prestwick High School, Prestwick, Alabama in 1960. After graduating high school he attended Alabama A&M University, Normal, Alabama, where he received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Agri-

business Education. In 1970 he received a Master of Education Degree in Agribusiness Education from Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Alabama, and in 1984 he received a Master of Education Degree from the University of West Alabama, Livingston, Alabama in Administration and Supervision with Superintendent Certification. In June 2002, he received his Doctoral Degree from Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, in Administration and Educational Leadership. On April 12, 2001, he was appointed the first African American Superintendent of schools for the Linden City School District. The district is located in Southwest Alabama, and is a part of the Black Belt area of Alabama. The student population is Ninety eight (98) per cent African American, and Ninety three (93) percent of its’ students receive free or reduced breakfast and lunch. Since April 2001, the

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mission of the Linden City School District has been to provide the opportunity for challenging academic and social interaction for all students so that they may meet the demands of society in the 21st century. A major challenge of the district is to find ways to connect and engage students to promote a sense of belonging, safety and joy for learning have been challenging. Bro. Davis, and the Linden City Board of Education is committed to devising methods that reach out to students and generate enthusiasm toward academia, as well as create a sense of “Family” within the classroom. In striving to meet the needs of every student, Bro. Davis and the Linden City School District have relied heavily on grants awarded from federal and state funds. Over the past four years the district has been awarded $250,000 from the Workforce Investment Act (WIA); $800,000 from the Alabama Reading

First Initiative (ARFI) Grant; $600.000 from the 21St Century Community Learning Grant; $110,000 from the Alabama Reading Initiative Grant; and $195,000 from the Office of School Readiness (OSR) Grant. The total amount equals to $1,955,000. Resources from these programs not only increase students reading, math, and writing skills, but they are also providing new ways for students to demonstrate knowledge and understanding not possible through traditional instructional practices.

How do you reach an audience of upscale, professional men? Advertise in The Crescent Magazine. Call today (202) 726-5434


Distinguished Service Chapter Members

* deceased

1975 - 1995 No.

Year

First Name

Last Name

Chapter

*

77

1975

Honorable Brother Archie A.

Alexander

Mu Sigma

*

78

1975

Honorable Brother Dr. Ulysses S.

McPherson

Delta Gamma Sigma

*

79

1975

Honorable Brother Samuel B.

Newton

Zeta Sigma

*

80

1976

Honorable Brother Clifford M.

Blackman

Epsilon Sigma

*

81

1976

Honorable Brother John E.

Westberry

Alpha Beta Sigma

*

82

1976

Honorable Brother Atty. Reuben N.

Vaughn

Xi Beta Sigma

*

83

1978

Honorable Brother Dr. Guilbert A.

Daley

Zeta Sigma

84

1978

Honorable Brother Charles W.

Moore

Lambda Sigma

*

85

1979

Honorable Brother Lewis W.

Engram

Alpha Beta Sigma

86

1979

Honorable Brother Dr. Frank T.

Hawkins

Alpha Sigma Sigma

*

87

1979

Honorable Brother Chester

Riley

Upsilon Sigma

*

88

1981

Honorable Brother Dr. Orris V.B.

Cooper

Delta Chi Sigma

89

1981

Honorable Brother LTC Lucius E.

Young

Alpha Sigma

90

1981

Honorable Brother Gilbert W.

Lindsay

Phi Beta Sigma

* *

91

1982

Honorable Brother Atty. R. Eugene

Davis

Phi Beta Sigma

92

1982

Honorable Brother Atty. Demetrius C.

Newton

Tau Sigma

93

1984

Honorable Brother Sylvester

Davis

Eta Beta Sigma

*

94

1984

Honorable Brother Dr. Henry E.

Cheaney

Eta Alpha Sigma

*

95

1984

Honorable Brother George H.

Hibbler

Nu Sigma

*

*

96

1985

Honorable Brother Arthur D.

McNeal

Beta Tau Sigma

97

1985

Honorable Brother Marshall

Bass

Delta Sigma

98

1985

Honorable Brother Edward E.

Cannon

Gamma Rho Sigma

99

1987

Honorable Brother James T.

Floyd

Alpha Lambda Sigma

100

1987

Honorable Brother Dr. Samuel

Robinson

Epsilon Beta Sigma

101

1987

Honorable Brother Luster B.

Hayes

Eta Beta Sigma

102

1991

Honorable Brother Henry L.

