Issuu on Google+

2013 GARY HARDT MEMORIAL

MAY 16-17-18 PAYSON EVENT CENTER

DENNIS FENDLER PHOTO

RODEO


GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

PAGE 2 • MAY 2013

RIM REVIEW

Is your ride getting a little rough? Maybe it’s time you saddle up in a new 2013 ride... www.chapmanpayson.com Stop by Chapman Auto Center — Your Official RAM Rodeo Sponsor Celebrating 32 Years Supporting PRCA RAM TRUCK

Good luck, Rodeo Contestants! RIDE SAFE! R AM 100 N. Beeline Hwy • 474-5261


GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

RIM REVIEW

MAY 2013 • PAGE 3

Dennis Fendler photo

The thunder of hooves behind you? Hot, damp angry breath on your neck? Don’t panic, it’s just rodeo time in Rim Country. Get your tickets to one or all of the performances of the 2013 Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo and you’re sure to have a good time. The rodeo kicks off with a special event at 6 p.m., Thursday, May 16, with rodeo performances at 6 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday at the Payson Event Center. Everyone can cowboy up and enjoy a great Rim Country tradition.

Welcome to rodeo country BY

TERESA MCQUERREY

RIM REVIEW EDITOR

There is something different about the 2013 edition of the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo — actually there are several new features. New features

To start, there is the start of the festivities. In the past, the Thursday night program has been devoted to the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association’s Cactus Series events. This year, it’s a local contest. The Payson Rodeo Committee is calling it Bulls, Broncs and Bling. Rim Country residents and others were invited to sign up for a variety of events that start at 6 p.m., Thursday, May 16 at the Payson Event Center.

There will be something for everyone, from the littlest cowboys and cowgirls willing to bust a mutton to daring adults trying their hand at bull riding, saddle bronc riding, team roping, barrel racing and more. An especially fun feature has been added for Saturday — a 1800s Old West Costume Contest. So, even though there is no formal parade with the spring rodeo, brave and fun-loving fans will be parading around in some great costumes at the Saturday afternoon performance of the rodeo. Special attractions

A draft horse show including draft horse barrel racing (you know those will have to be some big barrels) is another new feature at the spring rodeo. There will be a show at 5 p.m., Friday,

May 17 and at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 18. The Cowgirl Historical Foundation will also be performing. The group will perform at both the Friday night and Saturday afternoon rodeos. The tradition

The Friday night show is the annual “Tough Enough to Wear Pink” event. The rodeo committee will contribute funds to breast cancer support and research efforts for every contestant and audience member wearing pink. Saturday’s show is the Patriot Performance, to honor returning, wounded and fallen veterans. Red, white and blue attire is encouraged. All active duty armed forces members will be admitted free of charge. The shows Friday night and Saturday afternoon will both feature the tradi-

tional rodeo competitions: bareback riding, barrel racing, bull riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, tie-down and team roping. Admission

Adults, 13 to 64 - $14; senior, 65+ $12; children, 8 to 12 - $10; 7 and under free. Tickets are available at the Rim Country Regional Chamber of Commerce, all area Circle Ks, Bob’s Western Wear, Bill Armstrong Jewelry & Pawn in Star Valley, and the Payson Public Library ($2 off coupons can be found in the Payson Roundup). More fun

Guests can participate in a 50-50 drawing and several raffles at the rodeo performances.


GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

PAGE 4 • MAY 2013

RIM REVIEW

Andy Towle photo

Teri James is one of the Rim Country contestants who is known around the professional competitor circles. She was part of the women’s roping events last year and may make an appearance in the Bulls, Broncs & Bling special event at the Thursday, May 16 show of the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo.

Rodeo adds fun new features BY

TERESA MCQUERREY

RIM REVIEW EDITOR

The Payson Rodeo Committee’s annual Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo kicks off Thursday, May 16 with a new event, Bulls, Broncs & Bling. Bulls, Broncs & Bling

Taking place at the Payson Event Center, this event will give non-card holding cowboys and cowgirls a chance to compete. There will be bull and bronc riding for men; breakaway and team roping, plus barrel racing for women; 3D and barrel racing for boys and girls; plus mutton busting for the littlest rodeo riders. Gates open at 4 p.m., the event starts at 6 p.m. Admission is $10 per person. • Bull Riding — Contestants ride for 8 seconds with one hand; they compete for $200 added money and the $50 cash per competitor pot. Only 20 riders will participate. • Ranch Saddle Bronc Riding — Only 15 competitors will ride with a stock saddle, one hand only, for 8 seconds for

$200 added money plus the $75 cash per contestant pot. • Participants in the Girls Breakaway Roping will compete for $100 added money to the pot made up from each contestant’s $70 cash entry fee. • Girls Team Roping will have $200 added money to the entry pot, which is $70 per each contestant. In this event, the competitors can enter twice. • Girls Barrel Racing with $100 added money to the pot created from the $70 cash entry fees. • Boys and Girls 3D Barrel Racing has a $30 cash entry fee and contestants can enter as many horses as they have. • The Junior Barrel Races are for boys and girls, 13-17 and for those 6 to 12. Both groups must pay a $20 cash entry fee. The fee for contestants 5 and younger is $5 each. • Mutton Busting is open to both boys and girls for $10 each. Applications will be taken at Chapman Auto Center, at the corner of Highways 87 and 260 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Fri-

day. See Lynn Waters at Chapman for details. Costume Contest

Also new this year is the Spring Rodeo Costume Contest. The Rodeo Committee has added an 1800s costume contest to the pre-rodeo events Saturday, May 18. Categories to be judged: 1) Gentleman/Gambler 2) Gun slinger/Cowboy 3) Peace-keeper 4) 1800s male child (12 or younger) 5) Lady 6) Cowgirl 7) 1800s female child (12 or younger) 8) Dance Hall Darlin’ (family friendly ... minimal cleavage) Judging will take place at the rodeo grounds from noon to 1:45 p.m. Applications and rules are available where tickets are sold: Bob’s Western Wear, Circle K North, South and Star Valley, Northern Gila County Historical Society, Best Western Inn, Comfort Inn, Majestic Inn and Bill Armstrong Jew-

ON THE

COVER The 2013 edition of the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo will be held May 16, 17 and 18 at the Payson Event Center.

Dennis Fendler photo

RIM REVIEW • VOLUME 15, NO. 20

elry and Pawn. There is a $5 fee to enter the costume contest (entrants will not get special admission rates to the rodeo) to be paid at place of ticket purchase by May 16 or at the photo booth from noon to 1:45 p.m., Saturday, May 18. Judging Criteria: • 40 percent Costume authenticity (design and material) • 20 percent Originality (depart from traditional) • 20 percent Detail (hats, gloves, shoes, jewelry) • 20 percent Photographic Presentation (pose, facial affect) Awards: • Grand Prize $100 gift certificate from Bill Armstrong Jewelry & Pawn • 2nd Prize $50 gift certificate from Bill Armstrong Jewelry & Pawn • 3rd Prize two August Rodeo tickets and metal art • 1st, 2nd, 3rd place ribbons each category • Winners listed at photo booth at 3:30 p.m., Saturday, May 18.

Jaber Abawi, M.D., M.R.C.P. Internal Medicine & Arthritis

REVIEW STAFF TERESA McQUERREY

FRANK LA SPISA

EDITOR - 474-5251 EXT. 113

AD SALES - 474-5251 EXT. 104

Board Certified Internal Medicine

ANDY TOWLE

DWAYNE FLORA

Accepting New Patients

PHOTOGRAPHER - 474-5251 EXT. 121

AD SALES - 474-5251 EXT. 105

The Rim Review is published each Wednesday by WorldWest Limited Liability Company. Copyright 2013

1106 N. Beeline Highway Payson, AZ 85541

928.474.5286


RIM REVIEW

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

MAY 2013 • PAGE 5


GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

PAGE 6 • MAY 2013

RIM REVIEW

Courtesy photo

At the 2009 Spring Rodeo (pictured left to right) stock contractor Skip Beeler, then owner of Salt River Rodeo, rodeo boss Bill Armstrong, former justice of the peace Ronnie McDaniel and spur maker Leon King were on hand to award silver spurs to the winning bull rider at the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo. The spurs were donated in memory of Diane McDaniel, the late wife of McDaniel and a longtime rodeo supporter.

