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Pa v i t r a R a m j u t u n M a s te r of A rc h i te c t u re B a c h e l o r of A p p . S c ( A rc h i te c t u r a l S c i e n c e ) C u r t i n U n i ve r s i t y | 2 0 1 5


01

| Let’s Innovate!

Designing A Collaborative Ecosystem for Creative Innovation

M a s t e r o f A r c h i te c t u r e | F i n a l T h e s i s P r o j e c t | 7 0 % D e s i gn + 30% Research | Nov 2015

Forces from technological advances to a knowledge based economy to the new generation of creative entrepreneurial/freelancing workers seeking flexibility have been advancing radical transformations as to where, how and when work is now done.The concept of co-working - a shared collaborative workspace arrangement - providing the creative class with the sociable buzz of an exciting work environment has consequently gained momentum worldwide. Recent surveys, however, show that too often the physicalenvironment is neglected and the design of these spaces, based on personal intuition, fails to contribute these professionals’ creative process and innovative idea generation. With the growing emphasis on creative innovation as a key source for the growth of an economically, socially and technologically thriving Perth, this research vouches for the parallel requirement to build sustainable working platforms wherein the creative class can apply their knowledge & multiple creative skills to innovate at an optimum level. Through the literature analysis, 4 critical work modes - Focus, Collaborate & Learn and Socialize - emerged as the framework via which different processes of creative endeavours can be interpreted. This project hence explores the notion of creative ‘work’ and ‘home’ as a hybridized model of a strengthened community, an ideology and a series of collaborative opportunities within one metaphorical eco-system, where bigger ideas and innovative solutions can unfold even more swiftly. The aim is to apply design recommendations gathered through research and explore new possibilities for a the design of future creative hub – an system of interconnected spaces of different sizes and uses – where the creative professionals are given range of stimulating options to choose from.Along with the provision of different settings, considering how easily or conveniently, one would be able to move from one option to another also became crucial part of the project.Based on the hypothesis of the creative class being the motor of urban regeneration, this project adopted the underutilised industrial area of East Perth as the main context to develop a thriving hub.


E A S T P E RT H S I T E A N A LY S I S

INTE


RCO N N E C T E D CO L L A B O R AT I V E E CO S YS T E M - M A S T E R P L A N

After thorough analysis , it was conceived that different parts of the site support the most suitable environmental experience for the different modes - Living, Collaborating, Socialising & Focusing. Hence, instead of restricting the design to one particular niche of the site, clustering 3 major activity zones that fluidly cater to the identified modes was strategised. The result is a design proposal inter-connecting 3 zones within the site to provide a transit oriented hub with a range of spaces, implementing passive/active architectural elements which are conducive to the creative process.


The (bus station) Activity hub was designed,keeping in mind that creative class need time to decompress, contemplate and socialise as part of the creative process. The park was integrated within the existing landscape to form an event/social space and an outdoor gym and a jogging track. The scheme was also connected to the exisitng social housing on site via a walkway which creates increased opportunites for social collisions.


As socialising and casual collaborations/interactions were identitified as more conducive to creative innovations, the train station was redesigned as a flexible cafe strip with pop-up/urban furnitures where people would come together during transit periods. The Transit Hub physically connects to the main Co-Work-Co-Live Hub through a cable car loop system which gives quick, easy and safe transit.


This CoWork CoLive Hub was developped with lower /ground floors serving as public social areas (cafes/restaurants) which activate the urban edge, third/fourth levels as working spaces for coworking members and upper floors as comunal housing where creatives can gather, work, live, socialize. A mixed variety of private/open - collaborative v/s focussing spaces were considered for the creative work modes. The idea was to however, keep the overall atmopshere as a playful, inspiring environment which rejects formalities of the typical office and instead reflects the free nature of the creatives by imagining creative ways of working. Design of the spaces also takes

into

consideration,

environmentalfactors

active/passive

identified

from

the

research to make the spaces more enhancing for the creative innovation process.


