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PORTFOLIO // PAYTON NARANCIC


PAYTON NARANCIC BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON ‘19 EUGENE, OR paytonnarancic@gmail.com (408) 218-8822 San Jose, CA


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MPP MODULAR CABIN

Spring 2018

MPP ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Spring 2018

KINNEY PARK COMMUNITY CENTER Summer 2018

MAKING SILICON VALLEY SUBURBS WORK Winter & Spring 2019

DESIGN-BUILD DETAILS Winter 2018


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MPP MODULAR CABIN

Spring 2018


MPP MODULAR CABIN TERM: Spring 2018 PROJECT DURATION: 7 Days ADVISING PROFESSOR: Michael Fifield LOCATION: Anywhere TEAM: Simone O’Halloran DESCRIPTION: This one week exercise focused on issues of constructibility, minimal dwelling, and the environmental impacts of buildings in nature. The cabin combines the efficiency of a new type of mass timber, Mass Plywood Panels (MPP), and modular design in order to create a retreat that can be manufactured off-site, transported in pieces, and quickly assembled on-site. The use of MPP streamlines the construction process because openings can be cut using a CNC router and it uses 20% less wood than CLT. The screw pile foundation minimizes site excavation, the use of concrete, and offers flexibility to most types of terrain.


floor plan

A 38' - 6"

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1 Module 1 2 Module 2 4 Bunk Room

7 Washer Dryer

5 Raised Floor 6 Indoor/Outdoor Living 7 Eat-In Kitchen 8 Private Deck

4

14' - 0"

3 Bedroom

B

5

9 Large Deck 6

10 Built-In Seating Total Square Footage: 640 s.f.

3

12' - 0"

1/4” = 1’-0”Plan 1st Floor

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2

Payton Narancic and Simone O’Halloran // ARCH 439 // Spring 2018 // Professor Michael Fifield


Section A

Section B


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MPP ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Spring 2018


MPP ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TERM: Spring 2018 PROJECT DURATION: 9 Weeks ADVISING PROFESSOR: Judith Sheine LOCATION: Eugene, OR TEAM: Simone O’Halloran

14'-9"

DESCRIPTION: Conducted as an experiment with the TallWood Design Institute, this project sought to reimagine how schools can be constructed with modular Mass Plywood Panel (MPP) classrooms and supporting facilities. The classroom modules required careful attention to dimensions in order to ensure that they can be transported by truck while the supporting facilities are flatpacked and assembled on-site. The classroom modules were applied to existing floor plans of nearby River Road Elementary school in order to showcase MPP’s adaptability.

14'-9" 14'-2"

13'-4"


15' - 0"

The classroom modules are shipped in two pieces in order to fit on trucks. This required splitting the structural LVL beam in half and then attaching it to its counterpart when assembled.

15' - 0"

MODULE 2

25' - 0"

38' - 0"

6' - 6"

MODULE 1

6' - 6"

A

B

Classroom Module Floor Plan

3.5%

Physical daylight modeling proved adequate light levels in each classroom without electrical lighting.

7%

10.5%

2.75%

6%

2.5%

1.75%

2%

2%

1.75%

1.75%

1%

Daylight Percentage

Classroom Module Axonometric


ligh t fr om

architectural differentiation on the facade

initial unit

2

es sid

hard surface

shifted unit

hard surface

architectural differentiation between classrooms and corridor


Media Center UP

A

Mech. Storage

B

Lounge R.Room

Health

Conf. Room

C

R.Room

D Storage

E Reception

Principals Office

F G H I

5 L703

CAFETERIA

GYM

MUSIC ROOM

PANTRY BUILDING STOR.

PE STOR.

KITCHEN MECH.

CUSTODIAL

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1st Floor Plan

Section C

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ELEC.

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Classrooms are organized in clusters in order to create “neighborhoods� that foster community and unified learning. The classrooms share common areas in between the clusters that are used for tutoring and as break-out spaces during class time.