Moore

Nu Sigma

*

103

1991

Honorable Brother Clifford M.

Ashmore, Sr.

Lambda Sigma

*

104

1991

Honorable Brother Henry A.

Webb

Beta Xi Sigma

*

105

1991

Honorable Brother James A.

Clarke

Eta Sigma

106

1991

Honorable Brother Waymon L.

Ponds

Alpha Delta Sigma

*

107

1991

Honorable Brother Clifton H.

Felton

Zeta Alpha Sigma

*

*

108

1993

Honorable Brother Thomas

Washington

Alpha Sigma

109

1993

Honorable Brother Moses C.

McClendon

Iota Sigma

110

1993

Honorable Brother Julius C.

Simmons

Beta Delta Sigma

111

1993

Honorable Brother William S.

Riley

Alpha Nu Sigma

112

1993

Honorable Brother Alonzo C.

Jackson

Chi Sigma

113

1993

Honorable Brother Carl J.

Turner

Xi Beta Sigma

114

1995

Honorable Brother Howard

Felder

Upsilon Sigma

Continued on page 51 THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 37


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THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 39


Continued from page 14

ers about the future of the culture and the community it represents. In an effort to promote scholarship and support service, the Sigma Sigma Sigma Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma donated $1,000 to the creation of the book scholarship given to youth published in the Journal. This effort was lead by Bro. Gerald Smith, former National Executive Director of Phi Beta Sigma. This initiative was developed under the leadership of Miesha Lowery, a member of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. and Michael Husband. Sigma’s leadership within WBL is at multiple levels. Bro. Mark

Lawrence, a management and technology consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton, chairs the board of directors of WBL. Lawrence is the third board chairman of Words Beats and Life and plays a crucial role in the organization’s strategy, fundraising and cause branding.  He brings his own love of hip-hop culture and his personal experience with the transformative power of the culture.  Mark has played a pivotal role in helping Mutafa develop execution plans for WBL’s long-term strategy and recruiting new board members.

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Our Cause Speeds On Its Way WBL is committed to expanding the Academy to serve a total of 40 youth this year. Journal staff are also committed to making it a primary text in more hip-hop and popular culture related courses around the world, along with making it available in campus bookstores around the country.

For more informa-

tion about Words, Beats, and Life please visit www.wblinc.org, and post your comments in the forums section (message board).


Zeta Phi Beta Founder Myrtle Tyler Faithful Inducted Into the Great Blacks in Wax Museum The National Great Blacks In Wax Museum announced the induction of the late Myrtle Tyler Faithful, one of the five founders of the national sorority, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. into the museum at an unveiling ceremony at the Walters Art Museum. Myrtle Tyler Faithful joins two other prominent Zetas in the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum - Writer Zora Neale Hurston and Griot Mary Carter Smith. Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. was founded on January 16, 1920 on the campus of Howard University in Washington, DC. January 16, 1920. The wax figure was funded by the Alpha Zeta Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc., which Myrtle Tyler Faithful also founded. She was an active member until her death in 1993. The Myrtle Tyler Faithful Fund, Inc. was established by the Alpha Zeta Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority in 1984 to honor Founder Myrtle Tyler Faithful. From 1996-2003 the Myrtle Tyler Faithful Fund has awarded scholarships totaling more than $50,000 to college bound high school students and former fund recipients for the continuation of their educational pursuits.

Bro. Marion Crowe Zeta Beta Sigma Chapter, Fayetteville, NC Sports Information Director • Fayetteville State University In 1993, Fayetteville State was without a sports information director. In a bind, Ralph Burns, the athletic director at the time, called on Crowe, who was planning to retire from Fayetteville Parks and Recreation that year. “He asked me if I would do it until they found another person. He said, ‘Yeah, it’s part time, just until we find somebody,’” Crowe said. “And that was January ’93. Thirteen years later, I’m still part-time, still waiting for them to bring in somebody.” With limited resources, Crowe has helped build the athletic department’s web site and has started numerous files for recordtracking. “He was a breath of fresh air,” said Eric Tucker, Fayetteville State’s

women’s basketball coach. Crowe will get back to the school at 1 or 2 in the morning after a road trip and stay up until 4 or 5 in the morning listening to Gladys Knight and doing his work. Remarkably, Crowe believes he’s still in debt to the school. Fayetteville State did, after all, give him an education. “I owe a lot to Fayetteville State,” he said. “They gave me an education and they gave my daughter an education.” Crowe’s trademarks at CIAA events are his rings. He wears one on every finger but his thumbs, gifts he’s received from the various championship teams during his tenure at Fayetteville State. Bro. Crowe is truly a rare and special breed.