Mister Payson Rodeo

Armstrong keeps rodeo heritage alive BY

MAX FOSTER

ROUNDUP STAFF REPORTER

In the Rim Country, Bill Armstrong is known as a longtime rodeo boss, a crafty businessman, a sports aficionado and the father and grandfather to some of the finest athletes to ever play for Payson High School. But in his hometown of Winslow, he is remembered as the feisty son of the school superintendent and a talented football player. At Winslow High in the mid 1950s, Armstrong played tight end for legendary coach Emil Nasser’s alwaystough Bulldogs. During Armstrong’s years at WHS, Nasser-coached teams were among the best in Arizona, winning numerous conference and region titles. After graduation from high school, Armstrong knocked around for years before moving in 1972 to Star Valley, which at the time had only about 400 residents, Armstrong remembers. Today, Armstrong is one of the most

well known men in the Rim Country, partly because of his business enterprises. After first moving to Payson, he owned and operated the Texaco service station near the intersection of the Beeline Highway and Highway 260. He later owned Armstrong’s Automotive east of town, but sold it, thinking he was going to retire. But only a few months into his retirement, he decided to open Bill Armstrong Jewelry and Pawn in Star Valley. He continues today to own and operate the business that buys and sells Native American jewelry and firearms and sells firewood. For the past 30 years he has headed the Payson Rodeo Committee and is the rodeo boss for both the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo in May and the World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo three months later. Under Armstrong’s leadership, the World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo, also known as the August Doin’s, was

named the “Best Small Town Rodeo in America.” During the years when rodeos were held in Rumsey Park at the old rodeo grounds — located where the south multipurpose field now stands — the weekend event grew in stature attracting some of the country’s finest cowboys and throngs of city slickers eager for a glimpse of small-town rodeo life. As successful as the rodeos were under Armstrong’s guidance, he and his fellow committee members faced a crisis in the late 1990s when the chamber of commerce and the Pro Rodeo Committee couldn’t settle on a contract. The entire disagreement obviously disturbed Armstrong, but he refused to engage in a war of words with the chamber, instead focusing on reacquiring the rights to the rodeo. In 2000, the Pro Rodeo Committee settled with the chamber by clearing the last major hurdle needed to continue producing the August Rodeo. That same year, the Payson Rodeo

was moved from its former home at Rumsey Park site to the newly completed multi-event center south of town. Through all the turmoil, Armstrong’s leadership helped the committee survive, but that wasn’t the last time he would have to step up in a crisis. In 2010 after talks between the committee and chamber hit a snag, chamber members opted to oust the pro rodeo group, and instead contracted with the Payson Rodeo Alliance to produce the 125th rodeo. Just a year later, after the Alliance filed a suit against the Rim Country Regional Chamber of Commerce, the Committee signed an agreement with the chamber that gave the Pro Rodeo Committee ownership of the World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo. For Armstrong, there have been good times and bad times, but through it all he’s managed to stage two of the finest rodeos in small-town Arizona for decades.


RIM REVIEW

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

MAY 2013 • PAGE 7

The business of rodeo - love fuels engine BY

local causes, including awards to breast cancer and veterans support groups, each year. With ticket sales covering only 30 percent of costs, signing up national and local sponsors is critical. Landino said several volunteers head to Las Vegas to meet with national sponsors while locally, volunteers ask businesses to buy a banner or sponsor an event. “We have been very fortunate that we have a lot of loyal, local sponsors,” he said. “But, it has been more difficult to get sponsors in recent years.” Banners that line the ring of the arena typically go for $250 and there are 45 banner spots available. A business can also sponsor one of the day’s seven

ALEXIS BECHMAN

ROUNDUP STAFF REPORTER

Rodeos today look a whole lot different than the early ones held among working cowboys and vaqueros in weathered, dusty arenas. And they cost a lot more to put on. A two-day rodeo requires months of planning and a whole lot of flare. Spectators expect entertainers, commentators, concessioners, professional judges and seasoned cowboys. For the Payson Pro Rodeo Committee, a volunteer group tasked with organizing the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo in May and The World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo in August, it is a labor of love. The group starts planning the May Rodeo as soon as the John Landino August one wraps up. John Landino, president of events for $500-$800. the committee, said that with so much money riding Then there are additional banners near the chutes on a successful event, the group’s 102 members spend that cost more to sponsor. hours poring over every detail. All money raised over cost is given away, since the “People don’t realize how much it costs to put torodeo committee is a 501-3c nonprofit. gether a rodeo,” he said. Everyone that works on the project does so because On average, the spring rodeo costs $66,000. The Pro they love the sport and supporting the community, Rodeo Committee not only has to find a way to cover those costs, it needs to make a profit. The group gives Landino said. He and his wife, Nancy, joined the committee 13 an average of $20,000 away in scholarships and to

Payson Pro Rodeo Committee Gives a Special Thanks to

The Tonto Apache Tribe and the

for their continued support.

COSTS OF THE MAY RODEO • Stock contractor: $18,000 to $20,000 for two performances; covers all costs associated with transporting animals and preparing them for the arena • Professional judges: $4,000 to $5,000 • Sound system and sound engineer: $1,500 • Port-A-Pots: $2,000 • Application fee to become a PRCA sanctioned event: $1,500 • Security: $500 • VIP tent, food and entertainment: $2,500 • Ice: $600 • Venue fee to Town of Payson: $1,500 • Entertainers: $2,500 • Prize money: $17,000

years ago, just a few weeks after moving to town. After several years, Landino was roped into serving on the board, which he has done for the last six years. This is his first year as acting president. Landino said the group’s focus is offering scholarships to graduating high school seniors. And not just to seniors heading to a four-year university, but those who want to pursue a vocation, such as firefighting or cosmetology. He hopes the exciting and fun changes to this year’s spring rodeo will bring more people out. The rodeo will start earlier each day to take advantage of the warmer weather and on Thursday, local cowboys and cowgirls can participate.


PAGE 8 • MAY 2013

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

RIM REVIEW

Proud sponsors of the 2013 PRCA Pro Rodeo

best all-around Proud Pro Rodeo Rodeo Proud sponsors Sponsors of of the the 2012 2013 PRCA PRCA Pro

The Standard of the West since 1879


RIM REVIEW

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

MAY 2013 • PAGE 9

Entertainment: beauty, precision, plus hilarity

Dennis Fendler photo

Saddle bronc riding grew naturally out of ranch cowboys breaking wild broncos in the late 1800s to use as working cow horses. Modern saddle bronc riding has a few modifications, mainly in equipment. Saddle bronc saddles are lightweight and have no saddle horn. Riders must hold their boots over the horse’s shoulders at the first jump from the chute (called the mark out rule) and they must stay on for 8 seconds. The rider must constantly lift on the hack rein to keep his seat in the saddle. With all bronc events, a fleece flank strap is buckled around the flank of the animal, just snug enough to tickle. The animals, professional athletes in their own right, feel the fleece and know it’s bucking time. BY

TERESA MCQUERREY

RIM REVIEW EDITOR

Entertainment beyond the competition at Payson Event Center will include beauties in precision drills and the hilarity and high jinks of the PRCA 2012 Clown of the Year. The Cowgirls Historical Foundation will present two programs during the 2013 Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo. The specialty act for the event is Justin Rumford, who was named 2012 Clown of the Year by the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association in December at the Nationals in Las Vegas. The Cowgirls Historical Foundation

The CHF, a non-profit organization, works to increase public awareness, appreciation and preservation of America’s western heritage and equestrian lifestyle. Members present creative educational programs and services, active community service and volunteerism, and participation in local, state and national events. The group has participated in the spring and summer Payson rodeos for several years. With their mission statement to honor western heritage and spirit of patriotism, they develop equestrian performance drills with a mes-

sage. Using creative costuming, custom music mixes and unique props, the members use the beauty of the horse to interact with the audiences. At the 6 p.m., Friday, May 17 program’s Tough Enough to Wear Pink theme, the CHF will be performing a drill with long pink ribbons to respectfully show empathy for families who have battled cancer. As part of the 2 p.m., Saturday, May 18 Patriotism Day performance, they will perform an equestrian drill inspired by the Boston Marathon tragedy. The group has a guest runner who ran in this year’s Boston Marathon integrated into the equestrian drill. The Cowgirls Historical Foundation is a 2013 Cowboy Keeper’s award recipient from the National Day of the Cowboy organization. That award will be presented to the CHF during this Payson rodeo weekend. Members of the CHF have enjoyed many opportunities of parade participation such as the Pasadena Tournament of Roses Parade, Fiesta Bowl Parade, Gilbert Days Parade, Prescott Frontier Days, Payson Rodeo Parade and many others. The Cowgirls celebrate western heritage by riding on beautiful, vintage silver parade saddles; wearing collecta-

ble rhinestone-studded vintage western wear from Hollywood’s Glitterati age, and honoring the future. The flag drill team rides well-trained horses and wear outfits that are colorful and classy with vintage inspired shirts, matching blankets and details. PRCA’s top clown entertains

Justin Rumford will bring his awardwinning specialty act to the Payson Event Center arena as part of the 2013 Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo. This third generation rodeo cowboy out of Ponca City, Okla. has been in the PRCA since 1999 as a contestant, a pick-up man and now a Pro Rodeo entertainer. By growing up in the rodeo business — Rumford Rodeo Company, established in the 1950s — and by working for the last 12 years for stock contractors, Rumford knows exactly what it takes to make a great production. Combine that knowledge with his original acts and quick wit and you have the perfect recipe. His specialty acts include: braggart on bucking horse, gorilla hunter, mini motorcycle jump and cheerleader. The bucking horse act involves challenging the actual bronc riders by telling them

PRCA photo

Justin Rumford will perform at the 2013 Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo May 17 and May 18.

their job looks easy, and then he must prove his point on an actual saddle bronc. Rumford’s gorilla hunter act is a gentle parody of the late Steve Irwin’s exploits on the Discovery Channel. Rumford “in” Buck Irwin, Steve’s longlost cousin, who must corral a very smart gorilla that has escaped from a zoo and wound up in the rodeo arena. Expect plenty of surprises and lots of laughs.