DN

A B C D E

Each classroom has immediate access to outdoor space including the upper floor which hosts a learning garden.

F G H I

1

2

3

4

2nd Floor Plan

Section B

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KINNEY PARK COMMUNITY CENTER Summer 2018


KINNEY PARK COMMUNITY CENTER TERM: Summer 2018

SKINNER BUTTE PARK

PROJECT DURATION: 7 Weeks Wi lla m High Street

ADVISING PROFESSOR: Tom Hahn LOCATION: Frank Kinney Park, Eugene, OR

AMAZON PARK

eR

ive r

Hilyard Street

DESCRIPTION: Frank Kinney Park is at the terminus of the Amazon Active Transportation Corridor and at the beginning of the Ridgeline Trail system and Amazon Creek which offers a unique opportunity to appeal to bikers, hikers, and the surrounding community. The goal of this project was to enhance community activities, support pre-existing ecotones, and create an appropriate transition from an urban context to dense forest. The solution is a three building complex that consists of a bicycle shed for storage and repairs, a community center with a cafe and rentable space, and detached restrooms to serve hikers as well the other two buildings.

ett

rive zon D Ama

BUILDING SITE FRANK KINNEY PARK

SPENCER BUTTE PARK

Section A


Frank Kinney Park is situated between the Ridegline Trail system, Amazon Creek, and a wooded suburban area. Due to its natural context, the community center called for a program that minimally impacted the site while also fostering the growth of community and natural habitats. The result is a showcase of sustainable strategies including water collection/reuse, solar collection, and pollinator gardens.

2,058 ft

500 ft

SPENCER BUTTE

RIDGELINE TRAIL

DENSE DECIDUOUS AND CONIFEROUS VEGETATION

SUBURBAN NEIGHBORHOOD

AMAZON CREEK

WILD GRASSES

Site Characteristics

The pre-existing native landscape was preserved and enhanced with pollinator gardens in order to further attract different animal life. The landscape was also used as a purification strategy to the water that leads to the adjacent Amazon Creek.


Circulation

Cyclists Pedestrians

Siting

the com

munity

center

aligns wi

th the br

th

e

Site Plan

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bi

cy

order to

create fram

ed views

the negative space between the buildings creates a courtyard

ti o

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reek nC azo Am water ard tow on with ts in ti nec f po roo al con ti ting llec xperien r co e wate ake an the to m

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she d is

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1st Floor Plan

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Bicycle Shed

maximum sun exposure for solar collection

Community Center

inspired by the existing park kiosk

Restrooms

Structural Axonometric

valley for maximum water collection


Amazon Creek wild grasses

dense vegetation zone pollinator gardens pervious pavers

water collection tank water feature water feature

water ďŹ ltration basin

water ďŹ ltration basin

dense vegetation zone PV panels rain chain

pollinator gardens

wild grasses

Rainwater Management and Solar Integration

water ow through the site

wild grasses


Section B


Section C


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MAKING SILICON VALLEY SUBURBS WORK Winter & Spring 2019


MAKING SILICON VALLEY SUBURBS WORK TERM: Winter & Spring 2019 PROJECT DURATION: 6 months ADVISING PROFESSOR: Michael Fifield LOCATION: San Jose, CA DESCRIPTION: Located in the heart of the Silicon Valley, this project seeks to combat both an extreme housing crisis and the trend of lowdensity housing. As the tech capital of the nation, San Jose faces soaring housing costs and few housing options for middle income families. Single-family-detached homes dominate the San Jose housing market, making housing scarce and unsustainable. This project reimagines a small stretch of the Willow Glen neighborhood utilizing a courtyard housing model that emphasizes smaller living footprints and communal outdoor spaces. The overarching goal was to create an appropriate density in a traditionally low-density area (currently zoned at 8 D.U./acre) that encourages future development of a similar nature. Heavy emphasis is placed on shared spaces in order to encourage community, similar to what was once shared in villages, and to create an inclusive living environment. Different scales of living also attract a variety of users which increases diversity in often homogenous suburban neighborhoods.