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Bro. Dr. Kevin West: The Power of an Educator By Bro. Ikenna Anyanwu

wound at the early age of 15. With a brother feud that continued in my household for years, I opted to do things my way. I chose not to listen to my parents, do what I want and say what I want to whoever questioned me. At a time when I was losing control, I decided to see what the Sigma Beta Club was all about.

“Life is all about the choices you make; are you going to make the right choices?” I remember laughing at this quote off the first time I heard it. Who knew this would be one of those quotes that would subsequently redefine my life. This quote was said to me by Bro. Dr. Kevin West of Irvington, New Jersey. It is because of his words that I am alive and where I’m at today. Growing up in Irvington, New Jersey was not the easiest task in my life. Like many other urban areas, Irvington was consumed with gangs, crime, drugs, and kids opting to make bad choices. By the age of 15, I knew more about the streets than my mother could ever imagine. I had friends who dealt drugs, used drugs, and sold guns. Unfortunately I lost a close elementary school classmate and friend to a gun shot

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Brother Dr. Kevin West, the advisor to the Sigma Beta Club in Irvington took an unusual approach in handling his Sigma Beta Club. He wanted to recruit the best of the best as well as the worse of the worse. His vision was to put people from different spectrums of life and require them to work with each other and learn from each other. However, with my hot head attitude, I was not easily convinced. Under Bro. Dr. West’s close eye, I went from being a hot headed kid heading down the wrong path, to a leader. Although I had a rocky start, and was often put in what Sigma Beta Club members call the “Hot Seat” (used to question, evaluate, and punish one’s actions), I began to change. With the skills I learned from the Sigma Beta Club, I soon became the National Honor Society President, Sigma Beta Club President, Irvington High School’s football team captain, Irvington’s Homecoming King, Student Class Vice President, and Irvington High School’s Student of the Month. For once in my life, my parents were proud of me; and it’s all thanks to Bro. Dr. West. After graduating from high school, I was initiated into the Xi Pi chapter at The College of New Jersey just months after its reactivation. Using the skills learned from the Sigma Beta Club and Dr. Bro. Kevin West,


Contact the International Headquarters today to learn how to start your own Sigma Beta Club. I helped shape the Xi Pi chapter into an extraordinary chapter. For the first time, this chapter had retreats, brotherhood workshops, church visitations, etc. These initiatives were taught to me by Bro. Dr. West.

Under Bro. Dr. West’s close eye, I went from being a hot headed kid heading down the wrong path, to a leader.

Ole Miss To Retire Bro. Chucky Mullins’ Number 38 Before Season Opener Oxford, MS Ole Miss Athletics Director Pete Boone announced that the University will retire Mullins’ No. 38 football jersey during pregame ceremonies Sunday afternoon, Sept. 3, when the Rebels open the 2006 season against the University of Memphis in a game to be nationally televised by ESPN. Mullins had his career come to a tragic end on Oct. 28, 1989 when he broke his neck while making a tackle against Vanderbilt, which left him paralyzed from the neck down. For months after the accident, Chucky endured the grueling challenges of rehabilitation. His positive spirit touched the lives of hundreds of people.

Today, I am on the road towards graduating in May 2006 and I would be disappointed if Bro. Dr. West was not at my graduation. West, as I like to call him was more than an advisor; he is a friend and a father. I was proud to hear that our great fraternity honored him with the Distinguished Service Chapter award; an award deserving of his tireless efforts in saving our youth.

When Chucky returned to Oxford in August of 1990, he announced his determination to pursue a degree. Against all odds, in January of 1991 he did return to the classroom. However, on May 1, 1991, as he prepared for class, he suddenly stopped breathing. On May 6, he passed away due to complications resulting from a blood clot.

To this day, me and my former Sigma Beta brothers, some of whom are now members of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. still perform community service with the current Sigma Beta Club. Dr. West still contacts us and maintains his constant investment in our success. As an educator, Bro. Dr. Kevin West is New Jersey’s Principal of the Year. He is truly an educator and I am honored to call him my brother, friend, and my second father. He is truly a living image of what a Phi Beta Sigma Educator should be.