PAGE 10 • MAY 2013

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

RIM REVIEW

Royalty in Rim Country Get out the red carpet — royalty is coming to the Rim Country this weekend. In addition to Arizona’s reigning rodeo royalty, Jayme Smith and Sammi Miles, the area will host Kyla Jo Elder, Miss Turquoise Circuit and rodeo royContributed photos alty from other states such as Reigning Arizona rodeo royalty New Mexico, Colorado, South Miss Arizona Rodeo Jayme Smith Dakota, Wyoming and Florida. (at left) and Miss Teen Arizona Contestants for the 2013 AriRodeo Sammi Miles (above) will be part of the events at both the zona titles are also already rodeo royalty in their own right Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo and Miss Arizona Rodeo — so welcome the ladies accordPageant. ingly.

Rodeo queen contest draws six hopefuls BY

MICHELE NELSON

ROUNDUP STAFF REPORTER

scribes the position as it, “symbolizes the youth of our state who wish to further promote the sport of rodeo, and in so doing, promote our western heritage. She is the ideal western American young woman, and will represent our state and the sport of rodeo as she travels throughout Arizona and the country.” The queens visit schools, fire stations and FFA and 4-H clubs. They talk to rodeo hopefuls and those in hospital beds. They meet with rodeo committees and local business owners spreading good will and the warm western vibes. Miss Rodeo Arizona Jayme Smith

Smith is the daughter of Dennis and Nancy Smith and a fourth generation cowgirl from Taylor, Ariz. As Miss Rodeo Arizona she had the opportunity of promoting and preserving not only her personal heritage, but also that of the western way of life. She finished her associate’s degree in psychology from Northland Pioneer Community College and Arizona State University with the goal of becoming a flight nurse in the future. She also works as an emergency medical technician for the state of Arizona. During her reign as Arizona’s Centennial Queen, Smith traveled thousands of miles all over the U.S. and Canada promoting not only Arizona, but also the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association and the western way of life and being a role model for youth. “It is such an honor to have this opportunity and wants to make the state of Arizona proud,” Smith said. She logged more than 50,000 miles, attending many rodeos and rodeo queen pageants, making appearances at schools, visiting hospitals and senior living facilities and participating in a

wide variety of other events. A week after being crowned in May 2012 her travels began. She was off to Clovis, N.M. and then straight on to North Platte, Neb. It was a busy year, but she says it has honestly been the best year of her life. During last summer Smith was involved in many rodeos, including the “Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo” in Colorado Springs, Colo. While in Colorado Springs she attended the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame inductions, an experience that was absolutely amazing to her. She was able to see some of the greats of rodeo make history, as well as be a part of that history herself. As someone who loves horses and the western way of life, Smith had always dreamed of attending well-known rodeos, but was never sure she would ever be able to. Not only did she make it to these rodeos, she was a part of them, having experiences she will never forget. Smith also had the opportunity of representing Arizona in the Miss Rodeo America Pageant this past December in Las Vegas, Nev. She said it was truly a week to remember as she competed with 30 other state queens for the title of Miss Rodeo America 2013. As Smith passes her crown on to Miss Rodeo Arizona 2013, she looks forward to the next chapter of her life knowing that whatever she does, her 12 months as Arizona’s first lady of rodeo will be a time she will never forget — a whirlwind of activity, experiences, and meeting many people who she will remember fondly.

L

They were those little girls who loved horses. Some grew up on ranches where horses were part of their lives; others had to persuade their parents to help them pursue their passion with riding lessons and boarding arrangements. They learned to compete in 4-H, gymkhanas, junior rodeos and more. Then they took that competitive spirit to another level — coveting a jeweled crown — a crown of a rodeo queen. The Rim Country will be ablaze with all that bling during the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo when the Miss Rodeo Arizona Pageant joins the festivities to select the state’s new royalty. Payson’s hometown atmosphere and welcoming community brought the Miss Arizona Rodeo Pageant back to Payson last year after a stint in the Valley. “The board likes Payson,” said Nancy Landino, local contact for the Miss Rodeo Arizona Pageant board. While the rodeo thunder rumbles throughout the Rim Country with the competition at the Event Center, most of the pageant activities will unfold at the Best Western Payson Inn, located at 801 N. Beeline Highway. The ladies who compete must exhibit horsemanship talent, have poise on the stage, be well spoken, understand the western life, able to give a speech and answer extemporaneous questions. There are four contestants for Miss Rodeo Arizona 2013: Brittney Truman, Candice Hill, Halle Fry and Taci Shaffer. Two young women will compete for the title of Miss Teen Rodeo Arizona 2013: Brigitte Kennison and Page McGiffin. They will be welcomed by the reigning royalty Miss Rodeo Arizona Jayme

Smith and Miss Teen Rodeo Arizona Sammi Miles. The winner of the Miss Rodeo Arizona Pageant will compete for the Miss Rodeo America Pageant in December at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. While the contestants compete this weekend for the Miss Rodeo Arizona crown, the outgoing Miss Rodeo Arizona and Miss Teen Rodeo Arizona will participate in activities around town. Joining the Arizona Queens will be Kyla Jo Elder, Miss Turquoise Circuit and rodeo royalty from other states such as New Mexico, Colorado, South Dakota, Wyoming and Florida. Landino, a former president of the Board of Miss Rodeo Arizona, Inc., helped to find host families for the queens and worked with local businesses, such as Chapman Auto to arrange for transportation and activities. The visiting royalty will have an airplane ride, attend the grand opening of the St. Vincent de Paul Thrift Store and participate in the rodeo. Other Rim Country businesses the Board of Miss Rodeo Arizona, Inc. appreciates for supporting the Miss Rodeo Arizona 2013 Pageant are: the Payson Pro Rodeo Committee, Chaparral Pines, The Rim Club, Payson Pilots Association, Chili’s, Crosswinds Restaurant, Gerardo’s Firewood Cafe, Macky’s Grill, Pizza Factory and Safeway. “It would be extremely difficult to produce the pageant without their generous support,” said Landino. The first Miss Rodeo Arizona Pageant was held in 1958. Every year since, the organization has held a pageant. “It’s a beautiful thing,” said Landino of the event. The Miss Rodeo Arizona Web site de-

See Rodeo, page 12


GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

RIM REVIEW

MAY 2013 • PAGE 11

Welcome Rodeo Fans!!! Enj

y t n oy u o your C a l i stay in G

Thank You for your participation in Arizona’s Rodeo Heritage


GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

PAGE 12 • MAY 2013

RIM REVIEW

Campaign for state’s rodeo crowns BY

TERESA MCQUERREY

RIM REVIEW EDITOR

A half-dozen beautiful young women will be in Payson this week focused on a contest for a crown — or two. The Miss Rodeo Arizona Pageant is in the Rim Country for the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo. The event will take place Friday, May 17 through Sunday, May 19 when coronation ceremonies will be held at 8:45 a.m. at the Best Western Payson Inn. There are four women seeking the title of Miss Rodeo Arizona and two who want the crown for Miss Teen Rodeo Arizona. There are four contestants for Miss Rodeo Arizona 2013: Halle Fry, Candice Hill-Crouch, Taci Shaffer and Brittney Truman. Two young women will compete for the title of Miss Teen Rodeo Arizona 2013: Brigitte Kennison and Page McGiffin.