02

| Tree-Pod

The Sustainable Eco-Pod Student Competition, Curtin Unversity

Master of A r c h i t e c t u r e | I n t e g r a t e d B u i l d i n g s R e s e a r c h S t u d i o + M e t h o d s 5 | J u l y 2 0 1 5

IBR Studio + Methods investigated techniques of ideation and methods to resolve and document a small scale architectural project, with the documentation including provisions for incorporating statutory planning, building & environmental guidelines and client requirements whilst employing best practice documentation standards.The design brief required an iconic “Eco Pod” for Curtin University that will be a place for sustainability - minded people/groups to come meet, educate and inform students/ staff about sustainability initiatives on campus. After detailed analysis of the campus, the Pine Courtyard - an exisitng activated hub which attracts differerent crowds at various times of the day - was chosen as the potential site for the Eco-Pod. The concept of the Tree Pod was based on the exploration of mobility and minimal ground footprint.Designed as structure wrapped around the trunk of a pine tree in a very active hub, the idea was for the pod to be able to move up and down the tree through electronically operated hydraulic pistons legs so that the ground space is freed up.As the pod moves up among the tall pine trees, users’ connection to nature is enhanced.These trees, being the migrated habitat of WA’s endangered bird,Cockatoo, give the Tree Pod users’ a chance to observe these species. With the library & Architecture building surrounding the site, the Pod was conceptualised not only as a gathering area where sustainability minded people can meet up and discuss but also as a space where excess disposed paper can be recycled.Meeting areas and recylcing process take place on the ground floor while the deck level accomodates the drying process & informal seating areas.Because buildability and easy transportation/relocation of the Pod was a crucial part of the brief, construction methods and material were selected considering environmental impact and long term sustainanblity.The primary structure consists of a lightweight steel framing with light recyclable cladding materials such as fibre composite and polycarbonate.For the windows, wax coated recycled paper is used as an infill.This reinforces the sustainability of the design and the regular paper infill process engages users in a physical sustainable activity.The orientation and design was also driven by climatic factors and passive design was used as a way of maximising light and ventilation.The trunk of the tree remains undamaged with the use of shock absorbers while the Pod moves up/down on the hydraulic pistons which take the structural load.


1.Roof canvas 2.Steel bracing + Polycarbonate cladding 3.Fibreglass Frame + recycled paper infill 4.Solid Fibre composite Columns + Fibre composite panel cladding 5.Floor system + Lightweight Steel Assembly


S T R U C T U R A L

D E T A I L S

d2

D2 - STRUCTURAL BEAM DETAIL

D1 - STRUCTURAL BEAM DETAIL

CHS X-BRACING JOINT DETAIL


03

| WA Museum

Exploring, Experiencing and Re Living Western Australian History

M a s t e r o f A r c h i t e c t u r e | C o m p l e x B u i l d i n g s R e s e a r ch Studio | November 2014

With the exising WA Museum’s main buildings showing their age and the State Government recognising the importance of developing cultural infrastructure, both for the benefit of Australians and to attract investors, employers, workers and visitors, this studio required the development of a “New Museum” as an extension of the existing buildings.Over the course of the project, the new building was to be designed to integrate with the existing heritage buildings, including the Old Gaol, Hackett Hall, and the Jubilee and Beaufort Street wings – which will be refurbished inside and out and at the same time create a modern and contemporary museum experience. Western Australia’s rich and diverse cultural identity has been shaped by countless moments, many generations and the weaving together of different factors,lives and stories through the centuries.The concept is for the new museum is to comunicate, through an experiential journey, the different phases associated with WA’s complex timeline : The Aboriginal Culture & Art - The European exploration, colonisation and settlement - The Convicts’ contribution - The Discovery of resources & immigration influx - The War - 21st Century development. By interconnecting a series of spaces along a linear journey, the visitor is meant to explore and experience an ever evolving timeline. The scheme works as spinal configuration with a main pathway, respecting the precinct grid,cutting through the site and stems out to different parts of the themed museum.As a metaphor of WA timeline, 4 major phases were idenitified: EXPLORE - SETTLE STRUGGLE - PROGRESS Explore - Aboriginal & Heritage themed galleries + Exploratoriums Settle - Courtyard, Resting Spots, Restaurants/Retails + Nature Gallery Struggle - Old Gaol + Convict Gallery Progress - Education centre + Science Exploratorium

As a response to the evolving changes & complexity of WA’s timeline, the museum is expressedas a series of steel and glass structures which changes gradually from one end to another. At point A, a low print glass box reflecting the surrounding is proposed - at point B , the glass gets shielded through a steel skin - At point C, steel panels combined with suspended glass boxes adds to the complexity of the design.