“We just think the timing is right to permanently retire the number,” said Andy Kilpatrick, president of the M-Club Chapter of the University of Mississippi Alumni Association. “The establishment of the Roy Lee “Chucky” Mullins Courage Award will forever preserve and honor his indomitable spirit. It’s the right thing to do.” The Chucky Mullins Courage Award was initiated by Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity and the annual banquet is sponsored by Phi Beta Sigma, Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity and Pi Beta Phi Sorority. THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 43


Photo courtesy of Moorland-Spingarn Research Center

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The first black Rhodes Scholar “A Phi Beta Sigma Man” BY BRO. TODD LEBON

Alain Leroy Locke was born on September 13, 1886 in Phil-

adelphia, PA, son of Pliny Ishmael Locke (a teacher and postal worker) and Mary Hawkins Locke (a school teacher). Alain’s grandfather, Ishmael Locke, was a free Black man and a teacher. He studied at Cambridge University in England and later spent four years in Liberia establishing schools. Ishmael met and married Sarah Shorter Hawkins, Alain’s paternal grandmother, while in Liberia. After returning to the states he was the headmaster of a school in Providence, Rhode Island before becoming the principal of the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia. Alain’s father graduated from the institute in 1867, and taught there briefly before going to North Carolina to teach newly freed Blacks. Pliny enrolled at Howard University Law School in 1872 while working as an accountant in the Freemen’s Bureau and the Freedman’s Bank. Upon completing his law degree in 1874 he returned to Philadelphia and became a postal clerk. He would die six years after Alain was born. As a boy Alain contracted rheumatic fever which left him with a weakened heart and restricted his physical activities. To compensate for the restrictions he spent much of his time learning the piano, violin and reading. He attended Philadelphia’s Central High School and graduated second in the class of 1902. After high school he enrolled in the Philadelphia School of Pedagogy where he graduated first in his class. Locke continued his education at Harvard College in 1904 studying philosophy under William James, Josiah Royce and other leading American philosophers of the time. He completed the four year program in three years and graduated

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magna cum laude in 1907. While a student at Harvard College, Locke was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, won the school’s highest award, the Bowdoin Prize, and was named a Rhodes Scholar thus becoming the first Black to be awarded this prestigious honor. There would not be another Black Rhodes Scholar until John Edgar Wideman was selected in 1963.

The Rhodes Scholarship The Rhodes Scholarships have been awarded annually since 1902. Americans were first granted Rhodes Scholarships in 1904. Women would not begin to be included in the selection process until 1977 through an act of Parliament. The scholarships were created by Cecil Rhodes, the British diamond mining magnate to permit young men from around the world to study at Oxford University. As a young man he went to South Africa with his brother to become a farmer. While pursuing a degree at Oxford University he became involved in diamond mining near Johannesburg, South Africa. In 1888 he formed the De Beers Consolidated Mines Company by assembling South African diamond mining companies together. With his vast fortune and economic clout, Cecil developed an interest in politics. He won a

Bro. Dr. Locke shown here with former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. Photo courtesy of Moorland-Spingarn Research Center.

seat as a House Assembly member of the Cape Colony and used this position to further his business interests. In 1889 he obtained the charter for the British South Africa Company. Cecil acquired land that would become Rhodesia, through the British South Africa Company. Rhodesia, today the independent state of Zimbabwe, was named in his honor. The scholarships cover two years of study at Oxford University with a possible extension for a third year. Expenses such as a maintenance allowance, travel and research grants are also covered. Thirty two scholars from America are

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selected yearly and approximately ninety five from other countries. Originally the scholarships were for students in the British colonies, the United States and Germany. Locke studied philosophy, Greek and Literae Humaniores (the study of Classics) while at Oxford and received a bachelor of literature degree in 1910. After Oxford he spent a year studying philosophy at the University of Berlin. When he returned to America he was more qualified than many white professors, given his academic training. However, his race prevented him from teaching at a white university. Alain began


Bro. Dr. Locke along with famed surgeon Dr. Charles Drew greet the first initiates of Phi Beta Kappa at Howard University. Photo courtesy of Moorland-Spingarn Research Center.