Halle Fry

Candice Hill-Crouch

Taci Shaffer

Brittney Truman

Miss Rodeo Arizona contenders

Halle Fry is almost an Arizona native. She and her family came to Arizona when she was barely a year old. First living in Mesa, she was given a horse for her fourth birthday and started riding lessons. She competed in English and western riding shows and gymkhana. Eventually she was able to join 4-H and continue her training and love for anything “horse.” When Fry was 12, her family relocated to Snowflake. There was not much opportunity to participate with show horses, so she joined the National Barrel Racing Association and excelled in the competition. Fry’s first title was that of Navajo County Rodeo Junior Teen Queen First

L

See Contestants, page 16

Rodeo royalty visits Rim Country FROM PAGE 10

Miss Teen Rodeo Arizona Sammi Miles

Samantha “Sammi” Miles attends Arizona State University. She is a junior majoring in communications. In May of 2012, Miles graduated from River Valley High School in Mohave Valley, Ariz. and Mohave Community College with her associate’s degree. In December of 2014 she will be graduating with her bachelor’s degree from Arizona State University. Miles began riding horses at the age of 7 and has become proficient in gymkhana, western and English riding. She was appointed the Colorado River Round Up Needles Rodeo Princess in 2009 and again in 2010. At 16, Miles was crowned the 2011 Andy Devine Days Rodeo Queen and in May of 2012 she had the honor of

winning the title of Miss Teen Rodeo Arizona. She has fully enjoyed traveling throughout Arizona representing her title and our western heritage for the last year. Winning this title was a dream come true for Miles and has given her the experience of a lifetime. During her spare time Miles enjoys riding with the Cowgirls Historical Foundation and participating in their drill team. Her long-term goal is to help educate young people on western heritage, preserving the past to protect the future.

• 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Informal modeling, introduction speech and extemporaneous responses to questions about current events, horsemanship and rodeo, Best Western Payson Inn, 801 N. Beeline Highway

Miss Rodeo Arizona 2013 Pageant Schedule

Sunday, May 19 • 8:45 a.m., Coronation at Best Western Payson Inn, 801 N. Beeline Highway

Friday, May 17 • 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Horsemanship competition, Payson Event Center Rodeo Arena, 1400 S. Beeline Highway

Saturday, May 18 • 2 p.m., Rodeo performance at Payson Event Center Rodeo Arena, 1400 S. Beeline Highway • 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Fashion show and state speech, plus auction at Best Western Payson Inn, 801 N. Beeline Highway

Teresa McQuerrey, editor of the Rim Review, contributed to this story.


GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

RIM REVIEW

Dennis Fendler photo

Patriotism is always a big part of Payson rodeos and the 2013 Spring Rodeo is no exception. The Patriot performance is at 2 p.m., Saturday, May 18.

Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo Schedule Thursday, May 16 Bulls, Broncs and Bling Payson Event Center gates open at 4 p.m. Performance at 6 p.m. Friday, May 17 Payson Event Center gates open at 4 p.m. Special Draft Horse Show at 5 p.m. Tough Enough To Wear Pink Night Performance at 6 p.m. Saturday May 18 Payson Event Center gates open at noon Special Draft Horse Show at 1 p.m. Special Patriot Performance Performance at 2 p.m. Admission Adults, 13 to 64 - $14 Senior, 65+ - $12 Children, 8 to 12 - $10 (7 and under free) Tickets available at: Rim Country Chamber of Commerce, all area Circle Ks, Bob’s Western Wear, Bill Armstrong Jewelry & Pawn in Star Valley, and the Payson Public Library ($2 off coupons can be found in the Payson Roundup)

MAY 2013 • PAGE 13


PAGE 14 • MAY 2013

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

RIM REVIEW

Memories of the man of the memorial BY

MAX FOSTER

ROUNDUP STAFF REPORTER

The Payson Pro Rodeo Committee honors the memory of Gary Hardt when the action hits the arena at the Payson Event Center this week. Among those who remember him fondly is his son, Shawn, now a teacher and coach in Queen Creek. Shawn recalls his father was a star athlete, excelled in bull riding, was a seasoned outdoorsman and owned a John Waynelike reputation, mostly due to his physical and mental toughness. “Everyone looked up to him and admired him for all that he had done,” Shawn said. “He was a very unique individual.” Over the years, Shawn — who was 22 years old when his father was killed — has listened to endless tales of his father’s exploits in high school and on the rodeo circuit. “In high school in Phoenix he made the varsity team as a freshman and scored 26 rushing touchdowns,” Shawn said. “When he began bull riding, he rode with Larry Mahan and J.C. Trujillo, who are both world champions.” Shawn also recalls the story of how his father, who in the late 1960s was helping search for bodies after a flood near Tonto Creek, stumbled across an angry bear. “My dad shot him once with his .38 pistol but it only wounded the bear,” he said. “The bear crawled into some brush thickets, but Dad didn’t want to leave him wounded and dying.” As the story goes, Gary got on his hands and knees and crawled into the thicket after the bear. “Not many men would be brave

enough to do that,” Shawn said. “Dad eventually got within a few feet of the bear and was able to shoot him with his pistol.” Shawn also remembers his father had a reputation for being quick with his fists, but said that characterization is unfair. “Sure, Dad got in a lot of fights, but he was never the one to start them,” he said. “He wasn’t that kind of man.” The best memories Shawn has of his father are the times the two spent outdoors. “We did something every weekend,” he said. “It was usually hunting, fishing or going to rodeos — he was a very good dad.” Shawn continues to honor the memory of his father by wearing one of the buckles Gary won during his seasons on the rodeo circuit every day. “They are pretty special to me,” he said. Ronnie McDaniel, newly appointed mayor of Star Valley, a former Gila County sheriff’s deputy and justice of the peace, school board member and Payson graduate — and one-time rodeo cowboy — agrees his former sidekick excelled in most everything he set his mind to, including fishing. “We fished some tournaments together — he was a very good fisherman,” he said. At Payson High School, Gary starred in track and field, especially the high jump, and in basketball. Following his graduation from PHS in 1962, he was selected to play in the Arizona Coaches Association All-Star basketball game in Flagstaff, but opted out. “He wanted to go to a rodeo instead,” McDaniel said. “I think his family was a

little upset with him.” The family’s displeasure over not playing in the all-star game is understandable — his father, Jiggs Hardt, was a longtime high school basketball coach and is a member of the Arizona Coaches Association Hall of Fame. Gary satisfied his lust for bull riding for about 20 years before turning his attention to team roping. “He was good at that, too,” McDaniel said. “We roped together a few times.” Although Gary spent most of his adult life working in construction, he served a short stint as a Gila County Sheriff’s Office deputy working alongside McDaniel. “He was just then starting a family and couldn’t make a living as a deputy, so he went back to construction,” McDaniel said. Following Gary’s death, the Spring Rodeo was renamed in his honor and all the proceeds from the annual event benefit local youth through scholarship awards. His sports legacy in the Rim Country continues in the coaching contributions of Gary’s brothers, Chuck and Billy. Chuck, who recently retired after having coached football, basketball, track and cross-country at Payson High School, has been honored with enough coach of the year plaques to cover an entire wall of his Payson home. Billy is a longtime youth football league coach who has led the Payson Raiders to several undefeated records and Central Arizona Youth Football Association championships. During its earliest years, Payson’s Spring Rodeo was part of the National Old-Timers Rodeo Association, now known as the Senior Pro Rodeo Tour. In

Contributed photo

Gary Hardt

1987, it became the Gary Hardt Memorial Rodeo to honor the memory of the Payson native who died in 1987. Hardt was a well-known roper. He was recognized throughout the Southwest for his bull riding and roping talents. His rodeo career began in 1962 at the World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo in Payson. As a member of the Rodeo Cowboys Association, Hardt rode bulls for about 20 years. During the last 10 years of his work in rodeo, he became a wellestablished roper as well. This memorial event benefits local youth in pursuit of educational and athletic achievements. Scholarships are awarded to graduating seniors and assistance is provided to athletic and other programs offered by the Payson Unified School District.

TIE-DOWN ROPING Tie-down roping is the classic Old West ranch chore, formerly (and occasionally still) called calf roping. Like the steer wrestlers and team ropers, tiedown ropers start in the box ready to compete. The calf is released and the cowboy must ride his horse out of the box quickly, rope it, dismount, then sprint to the calf and lay it on its side, called flanking. With a pigging string, usually held in the cowboy’s teeth, he’ll tie up any three of the calf’s legs. The clock stops when the cowboy throws up his hands. If the calf struggles free within 6 seconds, the cowboy gets a “no time.” Tie-down roping is very competitive and takes an extremely trained horse, usually a Quarter Horse. A good rope horse can cost $75,000 or more, and many ropers use each other’s horses at different events.

