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MEDIATED PACE Adapting to the Rhythm of Upstate New York

Design Studio Spring 2010

I

MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010

I

KULeuven Belgium


MEDIATED PACE I Adapting to the rhythm of upstate NY INTRODUCTION Looking at the Erie Canal today, the remnant infrastructures of a fast developing industrial corridor are still apparent. This particular piece of infrastructure made it possible to comfortably cross the barrier of the Appalachians and continue the colonizing march to the West. Thereby facilitating the growth of the young colony predominantly on the eastern coast. The Erie Canal connected New York City to the trade centres in the interior, leading indirectly to the Louisiana Purchase, which doubled the size of the colony and 10 years later the nation extended from east to west coast.

1850 1810-40

fort calstop

foet cals

1800

top tran

sect 25

00miles

1790 erie canal

2600miles erie canal

s ile 0m

20 t1 ec

ne

w

santa fe

st.louis

tra ns

sec

n fe tra

rans

uis t

st.Lo

New york

ns

santa

es 0 mil t 175

s

mile

00 ect 9

1700

or le

sand

0miles

ct 250

anse iago tr

sandiago

The location of the Canal was determined by the presence of a corridor, known as the Mohawk Valley, created by the slow geological processes and glacial transformation that shaped the region and left particular traces on the landscape like the Mohawk Valley and the Fingerlakes.

new orleans

accelarted advancement to the west facilitated by the introduction of the canal.

2

slow geological processes and glacial transformation leading to a peculiar geomorphology of the upstate NY region

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010 I KULeuven Belgium

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MEDIATED PACE I Adapting to the rhythm of upstate NY INTRODUCTION

1800

1850

1900

1950

2000

1850 1810-40

1810-40

1790

1800

fort calstop

1700

-7.4% -10.8% -8.3%

1980

-22.7%

1970

-13.1%

1960

-8.2%

_ +

1950

Buffalo

s ile m

00 12 ct se lens

or w ne

-3.7% -8.7% -2.1%

132%

80.3%

80.3%

110%

67.3%

55.3%

_ +

4

Barge Canal development pop. 26, 331

canal relics shrinking city? pop. 34,950 8.5 % vacant

Barge Canal development pop. 295, 750

canal relics shrinking city? pop. 219,773 6.97% vacant

Barge Canal development pop. 506,775

canal relic shrinking city? pop. 292,648 8.22% vacant

rochester

river settlement pop. 15

4.6%

Erie Canal development pop. 2,500

28%

30.7%

15.8%

11.3%

57.8%

22.9%

64.9%

50.5%

54.4%

39.3%

63.8%

the ‘rust-belt’ a region formerly known for its manufacturing industries now characterized by shrinking population numbers

The rhythm of travelling over the canal greatly influenced the urbanisation patterns in the upstate region of NY; cities sprouted where ships had to wait inside locks, slowing down the flow of goods and people, and therefore providing an ideal location for economical transactions.

Erie Canal development pop. < 5,000

New York

26.3%

river trade post pop. < 100

2

32.4%

km

92%

.4

53.1%

14

20.3%

1,2

70.2%

43.2% 29.4%

64.8%

rome

2

49.8%

31.8% 45.1%

Historical populations Year Pop. %± 1790 3,498 — 1800 5,289 51.2% 1810 10,762 103.5% 1820 12,630 17.4% 1830 24,209 91.7% 1840 33,721 39.3% 1850 50,763 50.5% 1860 62,367 22.9% 1870 69,422 11.3% 1880 90,758 30.7% 1890 94,923 4.6% 1900 94,151 −0.8% 1910 100,253 6.5% 1920 113,344 13.1% 1930 127,412 12.4%

Albany

$0

-6.3% -10.1% -13.7%

Historical populations Year Pop. %± 1698 4,937 — 1712 5,840 18.3% 1723 7,248 24.1% 1737 10,664 47.1% 1746 11,717 9.9% 1756 13,046 11.3% 1771 21,863 67.6% 1790 33,131 51.5% 1800 60,515 82.7% 4.4% 1810 96,373 59.3% 9.4% 1820 123,706 28.4% 3.5% 1830 202,589 63.8% -10.4% 1840 312,710 54.4% 1.5% 1850 515,547 64.9% -1.4% 1860 813,669 57.8% 1870 942,292 15.8% 1880 1,206,299 28.0% 1890 1,515,301 25.6% 1900 3,437,202 126.8% 1910 4,766,883 38.7% 1920 5,620,048 17.9% 1930 6,930,446 23.3% 1940 7,454,995 7.6% 1950 7,891,957 5.9% 1960 7,781,984 −1.4% 1970 7,894,862 1.5% 1980 7,071,639 −10.4% 1990 7,322,564 3.5% 2000 8,008,288 9.4% 2008* 8,363,710 4.4%

