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CREATURE COMFORTS

HEALTH

DESIGN

BEHAVIOUR

INSPIRE IRE

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SEP-DEC

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Table of

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EDITOR`S LETTER CONTRIBUTORS

PET PROJECTS PROJECT DOG: A MOVEMENT TO CELEBRATE DOGS CRITTER CAREERS PET PHOTOGRAPHY GOES WILD WITH STYLE PUP FICTION

24 96 948 88

CREATURE COMFORTS TOYS FOR DOGS ORANGE YOU HAPPY? THINGS WE ADORE

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WELLNESS

1050 16 PETS AT HOME 32 82 FEATURE 42 BEHAVIOUR 3860 74

CANADIAN PET HEALTH PROBLEMS CANINE ARTHRITIS THE COUCH POTATO CURE

THE FUTURE OF CANINE QUARTERS OLD DOG, NEW TRICKS

FOUR LEGGED GLOBE-TROTTING

TREATING VET FEARS BEATING THE BACK TO SCHOOL BLUES TRICKS FOR TIMID TERRIERS


f Contents

BREED PROFILE

54 CAT CORNER: 20 78

YIPPEE! YORKSHIRE TERRIERS!

CATS AND DOGS? LIFE WITH A SOUR PUSS!

KIBBLE & BITS

92 102 104 CLOSING NOTES 110

THE TRICK OF THE TREAT TAILS TO WAG ABOUT RESCUE ME

MOST EMBARRASSING PET MOMENTS

Pawsh Cover

Photographed by TONYA SCHABACKER CULTURE FOR PETS

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Laura L Benn

Welcome

Autumn is the season of change, but what many of us forget is that in order to evoke positive change we must be willing to learn and discover an element of newness in our lives. This sentiment is the founding inspiration for our third issue ‘Learn to Wag.’

No matter how experienced we may be when it comes to raising pets, there is always something new to be learned and as doting owners it is up to us to take on the task of educating ourselves. Whether researching the best quality products or asking important health questions, an owner’s job is never done when it comes to taking the best possible care of our furry, fuzzy and feathery companions. It is my personal belief that the best of the best in any field, profession or hobby remain students their entire lives, constantly absorbing new information for the betterment of themselves and those whom they share their world with. Knowledge is an influential commodity that enriches our state of being and

Rory

inspires us to improve. I have learned so much since launching the first issue of Pawsh and hope that you have too. This magazine is a passion project at its core, a characteristic that has in and of itself taught me the greatest lesson I’ve learned to date – do something that you love and everything in life makes a little more sense. As always tremendous thanks to our wonderful new sponsors without whom Pawsh could not exist. Special thanks as well to the spectacular team of writers, photographers and designers who time and time again share their mutual love of pets within the vibrant pages of Pawsh. You are all incredible! Thank you for taking the time to read Pawsh and share it with your friends. I hope this season brings you and your family the very best!

Founder/Editor

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Writers ALEXANDER BENTLEY Alexander Bentley is a graduate of Algonquin College’s Scriptwriting program, now delving into the deep dark world of short stories and novels. Currently, he’s studying Web Development as a means not to starve to death while pursuing his literary passion. Despite a personal lack of pets at this point in time, he persists in prattling on about them to anyone willing to listen.

LISA DAY Lisa Day is a certified IPG Master Groomer and IPG certified grooming evaluator. Presently she is the developer/instructor of the Professional Grooming Program at Algonquin College in Ottawa and also teaches behaviour issues as part of the Vet Assistant Program. Lisa has worked with poodles in the sport of competitive obedience for over 30 years in both the USA and Canada. Her current canine partner, GMOTCh Tudorose Smooth Operator RE AM.CDX Am., better known as Shaver, is the first Standard Poodle in the history of Canadian competitive obedience to achieve the highest title offered in obedience -- Grand Master Obedience Trial Champion. She has won multiple awards in the field of obedience and many of her pupils are ranked nationally.

SHANNON BROWNRIGG, R.V.T. Shannon is a passionate registered veterinary technician, who has been working with pets and their owners for the past 18 years. Shannon is currently employed at Algonquin College teaching future Veterinary Technicians/Assistants and coordinating the Veterinary Assistant and Groomer Assistant Program. At home, she is regularly entertained by her sons, Jed (10-years-old) and Rhys (six-years-old) and SPCA adopted fur kid “Berger,” a one-year-old Leonberger mix.

ALLISON VORSTENBOSCH

www.theallusionist.ca Allison is a recovering English major. She spends her days selling chocolates in order to fund her real passion: writing, whether it be about animals or Canadian television. She previously blogged about her adventures in Canadian content and is now a guest contributor to the filmarmy blog. In an attempt to explore her creative side, her new blog will feature short stories, cinematic scenes, soliloquys and maybe even a sonnet. May God help us all.

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Photographers LIZ BRADLEY

www.elizabethandjane.ca Liz Bradley is a dog lover who lives with her husband, and their three little fur-kids, Paddington, Wellington and Corduroy, in Ottawa, Ontario. She has a passion for photographing pets, portraits and weddings and also runs the Ottawa Dog Blog.

NICOLE GAVARD

www.nicolegavard.com Nicole is a Sudbury based photographer who specializes in environmental and portrait photography. After graduating with a diploma in photography, she is furthering her knowledge and experience with new creative projects, as well as working at a print and design company.

STEPHANIE HEIM

www.stephanieheim.com Stephanie grew up with an unquenchable passion for the visual arts and fell in love with photography during her final year of high school. A graduate of Algonquin College’s challenging photography program, Stephanie is now hard at work exploring the world of photography any way she can.

TONYA SCHABACKER

www.tonyapetphotography.com Tonya was able to take the two things she loves most in life – animals and photography – stack them together and make a career. Her ability to capture a dog’s unique personality is what makes her work outstanding and beautiful. She calls Austin, TX home.

KIM RODGERS

www.barkpetphotography.com Kim graduated from Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, CA with a BA in Studio Arts. Her work has been published in The Wall Street Journal, PEOPLEPets.com, LAist.com, TMZ, PEOPLE Style Watch Magazine, and Dogs Today Magazine. She is also a founding and current board member of Lu Parker Project, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving conditions at LA Animal Shelters while enlisting the help of local at-risk youth looking to give back to their community.

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Photographers DANIELLE BERNIER

www.daniellelynnphotography.com Danielle is a Professional Photographer in Ottawa, Ontario specializing in on-location work with Families, Children and Pets. When not behind the lens, Danielle can be found chasing after her two children and two Pugs - Emma and Peanut. Danielle’s ambitions include chasing her dreams of working in commercial photography, and to some day move to the country and open her home to abused and abandoned Pugs. LAURA HOFFMAN

www.lauramerikayphotography.com Laura Merikay Hoffmann is a Baton Rouge based professional pet photographer as well as a full time animal science major at Louisiana State University. She provides a personal, fun, social, and one-on-one pet photography experience to private clients around the United States.

The PhoDOGrapher, BRITTANY VEINOT

www.phodographer.ca Brittany Veinot is Ottawa’s PhoDOGrapher! Brittany has experience photographing dog portraits, advertisements, magazine editorials, events and charities, and has patience and understanding when handling all animals.

NATALIE SCHLEYER

www.ndsphotography.com Natalie is a proud mom of three children and three fur babies, living in Merrickville with the love of her life. Passionate about photography and specializing in on-location photography, she can often be found capturing families and their pets in and around the Ottawa area.

MINH TAM NGUYEN

www.happycatstudio.com

Design Beauty

Minh believes that beauty lies in the details, a belief that serves her well in her work as a graphic designer. With over a decade of graphic design experience, ranging from corporate work to freelance, her skills are diverse and versatile. When she’s not busy creating gorgeous layouts on the computer, she is often pursuing other creative outlets, such as jewelery, stationary and more. She also enjoys mad cuddles with Rory while working in the PAWSH office!

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“Thanks again for capturing little Scruffy’s personality through your photos. They are awesome, and I can’t wait to get them printed and up on the wall.”

Scruffy’s human, Karen elizabethandjane.ca

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photography


CREATURE COMFORTS

FOR DOGS Play, play, play is a fabulous way to wind up or wind down any time of the day! HAPPY GO LUCKY FLEECE BONE

www.mymascot.com

MARTHA STEWART PETS™ 3-RING ROPE

www.petsmart.com

PUPPY OCCUPI TREAT DISPENSING CHEW

www.petsmart.com

MARTHA STEWART PETS™ NEOPRENE DISC

www.petsmart.com

SCOTTIE DOG RED

www.harrybarker.com

TENNIS BALL TROPHY SET

www.harrybarker.com

CHUCKIT!® AMPHIBIOUS DUCK DIVER

www.petvalu.com

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WELLNESS

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CANADIAN PET HEALTH PROBLEMS THE SHOCKING RESULTS

OF A NEW STUDY Written by LAURA L. BENN Photographed by LIZ BRADLEY

APPROXIMATELY 50 PER CENT OF CANADIANS ARE PET OWNERS WHO ADORE THEIR FURRY COMPANIONS, BUT A ABOUT THE OVERALL STATUS OF PET HEALTH IN THE COUNTRY.

new study reveals troubling statistics

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ccording to Canada’s Pet Wellness Report conducted in 2011 by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) in partnership with Hill’s Pet Nutrition, the choices owners are making for their pets’ diet and exercise could be effecting the quality and length of their pets’ lives. The study documents that on an average weekday, pet owners spend almost twice as much time browsing the Internet (48 minutes) and three times the amount of time watching television (79 minutes) as they do exercising their pets (25 minutes). Even on weekends, when people are more likely to have increased amounts of free time, television viewing and Internet perusal continue to double and triple pet play minutes. This lack of exercise combined with nutritional deficiencies is now showing up in increased pet obesity numbers and dental problems -- health issues that can drastically decrease a pet’s lifespan. CULTURE FOR PETS

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Veterinarian and member of the CVMA Executive, Dr. Jim Berry of Fredericton, New Brunswick, believes that a lack of knowledge about what is important from a health perspective is to blame for people failing to provide pets with healthy lifestyles. “It is a matter of education,” he says. “Pet owners need to understand the health implications of their choices and be able to recognize for themselves the visual indications of pet health, such as weight and teeth condition.”