The museum entrance, which edges the State library’s park, is designed

As they proceed along the journey, they will reach the 2nd phase of the timeline - t

as transparent low profile facade that engages with the surrounding foliage and reinforce WA’s initial vast bare lands with minimal footprint. At this point, the museum is only a backdrop to the natural elements. Musuem visitors will start off their journey discovering the formation of Wa and exploring the Aboriginals - Art & culture themed galleries / exploratoriums.

of the time when the British colonised, settled and started developping Wa. The Flo

also discovered at that time.In the New Musuem, this phase consists of a courtya

(retail/restaurant) where people would sit and relax as well as a gallery featuring bio


the settling phase acts as a methaphor

The third phase along the timeline -

The last phase of the New musuem features science galleries, explorato-

ora/Fauna and biodiversity of Wa were

Struggle -uses the Old Gaol to exhibit

riums and the education centre.The architecture here explores advanced

ard with water features, public spaces

the concvits era and War periods of

technology and materiality to reinforce the concept of Western Australia

odiversity and natural riches of WA.

WA. As the visitor goes into the Gaol,

progress and steps towards the future. Emphasizing on technological

the former function and architecture

advancements of the present and future era, the south elevation

of the space strengthens the notion

features a glass and steel insertion in between the existing buildings

of dark era of WA.

as well as a glass lift through which the visitor ends his journey.


04

| Cl aremont Hub

Redevelopping Claremont Oval As a Mixed used Community Hub

M a s t e r o f A r c h i t e c t u r e | U r b a n A r c h i t e c t u r e R e s e a r ch Studio | July 2014

This unit required a redevelopment proposal for the Claremont North East Precinct by exploring theories of urbanism and analysing of Claremont urban context to make speculative urban propositions.The vision was to develop sustainable mixed use in terms of a vibrant hub that will increase activity options, interaction and community life of Claremont residents and visitors.It aims to provide various civic spaces, a unique urban village character and an animated street life around the oval while the number of residents, workers and visitors continue to grow and stay connected.The final scheme was informed by analysis of the population + new market trends and access issues on the site.With 3 major nodes identified, the overall design focusses on creating a vibrant hub at each node to increases connectivity on/off the site, providing many unique housing options to accomodate people of all ages and economic standings & a setting for public activites for increased social interaction between Claremont residents.Targeted number of residents : 1300 No of housing units for students/ families/ couples/elderly/ visitors available: 600

Zone C, situated on the South - Eastern corner of the site, was chosen as the main area to be further developped for this unit.It was designed as a community hub in response to lack of public spaces where people of every age can meet and interact in Claremont, The concept was to create a conveniently located public realm which will eventually become higly recognised and valued in the local community as a safe gathering place for people and an access point for a wide range of community activities, programs, services and events. Major components of the development are the community centre and a 21st century public library situated on the ground floor. The 1st floor accomodates 2 small theatres as an entertainment venue for residents since there are currently no theatres in the town and on the 3/4th floors community housing is proposed. A green zone at the centre of the hub binds it all together. A one- way road, developped as a boulevard services the area. On the other side, an art centre/ gallery where people can enjoy classes and exhibitions and a FitLeisure centre is proposed. Lastly the hub also features a childcare centre and an old care centre for the varying demographics to interact with their age group.