SITE


Ave ge lid Coo

ve eA

Brac

Site Plan

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Transitional Space

ster clu

clu s

Transitional Space

Duplex

Outdoor Community Space

Parking is hidden off the street

Duplex

clu

Transitional Space

Duplex

Transitional Space

Rowhouses

cluster

Apartments

r ste

Transitional Space

Common Green

Duplex

clus ter

r te

Duplex

Duplex cluster

Transitional Space

Parking is hidden off the street

Duplex

Transitional Space

Apartments

Transitional Space

Smaller scale buildings face the street in order to reect the current scale of the neighborhood

Rowhouses

Transitional Space

Parking is hidden off the street

Site Configuration

Rowhouses

Parking is hidden off the street


Coolidge Ave

Site: 2 acres Total # of Units: 42 Density: 21 d.u./acre B Brace Ave

Courtyard housing creates a unique environment that emphasizes shared outdoor spaces and fosters community with meaningful site planning. Its ability to attract diverse user groups creates a more inclusive environment where neighbors can rely on one another for friendships and safety.

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Communal spaces, namely outdoor spaces, benefit all users as children have a safe environment to play in, parents feel comfortable raising their children within an inclusive environment, and outdoor areas can host community events for all neighbors.

A

FDC

FDC

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9

11

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

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Bioswale Shared Courtyard Community Pavilion On-Site Ride Sharing Service Community Mailboxes Apartments 1 Bedroom Duplex 3 Bedroom Duplex 3 Bedroom Row House 4 Bedroom Row House Trash/Recycling

11 B

1st Floor Plan

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A


Household Sizes:

Increasing Density & Variety:

existing density

1-2 Residents: » young professionals » empty nesters

new density

1 Bedroom and Studio Apartments

2-4 Residents: » roommates » small family

3-6 Residents: » small to large families

3 Bedroom Duplex

UP

WH

UP UP

UP

WH

DN DN DN

1st Floor Plan

Section A

792 s.f.

2nd Floor Plan

429 s.f. // 372 s.f.

1st Floor Plan 1,281 s.f.

2nd Floor Plan


Promoting Flexibility & Live/Work:

Sustainability Strategies: optional solar collection

landscaping as a means of passive heating and cooling, water management, and urban ecosystem

natural ventilation through operable windows and skylights

Office

Office/Guest Room

Additional Bedroom/Guest Room

1 Bedroom Duplex

4 Bedroom Row House

3 Bedroom Row House

DN

UP

UP

UP

WH

UP WH

DN

UP WH

DN

DN WH

UP

DN

DN

1st Floor Plan

695 s.f.

2nd Floor Plan

Section B

1st Floor Plan 1,858 s.f.

2nd Floor Plan

3rd Floor Plan

1st Floor Plan 1,329 s.f.

2nd Floor Plan


SCAN ME

Open your smartphone camera and simply hover it over the code. Click on the link that appears and turn your phone to landscape mode. Click 3 Bedroom Duplex the full screen icon in the 2nd Floor bottom right corner and enjoy your VR experience.

4 Bedroom Row House 3rd Floor

1 Bedroom Apartment

Studio Apartment

Courtyards

Small Courtyard and Paths

4 Bedroom Row House Front Porch

3 Bedroom Row House Balcony

3 Bedroom Duplex 1st Floor

Bioswale: Integrated Ecosystem

drainage gravel rainwater creek recycled plastic lumber bridge planting soil

n ecosyste m ba ur

perforated drain pipe


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DESIGN-BUILD DETAILS

Winter 2018


DESIGN-BUILD DETAILS

7/8” WEYERHAEUSER EDGE GOLD SHEATHING

TJI 210 11-7/8” FLOOR JOIST @ 24” O.C.

TERM: Winter 2018

2” X 12” BLOCKING

PROJECT DURATION: 9 Weeks

BATT INSULATION

ADVISING PROFESSOR: Tom Hahn

1/2" OSB SHEATHING 2” X 6” STUD @ 24” O.C.