ENOUGH EXERCISE? In the study, veterinarians report that 55 per cent of dogs and 70 per cent of cats they examine are not receiving enough physical exercise to maintain good health. “One of the things I found disturbing but interesting during the study was that both owners and vets said exercise was important,” says Berry. “Yet it turned out that on average owners were spending three times more time watching tv than they were playing with their pets.” Of course, Berry acknowledges that the amount of time a pet needs to exercise on a daily basis depends greatly upon its breed and energy levels. “Dogs that are high-energy like boxers need about one and half to two hours a day of full on racing around the park,” continues Berry. “Meanwhile a quieter breed, like a pug or a senior golden retriever, may only need two 15 minute walks a day and a bit of playtime.” As a general rule Berry recommends that dogs be given a minimum of at least two walks a day, but highly recommends that owners speak to their veterinary professionals to determine exactly what sort of exercise regime their pooch needs. Cats are also in need of regular physical exertion, especially if they are restricted to inside the home. “It is very important to actively play with your cat, which most people don’t do,” elaborates Berry, who suggests playing a game of tossing singular pieces of kibble up a flight of stairs for your cat to retrieve as a great form of feline fitness. “At the end of the day a person’s lifestyle is reflected onto their pet,” says Berry. “So the best way to make sure your pet is getting the right amount of exercise is to choose a breed that is appropriate to your way of living.” In other words, if

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WELLNESS

your idea of a tough workout is a walk around the block, consider a breed like a pug. If you regularly hike, jog or bike, you may want to bring a more active breed into your household.

FOOD FACTS Another significant finding of Canada’s Pet Wellness Report suggests that pet owners have difficulty choosing healthy foods for their pets. Only 18 per cent of owners are reported to feed their pets the serving amounts recommended on the pet food packaging, while only 17 per cent say they review the ingredient list. Furthermore, 44.5 per cent of owners are more likely to leave food fully accessible to their pets at all times; actions that veterinarians say result in overweight pets who do not live as long as pets who are lean and fit. “Owners need to chat to a vet about appropriate food types,” stresses Berry. “They need to make sure that the food is appropriate to the life stage of the pet. For example, a puppy needs to be on puppy food, not senior kibble.” Pet owners also need to be aware of what they are feeding their pets. The general consensus among the veterinary field is that owners tend to consider the price of a pet food above the food’s ability to meet their pet’s nutritional needs. “About 70 per cent of the dogs and cats that I see are overweight,” reveals Berry. “And owners are often surprised to hear that their pet could do to lose a few pounds.” Researching food options, discussing nutrition with a veterinarian and adhering to feeding recommendations are all courses of action that owners can take to help prevent their pet from packing on the pounds.

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DENTAL ‘DOS AND DON’TS’ Dental issues may not sound like a huge medical matter, but poor oral pet hygiene can actually lead to life-threatening issues, such as heart murmurs and liver and kidney problems. According to Berry, clean teeth and fresh breath are among the best indicators of good pet health that owners can be aware of themselves. “A lot of owners fail to recognize the signs of bad teeth and bad breath or don’t see it as a problem,” says Berry. “I would encourage people to recognize the visible indications of pet health by observing their pet’s weight and teeth condition. By addressing weight and tooth problems early, you can avoid severe complications like mobility issues, liver problems and skin conditions.” Fortunately, owners have a variety of dental foods and chew toys on the market to choose from to keep their pets’ pearly whites squeaky clean. Daily brushing for 30-seconds a day is Berry’s personal advice for maintaining good dental health as well.

PREVENTION IS THE BEST MEDICINE When it comes to the matter of pet health the true emphasis should be prevention. “I would encourage owners to get their pets into the vet’s office for regular examinations so that overall health can be assessed,” says Berry. “It is also important that owners learn to recognize weight and dental issues independently so that more serious health matters can be prevented. In the long run, prevention costs owners a lot less and improves a pet’s quality of life and longevity.”


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On an average weekday, pet owners spend almost twice as much time browsing the Internet (48 minutes) and three times the amount of time watching television (79 minutes) as they do exercising their pets (25 minutes).

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Poor oral pet hygiene can lead to more severe and life-threatening issues, such as heart murmurs, liver and kidney problems. “About 70 per cent of the dogs and cats that I see are overweight,” reveals Berry. “And owners are often surprised to hear that their pet could do to lose a few pounds.”

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WELLNESS

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Written by LAURA L. BENN Photography by LIZ BRADLEY

EVERYBODY ENJOYS A LAZY DAY SPENT SPRAWLED OUT ON THE COUCH WATCHING TELEVISION, READING A GOOD BOOK OR SIMPLY SNOOZING THE MINUTES AWAY. BUT IF YOUR DOG IS BEGINNING TO LOOK MORE LIKE A SPUD THAN A SPRY ENERGETIC CREATURE IT MAY BE TIME TO CALL A . FORTUNATELY, THERE ARE LOTS OF OPTIONS FOR ENTICING OTHERWISE LAZY CANINES INTO ACTION.

couch intervention

This may sound like a rather odd idea, but transporting your pup’s favourite indoor hangout spot outside can work wonders. Of course, that’s not to say that you should carry the entire couch into the backyard. Simply introduce your dog to a pillow or cushion bed surrounded by fresh air. The liveliness of the outdoors (ie; birds, people, nature’s sounds and smells) will help keep your pup alert and awaken their inherent puppy curiosity. CULTURE FOR PETS

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Spending day after day all alone is quite frankly no fun. Even if constantly surrounded by people and showered with affection, a dog needs socialization with its own kind. After all, not too many humans can run as fast as their canine counterparts. So make a point to round up your friends and their dogs and host a puppy playgroup! Even if your dog isn’t inclined to run around right away, chances are they will join the rest of the pack for some sniffing around and rough house.

Pawsh Point Most dogs want to be active. They adore running around, exploring and being ‘on the go.’ Often times a dog that spends most of its time sleeping simply isn’t receiving the mental stimulation it needs. In other words, your couch potato pup may very well be bored. Help them stay active by introducing them to new sights, sounds and smells!

Often times a dog will choose to sleep simply because they are bored and there is nothing of interest happening to warrant them staying awake. So introducing Fido to a ‘brain toy’ (aka a toy that requires your dog to work for a treat or puzzle something out). Not only will this be a source of great fun for them and you, but it doubles up as mental exercise too!

Who in their right mind turns down some quality one-on-one time with their favourite person in the world? Never underestimate the power of play for your pooch pal. Whether its fetch, swimming, tug-ofwar, hide and seek, running in the park or strolling leisurely around the block, dogs love to spend time with their owners and if properly encouraged will leave the couch in leaps and bounds just to be with you.

DOG TORNADO PLASTIC A whopping four layers of rotating discs will keep your pooch’s head spinning! Three of these levels are compartments where treats can be hidden and your dog has to figure out how to rotate the layers accordingly to uncover the goodies! Entertainment for the body, mind and spirit!

www.nina-ottosson.com

If concerend about your dog’s inactivity, a trip to the vet might be in order to make sure everything is ok.

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CAT CORNER

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CATS AND DOGS?

Written by ALEXANDER BENTLEY Photography by LAURA HOFFMAN

THE IDEA THAT CATS AND DOGS WILL NEVER GET ALONG IS SO ENGRAINED IN OUR CULTURE THAT, WELL, WE MENTION IT ALL THE TIME. MOVIES HAVE BEEN MADE ABOUT IT; WE QUOTE IT ( ); WE EVEN USE IT TO DESCRIBE WEATHER PATTERNS (OKAY, THAT ONE’S A CHEAT). BUT HOW MUCH TRUTH IS THERE IN THE OLD SAYING?

“those two fight like cats and dogs!”

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t would be great to say none, but in reality cats and dogs do naturally abrade against each other like any other territorial predators. However, what a lot of people forget is that there can also be a lot of intra-species tension, as many dogs won’t get along with other dogs and many cats won’t play nicely with other cats. The important thing to remember with any pet disagreement, even the ageold dog versus cat debate, is that this issue isn’t about species -- it’s about personality.

THE SECRET So, what exactly is the trick to getting cats and dogs to live together in fuzzy harmony? Well, if the two of them come into the home as infants (kittens and puppies, respectively) then the whole process is pretty straight for-

ward. The main thing with socializing your pets is to create a sort of comfort level or desensitization to other animals. The thing you don’t want is for your pet to think, “OH MY GOODNESS! It’s a cat/dog! I’m gonna jump them/panic/make a fuss/scream!” The better response that you wish your pet to have is, “Oh, it’s a cat/dog. Is time for belly rubs?” Naturally, if a cat and dog are introduced to each other early on in their lives, they’ll be perfectly comfortable with each other and the latter response is more likely to be nurtured.

THE HARD PART The difficult part comes when an already established pet is introduced to somebody new. Often times the established pet will be outright hostile to any intruders and the new

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CAT CORNER

“Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together - mass hysteria!” - Ghostbusters

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addition will be bullied to some degree. The best way to acclimatize both pets is to introduce them in a very controlled environment. It’s quite important, at this point, that the dog-half of the equation is well trained and leashed, just in case things turn crazy. Someone should have a fairly good grip on the cat as well, but not firm enough to make the kitten apprehensive of the situation.

ALL GOOD FRIENDSHIPS BEGIN WITH A SNIFF Start off by letting each pet sniff something that belongs to the other. Share a blanket or even a fuzzy toy, anything so long as scent is involved. After a round or two of this, it’s time to make some face-to-face introductions. Once both animals are in the same room and properly discouraged from any sudden leaps or excitable behaviour, let them scope each other out. Watch their reactions carefully and be mindful of any negative behaviours, such as hissing or snarling. If all goes well, fantastic! Repeat this process a few more times and your two pets should get along well enough that there won’t be any problems. If all does not go well, however, then it may be time to call the professionals. There are socialization classes for pets available out there, but mostly for single-species issues. These classes are still useful for dogs and cats to work out their differences. Any pet can learn good manners and how to get along well with others, be it a cat or a dog or whatever.

LIVING IN HARMONY Getting a dog and cat to live in harmony is like getting any two animals to live together well. You have to show them and prove to them that they are each nothing to fear. You also have to set limits and let them know that it is not all right to be mean or ill mannered. Two different species can get along just fine with a little bit of mutual respect. And belly rubs. Those are important too.

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CRITTER CAREERS

A cool serene colour palate with safari inspiration is an ideal backdrop to make this zebra’s adorable face really pop!