ZONE C - Community Hub


Architectural expression for the street corner entrance of Claremont Complex emphased though the use of a distinctive circular built form, an interesting material palette, interactive facades and additional height.The creative use of this corner ensures that it becomes memorable in the mind of the viewers,even from a distance. It thus takes on added significance , performing the role of landmark. The boulevard was developped as a means of vehicualar access within the hub but more importanly with the idea that the activity generated on the streets can add to the sense of authentic community and social contact. The changing artwork display of the gallery facade,interactive wall screens at the Fitness centre, modern street furniture, and warm lanterns lighting complements the friendly and dynamic atmosphere to create a vibrant hub that is activated and animated both during day and night. The communtiy hub was designed as a courtyard configuration,with a green piazza serving as a public realm in the middle and surrounding spaces opening up to it. While street furniture such as canopies/ benches /bean bags /coffee tables are provided, flexible pop up stalls are also proposed for so that art markets/ public organisation/ information centres can take place and add to the diversity of uses.

CLAREMONT COMPLEX


THE BOULEVARD

THE SQUARE


05

| Stal actitic Stairwell

Parametric Geometry & Digitial Fabrication

M a s t e r o f A r c h i t e c t u r e | A r c h i t e c t u r a l S y s t e m s R e s earch Topics | July 2014

This unit was a means of developping knowledge ans skill in emerging digital systems in the areas of parametric geometry and digital fabrication. Through the development of a design research project, an in-depth exploration of the theory and methods of digital architecture was conducted. The fieldwork of this project was the production of a digitally produced physical model in a chosen area in the Architecture building at Curtin University. The site, an exisitng dimly lit and underutilised stairwell on level 1/2, was chosen to activate the stairwell and encourage more usage. A bright and dynamic ceiling surface was proposed,animating and illuminating what was once a dull space. The geometry of the surface resonated from the idea of stalactites.Ascending and descending the stairs becomes a dynamic experience through varied intrusions “dripping” downwards from the suspended surface. Perforations on the surface provides glimpses of light, illuminating the space and creating the feeling of a “floating” structure.

Grasshoper scripting: 1.Creating a series of points 2.Using Image Sampler to arrange points & scale them 3.Connect the points to curves and loft to a surface 4.Use UV direction to divide the surface 5.Panlise the surface 6.Perforations


Fabrication Logic And Methodology 1.GH surface script (panelized) 2.Strips extracted from surface 3.Strips halved & placed on cardboard sheets 4.Strips cut/folded and manually perforated 5.Strips stapled together to form surface 6.Surface suspended from frame 7.Lighting/Perforation test

FINAL PHYSICAL MODEL SCALE 1:1


06

| Kl ang Affordable Housing

Creating a sense of place for low income in an urban context

B a c h e l o r o f A r c h i t e c t u r e | A r c h i t e c t u r e D e s i g n Studio 6 | Nov 2012

This project challenged an innovative and stimulating mixed-used development catering for alternative living options that provide for diversity in lifestyle and demographics in the busy urban context of Klang City, Malaysia. Macro and microstudy of the urban fabric surrounding klang city show a distinct difference between the patterns of either side of the river.While contrasting issues such as (highly congested v/s underutilised spaces, enclosed v/s open areas, heavywight v/s lightweight construction, high v/s low population intensities) on the site makes it very much disconnected from its people and environment, Little India on the other hand, is firmly linked together with a strong sense of place and identity. On the macro scale, the project binds together with the context to link the urban fabric together,connecting the people,buildings and the surrounding.On the micro scale, the sense of personalisation is enhanced by providing each user with a space within a defined boundary.Units are shifted such that no two are exactly similar. The targeted user groups of the area- foreign workers and local families both have one thing in common: the need for a sense of belonging to the place to emotionally bind them.Key architectural aspects such as building typologies, materials and technics, colours and finishes, heights and levels - that contribute to the personilisation of Little India are thus identified and translated in the housing scheme design to provide the users with a positive local identity that would in turn strengthen their identification with the town and place.The meaning of identity will however differ from each group the Bangladeshi men and Indonesian girls may relate to the idea of belonging in terms of sharing a space with friends in the community housing. Local extended families in the public housing would probably identify themselves by sharing a common space within a group of same class to form a community of their own while young couples may need a more private area to call it their home. Ultimately, the objective is to attach users to their environment and confirm that it belongs to them- individually and collectively, though sensitive architecture and construction techniques.