Dennis Fendler photo


RIM REVIEW

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

MAY 2013 • PAGE 15

RODEO &

Part of of the the Great Great Part

American Tradition American Tradition Proud sponsor of the 2013 PRCA Pro Rodeo


PAGE 16 • MAY 2013

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

RIM REVIEW

Dennis Fendler photo

Rodeo royalty from throughout Arizona and a number of different states always are part of the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo. This year, in addition to Arizona royalty, the rodeo queens from New Mexico, Colorado, South Dakota, Wyoming and Florida are scheduled to attend. Kyla Jo Elder, Miss Turquoise Circuit, will also be part of the festivities.

Contestants have diverse backgrounds FROM PAGE 12

Attendant and that hooked her on rodeo. She has since served as Show Low Deuces Wild Rodeo Queen (2011-2012) and is currently the Navajo County Rodeo Queen. After graduating from Snowflake High School, she attended Arizona State University. She is currently a senior at ASU and majoring in electronics engineering technology and is on the Dean’s List. She hopes to return to the White Mountains upon graduation to work in the alternative energy field. Candice Hill-Crouch, daughter of Alex Crouch and Rebecca Hill, grew up on her family ranch in Tucson. Graduating from City High School in 2008, she went on to earn a certificate of study in veterinary assistance from Pima Community College. She is now a student at the University of Arizona where she is earning a bachelor’s degree in business financing. Her love of horses comes from a lifetime of riding. She has participated in hunter/jumper riding, 4-H events; showing horses on the national level, and rodeo competitions. She holds numerous allaround championship honors from both local and national contests. Through 4-H, Hill-Crouch learned many valuable skills: volunteerism, philanthropy, public speaking and advocacy. She represented Arizona in 2006 at the 4-H National Congress in Atlanta, Ga. And was one of five state ambassadors to travel Arizona promoting 4-H programs, along with advocating youth education, animal welfare and farming to the U.S. congressional delega-

tion. Taci Shaffer, former Miss National High School Rodeo Queen, climbed aboard her first horse at the age of 2 and has since aspired to become Miss Rodeo America. Growing up, she competed in 4-H, Junior Rodeo, FFA and High School Rodeo. She graduated with high honors in cosmetology and makeup artistry, with a master’s in aesthetics. She is the owner of Shimmer Me Sexy Spa and founder of Beyond Beauty. She is dedicated to helping others feel confident and beautiful and has a passion for health and fitness. Shaffer is a certified fitness instructor and enjoys teaching Pilates, yoga, body sculpting, boot camp fitness and cycling classes. She hopes to some day be a television host and has a rising modeling career. As time allows, she enjoys barrel racing, traveling, shopping and competitive running. Shaffer also volunteers weekly with Hoofbeats for Heart, a therapeutic riding program for the mentally and physically challenged. Brittney Truman is a Marana, Ariz. resident and has been involved in rodeo her entire life. She runs barrels in the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association and continues to rope with her father and uncles. She is an active member of the Cowgirls Historical Foundation, which focuses on the preservation of America’s western heritage. Truman is heavily involved in the western industry both in and out of the saddle. Currently, she runs the Coors Rodeo Endorsee Program, which has a heavy emphasis on the Walmart Rodeo Program and

promotions. In 2010 and 2011, she held the title for Scottsdale’s Miss Parada del Sol rodeo queen; and as the 2012 Miss Turquoise Circuit rodeo queen, Truman traveled the country as the official representative of rodeo within Arizona and New Mexico. Miss Teen Arizona contestants

Brigitte Kennison is the daughter of Brian and Sylvia Kennison and a sophomore at Show Low High School. She has been riding horses since she was 18 months old and has won many national and world titles showing horses. Participating in the world of rodeo, Kennison has competed in barrel racing for the past three years. Her first rodeo royalty title was that of Show Low Deuces Wild Teen Queen in 2011-2012 and Navajo County Teen Rodeo Queen for 2013. She will graduate from SLHS in 2015 and plans to attend Colorado State University to study animal science with the goal of becoming an equine veterinarian as well as a horse trainer. Paige McGiffin is from Tucson. She enjoys barrel racing and roping, camping and fishing. She has been part of the Tucson Rodeo all her life as her parents are active participants in the event, working in the arena. She has won awards with her horse through the American Quarter Horse Association and 4-H. McGiffin is a member of the Southern Arizona Barrel Racing Association and the Cowboys and Cowgirls Barrel Racing Association.

Brigitte Kennison

Paige McGiffin


RIM REVIEW

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

MAY 2013 • PAGE 17

RAM R A M TTRUCKS RUCKS

Durable by nature. And when you’re up against nature.

Our thanks to Jerry Chapman, Tom Whatley and the staff at Chapman Auto Center 100 N. Beeline Hwy. 928-596-6514

www.chapmanpayson.com


PAGE 18 • MAY 2013

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

Rodeos ride better with Coke. Swire CocaCola USA

Proud sponsors of the 2013 PRCA Pro Rodeo

RIM REVIEW


RIM REVIEW

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

MAY 2013 • PAGE 19

Dennis Fendler photo

Steer wrestling (aka bulldogging) is the quickest of the rodeo events. It requires strength, speed and timing. It is a timed event and cowboys compete against each other and the clock. The amount of time it takes to complete could be as fast as just 4 seconds.

Stock contractor and commentators make Payson rodeos possible BY

TERESA MCQUERREY

RIM REVIEW EDITOR

They aren’t cowboys competing for points, but without them there would be no competitor. They’re the stock contractor and announcers. Once again, the Salt River Rodeo Company will be providing the livestock for the Spring Rodeo. Payson Pro Rodeo Committee President John Landino said the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo will enjoy the talents of announcers Reed Flake and Rob Smets. Flake grew up working cattle and horses for his family ranch. Later, he went to Ricks College where he received a degree in ranch management. Flake has been announcing rodeos for more than 20 years. He has announced such events as the National High School Finals, the National Jr. High Finals, the Turquoise Circuit Finals, the USTRC Finals and the George Strait Team Roping. Flake and his wife, Amy, reside in

Snowflake, Ariz., where they have lived for most of their marriage. Smets is known professionally as The Kamikaze Kid, and is a color commentator for the Professional Bull Riders tour and a former five-time Wrangler World Champion bullfighter. He was born in Palo Alto, Calif., but as a child lived in Thailand, Singapore, Puerto Rico and Australia before returning to San Martin, Calif. as a teenager and attended Palma High School in Salinas. As a sophomore, he started entering high school rodeos. While bull riding as a teenager, he taunted some of the bullfighters for not protecting riders well enough after the riders fell. They challenged him to try being a bullfighter himself, which he did. He made a name for himself early on, distracting bulls after riders had fallen, so the riders could leave the ring safely. During the 19 years of the Wrangler Jeans World Bullfighting Championship from 1981-2000, Smets was a top-6 fin-

isher 17 times. He also won the championship five times — a record. Smets was inducted into the Texas Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame in April of 2010. He retired from bullfighting in 2006,

after breaking his neck for the third time. Smets and his wife, Carla, married in 1993, and they have four daughters. They live on a ranch in Shamrock, Texas.

Welcome Rodeo Fans! Come try our authentic Mexican food. Bring in this coupon for

10% OFF YOUR MEAL La Sierra Mexican Restaurant 800 N. Beeline Highway • Payson, AZ (928) 468-6711 Mon-Fri 11am-9pm, Sat-Sun 10am-9pm Family Owned and Operated


GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

PAGE 20 • MAY 2013

RIM REVIEW

Rodeo revolves around seven traditions The Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo started as an Old-Timers Rodeo years ago, but has since grown into a fully sanctioned PRCA event featuring some of the top cowboys and cowgirls in the country. Payson has a long tradition of rodeo. Much has changed over the years in rodeo, from ranch hands riding local stock to vie for top-dog bragging rights and show off their skills, to a multi-million dollar endeavor that now gives back big time to various charities like breast cancer research and salutes our veterans, featuring top stock that is bred just for rodeo. Salt River Rodeo, with

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

15th Annual Mountain Hi Days

ARTS, CRAFTS & WORLD BAZAAR at the Gila County Court House Payson, AZ

May 25th, 26th, 27th 2013 Sat-Sun 9-5/Mon 10-3

some of the top bulls and bucking stock in the West, is this year’s stock contractor. The rodeo performances feature seven traditional rodeo events:

Bull riding is the most dangerous of all the rodeo events. As with bareback riding and saddle bronc, bull riders ride with one hand and cannot touch the bull with the free hand. Bull riders hang on to a thickly braided rope with a cowbell attached. The cowbell acts as a weight, allowing the rope to safely fall off when the ride is over. Cowboys can spur for extra points, but just staying on the bull for 8 seconds is the main priority.