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PET PHOTOGRAPHY

WITH STYLE! Written by LAURA L. BENN Photography by CATHERINE LEDNER

PHOTOGRAPHING ANIMALS IS AS EASY AS A-B-C FOR CALIFORNIA BASED PHOTOGRAPHER, CATHERINE LEDNER, WHO IS USING HER CAMERA TO TRANSFORM THE WAY PEOPLE VIEW THE WILD KINGDOM AND OF FURRY, FEATHERED AND SCALY WONDER.

open eyes to a whole new world

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hat makes Ledner’s work truly breathtaking is its unique blend of bold contemporary nature and whimsical yet sensitive allure. Combining beautiful designer wallpapers with the rich texture of carpeting, Ledner creates a luxurious scene in which to capture the compelling nature of all sorts of animal friends. “The concept behind these portraits is simple,” elaborates Ledner. “See something – in this case an animal – in an unexpected setting, thus elevating the animal to human status.” Ledner’s desire to see animals as equals is what inspired the series that began in 2006 and has resulted in a stunning collection of alphabetical photographs, ranging from an alligator to a zebra and covering everything in between.

Although a film graduate from New York University, Ledner soon discovered that photography was her true calling. Her style and confidence with a camera landed her work in popular publications such as Dwell, New York Times Magazine and Vanity Fair. “I love the permanence of photography,” Ledner continues. “It’s fleeting, but also always there to look at.” No doubt it is this ubiquitous and elusive quality that drew Ledner towards the strong visuals present in the animal world, a realm that is always on the move. One of Ledner’s typical animal shoots would run from 8am until 7pm to ensure that the maximum number of animals could be photographed each day. Hosted in a humble

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CRITTER CAREERS

Who knew donkeys could be so bold? Strutting his stuff in front of a daring floral design, this fellow knows how to make a statement.

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Polka dots mirror the fun, whimsical and often cheeky nature of parrots. CULTURE FOR PETS

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No need to frown with a gorgeous and bright arrangement of flowers surrounding you, as this beautiful bulldog discovers.

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When you’re this fluffy a plush carpet and romantically tuned wallpaper is a great way to mirror your soft and cuddly demeanour. CULTURE FOR PETS

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Who’s prickly? Not this guy posing against a serene spa-like background and finely textured carpet.

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studio that once was a car garage with three roll up doors, Ledner’s main priority always remained the comfort of the animals, which were rented from various companies that supply the film and television industry with livestock. Working closely with each animal’s trainer or handler was also vitally important, according to Ledner, in order to understand each creature’s likes and dislikes and increase the likelihood of creating a compelling image. “From chasing the turkey all over the studio, to watching the kangaroo jump around, to hearing the penguin’s feet waddle on the hard floor, every session was memorable,” says Ledner, fondly recalling her extraordinary experiences with critters that few people ever have an opportunity to interact with. When asked what she enjoys most about working with animals, Ledner instantly replies, “Their tenderness and honesty. The things you see in their eyes is always deep and surprising. I know people say that animals are stupid, but I don’t think of them that way. I see them as living things, just like us, and I want to connect with them.”

Although Ledner is now busy focusing on human photo subjects her lively animal portraits live on in her popular first book appropriately entitled Animal House (2007) to reflect the alphabetic characteristics of her work. Her signature wallpaper and carpet theme was then continued into a second book called Glamour Dogs (2009) that focuses exclusively on – you guessed it – dogs! Living her own day to day life with a menagerie of pets, including three dogs (Dodger, Little Bear and Gracie), two cats (Bebe and Iris) and four rabbits, Ledner feels that she will always remain inspired by the animal world, domestic or otherwise. ‘I encourage people of all ages to explore the sensitive world of animals and to be kind to all,” concludes Ledner. After all it is said that the beauty of humanity is discovered in how a person treats an animal. www.catherineledner.com www.catherinesanimals.com

Animal House (2007) Glamour Dogs (2009) CULTURE FOR PETS

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PETS AT HOME

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OF CANINE QUARTERS Written by LAURA L. BENN Photos Courtesy of KOHN PEDERSEN FOX ASSOCIATES

HAVE YOU EVER NOTICED THAT BEDTIME FOR A DOG IS SOMETHING OF A ROUNDABOUT AFFAIR? IT’S NOT SIMPLY A MATTER OF FLOPPING DOWN AND CLOSING ONE’S EYES. INSTEAD THEY PAW AND SNUFFLE AT THE GROUND THEN TURN AROUND AND AROUND AND AROUND UNTIL FINALLY , EVERYTHING IS JUST SO AND SLUMBER CAN COMMENCE.

the perfect little nest is created

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f you were not aware of this amusing yet primal phenomenon the revolutionary One Jackson Square Dog House probably won’t make a lot of sense to you. Designed in 2008 by Trent Tesch, Principal at the architecture firm Kohn Pedersen Fox

Associates (KPF), the geometry of this organically shaped dog house mimics the habits of a nesting dog that curls up for sleeping. But this ‘bark-itechtural’ triumph is more than a thing of aesthetic beauty; it is an intricately woven fabrication that thinks of everything

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PETS AT HOME

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to keep your furry companion completely comfortable. Of course, considering the original doggy design was inspired by KPF’s One Jackson Square in Greenwich Village, New York, a luxurious 30-unit residential development carved from the dramatic fashion typical of its prestigious locale, the incredible structural details of the canine affiliate should absolutely be expected. The uber sleek dog house is suitable for both outdoor and indoor use in any rural or urban setting, creating an instant nook for exhausted pups to cozy up in. Meanwhile the eco-friendly rooftop offers a grassy perch for dogs to lounge upon in true doggy glory. Constructed from 250 unique pieces of laminated Baltic birch plywood, the One Jackson Square Dog House is designed to control air flow. The sublime geometry of the structure expertly channels refreshing breezes into the interior during the summer, while rotating the house can also keep chilled winter winds from creeping inside. The floor of the One Jackson Square Dog House is referred to as ‘freestanding,’ meaning that there exists a comfortable buffer between the dog and the ground. Incidentally, this buffer allows for easy cleaning, thus also making every owner’s dream come true. “The most rewarding part of working on this project was finding the right form,” says Tesch, who believes that innovative and quality design for pets is a reflection of our love for them. Unfortunately, the One Jackson Square Dog House was a pro-bono project, built only once and auctioned off for approximately $7000 to support the Animal Rescue Centre of New York. This means it is not available for purchase. However, when asked if there are any plans to design additional dog houses for future sale, Tesch elusively replies, “Perhaps...” A gorgeous specimen of doggy style done right, The One Jackson Square Dog House has irrevocably raised the bar for canine quarters around the world – and the dogs are barking with delight! www.kpf.com

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PETS AT HOME

KPF’s One Jackson Square in Greenwich Village, New York – a luxurious 30-unit residential development that inspired the One Jackson Square Dog House.

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BEHAVIOUR

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VET FEARS Written by ALLISON VORSTENBOSCH Photography by STEPHANIE HEIM

IT’S THAT TIME AGAIN, TIME TO MAKE THE OH-SO DREADED . YOU EITHER HAVE TO WRESTLE YOUR PET INTO THE CARRIER OR PLEAD THEM TO EXIT THE VEHICLE ONCE PARKED. YOU HAVE TRIED TO EXPLAIN THAT IT’S FOR THEIR OWN GOOD, BUT TRY AS YOU MIGHT YOU’RE BELOVED COMPANION JUST DOESN’T GET IT.

journey to the vet

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s common as this problem may be vet visits don’t have to be a stressful event anymore. Dorothy Litwin of Animal Behaviour Services Canada doesn’t want you to have to struggle with your pet before your next vet appointment: “We can make their and our experiences different if we just take a little time and prepare them a little better. “ Decreasing the stress of these visits can actually be very important for your pet’s health. “Stress is going to affect the quality of the vet exam most likely. If the animal is

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being, let’s say aggressive, during the examination then the vet may not be thorough enough,” Litwin states, adding that stress can also be hard on an animal’s body and manifest in physical symptoms as it sometimes does in humans. A responsible owner can recognize the signs of their pet being frightened. Whether they tremble or start to get their growl on, a pet will always give an indication of how they are feeling, which creates an opportunity for the human to address the issue. “Here’s your animal for the first time ever going into a foreign situation and all of a sudden this person is poking and prodding and pushing and doing all these sorts of things that your animal may perceive to be threat-

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ening behaviours,” Litwin explains. No wonder there is a fear factor involved! To help your pet get over this fear, take them into the clinic before any type of appointment to get them familiar. According to Litiwn, associating positive happenings with the vet office is key. “You want to introduce your pet to this environment in a very kind of neutral way, in a very positive way so you’re going to bring lots of yummy treats with you,” she continues. “Have the staff feed your pet some yummy treats. Maybe play a game with a toy. Just have 10 minutes of fun at the vet clinic.” This will help establish the vet office as the best place ever in your pet’s mind!


Acclimatizing your pet to the car or carrier is of equal importance. Again the goal is to make these occurrences fun and exciting for your pet. It is recommended that you make a habit of taking your pet out in its carrier or in the car for a variety of occasions, so that they know they won’t always end up at the vet’s office once the door closes and the engine turns over. “Allow your pet to go in [the carrier] and stroke them or give treats while they are inside,” says Litwin, once again advising that owners make every aspect of the experience as positive as possible for nervous pets.

An owner should feel comfortable enough to discuss any matter with their vet and ask any question. Your pet, who may perhaps be the best judge of character, should also feel calm and comfortable with their medical professional.

Not only can we modify our pet’s behaviours, but we need to watch our own as well. “If we’re nervous or anxious, there’s a chance we’re behaving differently than our pet is used to and they’re going to pick up on that,” says Litwin. “If you are feeling that way, take a really deep breath and then try to focus on making it a positive expeAnother scary aspect of the visit is the ac- rience. If you’re going to stroke your pet, tual examination itself. Adbe mindful. Are doing it A responsible owner vanced preparation is once in a kind of fast, nervous again the secret ingredient can recognize the signs way because you’re feelfor easing your pet into this ing that way?” The calmer of their pet being strange experience. “Introyou can be, the easier it frightened. duce your pet to handling will be for your pet. as soon as you can,” is Even if you’ve been very diligent and have Litwin’s advice. “Touch between the pads, groom your animals, touch the coat, touch followed all of the above steps, burning off the muzzle, look at its teeth, start brushing some extra energy before the appointment their teeth, handle the body to mimic as- can also work wonders. “Allow your pet to pects of an exam.” Regularly handling your drain some excess energy so they can relax pet will familiarize them with the process even more,” Litiwn advises. Also try and get and make being examined seem like just an your pet to go to the bathroom beforehand everyday occurrence – a walk in the park, so they don’t end up doing so on the exam table. so to speak. As pet owners it’s hard for us to see our Of course, the whole vet-going experience will be infinitely easier once you’ve found a precious pet so frightened at the vet’s office vet that you really trust and who is willing to (often with those eyes that seem to plead, build a relationship with your pet. “Basically ‘Why are you doing this to me?’) but this I would say go with your gut. If it doesn’t can easily be solved with a little time and feel right, don’t be afraid to switch practitio- effort. Make your pet the envy of the waiting ners,” Litwin states. “Go somewhere where room by taking some time to work through you’re going to have a good experience.” the fear.