teaching at Howard University in 1912 as an assistant professor of English. His goal was to build Howard into the leading Black university in the country. The vision was to make Howard the center for Black culture and research on racial problems. He is one of the founders of the Gamma Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa at Howard. In 1915 his petition for a course curriculum on the scientific study of race and race relations was rejected twice by the board of trustees. The Board maintained Howard was a place to educate black professionals and courses on race had no place at the school. The school

would not offer a Black Studies program until 1954 one year after he retired. In the spring of 1915 he was one of four Howard professors invited to become members of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Locke played a major role in the development of Howard’s College of Liberal Arts. A big supporter of the arts Locke established the art gallery at Howard University. Today the gallery has become a major national art collection with over 4,500 works in the collection. Dr. Locke bequeathed his paintings, books, sculpture, and memorabilia to Howard University. The Moorland-Spin-

garn Research Center at Howard holds many of Locke’s papers, covering the years 1841-1954, in the manuscript division. The collection includes his personal papers as well as items belonging to his parents and grandparents. Locke is recognized as one of the major influences of the New Negro Movement and the Harlem Renaissance. The movement focused on the promotion of Black art, music and culture as tools to enrich the lives and communities of all people. Some of the notable figures of the movement were: James Weldon Johnson (Phi Beta Sigma), Zora Neale Hurston (Zeta Phi Beta), Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Paul Robeson, Aaron Douglas, Jacob Lawrence. W.E.B. DuBois and Josephine Baker. Locke’s book “The New Negro” has often been called the manifesto of the movement. Locke spent more than 40 years at Howard University, which ended with his retirement in 1953. Upon his retirement he was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters by Howard University. He moved to New York City after retiring and continued working on his writings. Alain Locke passed away from recurrent heart complications on June 9, 1954, in New York City.

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Submitted by: Bro. Michael W. Hines, International Director of Education and Bro. Sidney W. McCray, International First Vice President

MIAMI SIGMA BETAS For over 38 years the brothers of Theta Rho Sigma have mentored and nurtured a growing youth group. By Bro. Earl Davis

T

he genesis of the Miami Sigma Beta Club began in 1967 when Miami, Florida was experiencing their first wave of school desegregation. This was taking a serious toll on minority students; especially, the Black male population in the school district. Brother Wilkes J. Kemp, Sr., a teacher of mathematics at Miami Northwestern Senior High School, was concerned about bridging the gap between segregation and desegregation for these students. He discussed his concerns with Brother S. Frank McKoy and wanted to start a support group for a select group of students. Brother McKoy, being aware of the new component to the National Education Program called the Beta Club, suggested to Brother Kemp that

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they should use this structure for organizing a group of these young men. Rho Sigma Chapter approved the idea and in 1967, twenty five young men from Miami Northwestern Senior High School were the charter members of the first Beta Club in Florida. The name Beta Club was later changed to the Sigma Beta Club. For more than 38 years, Brother Kemp and Brother Earl Davis have used their homes as the weekly meeting places for the Sigma Beta Club. The members are trained in Parliamentary Procedure in conducting their own meetings. The officers of the club are responsible for planning club recreational and social activities. They are also responsible for community service project that will go towards their graduation requirements. Club members receive tutoring in language arts Mathematics, and counseling in personal and social development. The advisors inspire these students to achieve high academic success, while demanding that they strive for excellence in all aspects of their lives. The advisors’ commitment has been the impetus for sending hundreds of young men to college, who otherwise would not have considered post-secondary education an option. A significant aspect of being a member of

the Sigma Beta Club is the annual college tour which the chapter has sponsored since 1977. Each year, the advisors plan a 10-day charter bus excursion through different regions of the United States. The tour coincides with the MiamiDade County Public Schools’ annual spring break. The students visit 10–12 colleges and universities each year, which enables them to experience college life first hand and make more informed career choices. The collegiate tour consists of a three-year regional cycle. Club members visited the South Central region of colleges and universities (April 8-15, 2006), making this the 29th annual tour. Within a three-year period, a Sigma Beta has the opportunity to tour 33 college and university campuses. To date, more than 1000 club members have graduated from area high schools and approximately 80% of these students have gone on to college. In 1992, the Sigma Beta Club advisors were instrumental in bringing the Sigma Against Teenage Pregnancy (SATAP) initiative to South Florida. SATAP is a national program sponsored by Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. The program focuses on reducing teenage pregnancy by working with young

men and women to assist them in making more informed choices about sex and dating. The Sigma Beta Club SATAP Program has been so successful that the MiamiDade County School System made SATAP an initiative and instituted the program at 20 senior high schools throughout Miami-Dade County under the supervision of Brother Earl Davis, an Intergroup Relations Specialist for the school district during this time. The first Sigma Beta Club Step Team was established in 1987. This was the first known high school step team of its kind in the United States. Each year, during the annual collegiate tour of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), the Sigma Beta Club Step Team performs a step show for the collegiate Sigmas and Zetas on each campus visited. They are always welcomed with open arms by the brothers and sisters. This tradition continues each year.