SITE PLAN


BANGLADESHI COMMUNITY HOUSING

MAIN ENTRANCE

INDONESIAN COMMUNAL HOUSING


C O M M U N I T Y H O U S I N G S E C T I O N A L D E TA I L


M A L AY P U B L I C H O U S I N G U N I T L AY O U T S


07

| Tidal Pool & Pavilion The art of stone craft in architecture

B a c h e l o r o f A r c h i t e c t u r e | A r c h i t e c t u r e D e s i g n Studio 5 | July 2012

Technics is all about the expression of a building though beauty in craft & the art of making: Detailings, Connections, Construction methods and Crafting all form part of this school of thought. This project required the designing of a Tidal Pool and Pavilion atBagan lalang,is a beach destination in Sepang using “technics� as the main philisophy. With the abundance of stone as a natural resource around the site, the idea was to explore how these stones,in its various shapes, sizes, colours and textures can be assembled to act as crafted objects on the site.Each type of rock is used differently in the project : The larger rocks held together with mortar act as a water retaining pool while to medium stones are used as a skin through the use of gabion walls - theses act as barriers definind the spaces.The loose rocks are used as barbeque pits or seating. The idea was to use and put together this resource in various ways to achieve different effects. The method of construction varies from space to space, depending upon its placement, function and scale; thus forming different atmospheres in each area.The verticality of the stone construction acts as a barrier from space to space.These define the edges of each space, starting as singular posts and changing to walls when put together.In larger/higher spaces, the wall is increased in depth - making it more closed off and private. Stones are also used as a retaining element for the pool - granite and mortar are joined to provide a solid impermeable structure in contrast to loose rocks used in gabion posts/walls.Concrete floor slabs, stone pathways and gravel washed roofs complete the project.At certain points, exisiting small sized mangroves on site are preserved so that the green foliage contrasts the hardness of the stone stone structure.The water,greenery and stones all come togther as a whole to create a unique experience for the user.


SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE THROUGH PUBLIC ROOM


08

| Building Technology Floor | Wall | Roof Frame Construction

B a c h e lo r o f A r c h i t e c t u r e | A r c h i t e c t u r e D e s i g n Studio 5 | July 2012

The project required designing and preparing working drawings for an appropriate framed roof, wall and floor system enclosing a selected portion of a restaurant by addressing:

F

The integration of structural systems The selection of materials for selected structural systems Use of selected cladding material 3-D composition of the structure and cladding Efficient and elegant design development and Detailing of the Wall/Roofing/Flooring & their connections Roof system: Framed steel construction + Polycarbonate cladding Wall system: Steel Post + Fixed glass panel + Pivot windows + Polycarbonate Floor system: I beams + Timber joists + Hardwood strip finish A physical model was constructed to demonstrate the resolution of the overall structural stability for the design. Thought upon how the structural system distributed dead loads to the ground through a sequence of tertiary, secondary and primary structurewas given.The way the structural system would transfer wind loads from all directions to the ground was also considered.

Floor Plan


Front Elevation

Wall to Roof Detail

Floor to Wall Detail


09

| The Kern House

A building within a building - Austria

B a c h e l o r o f A r c h i t e c t u r e | A r c h i t e c t u r e T e c hniques | Nov 2011

Practical model making is a skillful technique that can be used as design and communication tools. Residential building - Kern House - was in this case the assigned project to be dissected and explored through touchstones & models. The focus was to expore this dramatic contrast of materials of the different facade layers. The inner box, in its glassiness is clear, hard and modern while the outer skin in its woodiness, is soft, diffused and looks traditional. With quite a simple but Versatile plan, Kern House was planned “from the outside in” so to speak.The idea behind it was to enable the inhabitants to look out without others being able to look in. The completely transparent inner glazed offers a superb panoramic view of its attractive surroundings. To however avoid a life of complete exposure, a slatted wooden frame was installed in front of the inner box – a building within a building.The louvers, designed such that they were relatively closely spaced on the ground floor but gradually opened up by being tilted at different angles toward the roof, limited the view from outside. Standing beside the house hence meant that once cannot see directly on the lower level and perceive a little more than the upper storey’s ceiling. This simple arrangement together with the transitional space between the house’s two layers create a myriad of effects from the outside. The touchstone: A simple glass box with an arrangement of see through wooden slats but when turned upside down, it becomes solid and closed off. It depicted the key decription of the house: “see everything from the inside but nothing from the outside”.The sectional model: Emphasis was laid on the arrangement of the wooden slats and the catwalk in between the glass and the louvered skin.