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TIPS FOR TRAVELLING WITH YOUR PET Written by LAURA L. BENN Photography by NICOLE GAVARD

Is it that time for you? TIME TO PACK YOUR

BAGS, RESERVE YOUR TICKETS, BOOK A HOTEL, AND HEAD SOME PLACE FABULOUS FOR A MUCH NEEDED VACATION? A LOT OF PET OWNERS HAVE TROUBLE PICTURING HOW THEIR FURRY FRIENDS WILL FIT INTO THEIR PERFECT LITTLE BIKINI PLANS, SO MORE OFTEN THAN NOT FORSAKE ALL TRAVEL DESTINATIONS AND SIMPLY STAY AT HOME INSTEAD.

W

hy do so many of us believe that pets and travel do not mix? If NASA can successfully and safely send chimpanzees and dogs into orbit and back again, there is no reason why it should be considered impossible for a pet to tag along on a much needed vacation. Truth be told, there are actually an abundance of pet-friendly travel options available, owners just need to know where to sniff around and how to plan ahead.

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First things first, other than deciding where you want to go, you must decide how you want to get there. For most people seeking a weekend getaway that mode of transportation is their trusty automobile. It is convenient, familiar and (wait for it...) readily pet accessible! However, there are a few things to keep in mind to ensure your four legged friend’s well being. For instance, only feed your pet a light meal before departure to avoid motion sickness. During the summer months, it is imperative that you always keep a front and back window open to allow your pet a continuous cross-current of fresh air. Likewise, in the winter, one must be aware of the cold – your pet’s fur coat only insults against so much! To avoid pet stress on a road-trip make frequent stops for water, bathroom breaks and quick leashed walks – this also allows for an opportunity to stop and take in a few sights along the way. Like the people in your car, pets should also be secured. Thus, a pet-safety belt (essentially a seatbelt for pooches, available from stores like Ruffrider.com) is a vital investment for any excursion, whether it be a cross country escapade or quick trip down the street. Other pets, like cats and birds should be kept in a suitably sized and secured car-

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rier with plenty of food and water nearby. Once buckled up you and your pet will be ready to hit the open road.

For the more adventurous traveler looking for a romp overseas, there are numerous commercial airlines that offer pet friendly services and cater to your pet’s every need during the flight. But, as always, preparation before take-off makes any trip infinitely smoother. Double check with your airline to ensure that you are using an air-travel approved animal carrier. Familiarize your pet with the carrier in the weeks leading up to your trip by placing clothing items covered with your scent inside to reassure your pet that it is a safe space. Exercise your pet before take-off, so that they hopefully sleep for some of the flight. Also, perhaps most importantly, keep your pet’s vaccination records on hand at all times – they are your pet’s passport, so to speak. Never ever sedate your pet without first consulting a veterinarian, because the rapid change in altitude can sometimes cause heart and respiratory complications. Some airlines will allow a pet to travel in the cabin with their owners, but most typically have a special area for ‘live cargo’ and do their best to unload pet travelers first. When collecting pets at your destina-


tion have the appropriate claim tickets and Many VIA trains allow you to visit your pieces of photo ID ready to speed up the pet throughout the journey in the presence process. of a VIA Service Manager, although pets must travel in a separate baggage car. It There are also charter-flight companies, is also your responsibility to ensure your pet like Pet Airways (www.petairways.com) that has ample food and water during the trip, specialize solely in the transportation of pets. but considering most people try to get a little Pets have their own lounge to hang out in shut eye to pass the time on a train, getting prior to take-off, are checked in on every up every hour to check in with your pet is a 15 minutes during the flight by professionrelatively simple task. als, and owners can visit up to 72 hours before departure time. Pet Airways also proA few things to keep in mind if travelling vides an automated tracking system which by train with your pet, VIA requires 24 hours informs owners about the status of a flight notice of the furry traveler’s attendance and and whether or not it will be late. you need to arrive at the station at least one hour before departure. Simple, right? In response to passenger demand, a few airports have started offering more pet-friend*VIA does not allow birds on board. ly facilities as well. The Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, for example, has created a 93-square-meter fenced in dog park, containing grass, rocks and some benches so dogs can stretch their legs while their owners wait for taxis. Washington Reagan National Airport and Los Angeles InterCongratulations! You and national also offer similar dog parks, and the your pet have arrived at your trend is growing in popularity. destination, bright eyed and bushy tailed! Now, for the next step toward your idyllic vacation – the hotel. VIA Rail Canada (www.viarail.ca) understands that sometimes a canine or feline companion needs to get from point A to point B,* and will allow you to transport live cargo so long as secured and padlocked pet carriers are used.

Numerous hotels around the globe gladly accommodate pets. Best Western, Candlewood Suites, Courtyard Marriott, Comfort Inn & Suites, LaQuinta Inns & Suites (to name a few) are all too happy to shake a paw and welcome you and your pup into their establishment. Also, several hotel chains offer

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affordable pet services, such as elaborate puppy pampering sessions, dog-walking, puppy massages and professional grooming. A lot of hotel managements have anticipated the conflict of wanting to sight-see versus taking care of Fido, so offer on-site supervised doggie-daycares to keep your pooch entertained with fun and games until you return. Some great websites to help you plan your next stay are www.petswelcome.com and www.petscanstay.com. And not to worry, pet friendly hotels exist all over the world – you just need to be sure to do your research in advance and book ahead.

Sometimes, however, there is nothing else for it and you simply cannot bring your pet along on the trip. But don’t despair, there is always the kennel option. Take Dragonluck Kennels, located in Stittsville, Ontario for example. Owned and operated by K.M. Dawn O’Leary, Dragonluck Kennels strives to provide dogs with the best away from home experience possible. “You want a kennel where there is always staff around to comfort the animals,” says O’Leary. “Secondly you want a ken-

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nel where people have experience training dogs, raising dogs, know about dogs behaviors and temperaments. And thirdly you want a place that is clean, not an exact replicate of home, but enough so that the dog has as good an away from home time as possible.” On her 30 acre property, O’Leary and her staff offer doggy guests off-leash play with other dogs as well as several couches for sleeping on – reserved mainly for those pups who get anxious in a crate. Like any trip, however, one must book in advance for a stay at the kennels. “Plan way ahead of time. During peak holiday times, kennels fill up really quickly. And you don’t always have to leave your dogs in your home city, board them in the city where you’re going so you can visit. But plan way ahead for long weekends and busy times,” recommends O’Leary.

There you have it! Pets and travel can go together! The key to a successful trip with your beloved pet is planning, planning, planning. But hey, you’re already booking hotels and making reservations for yourself, what’s a few more phone calls so your best friend can come along too?


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CREATURE COMFORTS

ORANGE YOU

ORANGE IS WORN BUT ONCE A YEAR, SO WHY NOT FALL HEAD OF TAIL IN LOVE WITH THIS VIBRANT SASSY SHADE?

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JIMMY MOD LEASH

www.elladish.com

CRYPTON DOODLE DOG DECORATIVE PILLOW

www.allmodern.com

TEXTUR LAMP

www.ikea.com

SLOPESIDED BOWL

www.olivegreendog.com

HIGH HEEL POINTED COURT SHOE

www.zara.com

MONACO PET TOTE

www.dogbar.com

PUMPKIN CHOCOLATE BAR JACKET

www.modcloth.com

STRIPED NECK SCARF

www.zara.com

HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTORCYCLE CHEW TOY

www.petsmart.com

REKNITZ STRIPED SWEATER

www.gifts.wrapables.com

BOILED WOOL TOADSTOOLS

THE CAMBRIDGE SATCHEL

www.olivegreendog.com

www.jcrew.com

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WELLNESS

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COPING WITH CANINE ARTHRITIS Written by SHANNON BROWNRIGG, RVT Photography by STEPHANIE HEIM

WITHIN OUR PET POPULATION WE HAVE A CONDITION THAT PLAGUES MANY SPECIES INCLUDING OUR CANINE AND FELINE COMPANIONS. IT IS AN AFFLICTION THAT WE, AS PET OWNERS, CAN EASILY RELATE TO. . BY DEFINITION ARTHRITIS IS “INFLAMMATION OF THE JOINTS DUE TO INFECTIOUS, METABOLIC, OR CONSTITUTIONAL CAUSES” (MERRIAN-WEBSTER). CAN WE CURE ARTHRITIS? SADLY NO. CAN WE SLOW THE PROGRESSION OF ARTHRITIS? YES AND WE CAN ALSO MAKE OUR PETS MORE COMFORTABLE. HERE’S HOW.

This condition is arthritis

WHAT IS ARTHRITIS? Arthritis, also known as osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease (DJD), is in the most basic terms an inflammation of the joint and any joint can be effected by this malady. Over time there is wear and tear on each joint or sometimes even an injury or infection within a joint space, which causes the cartilage to become damaged and reduces or even eliminates its cushioning function. This creates a bone-on-bone contact. As the bone becomes damaged this causes pain and swelling within the affected joint, resulting in discomfort for your pet. As with any injury or infection, a prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential for maintaining the long term health of your pet and, in this case, you pet’s joints.

HOW CAN IT BE TREATED? Each pet is an individual physiological being. As veterinary professionals we may be able to predict a specific response based upon research and experience, but we are not able to (and are unlikely to) guarantee a result. At the end of the day each pet will respond to treatment differently. There may be similarities between cases, but ultimately our pets are individuals first, each with their own unique response; a fact that remains true when it comes to treating arthritis too. No two pets will respond to the same treatment with the same level of comfort or duration. Thus for any treatment to be successful it is critical that it be tailored to the specific needs of each pet.