Steer Wrestling

Steer Wrestling (aka bulldogging) is the quickest of the rodeo events. It requires strength, speed and timing. It is a timed event and cowboys compete against each other and the clock. The amount of time it takes to complete could be as fast as just 4 seconds. Saddle Bronc Riding

This event grew naturally out of ranch cowboys breaking wild broncos in the late 1800s to use as working cow horses. Modern saddle bronc riding has a few modifications, mainly in equipment. Saddle Bronc saddles are lightweight and have no saddle horn. It’s a very hard event to master. Riders must hold their boots over the horse’s shoulders at the first jump from the chute (called the mark out rule) and they must stay on for 8 seconds. The rider must constantly lift on the hack rein to keep his seat in the saddle. With all bronc events, a fleece flank strap is buckled around the flank of the animal, just snug enough to tickle. The animals, professional athletes in their own right, feel the fleece and know it’s bucking time. Bareback Riding

Bareback Riding is a rough and explosive rodeo event and predictably the most physically demanding of all the rodeo events. To compete, the cowboy rides with no rein or saddle, but instead a rigging, which looks like a heavy piece of leather with a suitcase style handle. Riding one-handed, the cowboy cannot touch the horse with his free hand and, in this

EXTERIOR LOG HOME RESTORATION MEDIA (Corn Cob) BLASTING

Dennis Fendler photo

event, he will lean way back onto the haunches of the horse for position. As with Saddle Bronc Riding, the mark out rule is in effect Barrel Racing

Barrel Racing is a timed rodeo event, where the fastest time wins. Cowgirls race their top barrel horses around a cloverleaf pattern of three barrels. The riders enter the arena at full speed, quickly rounding each barrel and then exiting where they entered. A laser timer is used, registering to a hundredth of a second. Speed is what it is all about in this event. But if a rider knocks over a barrel, it is a 5-second penalty. It may look easy, but remember, these horses are flying along at 35 miles per hour or more. Bull Riding

Bull Riding is the most dangerous of all the rodeo events. Bull riders say, “It’s not if you get hurt, it’s when.” As with Bareback Riding and Saddle

GRAND OPENING SALE 20% OFF

Bronc, bull riders ride with one hand and cannot touch the bull with the free hand. Bull riders hang on to a thickly braided rope with a cowbell attached. The cowbell acts as a weight, allowing the rope to safely fall off when the ride is over. Cowboys can spur for extra points, but just staying on the bull for 8 seconds is the main priority. Team Roping

Team Roping is the only team event in rodeo. Like other rodeo events, team roping grew out of the ranch chores of the past. Larger cattle would have to be constrained for branding and doctoring by two ropers due to their strength and size. Today, two cowboys (known as the header and the heeler) work together to rope the horns and the back feet of a steer. The team that finishes the fastest wins. If they only catch one back leg, they receive a 5-second penalty on their time and if they break the barrier strip — the head start line for the steer — they are

We Buy Gold, Silver & Coins Top Prices Paid

penalized 10 seconds. Tie-Down Roping

Tie-Down Roping is the classic Old West ranch chore, formerly (and occasionally still) called calf roping. Like the steer wrestlers and team ropers, tie-down ropers start in the box ready to compete. The calf is released and the cowboy must ride his horse out of the box quickly, rope it, dismount, then sprint to the calf and lay it on its side, called flanking. With a pigging string, usually held in the cowboy’s teeth, he’ll tie up any three of the calf’s legs. The clock stops when the cowboy throws up his hands. If the calf struggles free within 6 seconds, the cowboy gets a “no time.” Tie-Down Roping is very competitive and takes an extremely trained horse, usually a Quarter Horse. A good rope horse can cost $75,000 or more, and many ropers use each other’s horses at different events.

YOU CAN CUT WITH A FORK Your hometown butcher offers quality meats at comparable prices!

Bring in your old or broken jewelry, coins, dental gold, or watches. We will buy, trade or sell them for you. WE BUY ESTATES. See Robert and talk to us first!

IT’S FREE

26 years in the Rim Country

“IT’S A HAPPENING”

CHARLIE’S

ATM ON SITE a GGF Classic Celebration

1-928-226-0423

Payson Village Shopping Center•474-9126 www.paysonjewelers.com Open Monday-Friday 9:30-5:00, Saturday 9:30-2:00

Open Wed, Thur, Fri 9-5 Sat 9-4 Closed Sun, Mon, Tue

Old Fashioned Sausage & Fresh Meats

405 S. Beeline, Ste. A • 474-2085


RIM REVIEW

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

MAY 2013 • PAGE 21

2013 Spring Rodeo offers tons of fun on hoof

Dennis Fendler photos

Steer wrestling in just one of seven traditional events on which rodeo was created in the 1880s ... and the bragging rights for the World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo are “owned” right here in the Rim Country. The Payson Rodeo (held in August) originated in the mid-1880s and has continued through today. The 2013 edition is coming up, but you can see some of the contestants likely to appear in August at the Gary Hardt Memorial Spring Rodeo this weekend at the Payson Event Center.

Barrel racing will be one of the features at the new event — Bulls, Broncs & Bling — at 6 p.m., Thursday, May 16 at the Payson Event Center. It is also part of the regular rodeo contests.

Probably the most entertaining event at any Payson rodeo is the mutton bustin’ contest for youngsters. Look for it to take place at the May 16 Bulls, Broncs & Bling event.


GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

PAGE 22 • MAY 2013

RIM REVIEW

classified advertising MERCHANDISE ANIMALS AKC Cavalier Spaniels: Are you ready to fall in Love? 3 Fe. 1m. $800. - $900. Call Kathy 928-468-1158 Dog Nail Clipping in the comfort and convenience of your home by Tracy. Local professional groomer of 23 years. $12.00 928-978-4959 DOG SITTING, HOME AWAY FROM HOME! 24-7 LOVING CARE In My Home, Yvonne: Hm: 928-468-2105 HORSES FOR SALE 8 year old Paint Mare, $700. 4 year old Pant Gelding, $800. 24 year old Papered Quarter Horse, $300. All Good Trail Horses. 21 mo. old registered Overo Paint Filly, $700. I can Text you Pictures, Call Toni, 928-978-6133

APPLIANCES Large White Amana Side-by-side Refrigerator, $200.obo; Nearly New G.E. Propane Stove, $250.obo; Microwave $10. Tim 928-478-6159

FURNITURE Furniture Dining Table, glass top with 4 chairs $100.00 Double bed, mattress & box springs w/ bedding $100.00 Sofa/ Bed w/ bedding (red)$200.00 Armoire cherry $100.00 Sony 25” TV $100.00 Gazebo $50.00 Buffet table cherry $25.00 928-978-2511

GUNS/KNIVES CCW CLASS: $75.00 Firearms & Ammunition , Call Brian Havey (CERTIFIED INSTRUCTOR)

928-970-0062

www.rim-fireguns.com Serious Collector wishes to, Buy U.S. and German Military Guns, Colts Winchester and any Other High Quality Antique Guns. Single Pieces or Collections, Give Us A Call at 928-468-0306

MISCELLANEOUS *CANCER CASES* www.cancerbenefits.com Call 800-414-4328.

20 ft. and 40 ft.: Shipping Containters, 928-537-3257 Craftsman 10 inch Table Saw w/Extra Blade & Stand, $120. Older Spa, Seats 4, Has New Motor, Works Good $400. 928-468-2206 GIFTS-ENTERTAINING FOR APPOINTMENT 928-468-1670 Fragrance Sets, Lingerie, Scarves, Jewelry, Evening Gowns, Bags, Gloves, Accessories, Serving Pieces, Glassware, Fine Knife Sets, Decorations, Paintings, Frames, Candles, Ficus Tree, 3 Ornamentals, Silk Plants, Degrazie Artwork, Clocks, Golf Items, Briefcases, C&W Tapes, Furniture, Tools Galore,

MISCELLANEOUS YARD CLEANING SERVICE

(COMPETING PRICES) Tree-Trimming, Brush Removal w/Hauling-Service. We also do Backhoe Work. Looking for used Washing Machines 928-468-2213 or 928-951-6590

AUTOS/VEHICLES ATVS 2000, 325 HP, Polaris Trail Boss Quad, Automatic, Good Shape, $1,500. obo, Pine, AZ Call Mike 928-476-3079

TOOLS Snap-On Tools for Sale 1/2 Inch and 3/4 Inch Impact, Wobble, Deep and Short Sockets and Misc. Wrenches Call Jon after 4pm 928-978-7566 TOOLS GALORE LARGE COLLECTION CRAFTSMAN, MECHANIC/CONSTRUCTION, TOOL CHESTS, LADDERS, SAW HORSES, WEBER COOKER, UNDER-COUNTER KNIFE SET, SLEEPING BAGS, GOLF-ACCS, BY APPOINTMENT 928-468-1670

Artic Cat Prowler 700 EFI

1057 Miles, Like New, Complete with Trailer $8,500. Call 928-474-1640

BOATS

10. 400 W. Corral Circle, Thurs. Fri., Sat. & Sun. May 16, 17, 18, & 19 from 8am to 5pm: Moving Sale, Everything Must Go!