km

$50,000

New york

Historical populations Year Pop. %± 1790 3,498 — 1800 5,289 51.2% 1810 10,762 103.5% 1820 12,630 17.4% 1830 24,209 91.7% 1840 33,721 39.3% 1850 50,763 50.5% 1860 62,367 22.9% 1870 69,422 11.3% 1880 90,758 30.7% 1890 94,923 4.6% -1.6% 1900 94,151 −0.8% -5.4% 1910 100,253 6.5% -0.6% 1920 113,344 13.1% 1930 127,412 12.4% -12.1% 1940 130,577 2.5% -10.7% 1950 134,995 3.4% -3.9% 1960 129,726 −3.9% 1970 115,781 −10.7% 1980 101,727 −12.1% 1990 101,082 −0.6% 2000 95,658 −5.4% 2007* 94,172 −1.6%

new orleans

.6

$200,000

tran

56

$150,000

s st.Loui

Syracuse

$100,000

st.louis

2

$450,000

miles

km

$500,000

sect 1750

fe tran

2

$400,000

santa

.4

km

$350,000

2500miles

santa fe

66

.8

$250,000

transect

Rochester

92

$300,000

sandiago

sandiago

New york

Historical populations Year Pop. %± 1840 20,191 — 1850 36,403 80.3% 1860 48,204 32.4% 1870 62,386 29.4% 1880 89,366 43.2% 1890 133,896 49.8% 1900 162,608 21.4% -5.9% 1910 218,149 34.2% -5.1% 1920 295,750 35.6% 1930 328,132 10.9% -4.2% 1940 324,975 −1.0% -18.4% 1950 332,488 2.3% -7.0% 1960 318,611 −4.2% -4.2% 1970 296,233 −7.0% 1980 241,741 −18.4% 1990 231,636 −4.2% 2000 219,773 −5.1% ``2008* 206,886 −5.9%

Buffalo 2

1830

km

1850 1840

1700

miles

Syracuse

6.0

1860

Rochester

900

13

1870

sect

tran

en w ne

2008

1990

1880

erie canal

orl

orl en w ne

new orleans

2000

1890

erie canal

miles 0 mi

st.Lou

120

st.louis

900

is trans

les

ect

miles

nse

santa

t 1750

s tra

120 s tra

nse

ct

santa fe

fe transec

new orleans

Historical populations Year Pop. %± 1830 8,668 — 1840 18,213 110.1% 1850 42,261 132.0% 1860 81,129 92.0% 1870 117,714 45.1% 1880 155,134 31.8% 1890 255,664 64.8% 1900 352,387 37.8% 1910 423,715 20.2% 1920 506,775 19.6% 1930 573,076 13.1% 1940 575,901 0.5% 1950 580,132 0.7% 1960 532,759 −8.2% 1970 462,768 −13.1% 1980 357,870 −22.7% 1990 328,123 −8.3% 2000 292,648 −10.8% 2008* 270,919 −7.4%

Albany

1800 iles

2600miles

New york

New Amsterdam ct

miles les

900

0 mi

ect is trans

st.Lou

ct 2500m

1790

1700

st.louis

p transe

1790

1700 New Amsterdam

foet calsto

This flourishing economy made it possible to fully recover the initial investment of 7 million dollars for the construction of the canal within merely 8 years. When this flow of transaction carried by the Erie Canal slowed down, so did the development of these cities and in many of these locations life took on a slower pace.

buffalo

lake/river trade post pop. <1,000

Erie Canal development pop. 2,400

the ‘rust-belt’ a region formerly known for its manufacturing industries now characterized by shrinking population numbers