LOCATION: Eugene, Oregon

J BOLT PER STRUC.

TASKS: Foundation Details // Renderings

#4 HORIZONTAL REBAR TYP. 6 MIL POLY VAPOR BARRIER CONT.

FOUNDATIONS TEAM: Claudia Monroy-Benitez

16" X 8" FOOTING

DESCRIPTION:

The OregonBILDS program specializes in design-build affordable housing. This studio project consisted of 5 weeks of collaborative design work and 4 weeks of construction document production. The foundations team was responsible for all foundation details and floor framing. The final design of the house included a 61/2” thick mass wall which required unique detailing.

Pony Wall Detail

6 1/2” THICK MASS WALL

3” X 12” LEDGER BOARD 7/8” WEYERHAEUSER EDGE GOLD SHEATHING TJI 210 11-7/8” FLOOR JOIST @ 24” O.C.

6 1/2” THICK MASS WALL

ANCHOR BOLT PER STRUC.

7/8” WEYERHAEUSER EDGE GOLD SHEATHING

ITS2.06/11.88 TOP FLANGE HANGERS BATT INSULATION

TJI 210 11-7/8” FLOOR JOIST @ 24” O.C. 2" X 12" BLOCKING

ICF

BATT INSULATION

STEEL REINFORCEMENT PER STRUC.

2" X 6" STUD @ 24” O.C.

6 MIL POLY VAPOR BARRIER CONT. J BOLT PER STRUC.

ICF 22"

6 MIL POLY VAPOR BARRIER CONT. 18" X 8" FOOTING

2” RIGID INSULATION 18" X 8" FOOTING

2” RIGID INSULATION 16" X 8" FOOTING 3'-0"

Pony Wall Opening Detail

18"

Mass Wall Detail

3'-0" 2” RIGID INSULATION TO TOTAL OF 6’ WIDTH


3 A2

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TYP. @ GARAGE 6” GARAGE STEM

EQ.

EQ.

1/8” / 12” SLOPE

receivi howev virtue deeme the for

F.F. = -0’-6” AT DOOR TO HOUSE 22"

JOIST START 1-1/16” FROM POINT OF BEGINNING O.C.

POINT OF BEGINNING

VERIFY -6” DIFF IN F.F. AT CTR DOOR OPENING

21” X 24” CRAWL SPACE ACCESS

4 A2

8 X 8 POST BASE

LAVATORY DRAIN THRU FLOOR

11 7 /8” TJ I 21

0@2

4” O.C

.W BLOC ITH 7/8" WE KING PER YERHAE STRU U CTU SER EDG RAL E GO L

D SH

8 A2

2X12 BLOCKING O.C.

EATH

ING

18” WIDE FOOTING

4” MAX

6 A2

5 A2

11 7 /8” T J

I 210

CONTROL JOINTS ALIGN WITH STEM

1/8” / 12” SLOPE

7 A2

CONT. 6 MIL POLY. MOISTURE BARRIER THROUGHOUT CRAWLSPACE

@ 24

” O.C .W BLO ITH 7/8 CKIN " G PE WEYER H R ST RUC AEUSER TUR AL EDGE G O

LD S

HEA THIN

G

F.F. = -0.0” = 392.25

PR

CO SEE RAINWATER PLANTER DETAIL 2/A1.0

2 A2 ALL FLOOR JOIST CAVITIES FILLED CONT. WITH R-38 BATT INSULATION

Foundation and Framing Plan 1

TYP. @ HOUSE

ALL FOOTINGS 16” WIDE U.N.O. ALL STEMS 8” WIDE U.N.O.

14” X 6” VENT TYP. 52 SQIN

ALL FLOOR SHEATHING CLUED WITH CONT. CONST. ADHESIVE + NAILED PER STRUCT. + MFR’S RECOMMENDATIONS


// THANK YOU //


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