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HOW DO I KNOW IF MY DOG HAS ARTHIRITIS?

Early signs of arthritis often go undetected as tthe changes occurring within the joint space are uusually slow and progressive. However, there are a wide range of symptoms that owners should be on the look out for, as detecting the subtle signs of arthritis can allow for earlier treatment options. Does your dog avoid going up or down stairs? Does he suddenly stop trying to sneak up on to your bed and prefer his own bed on the floor? After a big day of exercise, such as going to the cottage ot playing with friends, will he rest for a day or two with little or no movement? These are all early signs of arthritis. If lameness, changes in play behaviour, or changes in your pet’s daily routine, such as ceasing to jump on the furniture, occur you should definitely take your pet for a vet visit.

DIAGNOSIS

Obtaining an accurate diagnosis is vital for treating arthritis effectively and reducing its progression. Radiographs (also know as x-rays) are necessary to verify whether or not your pet’s discomfort is arthritis and determining the severity of the condition. A radiograph will also help determine the best direction for treatment. Of course, just as each of our pets is different, each and every owner is different too. Depending upon an owner’s wishes and financial circumstances, there are a number of treatments available for tackling arthritis.

ONE STEP AT A TIME

Arthritis is a challenging and often times crippling affliction for pets and their owners alike and can be found in dogs of all ages. However, by keeping a close eye on your pet’s mobility and behaviour, an early diagnosis can be established while dedicated therapies can help get your pet back on their feet again.

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TREATMENT OPTIONS THE BEST AND MOST SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT FOR YOUR PET MAY BE A COMBINATION OF MULTIPLE THERAPIES.

1

Maintain a healthy body weight. Maintaining a healthy body weight is very important! A few extra pounds can mean a whole lot of pain with arthritis. Regular consistent exercise is therefore invaluable, keeping in mind your pet’s specific abilities. You do not want to overwork an animal with arthritis. Be sure to adopt a gradual change to exercise. A healthy diet is also very important and there are a number of diets out there specific for mobility and joint conditions. Many diet claims are not supported by data, so be sure to do your research first and obtain tangible evidence. In my experience with my own pet, Hills J/D and Royal Canin Mobility Support have excellent properties to compliment any therapy for arthritis. I was able to maintain a drug free therapy for a couple of years for my dog, Gobles.

2

Working with your veterinarian to find medicinal and non-medicinal therapies for arthritis in dogs can be beneficial. This may include drug therapy such as NSAIDS (non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) or steroidal therapy or surgery for severe cases. Acupuncture has also been used successfully in some cases to treat arthritis.

3

Identify any physical therapy options. Hydrotherapy, physiotherapy, magnetic and ultrasound therapy are becoming more available to pet owners.

4

Supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin are very common in the treatment of arthritis. It is important to review all therapies with your veterinarian to insure correct dosage and quality. There are many products containing glucosamine and chondroitin, but they are not all at therapeutic levels or in formats suitable for treatment or absorption.


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BREED PROFILE

Written by ALEXANDER BENTLEY Photography by TONYA SCHABACKER

TO PROPERLY VISUALIZE THE YORKSHIRE TERRIER’S PERSONALITY, ONE — AND MAYBE MUST ENVISION THEM WITH THE COAT TOO. YORKIES ARE BIG DOGS IN A LITTLE DOG’S BODY; SPUNKY, LOVING, AND PROTECTIVE. THEY ARE A LOYAL COMRADE AT ONE-EIGHTH THE SIZE.

a little Napoleon hat

A

s one of the hypoallergenic breeds, the Yorkie does not shed. Instead, its hair just keeps on growing and growing ... and growing until the dog is nothing more than a moving ball of silky, shiny fur. Grooming, therefore, is naturally important. A Yorkshire Terrier groomed for show may go through a lengthy cut-andbeautifying process, but for the average house Yorkie, a simple clipping will more than do. Originally bred from a working dog (hunting rats in coal mines, as

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the stories go), Yorkies are active little scamps that needs regular exercise. We’re not talking running marathons, just a nice walk around the block and maybe a bit of play time at home. At 15 centimetres tall and barely eight pounds, this is enough to keep the little Yorkie content and fit. Obesity is a problem if a Yorkie is spoiled; they are so small that every extra bit of food has a distinct impact. Fortunately, Yorkies are light eaters, so as long as they are not weaned on a diet of treats they should be fit as a fiddle.


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I S B O T H L O YA L A N D

Training is of the utmost importance for a Yorkie. While never a good thing, it’s not catastrophic to spoil some of the other small breeds. Spoiling and babying a Yorkie, on the other hand, can lead to lots of headaches. That little Napoleon hat, you see, can have them thinking that they rule the roost if not provided with definitive boundaries by its human companions. The Yorkie is both loyal and territorial, and quite prone to barking at anyone and anything. It can also be rather aggressive towards other animals if it hasn’t been properly acclimatized. But properly trained, a Yorkie is one of the loveliest lap dogs out there. Health problems are much rarer in a Yorkie than in other purebreds. There is still the occasional issue, mostly to do with breathing and walking (two common areas of malady in small dogs), but regular doctor checkups and a few minutes doing Yorkie-illness-specific research can help prevent these worrying 56

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issues. All in all, the average Yorkshire Terrier will live to be around 12 to 15-years-old. Staying true to their Terrier heritage, Yorkies are proud and adventurous. They are not, however, in general very good with babies and toddlers, and are known for taking great offence at being teased or prodded without provocation. Slightly older children who can better understand the consequences of their actions are better for the average Yorkie. Another interesting thing to know, Yorkies are more inside dogs than out and are just the right size for apartments – an environment in which they thrive. Of all the toy-sized breeds the Yorkshire Terrier has one of the biggest personalities. With the right training and a heaping load of love, a Yorkie will be your best hairy friend for a long, long time. Just be mindful of that old Napoleon complex!


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BEHAVIOUR

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BEATING THE

PET BLUES Written by LAURA L. BENN Photography by LAURA HOFFMANN

WE ALL KNOW THAT THE LINGERING SCENTS OF FRESH PENCIL SHAVINGS, PRISTINE LOOSELEAF AND NEVERBEFORE-USED PINK ERASER ARE ENOUGH TO MAKE ANY CHILD GROAN WITH DREAD, BUT DID YOU KNOW THAT THE BACK TO SCHOOL SEASON CAN ALSO AFFECT YOUR PETS? AS YOUNGSTERS CATCH THE EARLY MORNING BUS, TEENAGERS PACK UP FOR COLLEGE DORMS AND PARENTS RETURN TO WORK FOR FALL, MANY FOR EXTENDED PERIODS OF TIME, CONFUSED AND EVEN DEPRESSED BY THE SHIFT IN HOUSEHOLD DYNAMICS.

are inevitably left at home alone

pets

WHAT ARE BACK-TO-SCHOOL PET BLUES? This phenomenon is called ‘back to school pet blues,’ when dogs and cats in particular go through something of a ‘mood funk’ as everybody heads back to the classroom. Why does it happen? Well, put yourself in your pets’ paws. Summer holidays are jam-packed with trips to the cottage, lots of extra walks, lively playtime and best of all there’s always somebody around to snuggle up to. Then all of a sudden, the leaves change colour CULTURE FOR PETS

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and everybody disappears without explanation. Wouldn’t you be a little sad too? The disruption of routine between seasons can be more traumatic for some pets than others. For instance, herding breeds, like Border Collies, tend to perceive the children of a household as their respective ‘flock’ and their sudden absence can create feelings of boredom and anxiety. Other signs that your pooch may be having some difficulty adapting to these changes can include destructive behaviour (like chewing furniture 62

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and scratching walls), separation anxiety, inactivity and even depression. Cats, on the other hand, are a little trickier to read and if emotionally stressed will resort to sleeping more than usual, changing their vocalization habits (either more or less depending upon the feline in question) and even spraying to vent their frustrations. WHAT CAN YOU DO? Although sadly nobody has the power to make summer last forever, there are measures


you can take to ease your pet into the fall transition. First and foremost it is important to maintain your pet’s feeding schedule. Pets, like people, often look forward to their meals and are excited to hear the kibble bag rustle, so keep breakfast and supper at the same time everyday. Also, try to avoid drastically changing your pet’s times to go out – believe it or not, Mother Nature can also be trained to abide by a schedule and altering this without warning can be stressful, not to mention messy.

It is also vitally important to increase your pet’s physical activity, as the ‘feel good’ effect of endorphin’s also effects dogs and cats. Bring your pup with you on your morning jogs before work or have the kids take Fido out for playtime after dinner. Cats also benefit from more exercise and activities such as chasing fluff balls on string are a great way to keep kitties moving. Of course quelling those sad puppy-dog eyes in the morning may seem impossible, but there are ways to reassure your pet that CULTURE FOR PETS

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all is well while you’re away. Providing positive association with your absence is very important for a well-adjusted pet, so treat them to a new toy which they only get to play with when you take off for the day. Challenging toys, like the TreatStik or Tug-A-Jug, are best as they require ‘working’ for a treat and will keep dogs entertained. It won’t take long for your canine chum to look forward to their special toy and inevitably the sound out your car pulling out of the driveway. There is also the option of looking for doggy-daycares in your local area or hiring a dog-walker to let your pup out at lunch if you can’t make it back in time. Leaving an article of clothing out for your pet to sniff and lie down with while you’re away is never a bad idea either; although sometimes not necessary. WHAT NOT TO DO It’s easy to feel guilty leaving your dog or cat for the day by themselves, but spontaneously getting another animal as a friend for the one left at home is not an ideal

solution. Owners need to be aware of what is best for their family pet and adding a new animal to the household can create more stress, not less. The addition of any new pet to a family home requires planning and time so that everyone involved can acclimatize to the new member and bond. It is unreasonable to expect your pet to become best friends with a new puppy all by themselves and if you’re not around to supervise territorial issues can potentially arise. BACK TO SCHOOL NOW Anybody with kids knows that back to school requires a lot of preparation, shopping and encouragement. You want your child to succeed in the new semester and feel as comfortable as possible returning to the world of lockers and cafeterias. Similarly, pets need a bit of extra attention too during this busy time of year. Don’t wait until the day your kids go back to start a new routine with your pet, but instead gradually introduce changes over the course of a couple of weeks. There’s no reason why every member of the family can’t earn an A+ for good behaviour this fall.