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010 I KULeuven Belgium

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DAYCYCLE CURRENT TRAVEL TIME

day 1

4,5 hours

day 2

day 3

5 hours

7 hours

6 hours

5 hours

day 4

2 hours

3 hours

day 5

5,5 hours

9,5 hours

CANALSCAPE

RHYTHM (0,5 h) buďŹ&#x20AC;alo

rochester

lockport

rome

syracuse

newark

utica

amsterdam

little falls

albany

oswego

.8

92 2 km fulton rome

.4 baldwinsville

.0 2

km

oriskany

north tonawanda fairport tonawanda buďŹ&#x20AC;alo

canastota

clyde macedon

jordan newark

port byron

little falls

utica

syracuse fayetteville

illoin

st.johnsville fonda

auburn

amsterdam

2

fort plain

m

6 13

spencerport

rochester

2

brockport

km

medina

albion

66

lockport

56

.6 k

canajoharie

schenectady

troy

albany

100

0 feet

travel on the erie canal and the related experience of a varied arrey of paces 6

10

0 miles

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010 I KULeuven Belgium

7


100

0 feet

MEDIATED PACE I Adapting to the rhythm of upstate NY INTRODUCTION

Apart from illustrating this relation between the unique pace of the Erie Canal and the location of settlements and key cities, travelling on the Erie Canal today also shows this shift in pace from high speed development to a location for people that want to take a step back. It also reveals the natural cycles that have always greatly affected the pace in this region, like the drastically changing seasons with a difference in temperature averaging over 40 degrees Celsius, and related to that the fluctuating flow of water and the agricultural cycles.

8

10

Natural to the process of fast development is the creation of abandoned buildings, infrastructures and open spaces. The Erie Canal, in a way, acts as a datum that structures the distribution of these industrial remnants and wasted spaces in Upstate New York, creating what is now known as part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rust Beltâ&#x20AC;?, a region formerly focused on manufacturing industries and now characterised by shrinking cities.

0 miles

The pace of development in the region was also accompanied by competing infrastructures, which has led on the one hand to these wasted spaces, but also holds the potentiality of having a wide range of alternative modes and paces of mobility.

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010 I KULeuven Belgium

9


MEDIATED PACE I Adapting to the rhythm of upstate NY INTRODUCTION

Montreal

Minneapolis

Toronto

Boston

Buffalo Milwaukee

Detroit

NEW YORK THE GREAT LAKES MEGA-REGION 2050

CHICAGO

Cleveland

Pittsburgh Philadelphia

Omaha

East Coast Megaregion Great Lakes Megaregion

Cincinnati

Kansas City

Great Lakes Megaregion (Canada extension)

WASHINGTON

urbanisation High Speed Rail

3 million + metro

St. Louis

250,000 +

Incrimental Speed Rail

50,000 +

Bus Connection

0

50

100

150

200

250 km

proposed HST conectivity network

In the current trend of globalization, the creation of strong transnational regions and providing fluid connectivity is crucial to drawing and facilitating flows of transaction. This idea of megaregions changes our perspective on upstate New York completely. The east with New York City as its main node is part of the East Coast Mega-region; in the west Buffalo is envisioned as the new gateway to the Great Lakes Mega-region, whereas the rest of the hinterland is turned into an “in-between” space. The mega-regions are linked by a high speed rail project which reinforces this idea. On the other hand one of the major cyclical processes affecting both mega-regions and the hinterlands are the seasonal changes with cycles of freezing winters and warm comfortable summers. Adapting to these natural processes has been one of the assets of the region and continuing to do so will be crucial in its sustained development.

Our research position argues that mediating between fast processes of development and slower processes and cycles of change contributes to the unique landscape character and regional identity of upstate New York and therefore should be sustained with strategic urban and environmental interventions. To advance this investigation, we have selected two sites: one situated in Buffalo, which will develop in the coming decades as the gateway to the Great Lakes mega-region and as an important node in the newly proposed HST system. And one in the Mohawk Valley, the hinterland “in-between”, characterised by its long hard winters, rugged terrain and inaccessibility. We deliberately chose two sites of apparently contrasting paces, but the project will show that this opposition of fast and slow pace is only apparent at first sight, and that the projects should mediate between different paces locally to be able to adapt to the rhythm of Upstate New York in a contextualized, non-generic way. seasonal frost phenomenon affectin the whole of the great lakes region

10

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010 I KULeuven Belgium

11


In the context of the proposed development of mega-regions in the US (by 2050) as a continuation of its fast pace of development, we argue that the plan for the Great Lakes Mega-region and the HST should extend over the national borders to Canada, as it is equally part of the Great Lakes economic and ecological rhythm.