10

| Holiday Inn Hotel

Ramgoolam International Airport,Plaisance Mauritius

I nt e r n s h i p W o r k | M a c b e t h A r c h i t e c t s a n d D esigners

| Nov 2013

InterContinental Hotel’s franchise agreement for Mauritius Island’s first Holiday Inn was a response to the need for a hotel at the airport driven by the ongoing growth of the tourism market in Mauritius. With a three-fold increase in passenger traffic since 1990, the 140 room hotel located just 700m from Plaisance Airport, would help service the increased travellers traffic through Mauritius Airport as it continues to expand into a global business, leisure and tourism hub. The hotel and its grounds was developed in keeping with traditional Mauritian vernacular in its design and character. Creative use of decorative steelwork combined with hardwood timber shutters and pergolas brought out a distinctive local ‘feel’ to the architecture. The buildings were kept low to minimise their impact on the environment and above all the bedroom layout interweaved between the numerous mature trees of the site. The entrance was designed with reflective glass fenestration and a glass canopy porte-cochere with incorporated photovoltaic cells, creating a hallmark entrance with a high signpost to signal the brand from the airport. Harnessing the local biological diversity of the site, the landscape retained the majority of the existing trees and foliage in the garden while a roof garden on the third floor bring the guests relaxation areas closer to the natural environment. Sustainable design initiatives in the hotel included taking advantage of the natural ventilation in the living areas as well as the use of low-e glazing to reduce air conditioning loads. Using locally sourced building material as well as use of local stone and timber further helped to further reduce the building’s carbon footprint.


11

| The Artist’s House Highlands,Mauritius

F r e e l a n c e W o r k | J u l y 2 0 13

This single family residential project was designed for a Clay Artist in Mauritius.The client’s brief mainly demanded a three bedrooms, a kitchen + dining + living room, a work studio and a garage to fit one car with a modern yet cosy feeling architecture. The site, a bare plot of land, in a developping residential area was located at the junction of two main roads. After analysis and discussions ,an L-shaped design, maximising landscaping and minimizing footprint was proposed to the client. On the ground floor, public spaces: Kitchen + Living + Dining and a bedroom for the elderly parents of the client open up to the lush greenery of the garden. The garage and studio were planned at the rear end while the upper level accomodated two additional bedroom and storage + laundry space. The rectangular composition of the overall design comes together as unified whole through the use of a cantilivering concrete envelope wrapping the smaller space and giving the sculpture-like feel to the house. While locally available concrete blocks were the main structual material used, timber was also proposed to highlight certain distinct areas. Clay artworks, desinged by the artist herself, find their way on the external walls of the house to give a personalised character to the project.


A

B 3,200

6,150

175

+5.630 SL 75

150 212

250

300 +5.630 SL

515

F D

D

C 1,290

C

860

A

+2.815 SL

E

C

A

860

2,150

1,290

C

+2.815 SL

+0.000 SL

F

1. SL=structural slab level, FL=finished floor level, GL=finished ground level & IL=invert level 2. All materials/ products/ equipment to be laid/ installed as per supplier's details & specifications

515

515

D

3

4

3,965

NOTES:

F D

1

3,850

150 212

175

+5.630 SL 75

250

150 212

+5.630 SL

G

3,050 Top of Parapet +5.843

1,675

5 590

+5.630 SL

150 212

E 6,150 300

515

B 3,200

D

1,290

A

+0.000 SL

C

MATERIALS

1,290

Top of Parapet +3.028

860

+2.815 SL

150 212

A

A

1,290

C

2,815

E

E

C

C

A

E

2,150 +0.000 SL -0.150 GL

3 3,965

4 1,675

+5.630 SL

5 590

6 1,200

11 3,050

ELEVATION B Top of Parapet +5.843

50 212

1

50 212

D

860

860

+0.000 SL

E

150 C

2,150

1,290

C

A

+2.815 SL

D

515

+2.815 SL

515

+2.815 SL

B

860

C

1,290

A

A - Paint on Rendered Masonry B - Treated Timber Cladding C - Powdercoated Aluminium Openings D - Insitu Concrete Surrounds E - Feature Panel F - Insitu Concrete Hopper