TREATSTIK This colourful contraption will keep your furry friend occupied for hours! Challenging, fun and rewarding all at the same time!

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PET PROJECTS

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A MOVEMENT TO CELEBRATE DOGS Written by LAURA L. BENN Photography by KIRA STACKHOUSE

IN 2009 KIRA STACKHOUSE, OWNER OF NUENA PHOTOGRAPHY, HAD NO IDEA THAT BRINGING A TINY BOSTON TERRIER PUPPY CALLED HARLEY INTO HER LIFE WOULD SEND HER DIVING HEAD OVER HEELS INTO THE DEPTHS OF THE DOG WORLD. NOW, A LITTLE OVER TWO YEARS LATER, NOT ONLY HAS STACKHOUSE, 31, BECOME A , BUT SHE IS ALSO ADDRESSING A LINGERING CONTROVERSY THAT EXISTS IN THE PET WORLD THROUGH HER EXCITING NEW BOOK ENTITLED PROJECT DOG.

bonafide puppy parent

P

roject DOG is a grassroots movement in San Francisco, California designed to celebrate the diversity of dogs and promote responsible dog ownership by compiling stunning photography into a 350+ page coffee table book. The goal is to ямБnd and photograph the 170+ dog breeds of the American Kennel Club (AKC). The twist is that each breed will feature photos of a dog from a reputable breeder and a

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dog from a rescue, so as to promote particular emphasis upon the sentiment that being a responsible dog owner begins before you even get a dog. “When I got Harley I wanted to do everything possible with my new puppy. I took him to classes, play groups, beaches, events and even started volunteering for local dog rescues,” says Stackhouse. “And I quickly learned of ‘dog world’ politics. The first question many people would ask me upon meeting Harley was, ‘Is your dog a rescue?’ When I told them no, I often heard responses like, ‘Oh, why not?’ I felt com-

pelled to do something about it. I didn’t feel like I needed to defend myself for having a dog from a reputable breeder, especially since Harley is healthy, cared for – spoiled really – trained and greatly loved.” The debate between owners about dogs from breeders and dogs from rescues is nothing new and can often escalate into heated controversy. Stackhouse became determined to find a way to bring both sides together and focus on what is most important -- the love of dogs. In the spring of 2010, Project DOG was born and officially launched in July of the same year.

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Stackhouse’s background in dog photography became the natural outlet through which to address the issue of dog backgrounds. “I’ve always wanted to create my own coffee table book, but I wanted to make it something that would excite people about their dogs and have a positive social impact,” explains Stackhouse enthusiastically. She hopes that Project DOG will create a unity in the dog community and celebrate the love that people have for their pets. With the Project DOG website receiving more than 50,000 views a month it certainly seems to be off to a good start. The modern editorialized photoshoots for this book are as varied as the furry faces it plans to promote. All pooch portraits are shot on location by Stackhouse in iconic San Franciso settings, typically ones that are of particular meaning to the dog owners. The challenge, of course, lies in keeping the portraits vibrant, colourful and conceptually interesting. Stackhouse, however, seems to thrive on the challenge. For example, the Pharaoh Hound was photographed between two Sphinx statues, while the Shiba Inu (a Japanese breed) was photographed in Japantown – and the creative nuances continue throughout every shoot!

DEVOTION

PULSES AT THIS PROJECT’S

CORE.

Although the final images are lovely in their composition, getting those spectacular moments on ‘film’ is not always as glamourous as it may appear. Stackhouse laughingly recalls accidentally kneeling in goose excrement, sitting in puddle and splitting her pants by balancing on the side of a cliff, all in pursuit of the perfect shot. “Those instances aside, the most memorable moments are the stories that the owners share with me during their session,” continues Stackhouse, obviously moved by the canine characters she has met over the past year. Grounded in a strong social media campaign, Project DOG finds the majority of its models through owner submissions via Facebook and the website. Breeds that were not as common were found through AKC breed clubs and rescue groups alike. Devotion pulses at this project’s core. Stackhouse is determined to have Project DOG include all breeds and all dogs. CULTURE FOR PETS

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“I have partnered Project DOG with The San Francisco SPCA and will be donating a percentage of sales to the organization,” says Stackhouse proudly, clearly happy to be giving back to the dog world she has grown to love so much. The SPCA’s Co-President, Jennifer Scarlett, has also written Project DOG’s forward. Scheduled for release sometime before New Year’s 2012, dogs and owners alike are eagerly awaiting the arrival of Project DOG, excited to see the fruits of Stackhouse’s hard work and determination. www.joinprojectdog.com.

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TIMID TERRIERS

Written by LISA DAY Photography by KIM RODGERS

EXPERT ADVICE FROM MASTER GROOMER AND

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OBEDIENCE TRAINER, LISA DAY!

S

ocialization is an important part of a dog’s life. Whether they are interacting with other dogs, cats or humans, spending time in a social setting helps satisfy their need for company. After all, everyone needs a good friend! But what if your pooch is so shy they cannot even bring themselves to sniff at another living creature?

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Does your dog have a pesky habit or two? Send your behaviourial questions to info@pawsh-magazine.com for a chance to receive some expert advice from Lisa in our next issue!

Hi Susan, Since I don’t know Louis’ age, it’s hard for me to know if this is a behaviourial issue or possibly a physical one. Older dogs can get very anxious around children because of their quick sporadic movements. If Louis is experiencing any arthritis or joint issues, the presence of children could be one of physical discomfort, particularly if there’s cuddling attempted. But assuming that Louis isn’t of the senior sect yet, then it may just be a distrust of ‘small humans.’ Dachshunds can have the propensity to be nervous around children, but behaviours can be modified and that is what we’ll try to do here.

Hi Lisa,

lled Louis, who is I have a dachshund ca y dog I have ever the most happy-go-luck le and will literally known. He adores peop th excitement whenrun around in circles wi y new, plus he loves ever he meets somebod thing is he seems to give kisses. The only ren and always ild ch to be afraid of young any children of my has been. I don’t have tries to cuddle Louis own. Whenever a child attention he tucks or give him any sort of s and whines. He his tail between his leg can tell he doesn’t I doesn’t get mean, but g children to coax like it. I’ve tried gettin th treats, but it he Louis into friendship wi can I help my lovejust isn’t interested. How you! bug to trust kids? Thank Susan

Children don’t always act very calm and assured and an invasion of Louis’ space, such as ‘cuddling,’ could be perceived as overwhelming from Louis point of vi view. I’d suggest that you ask the children to sit on the floor o and just have an irresistible treat in hand and w wait for Louis to approach. Som times when we en encourage too much it can actually back fire and be ta taken as pressure from the recipient. Being patient, ca calm and relaxed will probably be the best recipe for Lo Louis’ success. If he’s been practicing this nervous response for ye years, it will take sometime to replace the default. But w with the above mentioned recipe I think you’ll be able to expand his lovebug nature to include and enjoy all sta stages of humans. G Give him a kiss for me!

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BEHAVIOUR

Hi Lisa, rder Collie mix I recently adopted a Bo y. She is about iet from my local humane soc with me, but t ee sw a year old and very If a friend le. op pe very timid with other say hello, d an up comes over she won’t run d start to an r rne co but instead cower in a not snap es do she tremble. If approached had a ver ne I’ve . or growl, but just shakes g you pin ho s wa d dog like this before an come l gir le litt s thi had some ideas to help u! yo out of her shell? Thank Leslie

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Hi Leslie, Congratulations on adopting from the local humane society. That’s wonderful. What you’re describing is a very ‘soft’ temperament. If we were describing a human we’d say, ”sensitive/shy type.” Think introvert. These types need what I call, “an ‘S’ put on their chest.” They need to be shown that they really are ‘Superman.’ Taking her out a lot and exposing her to different places, people and things will help her build her confidence and self assurance. Unfortunately, however, confidence is not something you can give her. She has to develop it on her own, but you can provide her with the opportunities to grow and become stronger in those areas. Having treats in hand and showing her the world is pretty exciting and there’s a lot of good things in it usually helps ease shy types out of their shells. If she starts to display the cowering and trembling while you’re out, just be very matter of fact and reassuring with your demeanor. You can tell her, “Oh you silly girl. There’s nothing to be concerned about. I know you’re brave. Let’s just do this”, and move along with assurance and conviction. When she starts moving again, treat her! You may be tempted to pick her up and coddle her when she starts to shake, but doing so will inadvertently reaffirm your little girl’s fear, which is what we are trying to overcome. When you are entertaining guests ask them to refrain from approaching her, particularly if they’re standing up. Kneeling or in a chair would be more comfortable for the unsure pooch. Have some really tasty treats available for your guests to reward her when she does approach, on her terms. But don’t push it. Forcing a situation may only frighten her. Teaching her some ‘parlour tricks’ will also help her become more fearless. Generally the sensitive ones train fairly easily, because they don’t like to be wrong. The more areas that you can provide for her to succeed, the braver she’ll become over time. With a little bit of time and energy, you’ll have her ready for her Broadway debut. Well... maybe not Broadway, but at least ready for greeting guests. I hope this helps you. CULTURE FOR PETS

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CAT CORNER

LIFE WITH A

Written by ALLISON VORSTENBOSCH Photography by TONYA SCHABACKER

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FELINES HAVE OFTEN BEEN PORTRAYED AS SUPERIOR ALOOF CREATURES IN COMICS, CARTOONS AND BUMPER STICKERS AROUND THE WORLD. WHILE THE MAJORITY OF THE KITTY-CAT POPULATION IS ACTUALLY VERY SWEET AND LOVING THERE IS THE OCCASIONAL CHARACTER WHO INEVITABLY REINFORCES THIS NEGATIVE STEREOTYPE. SO WHAT CAN YOU DO WHEN AN ACTUAL ?