YARD SALES 2. Friday & Saturday 5/17 & 5/18, 605 N. Oak Ridge Rd., Woodhill. Patio furiture, great redwood table w/benches, Dept. 56 snow village buildings, power and hand tools, camping supplies, misc. household items. Lots of good stuff. Don’t miss it. 3. 1103 S. Stewart Pocket Circle. Multi-family weekend sale starts Friday 5/17, 7:00am. Non-fiction Southwest books, furniture, silver and costume jewelry, baseball cards, current paperbacks, cookbooks, clean clothing, miscellaneous galore. 4. Two sales on 1109 & 1112 S. Deer Born Dr. Fri. & Sat. May 17 & 18 (Elk Ridge) 7:30 to ? Furniture, small appliances, oak kitchen table/chairs, scrapbooking, books and DVDs for all ages, story audio book cds, linens, clothing, shoes, plants, toys, and more. Optimist bake sale. Questions! 472-2264 5. 305 E. Rancho Rd. Fri. & Sat. May 17 & 18 from 7am to Noon: Radial Saw, Machanic Tools, Yard Tools, Like New Mattress Sets, Lay Z Boy Rocker Reclyner, 2007 250 Quad, 5th Wheel Hitch, Furniture, Clothes, etc. 6. Yard Sales Lamplighter Rv Park Fri. & Sat. May 17 & 18 from 8am to 3pm: Lots 256, 257, 260, 265 South Loop of Park. Furniture, Digital Piano, Art and Craft Supplies, Materia/Cloth, & Collectibles

Moving? Retiring? Local Resident looking for established business in area, offering cash 928-978-5322

7. 600 N. William Tell Circle, Fri. & Sat. May 17 & 18 from 8am to ? William Tell & Timber; Fishing Boat, Garden Tractor, Motorized Schwinn Bicycle, Camping, Furniture, Antiques, Household, Bedding, Coleman Grill, Ski Country Bottles, Guy Stuff, Misc.

THE BLIND DOCTOR Broken Blinds? Saggy Shades? Droopy Drapes? WE CAN FIX THAT! Dani 928-595-2968 BLINDS & DESIGNS Repairs, Sales, Blind-Cleaning & More!

8. Saturday Only May 18 from 7am to Noon. Multi Family Yard Sale. Community Presbyterian Church parking lot. 800 W. Main St. Great Selection and Variety with Over 30 Participants.

4 DOOR ONE OWNER, NON-SMOKER, GARAGE KEPT, SERVICE RECORDS, CUSTOM ALLOY WHEELS, EXCEPTIONAL CONDITION, 74K MILES. INCLUDED HITCH MOUNTED CARGO CARRIER. THIS VEHICLE HAS NEVER BEEN USED FOR OFF-ROAD DRIVING. IF YOU ARE TRULY IN THE MARKET, THIS IS THE CLEANEST YOU WILL FIND. PRICED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE.. $14,000.00. 602 741 6676 OR 928 978 2298 Z@JOANMCMANUS.COM.

TRAILERS 3x6 trailer with diamond plate floor and wood sides, can be converted to glatbed. New hitch and lights. $300.obo 928-978-5719

ADMINISTRATIVE/ PROFESSIONAL

Looking for a Christian companion. I have brown eyes and shoulder length auburn hair. I’m 5’5” and am 57yrs. Please write a long with a photograph to Patricia at PO Box 1045, Pine, AZ 85544.

MOVING SALES

2006 HUMMER H3

EMPLOYMENT

PERSONALS

YARD SALES/ AUCTIONS

4X4S

BHT / CASE MANAGERS HS/GED plus exp. in BH or combined edu/exp totaling 4 yrs; Case Managers must have 1 yr case mgmt. exp; Must be 21, AZ drivers license w/good driving record 2006 Mercury Outboard, 25 Horsepower, 4 Stroke, Model 25 ELPT, Low Hours, Great Shape Call Dave 928-472-7164

CARS AUTOMOTIVE RECYCLING, LOCAL: Will Pick Up, Good Prices, DAVE’S AUTOMOTIVE RECYCLING, Parts for Sale, M-F, 9-5, Sat 9-1, 928-474-4440

MOTORCYCLES 2004 Harley-Davidson FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide Color: Pearl White Fuel Injected Harley-Davidson Dyno’d at 100 HP Many Upgrades including: Chrome Upgrade, Motor Upgrade, Gear Upgrade, New Tires, New Windshield, New Saddle-packs, New Battery, Helmet’s included. Excellent Condition 28,000 Mileage $9,000.00 OBO. Must Sell. Vic/928-595-1050 Doug/928-478-7169 mollymariea@gmail.com.

CARS 1985 Jeep Wagoneer, V-6, 2.8L, orig. AZ vehicle, 87k miles, well maintained w/service records $3500/obo, 978-5107

LOCAL NEWS delivered to your home twice a week.

PAYSON ROUNDUP To subscribe, call 474-5251, ext. 108.

PEER / RECOVERY SUPPORT SPECIALISTS Must have Peer/Recovery Support Certificate, willing to provide peer support services; Requires HS/GED, AZ driver’s license with good driving record; 21 years of age. CLINICIANS Requires Masters Degree in Psychology or BH related field. Requires AZ driver’s license with good driving record; 21 years of age

SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS Guitar Lessons Learn basic guitar. Note reading, chords, scales and much more. Materials supplied. Serious and camp fire players welcome. Fun and fast paced! One FULL hour $20. Call: 978-2151

CONSTRUCTION Debco Construction

New Homes, Remodels, Deck, Painting, Garages, Wood/Tile Floors, Affordable Prices, Don 928-978-1996, Lic. & Bonded, Res. Lic.#ROC185345 Commercial Lic.#ROC182282 In Payson Aera 30 years

HANDYMAN DHW Home Services Decks/Porches Sheds Drywall Texture Matching Paint Remodeling 928-595-1555 Credit Cards Accepted not a licensed contractor

HANDY CARPENTER!

20 Years Experience Repairs Small Remodeling Work: Doors, Windows, Decks, Sheds,Kitchen/Bath, etc. not licensed Just Call Dennis 928-978-1385

LANDSCAPING 1x1 CD

Generous benefit pacage. Bilingual encouraged. Submit application/resume to: Horizon Human Service, 600 E. HWY 260 #8, Payson, AZ 85547 AA/EOE/M/F D/V

HOMES FOR SALE F.S.B.O. 3BR/2BA. Great Neighborhood Mobile Home, 213 E. Chateau Circle, Payson, 1233sf, Appliances, Many Upgrades, $69,900. 323-301-0707 pam91384@gmail.com F.S.B.O. Two Residences on One Property 1Br/1Ba Mobiile, 4Br/2Ba MFH, Both Fenced Back Yards, $165K, Call for Appointment 928-951-6300 OLDER RELIABLE FAMILY Looking for 3/Bedroom Home where Owner Will Carry or Rent. 10K-15K Cash Down. Ok-If Home needs repairs.989-714-5190 Riverfront Paradise

Sit on the front porch of this 2,000 square foot,3B/2B Home with a 600sf detached studio/officer on nearly 2 acres Overlooking the East Verde River. The river flows past the front porch and limestone formations tower out the back porch. Gigantic master bedroom suite with a fireplace and a walk-in closet. Pine paneling, giant living room, big picture windows, two fireplaces, 1.82 acres of boulders and oaks. Plenty of room for kids and visitors. Listed at $319,000 for one of the few riverfront properties in Arizona. 548 W. Eleanor Dr, East Verde Estates. Call: Realty One Group, Deborah Rose-Ellis (928) 978-0063 or Deborah@sellspayson.com

MOBILES FOR SALE 55+Park 705 E. Miller #29, 2Br/1Ba 12x65, Covered Patio, Screened Porch, Nice Yard, All Appliances, Storage, Furnished, New Carpet, Make Offer, Park Owned, 928-978-2658 Foreclosures: 30 Homes, both New and PreOwned to Choose From, Free Delivery, Call Bronco Homes, 1-800-487-0712

CLERICAL/OFFICE Busy family medical practice needs front office receptionist. Must be computer literate. Please e-mail your resume and any other material you may feel is appropriate, in a PDF format, to the following e-mail address. EASTON708@GMAIL.COM

REDUCED

GENERAL Twin Lakes MHP 55+ Park, 1985 Fleetwood 1Br/1Ba, well Maintained w/Az Room, Garage/Work Shop, Handicap Accessible, $15,500. 928-479-2329 to see

Looking to Hire Experienced HVAC Tech: Must Have Good References, w/at least 5 years Experience in Residential Repairs, Service, and Installation. EPA Certification a Plus, Plumbing Experience a Plus. Please Send Resume to: mike.ghp@gmail.com or call Mike AFTER 5pm at 928-951-6515

IRIS GARDEN SERVICE: COMPLETE SPRING CLEANUPS, DEBRIS REMOVED, RESONABLE; PAYSON LIC. 928-474-5932 Cell 928-951-3734 not.lic.contr.