860

C

+0.000 SL

C


A

B

C

3,200

D

1,175

3,800

E

F

1,175

3,850

150 212

+5.630 SL

150 213

G

3,050 Top of Parapet +5.843

515

515

750

3,850

NOTES:

C 3,800

B

Bedroom 2

A

1,175

750

+2.865 FL

Bathroom 1

101 14

Bedroom 1

+0.050 FL

75

aluminium door/ window to specialist installation

water drip 214

69 12

370 860

1,075 Low-level wall

Gap to take Washing Machine 166

C

100

515

156

Living Room

860

E

+2.815 SL

+0.050 FL

+0.000 SL

+0.000 SL -0.150 GL

Typical Head Detail

SECTION C REV DATE DESCRIPTION

SL varies

SECTION A 1,200 1,200

5

4

Top of Parapet 590 +3.028

3

1

1,675

3,965

+2.815 SL +5.630 SL 800

300

aluminium door/ window to specialist installation

PROJECT REV DATE DESCRIPTION House 50at 15

Bedroom 2

Store

200mm blockwork 15mm cement render 1,290

645

SECTION D

Sections A & B

Kitchen

Elevations A & B

PLANNING APPLICATION 645

960

910

165

-0.150 GL

ELEVATION A

Ishaan Saccaram A: Mgr Leen Ave, La Louise, Quatre-Bornes T: (+230) 7074605 E: ishaan.saccaram@gmail.com

PAC Reg: 169 BRN: I10007874 VAT Registration: 18906167

101

DRAWING STATUS

Gap to take Oven

-0.150 GL ARCHITECT

170

DATE: 21.07.13 DRAWN: IS SCALE: 2151/50@A3 REV: -

DATE: 21.07.13 DRAWN: IS SCALE: 1/50@A3 REV: -

DRAWING STATUS

20mm cement render

14

Dining Room

104(PL)06

15mm cement render

2,365

2,150

100

104(PL)08Insitu Concrete Counter

Typical Sill Detail

PAC Reg: 169 BRN: I10007874 VAT Registration: 18906167

DRAWING NUMBER

DRAWING NUMBER

C

860

A

1,290

1,190

DRAWING TITLE

PLANNING APPLICATION at Highlands

Ishaan Saccaram NOTES: A: Mgr Leen Ave, La Louise, Quatre-Bornes 1. SL=structural slab level, FL=finished floor level, GL=finished ground level &200mm IL=invertblockwork level (+230) 7074605 DRAWINGT: TITLE 2. All materials/ products/ equipment to be laid/ installed as per supplier's details & specifications E: ishaan.saccaram@gmail.com 200

15mm cement render

PLANNING APPLICATION 15

200mm blockwork +0.000 SL

ARCHITECT

+0.050 FL

Ishaan Saccaram 75 A: Mgr Leen Ave, La Louise, Quatre-Bornes

SECTION B

aluminium door/ window T: (+230) 7074605 to specialist installation E: ishaan.saccaram@gmail.com

214

PAC Reg: 169 BRN: I10007874 12 VAT Registration: 18906167 370

100 20mm cement render

100

D

20mm cement render

104(PL)07

230

515

House at Highlands

water drip

Sections C & D

House ARCHITECT

450

PROJECT

TITLEpurpose only. 1. Drawing toDRAWING be used for intended 69 2. All works to be in accordance with national building regulations and69 other relevant legislations. 20 12 3. Do not scale from this drawing, use annotated dimensions and levels. 4. All dimensions are in millimetres and levels in metres, unless otherwise170 noted. DRAWING NUMBER 5. All dimensions and levels to be checked on site prior to commencement of works. Any discrepancies to be reported to the Architect. 6. Drawing to be read in conjunction with other consultants/ suppliers information. 21.07.13 DRAWN: IS of SCALE: 1/50@A3AnyREV: 7. Drawing is copyright DATE: and remains the sole property the Architect. reproduction or disclosure to third parties, without the permission of the Architect,DRAWING is strictly prohibited. STATUS PROJECT