OTHER PROGRAMS OF THE MIAMI, FLORIDA SIGMA BETA CLUB: “I GOT YOUR BACK”: A program of the Sigma Beta Club that works with a select group of senior high school athletes in a target senior high school.

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The purpose of the program is to prepare these athletes for their post-high school education. TAKING CHARGE OF YOUR FUTURE: A community outreach program for high school athletes that interface with the philosophy and support programs of the athletic department of selected MiamiDade County Public Schools. The program is designed to provide additional services to young men being groomed by coaches to be athletes, but more importantly, our next generation of leaders. THE SIGMA WARRIOR PRESENTATION: The Sigma Warrior Presentation is the formal presentation to the community of the graduating seniors of the Sigma Beta Club. The term “Warrior”, as it relates to the African heritage, symbolizes the transformation from boyhood into manhood. The Sigma Warrior Presentation program consists of several workshops and activities during the senior year of the members of the Sigma Beta club. These workshops include Teenage Pregnancy (SATAP), Drug Awareness and Violence Prevention, Personal Development and Leadership Training, Political Awareness, Study Skills, Time Management, and Interpersonal Self.

Each graduating senior is presented to the Miami Community by his father or another male role model who has made a positive impact on the senior’s life if his father is not available. ANNUAL SIGMA BETA CLUB EXTRAVAGANZA SHOW: This program allows middle and senior high school individuals/ groups to display their artistic/performing talents. Each year, these students perform to audiences of over 2000 and more. The Show ends with a step presentation by the Sigma Beta Club Step Team. The Sigma Beta Club has been under the supervision of Theta Rho Sigma Chapter since 1983. Members of the Chapter focus on four general assumptions: 1) that there are positive, successful young men in our community to emulate; 2) that there are positive alternatives to self-destructive behaviors and societal pitfalls; 3) that high self-esteem breeds success; and 4) that fraternal and other community organizations must be responsible for the preparation of our young Black males to effectively deal with the challenges and struggles that now confront today’s youth. These general assumptions give impetus to the success and longevity of the Sigma Beta Club in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

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SIGMA BETA COLLEGE TOUR SOUTHWEST REGION University of Florida Florida A&M University Dillard University Xavier University Southern University Texas Southern University Huston-Tillotson College Paul Quinn College Grambling State University Jackson State University Fort Valley State University SOUTH CENTRAL REGION Bethune Cookman College Albany State University Clark-Atlanta University Morehouse College Fisk University Tennessee State University Alabama A&M University Alabama State University Tuskegee University SOUTHEASTERN REGION Bethune Cookman College Allen University Benedict College Shaw University Saint Augustine College Morgan State University Hampton University Virginia State University North Carolina Central University North Carolina A&T University Claflin College South Carolina State University


Distinguished Service Chapter Members

* deceased

1995 - 2005 *

No.

Year

First Name

Last Name

Chapter

115

1995

Honorable Brother Luther J.

Mitchell, Sr.

Gamma Omicron Sigma

*

116

1995

Honorable Brother Argel G.

Oatis, Sr.

Tau Iota Sigma

*

117

1995

Honorable Brother Charles H.

Odom

Alpha Epsilon Sigma

*

*

118

1995

Honorable Brother Mack T.

Scott

Eta Beta Sigma

119

1995

Honorable Brother Wilfong

Wilson

Nu Sigma

120

1995

Honorable Brother Carter D.

Womack

Zeta Alpha Sigma

121

1997

Honorable Brother William E.

Stanley, Jr.

Lambda Sigma

122

1997

Honorable Brother Robert B.

Greaux

Chi Sigma

123

1997

Honorable Brother Jesse T.

Williams, Sr.

Delta Rho Sigma

124

1997

Honorable Brother Marvin L.

Cheatham Sr.

Zeta Sigma

125

1997

Honorable Brother James D.

Anderson

Phi Beta Sigma

126

1997

Honorable Brother Clarence D.

Johnson

Upsilon Sigma

127

1997

Honorable Brother Charles Y.

Thomas

Alpha Theta Sigma

128

1999

Honorable Brother Dudley E.

Flood

Eta Sigma

129

1999

Honorable Brother Henry L.