GET RESULTS

REAL ESTATE

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

HOMES FOR SALE

1100 Sq.Ft 2BDR/2BA Apartment In Central Payson, Central Heating and A/C, F/P., Washer/Dryer Hookup $635.p/m, 480-326-7203 or 480-926-9024

with an ad in our

Classifieds! Call 474-5251 to buy an ad.

Silver’s Landscaping & Concrete Concrete & Block, Fences, Paint, etc. Free Estimates, Cell 928-468-6764 Ask for Silverio

2Br/2Ba for Sale in Pine, 1&1/2 Car Detached Garage, Central Heat, Insulated Windows, Near School, $144K, 928-978-3597 Cute 2 bedroom, 3 bath, manufactured, fenced yard. Great investment. Currently rented. Pat, agent. 928-970-4140

REPOS: 2, 3, & 4 Bedrooms, Starting from $9,989. Call Bronco Homes: 1-800-487-0712

RENTALS

1Br & 2Br Apts. Recently remodeled, w/New Applicances and AC, Great S. Beeline Location, $500 to $600.p/m 928-474-8000


APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Spring into Savings

Apartments For Rent

when you plant your roots at Aspen Cove!

Comeinintoday, today, look Come lookand andlease! lease We will OFF YOUR and take we’ll1/2 waive your FIRST FULLfee MONTH application + takeRENT!!!! 1/2 OFF LIMITED TIME OFFER!!! your first full month move-in! • 2 bedroom/2 full bath floorplan available DEPOSIT OAC!!!! • 2NO bedroom/1.5 bath floorplan available

HOMES FOR RENT 3Br/1Ba, Stove, Refrig, Evap.Cooler, Wood Stove, W/D, Trash Included, 700 S. Oak, $790.p/m, 928-474-8833 Chaparral Pines: 2Br/2Ba, 2-Car Garage, Unfurnished, Cabin Style, Lg.Yard, Hot-Tub, 1 yr lease, $1,295.p/m, Includes Clubhouse & Workout Facility 928-978-0888 Lease a Lifestyle

ASPEN COVE

810 801 E. FRONTIER ST. #46, PAYSON, AZ 85541

(928) 474-8042

Cornerstone Property Services

www.cornerstone-mgt.com

Large Studio Apartment, Utilities/Cable TV Included in Rent, $600.p/m; Small Studio Apt. $550.p/m, Call Don, 928-978-3423

Tonto Oaks Apts.

Rentals CD

& Mobile Homes

120 S. Tonto St.

COME CHECK OUT OUR AFFORDABLE, UP SCALE BEAUTIES LARGE & SUNNY

1BR/1-1/2BA 2BR/2BA

ON-SITE LAUNDRY, EXERCISE ROOM, COVERED PARKING, GARBAGE P/U INCLUDED

Open House Every Saturday 9:30-2:30 Call Cindy for availability (928) 472-9238

COMMERCIAL FOR RENT Office or Retail Space Lowest Rates In Payson Private Bath,500 sq.ft. On Upgraded Remodeled Units, 1 Month Rent Free 602-616-3558 Office Units $220.mo and a 30’x40’ Double Bay Warehouse M-1 Zoning $700.mo, call 928-595-0252 (Local)

Rim View OFFICE PARK, Executive Suites, Payson’s Premier Office Space, 708 E. Hwy 260, 928-472-7035.

HOMES FOR RENT 1BEDROOM/1BATH CABIN Fully furnished, Including Dishes & Linens Secluded/Senior Neighbors! Pine $600 month + Deposit Credit Report Required 928-476-3989

Rent this Riverfront Paradise The huge front porch overlooks the East Verde River. The back porch overlooks an acre of boulders and oaks. The 2,000-square-foot house has a gigantic master bedroom suite with a fireplace. Guest bedroom has its own bathroom, with two bonus rooms downstairs. Huge living room/dining room off hickory paneled kitchen. Fish the stocked stream out front or stroll downstream to swimming holes on Forest Service land. Asking $1,400 a month. Come by and check it out at 548 W. Eleanor Dr, East Verde Estates. Call: Realty One Group, Deborah Rose-Ellis (928) 978-0063 or Deborah@sellspayson.com

Z

-Man The Price Slasher!

Subscribe to the Payson Roundup Newspaper SAVE 50% Pay $32.37 for 6 Months, Get Next 6 Months FREE

MOBILES FOR RENT

2/bd 1/ba mobile home with large family room add-on, large fenced yard, $600/mo, $250 deposit. 928-978-4069 leave msg. MAIN HOUSE ON ESTATE: Spacious 1,800sf. Furnished Fenced yard, Garage, In Town, Pets-Ok, Horse Stall, $1,300. Lease Available 602-290-7282

Rye RV Park: 1 Bedroom, $250. to $400. Per Month, Laundry on Site, Water/Trash Included. Spaces $200.mo. 602-502-0020

ROOMS FOR RENT ROOMMATE WANTED! Mature, Responsible Person to share my Beautiful mountain view home! W/D, Cable, Own Bathroom & Deck, F/P & Views! $400 per month: 928-474-2106

LOCAL NEWS delivered to your home twice a week.

3 BR, 2.5 BA, 1640 sf. kitchen appliances, A/C, 2-car garage, bonus room, fenced yard, quiet in town, walk/ parks/ schools $969/mo + dep, Pets/dep 928 474-2724/602 267-7655.

Brought to you by

1Br’s & One Studio/w Utilties, Security Dep. Plus First Months Rent, Pets-No, $350 to $600.mo 928-978-3775

PAYSON TRAILER RANCH 1 & 2 Bdrms, 1st Mo + Deposit! Starting @ $400.00 Cable/Water/Sewer/Trash Included, Discount for 6-12/mo.lease. 928-517-1368

PAYSON ROUNDUP To subscribe, call 474-5251, ext. 108.

MAY 2013 • PAGE 23

Today ’ Deal

NICE QUIET AREA, 2BDR/2BATH,LR,FR, Enclosed Large Az Room, Fenced Easy-Care Yard, Carport, 3 StorageShed, Payson, Avail Now.$895/month Call 602-647-2014 928-468-1068

MOBILE/RV SPACES

1Br/1Ba Cabin In-Town, Completely Restored, Heating/AC, Wood Burning Stove, Outside AZ Room, Laundry, Storage Shed, Lots of Trees, $625.p/m 928-288-2440

Z Z

GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

RIM REVIEW

(For new subscribers. Local area only.)

1/4-page B&W Advertisement in the Payson Roundup just in time for your special event!

$200 for a $415 Value! PAYSON ROUNDUP MEDIA COMPANY 708 N. Beeline Highway • (928) 474-5251 • www.payson.com

Z

DEALS CLOSE AT NOON MAY 21 • OFFERS GOOD FOR 3 MONTHS AFTER DATE OF PURCHASE

Get these deals at

paysondeal .com A division of the Payson Roundup


GARY HARDT MEMORIAL SPRING RODEO

PAGE 24 • MAY 2013

RIM REVIEW

4402 E. Highway 260 STAR VALLEY - AT THE END OF TOWN, ON NORTH SIDE

Quality Advice AND

PRICES!

EVERYTHING WE SELL! 6” or 1 gal

Geraniums price 2 for $5 compare at $3.99-$5.99

JUMBO 6-PACK

Tomatoes 20 Varieties Peppers 7 Varieties

COLOR

3 for $5 Compare to $1.99-$2.99 each Petunias 30 Colors Dianthus • Snaps Marigolds & More

14” COLOR BOWLS

$8.88

3/$20 Others price $9.99-$15.99

4402 E. Highway 260 STAR VALLEY - AT THE END OF TOWN, ON NORTH SIDE

At NATEs it’s like buying 2-getting 1 Free


2013 Gary Hardt Memorial Rodeo