Living Room

150

860 150 212 515

Top of Parapet +3.028

insitu concrete sill to eng's details and specs smooth finish

insitu concrete head to eng's details and spe smooth finish aluminium door/ window to specialist installation water drip

69

370

2,150

1,785

GENERAL NOTES:

Bedroom 1

100

1,290

2,365

Bathroom 1 1. Drawing to be used for intended purpose only. 2. All works to be in accordance with national building regulations and other relevant legislations. 600 3. Do not scale from this drawing, use annotated dimensions and levels. 4. All dimensions are in millimetres and levels in metres, unless otherwise noted. 5. All dimensions and levels to be checked on site prior to commencement of works. Any discrepancies to be reported to the Architect. 6. Drawing to be read in conjunction with other consultants/ suppliers information. 7. Drawing is copyright and450 remains the sole property of the Architect. Any +0.000 SL +0.050 FL reproduction or disclosure to third parties, without the permission of the+2.865 FL +2.815 SL Architect, is strictly prohibited.

Highlands

100

135

580

REV DATE DESCRIPTION

+2.815 SL

1. Drawing to be used for intended purpose only. 2. All works to be in accordance with national building regulations and other relevant legislations. 3. Do not scale from this drawing, use annotated dimensions and levels. 4. All dimensions are in millimetres and levels in metres, unless otherwise noted. 5. All dimensions and levels to be checked on site prior to commencement of works. Any discrepancies to be reported to the Architect. 6. Drawing to be read in conjunction with other consultants/ suppliers information. 7. Drawing is copyright and remains the sole property of the Architect. Any 75 to third parties, without 245 reproduction or disclosure the permission of the Architect, is strictly prohibited.

75

6

295

ELEVATION B

GENERAL NOTES:

C

2,250 2,250

15

300 150 212

150 212 515

D

9

GENERAL NOTES:

insitu concrete jamb to eng's details and specs smooth finish

170

Top of Parapet +5.843 Top of Parapet +5.843

800 800

5

150 213

11 3,050

11

6

860

6

9

515

11

20

+0.050 FL

200

860

+0.000 SL -0.150 GL -0.150 GL

1,200

insitu concrete head to eng's details and specs smooth finish

2,150

1,290

2,815

C

Toilet

1,290

100

230

Kitchen Insitu Concrete Counter

250

910 810

150 215

120 343

Top of +2.815 Parapet SL +3.028

20mm cement render

170

515

2,150 156

Concrete Staircase with 25mm Timber Treads. First riser at 166mm, remaining risers at 156mm

Top of Parapet +1.458 FL +3.028+1.418 SL

215

150 212 515

645

Bedroom 3 250

+0.000 SL +0.050 FL

A

Top of Parapet +3.028

200

+2.815 SL

150 213

2,782

+2.815 SL +2.865 FL

215

515 860 1,290

D

15mm cement render 200mm blockwork

Stairs

A - Paint on Rendered Masonry B - Treated Timber Cladding C - Powdercoated Aluminium Openings D - Insitu Concrete Surrounds E - Feature Panel F - Insitu Concrete Hopper

+2.815 SL

1. SL=structural slab level, FL=finished floor level, GL=finished ground level & IL=invert level 2. All materials/ products/ equipment to be laid/ installed as per supplier's details & specifications

+5.630 SL

1. SL=structural slab level, FL=finished floor level, GL=finished ground level & IL=invert level 2. All materials/ products/ equipment to be laid/ installed as per supplier's details & specifications

MATERIALS

NOTES:

3,200

15

150 212

3,050 Top of Parapet +5.843

D 1,175

G

Top of Parapet +5.843 Top of Wall +3.990

1,290

E

430

F

215

E

100

Typical Head Detail


Architecture portfolio  

A synthesis of academic and professional / freelance architecture projects - By Pavitra.R

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