Goldston

Gamma Beta Sigma

130

1999

Honorable Brother James L.

Hill

Beta Nu Sigma

131

1999

Honorable Brother Emmett H.

Spencer, Sr.

Alpha Epsilon Sigma

132

1999

Honorable Brother Elbert P.

Green

Gamma Sigma

133

1999

Honorable Brother Louis D.

Hassell

Chi Sigma

134

1999

Honorable Brother August J.

Marigny

Delta Beta Sigma

135

2001

Honorable Brother Atty. Peter M.

Adams

Kappa Beta Sigma

136

2001

Honorable Brother Joseph T.

Bickers

Lambda Sigma

137

2001

Honorable Brother Judge Luke A.

LaVergne

Omicron Beta Sigma

138

2001

Honorable Brother Larry D.

McCutcheon

Beta Mu Sigma

139

2001

Honorable Brother William J.

Walker

Eta Iota Sigma

140

2003

Honorable Brother T. Harding

Lacy, Jr.

Iota Sigma

141

2003

Honorable Brother Robert J.

Booker

Phi Sigma

142

2003

Honorable Brother Theoplis A.

Woodard, II

Alpha Beta Sigma

143

2003

Honorable Brother Joseph

Carter

Alpha Xi Sigma

144

2003

Honorable Brother Emanuel J.

Kenny, Jr.

Nu Sigma

145

2003

Honorable Brother Carlia E.

Oatis, Jr.

Gamma Epsilon Sigma

146

2005

Honorable Brother Lynard

Carter

Theta Beta Sigma

147

2005

Honorable Brother Ronald H.

Carter

Phi Beta Sigma

148

2005

Honorable Brother William F.

Hayslett

Eta Beta Sigma

149

2005

Honorable Brother Sidney

Moshette, Jr.

Kappa Beta Sigma

150

2005

Honorable Brother Winford L.

Rose

Eta Sigma

151

2005

Honorable Brother Atty. Arthur R.

Thomas

Omicron Beta Sigma

152

2005

Honorable Brother Dr. Kevin R.

West

Chi Sigma

THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 51


S tudent A frican A merican B rotherhood As one of four sons, I was born and raised in Grenada, Mississippi. Upon graduating from high school in spring of 1979, I went off to college at Mississippi State University and soon thereafter was introduced to Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. through the Theta Iota chapter during the fall of 1980. At that time and still today, the Theta Iota chapter was one of the strongest and most vibrant of all the fraternities on the campus and in the state of Mississippi, which is what attracted me. I was truly moved by the fraternity’s leadership involvement on the campus and in the greater Starkville, Mississippi area. As an undergraduate student, I was extremely involved as a student leader on the campus. The fraternity experience was yet another way for me to exert my leadership along with honing in on other important skill sets. Another factor that attracted me to the fraternity was my oldest brother. Tommie Gene Bledsoe, Jr. joined the fraternity prior to me joining through the Lane College (Jackson, TN) chapter. Sigmas and Zetas are prevalent in my family which includes cousins who are Sigma men as well as two of my nieces (LaKitha Hughes-Bledsoe and LaToya Bledsoe) who are members of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. via the Mississippi State chapter. As a Sigma Man with more than 23 years as a higher education administrator and a faculty member, I have

advised six (6) different undergraduate chapters of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. --- one of which I established and chartered at North Carolina Wesleyan College, where I served as the college’s first African American Vice President and Dean, making Sigma the first historically African American fraternity on campus. I personally re-activated two undergraduate chapters, Morehouse College and the University of Georgia along with two city-wide graduate chapters in Rocky Mount, North Carolina and Toledo, Ohio. I would have to say that my time in the fraternity has proven to be extremely rewarding and productive. My first professional job with the College Board’s southern regional office in Atlanta in 1986 was made possible after learning of the position from a fellow fraternity brother Dr. Joel Harrell. To that end, my fraternity experience has shaped my per-

By Bro. Dr. Tyrone Bledsoe 52 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006


spective and philosophy that would later shape my vision in 1990 as the founder of the Student African American Brotherhood (S.A.A.B.) organization.