The fast process of suburbanisation in the Greater Buffalo metropolitan area has extended across the Canadian border towards the metropolitan area of Toronto. Together, the cities of Toronto and Buffalo could become the new commercial and cultural gateway to the Great Lakes Mega-region. Slightly adjusting the proposed high-speed rail connection for the region would facilitate this global vision and partnership.


Buffalo used to be one of the main commercial nodes and distribution ports for goods going to and coming from New York City via the Erie Canal. Its industrial activities were mainly located around the Buffalo River, which acted as an extension of the Canal. Therefore it is currently also the location of many waste-spaces, disconnecting the suburbs (to the south of the river) from the shrinking city centre. Locating the new HST station just south of the Buffalo River, close to the waterfront, will not only connect the city of Buffalo to the global network, but the proposed development could also generate a new impulse in this part of the city. 4. These waste-spaces are the result of the rhythm of industrialisation and deindustrialisation. But some of these industrial relics, caught in a pace of decay, still hold esthetical value and great potential for reuse.

But since the site is located in and around wetlands any future development should also take the critical slower processes of seasonal flooding and freezing into account, giving them room to happen and using them as assets if possible.. To be able to reintroduce a new urban pace in this location we not only need to connect it to the global network, but also reconnect it to the city centre. . Extending the existing mobility network and strategically placing new transportation nodes will help facilitating this.


Together the pace of wetlands, cultural heritage and alternative modes of transportation can generate a wide range of interrelated programs on this particular location.

In plan this basically translates into three strips working on a different pace. The strip linked to the HST station represents the fast pace development in the context of Buffalo as gateway for the Great Lakes megaregion and node in a global network. On the waterfront we have development sfocussing on a slower pace of leisure, but also providing an ideal location for related commercial development. Between these two is a strip working on a slower pace, where industrial relics stand in a landscape of wetlands revealing the rhythm of the seasons.

A possible spatial translation of this is shown in the following sections, which represent the location of specific programs and an envisioned development they could bring.


10. The next collages show we can mediate between these different paces. By for example reinforcing them through confrontation as shown here in the HST station. 11. Or by recycling the industrial heritage to facilitate a new urban cultural program along a pedestrian ecotrail consisting of reused rail tracks. 12. The waterfront development is organised around the skyway (highway), which we downgraded and turned into a linear park and providing a safe connection to the city centre for pedestrians and cyclists. 13. This last image shows the seasonal transformation and how this can influence the pace in the station development area by drawing the water system in and using its rhythm of change as an asset.


MOHAWK VALLEY adapting to a slower pace

14

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010 I KULeuven Belgium

15


MOHAWK VALLEY adapting to a slower pace This shift in pace brings us to the Mohawk valley, which in essence is emblematic of what we identified as being a slower pace, characterized by subtly changing landscape textures, dense vegetative masses and dramatic rolling hills that buffer the interior region of New York State from the accelerated urban conditions found in the port cities as New York City and Buffalo. SPRING THAW 2009

The Native American tribe of Mohawk from which the Valley inherited its name were also known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keepers of the Eastern Doorâ&#x20AC;?, as they protected their nation from invasions from that direction. We believe that this area- secluded as it may be- is once again under indirect pressure induced by the future development of these mega-regions on either side,

April 20-30

April 10-20

since it is a continuum of the same regional network and ecological corridor. Though bundles of infrastructure are packed together in this valley, this area acts mainly as a corridor of flows (both literally and figuratively) and thus offers a condition which is in sharp contrast from the character associated with mega city-regions April 20-30 April 30-May 10

May 10-20

after May 30

Mohawk valley is also characterised by its long and harsh winters, which in combination with its rugged terrain and inaccessibility gives the area its slow paced dynamics, highly regulated by cyclical natural processes to which it is continually exposed.

May 10-20

May 20-30

April 20-30

April 10-20

black river upper hudson river

lake champlain

ROME

ROCHESTER

lake ontario tributaries UTHICA

SYRACUSE BUFFALO

Mohawk river

SCHENECTADY

niagra falls/lake erie oswego river/finger lakes

TROY ALBANY

genesse river

susquehanna river chemung river

lower hudson river 0

5

15

secluded despite abundance of infrastructure 16

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010 I KULeuven Belgium

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MOHAWK VALLEY adapting to a slower pace Frost generally stays longer in the Mohawk Valley, lasting on average from mid November until beginning of Aprilrendering this part of the region literally dormant during this period . The rate of the water flow also affects the speed of the frost-andthaw-cycle, as the fast flowing water in rugged terrain freezes later and thaws faster. SPRING THAW 2009