puss comes clawing at your door

sour

Dear Cat Whisperer, My cat and I are having some issues. I’ll just be sitting there, minding my own business when suddenly there’s a fury of fur and claws pouncing in my direction. Or I’ll round a corner and he’ll be lying in wait for my ankles to appear. I’ve had him since he was a kitten and have always been loving and adoring but all I get in return is this spiteful behaviour. What can I do? ~ Tired of Being Bullied Dear Bullied, Not all cats enjoy being the snuggly love bugs we want them to be, but you can train your cat to be more social. First you need to curb his negative behaviours. Whip out that signature water bottle when you see him about to attack – a water bottle with a gentle yet meaningful spritz is best. If he is crouched and starts a classic bum wiggle preparing for attack, give him a quick squirt in the side of his body. Do not ever spray your cat in the face; that’s just mean. This spritzing action will distract him and show him that you aren’t prey. Since kitty is a natural hunter, he may be learning your habits in order to attack you more efficiently as a displaced stalking behaviour. It could also be his way of trying to get more attention. Play with him as much as possible to provide him with a proper outlet for these instincts. Always make sure that when he does display proper social skills, you praise him and pet him. Show him that being around people can be fun and pleasurable. CULTURE FOR PETS

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Dear Cat Whisperer, My cat is a big jerk – that’s harsh to say, I know, but it’s true. She bullies all of our other cats and expects them to bow down to her. Sometimes they seem like friends but then she’ll turn around start a huge bushy tailed mess. We had to buy a new vacuum since the other one couldn’t deal with the flying fur any longer. Why does she hate other cats so much? ~ Looking for Harmony Dear Harmony, We all want a smooth household but this can be tricky with multiple cats. Usually this type of behaviour stems from redirected territorial or predatory aggression. They may want to get that cat invading their backyard but are forced to attack whoever is closest. In the case of extreme fights, remember never jump in the middle of the fray because you don’t want cat scratch fever. Wait for them to take a breathe and then grab the attacker by the scruff of the neck. This is what Mamma cat would do, so gently (emphasis on the gentle since you might not be in the gentlest state of mind) push her down to the floor, placing her in a subservient position. And please remember to pet and praise the victim of her violence. A little reassurance goes a long way. Another way to break up some less serious tussles is to blow a whistle or hiss loudly, again mimicking a mother cat. This distracts them and breaks the growing tension. Should the fights keep happening be sure to have a large stuffed animal to throw in the middle so she attacks Mr. Teddy instead of her live opponent. Redirecting the aggression to an inanimate object is a great diffuser. When dealing with an extreme case of feline unfriendship, you can try a reintroduction. Place the aggressor in a separate room and pretend that they have never met before. Let them sniff each other under the door. Swap out objects and toys from the rooms. Use the same shampoo on both of them so that they smell more similar. Start giving them small amounts of time together in a supervised way. Work your way up like you would with a completely new cat. Give them a second chance at a first impression.

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Dear Cat Whisperer, I have the most noisy cat on the planet. Either he`s wandering around the house in the middle of the night, shouting about the sadness in his soul or he`s holed in the kitchen asking when dinner will be ready. I would just like a few moments of precious silence, especially when I am trying to sleep. I don’t follow him around when he`s sleeping. Why won’t he do the same for me? ~ Sleepless in Sudbury

Dear Sleepless, Cats express themselves in many ways and vocal sounds are part of their communication package. It can be hard but the first step is not always to respond to them. I know you might like to think you are having a conversation with him but often by chattering back at him you are simply encouraging that behaviour. With regards to the night yowling, kitty is probably bored and a little lonely. He just wants to know if there`s anybody else around. The best way to deal with this is to take the time to play with him. Set aside some time each night to help wear him out before you want to sleep. You also get some quality relaxing time too before hitting the sack. Provide him with lots of toys that he can play with during the night so he doesn`t miss the best toy of all: you.

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PETS AT HOME

OLD DOG Photography by LIZ BRADLEY

never too late

IT’S TO LEARN A NEW THING OR TWO. ANY POOCH CAN DO IT!

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PETS AT HOME

There’s a huge world just waiting to be discovered on a bookcase like this, brimming with exciting topics like how to bake dog biscuits and how to learn new tricks!

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PETS AT HOME

Sniffing out a great route to school is very important. Luckily, Corduroy has the right nose for the job!

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After a busy day of learning, it’s time to be carried home for a nourishing afternoon snack and of course... homework!

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CREATURE COMFORTS

THINGS WE

ZUZUTOPIA OUR TOWN COLLAR

PETSTAGES HEART BEAT PILLOW

A pet’s collar is a reflection of their character, so naturally you want them wearing something that bursts with character itself! This charming ‘Our Town’ collar pays adorable hommage to the lovely fall season and will make your pet the talk of the town this autumn!

Pets get lonely. So when you’re not around be sure to leave them with this soothing heart beat pillow. Simulating the sound of an actual heart pulsing with love, this gadget is a wonderful way to calm anxious pets and keep them company.

www.etsy.com/shop/Zuzutopia

www.petstages.com

DENHAUS BOWHAUS PET BED AND END TABLE

PLANET DOG WOOF WELCOME MAT

Ideal for small spaces, this two-in-one multifunctional piece allows for comfort and efficiency in one’s decor. The round metallic design creates a cozy little den for your pet to sleep in and can double up as a crate too all the while serving as a steady table for drinks and snacks.

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What does the autumn breeze blow in? Muddy little paws of course! This creative doormat reminds pets and owners to wipe their feet before traipsing through the house! How sweet!

www.planetdog.com


WILDEBEEST MEADOW RUG Make sure your pet has something super soft to snuggle with this season by treating them to a Wildebeest Meadow Rug! Inspired by nature these comfortable rugs are a great alternative to the traditional pet bed and add a dash of whimsy to any space.

BONE SHAPED CAKE PAN Entertaining the pack after a romp at the park? Don’t panic, just whip out your trusty non-stick bone shaped muffin pan! Whether you make muffins for the humans or biscuits for the dogs, this pan cooks up all sorts of possibilities!

www.wildebeest.co

www.gooddogexpress.com

MODKAT

MODRUFF SPORT COAT

Cats are curious creatures who inevitably end up tracking kitty litter all through the house. Well, no more thanks to the beautiful design of ModKat. Offering a small hole in the top for cats to drop down through, the ModKat encourages cats to exit through the same ceiling hole, helps remove litter from their dainty paws.

Its time to break out the doggy jackets! MODRuff Sculpted Dogwear is a stylish Canadian line that offers luxurious warmth. Boasting a wide variety of fashions, from modern, to classic, to hipster, to casual, MODRuff creates incredible possibilities for keeping your pooch protected from the elements. The Sport Coat is an excellent option for fall!

www.modkat.com

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CREATURE COMFORTS

BAUER POTTERY DOG BOWL

WIENER T-SHIRT

Dress up any piece of kibble with a splash of lively colour! Presenting vintage style with modern flair, these gorgeous dog dishes will tug at any well-tuned design heart and encourage pets to gobble up dinner without hesitation!

Handmade and tailored to make you laugh this non-toxic inked shirt celebrates the noble little dachshund and is a charming little oddity to add to your wardrobe.

www.etsy.com/shop/lastearth

www.bauerpottery.com

NANTUCKET PET BICYCLE BASKET

DOG TUCKER TRAVELLER

Fall is quite easily the most beautiful time of year to indulge in a long meandering bike ride. But what fun is that if you best friend can’t come along for the ride? Stylish, sturdy and oh-so cute, this pet basket is handwoven and comes in brown or white to suit your taste.

If you are the outdoor type chances are you’ll want to get in as much hiking as possible before snow arrives and the Dog Tucker Traveller will be a must have! With two collapsible feeding dishes, hardy material and able to hold up to 15lbs of kibble, this nifty modern contraption can be the perfect adventuring accessory.

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www.abogear.com


SLEEPYPOD

BROWN ARGYLE PLUSH BONE

An award-winning product, the Sleepypod is doubles up as your pet’s bed and a travel carrier! Offering luxurious comfort and practical features, this nifty item guarantees a first-class travel experience always!

For some reason a little bit of argyle always warms the spirit and this rather fetching plush bone does the same! An excellent option for pup’s that value coziness.

www.sleepypod.com

KISS MY MUTT VANCOUVER ISLAND LEASH We love Vancouver Island and the glamourous yet down-to-earth feel of this two-toned braided leash. Sophisticated, water resistant and too chic for words, this little looker will dress up any walk – even if you zip out with Fido in your pjs!

www.fabdog.com

BOXER SHAPED CHALKBOARDS Keep your pet ultra organized with a snazzy chalkboard tailored to suit their breed – literally! A functional piece of art that makes a lovely decor statement and writing the inevitable doggy ‘to-do’ list fun fun fun!

www.voilacollection.com

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KIBBLE & BITS

Written by KRISTIN LARSEN Photos courtesy of DIVA DOG BAKERY AS AN INTERIOR DESIGNER TURNED GOURMET DOG CHEF, KRISTIN LARSEN USES HER INNATE CREATIVITY TO CARVE HER NICHE IN THE DOG TREAT BUSINESS AND MAKE DIVA DOG BAKERY A PACK LEADER. BY DESIGNING THAT ARE COMPARABLE TO HUMAN DESSERTS, LARSEN IS SHOWING THE WORLD THAT IT IS POSSIBLE TO SPOIL YOUR POOCH IN A HEALTHY, YET OH-SO TASTY MANNER! SHE CREATED TWO LINES OF TREATS TO ENSURE THAT THEY CAN BE ENJOYED BY ALL SHAPES AND SIZES OF CANINE CUSTOMER.

decadent doggy delights

A

ll treats are made with local, fresh ingredients and have been certified via nutritional analysis as all-natural treats with no added or harmful content. Larsen’s primary goal is to create nutritious yet appealing treats through Diva Dog Bakery that aren’t just delicious, but rather ‘diva-licious!”