IMPETUS OF S.A.A.B. As the founder of the Student African American Brotherhood (S.A.A.B.) organization, I am extremely excited about efforts to further the organization’s growth and publicity. S.A.A.B. remains one of the most dynamic organizations in the country established specifically to assist at-risk males ---primarily African American males and recently added Latino male students (K-12 and collegiate) to excel academically, socially, culturally, athletically, and in the community. S.A.A.B. is primarily comprised of young male students who strive for academic and personal excellence. The organization has committed to planning and implementing programs that benefit the young men in their respective school/ college and the community at large. We are in the process of expanding the organization to meet the needs of young men in high school and community colleges around the country. We encourage the young men in our program to embrace leadership by being positive examples for each other through a strong commitment to academic achievement, brotherhood, and community service. We provide weekly study sessions, weekly business meetings, social and religious activities, and work with various non-profit service agencies like Habitat for Humanity, Big Brothers and Big Sisters. To assist in fulfilling our mission, we established a national headquarters office last year at the University of Toledo. The University of Toledo has been extremely supportive in our efforts. On June 30, 2005, I gave up my role as Special Assistant to the President of the University of Toledo

and I have temporarily delayed my aspirations to become a college president in order to fully dedicate my time and effort to elevating S.A.A.B. to the next level of staffing, funding and programming. Over my career, I have paved a very successful career in higher education that has easily prepared me for a college presidency as an obvious next step. However, it is my intention to fully commit my time and efforts to developing the S.A.A.B. national headquarters and the expansion of the organization in general as a critical initiative for the next couple of years of my career in order to ensure innovative solutions to the challenges of educating at-risk males in our country.

ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW I established S.A.A.B. on October 17, 1990 on the campus of Georgia Southwestern State University. The organization was established to address the academic and social challenges of African American males at Georgia Southwestern State University and has more than 130 high school and collegiate chapters. The organization currently has impacted more than 2000 African American and Latino male students and spans 27 states. Undaunted, S.A.A.B. is an organization committed to access and success of at-risk males in high school and college, with a clear vision and a passion for delivering outstanding results. Graduates of S.A.A.B. have gone on to produce at a very high level in the professional world of work and serve as role models in inner-city neighborhoods throughout the country. The S.A.A.B. program has attracted national attention as an innovative prototype for personal and academic enrichment, and has been successfully replicated at public and private 4-year institutions to include predominantly white and historically Black institutions. Over the years S.A.A.B. has proven the effectiveness of African American and Latino male leader-

THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 53


ship and personal development. For a number of years research statistics have revealed that a disproportionate number of Black and Latino men contribute to teen-age pregnancy, use illicit drugs, and commit other crimes. Just as alarming, one out of every four Black men aged 20 to 29 is either in prison, on probation, or on parole. In fact, according to recent studies more Black men in this age group are in prison than are in college. Unfortunately, many young men choose crime and irresponsibility because they feel that no one cares about them and they have nothing to lose. As a community-based non-profit

organization, S.A.A.B. has recently accepted the demanding challenge to not only address the needs of African-American males at 4-year colleges, but also replicate the program for young men in community colleges and high schools. The primary goal is for each S.A.A.B. participant to take full advantage of the available academic opportunities and to better understand and participate as individuals with responsibilities, rights, and privileges afforded them as active citizens. The challenge at this stage is for S.A.A.B. to seize the opportunity, to take the risk, to realize an innovative, new, rewarding and productive future for our youth.

Gamma Kappa Chapter • Paul Quinn College (Fall 1951)

Newly inducted charter members of the Gamma Kappa Chapter, Paul Quinn College, Waco, Texas, still burning with the enthusiasm

S.A.A.B. PROGRAM GOALS S.A.A.B. encourages all participants to: • Achieve success in school/college and graduate • Promote and embrace independence and personal responsibility • Promotes career exploration and entrepreneurship in every aspect • Develop a network that allows participants to realize their fullest potential

of their recent experience, borrow the chapter sign of Omicron Sigma of Dallas and pose for their first picture, on the steps of the college Student Union Building.

• Connect and engage with the community through active service learning

Standing third from the left on the back row is Professor Ulysses Hughey, Dean of the college, who was instrumental in getting the chapter organized at Paul Quinn.

• Increase self-esteem

Paul Quinn College is now located in Dallas, Texas.

54 | THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006

• Take advantage of technological opportunities and experiences


THE CRESCENT MAGAZINE • FALL 2006 | 55


Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. International Headquarters 145 Kennedy Street, NW Washington, DC 20011-5294

The Crescent Magazine Fall 2006  
The Crescent Magazine Fall 2006  

The Crescent is the official publication and voice of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. The journal, released twice yearly, provides the frate...