A direct consequence of this is the seasonally recurring problems of ice jams and continual swelling of the Mohawk River posing a seasonal threat to the settlements downstream. To address this reoccurring problem we propose to enhance the existing wetlands in the floodplain of the valley segment between Little

April 20-30

April 10-20

Falls and St Johnsville, as a sample of the area. This intervention could be implemented in parallel with the rearrangement of settlement patterns in the valley, as is shown in the sequence of valley sections below, by properly programming it and moving settlements and crop-yielding fields further uphill on the south facing side of the valley

April 20-30 April 30-May 10

May 10-20

after May 30

and dedicating the north facing one mainly to a less demanding productive landscape.

May 10-20

May 20-30

April 20-30

April 10-20

black river upper hudson river

lake champlain

ROME

ROCHESTER

lake ontario tributaries UTHICA

SYRACUSE BUFFALO

Mohawk river

SCHENECTADY

niagra falls/lake erie oswego river/finger lakes

TROY ALBANY

genesse river

susquehanna river chemung river

lower hudson river 0

5

15

an area subject to cyclical micro climatic conditions 18

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010 I KULeuven Belgium

19


MOHAWK VALLEY adapting to a slower pace The next slides show a simulation of how we propose to slow down the seasonal and exceptional water fluctuation, by letting the river seasonally claim part of the agriculture land temporarily increasing the natural wetland areas. The existing infrastructures in this valley could act as dikes on the edge of this widened floodplain. This would then decrease the speed of the water flow and thereby reducing the risk of flooding further downstream of the Mohawk River. As a continuation of this slower water strategy- we add a second absorptive layer of forest on the steep slopes and along the creeks feeding into the river. Reforesting certain strategic locations could contribute over time to the enhancement of existing ecological corridors. Next we zoomed in on a sample site of this particular area, containing strips of various contextual conditions, changing at their own pace, that can be found here: ranging from creeks to forest and wetlands, to the little urbanisation there mainly linked to agricultural activities.

1

Valley cross section study

Mohawk Valley

Little Falls - Saint Johnsville

Small urban node

2

A

located in anarrow steep corridor, developed near lock, subject to seasonal flooding

1

3

Wetlands

located in Mohawk flood zone, ecological value,

2

down river run-off Mohawkslows Valley

Little Falls - Saint Johnsville Agricultural land mostly pasture land, developed on milder slopes, greatly affecting run-off

3

Mohawk Valley

Small urban node

Little Falls - Saint Johnsville

B

Forest in anarrow steep corridor, located located on steep slopes, developed lock, mostly alongnear creeks, subject to seasonal slows down run-off flooding

1 4

Mohawk Valley

Small urban node

Little Falls - Saint Johnsville 1

Mohawk Valley

1

Small urban node 1

located in anarrow steep corridor, developed near lock, subject to seasonal flooding

Wetlands

proposed located forestincover extention Mohawk flood zone,schemes 2

ecological value, slows down river run-off

3

Agricultural land

20 3

mostly pasture land, developed on milder slopes,

located in anarrow steep corridor, developed near lock, subject to seasonal flooding

2

located in Mohawk flood zone, ecological value, slows down river run-off

4

3

located in Mohawk flood zone, ecological value, slows down river run-off

mostly pasture land, developed on milder slopes, greatly affecting run-off

located in Mohawk flood zone, ecological value, slows down river run-off

2 0

3

1

2

3

Agricultural land

4 km

mostly pasture land, developed on milder slopes, greatly affecting run-off

Forest 4

located on steep slopes, mostly along creeks, slows down run-off

Forest

Agricultural land

mostly pasture land, developed on milder slopes, greatly affecting run-off

Forest

Wetlands

Agricultural land

Wetlands 2

located in anarrow steep corridor, C developed near lock, subject to seasonal flooding

Wetlands

Small urban node

Little Falls - Saint Johnsville

4

4

located on steep slopes, mostly along creeks, slows down run-off

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU0 2009-2010 I 2KULeuven 4 km 3 Belgium 1

located on steep slopes, mostly along creeks,

21


MOHAWK VALLEY adapting to a slower pace farmland

Agriculture has been one of the most important activities in the Mohawk Valley ever since people started inhabiting the area. Even today it is the main occupations of its inhabitants, but the locally slower pace of agriculture is under pressure of accelerated conditions in the mega-regions as mentioned before The pace of the local agricultural facilities follows the cyclical processes of the seasons. This graph represents how these processes affect the growth and distribution of various kinds of pasture grasses. Since the economy of the valley is highly dependent on pasture based animal rearing practices and dairy-farming consideration of these processes is of paramount importance.