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ADORABLE ACORNS Is your furry guy or gal a little...nuts? Then these exquisite acorn snacks are the perfect sweet treat! Packed with creamy all natural peanut butter and lots of tasty yogurt, this is a recipe for guaranteed goodness! INGREDIENTS whole wheat our all natural peanut butter skim milk carob powder yogurt baking powder roasted unsalted peanuts Guaranteed Analysis: Crude Protein (min) 16%, Crude Fat (min) 24%, Crude Fiber (min) 7%, Moisture (max) 2%

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KIBBLE & BITS

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BARKIN’ BROWNIES Chocolate is bad for dogs, but there’s no reason why they can’t enjoy a cocoaesque substitution! These brownies are entirely canine compatible and are chocful of protein and fibre, making a nutritious and delicious treat! INGREDIENTS whole wheat flour carob powder honey canola oil baking powder cage free eggs yogurt unsalted roasted peanuts Guaranteed Analysis: Crude Protein (min) 7%, Crude Fat (min) 15%, Crude Fiber (min) 7%, Moisture (max) 4%

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CRITTER CAREERS

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FICTION Written by LAURA L. BENN Photography by NATALIE SCHLEYER

DOGS HAVE ALWAYS KEPT US COMPANY, PROTECTED OUR FAMILIES AND HELPED THE DISABLED, BUT NOW A NEW BREED OF POOCH IS ALSO HELPING OUR CHILDREN .

learn how to read

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CRITTER CAREERS

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R

eading Tails is a program associated with the St. John Ambulance organization, specifically designed to encourage children to embrace literature while spending time with their doggy friends. Designed as an animal assisted activity, Reading Tails creates an atmosphere that is calm, supportive and fun so that an adult facilitator can teach a child to read in a receptive state of mind. Mary Brown, a retired teacher from North Shore Vancouver, and her faithful sidekick Emma, a seven-year-old black lab, have been volunteering their time with the unique literacy program for three years. “Research has proven that sitting with a dog lowers a person’s heart rate and blood pressure,” says Brown. “It calms you down. Instead of being made to read in front of a class, which can be stressful for some children, Reading Tails creates an environment where it is just the child, the dog and the dog’s handler. It’s non-judgemental and safe, a chance for kids to come out of their shell.” On average a reading session lasts about 20 minutes and involves children who are enrolled in the elementary grades. Brown and Emma volunteer their time at the West Vancouver Memorial Library and make regular visits to half a dozen schools in the North Shore area. Some of the most popular books involved during these sessions are of course dog themed, although all sorts of titles are welcomed so long as it captures the child’s interest. According to Brown, Emma’s favourite read is Letters from a Desperate Dog, because the canine heroine is also called Emma. To become a Reading Tails buddy you must first approach your local St. John Ambulance office and ask if they have a therapy dog program. Orientation, criminal record checks and evaluations then occur, all of which CULTURE FOR PETS

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CRITTER CAREERS

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are considered standard procedure if you wish to join a therapy team. You must then go through additional testing to be certified to work with children through the program and approach the R.E.A.D (Reading Education Assistance Dogs) group to be additionally certified. “This program gives so much back to the parents, the schools and the kids,” continues Brown passionately. “The gift of literacy is the gift that gives forever. Teachers today don’t always have the time to give a child one-onone attention, because their plates are already so full and there is not enough time in the day. That’s why Reading Tails is so important. The dogs have all the time in the world and the kids love them!” Brown says that in her own experience she has witnessed an incredible difference in the children that come through the program. “Emma and I once worked with a little girl who was in Grade 3. We had been working with her for four or five months and one day she came in and in a completely serious voice said, ‘I love reading with you and Emma, but I don’t think I need you anymore.’ She fired us!” laughs Brown. “Luckily this is the one job where it is good to be fired, because it means you’ve been successful in your work.” It is a type of rewarding work that is obviously enjoyed by Brown and Emma alike as Emma was awarded a gold medal for logging over 350 hours! However, Brown suggests that if a Reading Tails program isn’t available in your area that reading with an animal is something parents can do in the comfort of their own home with their family dog, cat, hamster or rabbit. The ultimate goal of the Reading Tails philosophy is to have children learn to read with a friend close by and what greater friend than the furry critters that never judge and always love. www.sja.ca

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KIBBLE & BITS

WHAT A DIFFERENCE A DOG MAKES by Dana Jennings

A beautiful tale of life, love and learning as one man fights a terrible terminal illness and finds inspiration amidst his struggle from a doting miniature poodle called Bijou. Dog wisdom in its purest form.

YOU HAD ME AT WOOF: HOW A DOG TAUGHT ME HAPPINESS by Julie Clam

In this witty and honest memoir Clam, a dedicated member of a rescue group, reveals how the scruffy broken dogs she tends actually saved her life in return. A witty and touching narrative that will not fail to move you.

AMI AMI DOGS: SERIOUSLY CUTE CROCHET by Mitsuki Hoshi

A comprehensive guide to the art of Amigurumi, this colourful and vibrant collection of easily to follow patterns and darling photographs promises hours of canine crocheting fun. The ideal gifts for dog lovers everywhere!

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I

scholastic season

N KEEPING WITH THE WE’VE ROUNDED UP SOME TRULY ‘PAWSH’ TITLES TO HELP YOU AND YOUR PET LEARN ALL SORTS OF WONDERFUL THINGS.

THROUGH A DOG’S EARS by Joshua Leeds & Su Susa Susan s n Wagner, DV DVM, VM, M MS S

We’ve all heard the phrase ‘life through a dog’s eyes,’ but what is the world like through a dog’s ears? This deeply informative book explores the various ways in which noise can determine the canine mood. Presenting research from psychoacoustic expert Joshua Leeds and veterinary neurologist Susan Wagner, this book explores how the right sounds can calm aggressive and anxious dogs.

MUTTS by Sharon Montrose

A playful and scruffy coffee table book that celebrates the playful and scruffy mutts of the pet world! Showcasing engaging portraits, uncanny canine expressions and the priceless antics that have become synonymous with the word ‘dog,’ this piece of art brings joy and laughter to all who look upon it.

FOR EVERY ANGEL DOG by Christine Davis

A soothing book for helping little ones understand and cope with the heartbreak of losing a beloved pet. Calm, dreamy illustrations infused by a serene colour palate and gentle narrative offers a comforting way to get through this most difficult time.

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KIBBLE & BITS

DOGS ARE NOT OUR WHOLE LIFE, BUT THEY MAKE OUR LIVES WHOLE. ~ ROGER CARAS Written by LAURA L. BENN Photography by THE PHODOGRAPHER

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LIKE MOST PUGS, SUSHI IS PLAYFUL, AFFECTIONATE AND adorable! This three 3-year-old darling gets along great with other pugs and is good with cats. Having been through a lot of changes this year, including losing her human, Sushi is slowly beginning to trust her foster family and is learning not to bark at the scary shadows, especially at night. She sleeps with us in a bed because she’s too scared to sleep by herself. However, with time, once her environment becomes familiar again, she will no doubt regain her confidence. She’s looking for a forever home that is loving, calm and gentle to help heal her broken heart.

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KIBBLE & BITS

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A WHITE FLUFF BALL THAT IS FULL of beans? A small dog who is an endless entertainer? A cuddlebug and a sweetheart? Then Buffy may be the furball for you! Found abandoned and wandering the streets, Buffy would do best in a home where she is the only female dog as she tends to bully other lady canines. This little clown loves her chew toys, especially the noisy ones. Her favourite spot is lying on her back, with her head hanging off the couch. She loves to follow her people around the house and follows your lead -- if you are being a couch potato, she does the same. If you are running around the backyard, she will play tag with you. She is pretty easy going and settled quite quickly into her foster home. Is this spunky intelligent girl the one for you? 106

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ACCORDING TO THE KINGSTON HUMANE SOCIETY, PIXIE and another dog were surrendered by a couple who said they didn’t want them anymore. The couple would not offer up any info on the dogs other than their names so there is little to say about Pixie’s previous living environment or experiences. She does well meeting new people and is a friendly little soul with an adorable personality. She enjoys travelling in the car, snuggling and being around people.

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KIBBLE & BITS

HI THERE, MY NAME IS POSEY AND AS YOU CAN SEE, I am tiny and sweet. I travelled all the way from the Windsor shelter to Hopeful Hearts in hopes that someone here will love me. I’m a tiny little Chihuahua and I’m 13-years young. I only weigh about 3.5 pounds right now but I’m hoping to gain a bit of weight so I’m not so slim. I’m a quiet and loving little girl who would be happy in a quiet home just being cuddled. Could that be you?

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CHASE IS AN 11-YEAR-OLD BICHON. HIS ELDERLY OWNER moved and was not able to take him with her. Chase is a cute little man. Although his vet had to remove his teeth, he has been given a clean bill of health. He eagerly eats his small kibble mixed with soft food. Though he pulls a bit when walking on a leash, a little correction gets him back on track. This little guy just gets excited to see and sniff everything he sees while on his walk. He’s full up pep, but is the strong silent type (little barking). He gets along well with other dogs, but should have supervision when around young children. Also, please no cats.

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CLOSING NOTES

IF YOUR PET HAD A VOICE, WHAT WOULD IT SOUND LIKE?

Photo by DANIELLE BERNIER Send PAWSH your answers to this question for a chance to be included in our next issue! Write to us at info@pawsh-magazine.com.

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This Issue’s Question

WHAT IS YOUR MOST EMBARRASSING PET MOMENT? Max has always had a nose for mischief. He once pulled a tampon out of a dinner guest’s purse while I was busy hosting and he treated it as a toy! Luckily our guests had a great sense of humor and we all had a great laugh about it. Not sure if they ever came to dinner again though...ha ha! ~ Aimee Cheek

When my Lhasa Apso, Shirley, was just a puppy I took her over to my boyfriend’s house. The three of us curled up on the couch to watch a movie. Shortly after the previews my boyfriend turned to me holding his nose and said, “You should give me some warning!” We quickly discovered that Shirley was the gas culprit! I was absolutely mortified! ~ Jennifer Wells

My dog once stole a Barbie doll from my daughter’s bedroom and adopted it as his new chew toy. It became an awkward situation when the doll lost it’s clothes. Needless to say I swapped Barbie with a proper chew toy as quickly as possible! ~ Trevor Hardy

My mother came to stay with me for a weekend last summer. We had just finished making up the guest bed when Reginald (my Westie) jumped on to the bed and decided to mark his territory. I just stared at him in complete dismay! Of course I had just finished bragging to my mom about how good Reggie was, hadn’t I? ~ Mandy Smith

I never grew up with dogs, so when I started dating my wife it took some time to get used to her excitable Labrador. On one of our earliest dates I went to pick her up. I was waiting on the front porch while she got her coat and purse when her Lab appeared at the open window. He barked and I screamed. Yep, like a little girl and my wife, whom I was trying to impress at the time, of course heard it all. ~ Jeff Sailsbury

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PAWSH could not exist without our wonderful sponsors. To place an ad in our next issue write to us at info@pawsh-magazine.com.

PAWSH Magazine No.3 -- Learn to WAG  

A different breed of pet publication, PAWSH combines a deep love of words with a passion for artistic photography and a devotion to captivat...

PAWSH Magazine No.3 -- Learn to WAG  

A different breed of pet publication, PAWSH combines a deep love of words with a passion for artistic photography and a devotion to captivat...

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