west Canada lake

Our intervention on this scale consists of the implementation of the earlier proposed densification of the existing forest patches along the creeks, and also use it to mediate between this ecological intervention and the little development there. Small wooden cabins could exist within these forests, but they will focus on the experience instead of ownership. On the other hand we try to adapt the local agriculture to the current pace of development to be able to sustain their pace of living. By promoting and facilitating agro-tourism for people that want to take it slower, by constructing terraces and smaller parcels to facilitate this and suggest a more sustainable use of soils and water.

woodland 0

100

woodland

200

woodland

higher surface run off

farmland

west Canada lake

woodland

creek

farmland

woodland

woodland

west Canada lake west Canada lake

woodland

woodland

woodland

wetland area

woodland

wetland area

higher surface run off

e

summer seeded brassicas

7 6

AVAILABILITY

summer seeded brassicas

legume

2 ave. annual precipitation

kentucky blue grass unimproved

jan

feb

mar

apr

may

5 4 3

kentucky blue grass improved

tall grasses 150 lb

8

1 0 in

jun

jul

aug

sep

oct

nov

dec

e wooded wetland

Pature land

wood land

wooded wetland

e

e e e e

e

wet dry

run off

e

raised foot path

crops

0.00

crops

wet dry

0.00

infiltration

infiltration

infiltration

foot path

infiltration

crops foot path crops

crops

1.60

crops

run off

1.60

irrigation channel infiltration

irrigation channel 0.00

0.00

wet dry

infiltration

ee

1.60

infiltration

run off

wet dry

ee ee

ee

infiltration

infiltration infiltration

infiltration

seasonal land surface texture change patterns 22

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010 I KULeuven Belgium

r

resized and terrac

irrigation channel

1.60

raised foot path

wet dry

Pature land

crops

irrigation channel

infiltration

wet dry

ee

resized and terraced agricultural plots

resized and terraced agricultural plots

foot path

crops

run off

ee

foot path

raised foot path

wet dry

Pature land

wooded wetland Pature land

raised foot path

wet dry

creek

creek

higher surface run off

ee ee

e

e e ee e

farmland farmland

higher surface run off

wooded wetland

ee ee e ee e ee e e ee ee e ee

wood land

hig sur

farmhouse farmhouse

increased percolation

ee

wood land

9

pasture land

increased percolation

creek

pasture land

increased percolation

pasture land

creek

wood land

ave. annual snow fall

wetland area

creek

woodland

woodland

higher surface run off

warm season grasses

pasture land

increased percolation

higher surface run off

farmland

stockpiles tall fescue

wetland area

500 m

23


MOHAWK VALLEY adapting to a slower pace

More concretely this could translate into introducing walkways in the forests and wetlands for people to experience the rhythm and changes of this landscape as depicted in the sections above. a scematic detail showing the agricultural terraces with a rethought irrigation system on these steep slopes that slows down the runoff, and with increased accessibility for both owner and visitor can also be found above . The maps immediately above suggest the seasonal cycle of drastic change and its effect on the textures, the experience, and the use and pace of the landscape.

24

We adapt the area to the rhythm of the region by reinforcing existing ecological systems that also structure the landscape and urbanisation, and by introducing new seasonal programs of a different pace to help sustain the existing pace of life and recycle historical (industrial) relics. In this sense we not only try to mediate between the different paces on a local level, but also on a regional level mediate between the accelerated development in the coastal and port cities of the mega-regions and the hinterland of Upstate New York in a contextualized, non-generic way.

Design Studio Spring 2010 I MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010 I KULeuven Belgium

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DESIGN STUDIO REPORT: Dagnachew G. Aseffa, Miguel Vanleene, Payam Tabrizian STUDIO CRITICS: Amaechi Raphael Okigbo + Ward Verbakel INFO: MAHS / MAUSP / EMU Master programs, Department ASRO, K.U.Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 1, B-3001 Heverlee, Belgium, Tel: +32 (0) 16 321391 Fax: +32 (0) 16 321984

Design Studio Spring 2010

I

MaHS-MaUSP-EMU 2009-2010

I

KULeuven Belgium

Design Report  

Erie Canal Studio Design report

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