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CITY LIFE STYLE S A S K AT O O N

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MARCH 2014 ISSUE 8 VOLUME 2

WELCOME SPACES A CITY TRAPPED INSIDE FOR HALF THE YEAR OPENS UP TO REVEAL ITS INNER WONDERS

UPCYCLED STYLE

RECLAIMED, RE-LOVED AND RE-IMAGINED

GREEN LAGER?

SPOIL YOURSELF, NOT THE BEER THIS ST. PATRICK’S DAY

MELISSA SQUIRE

BOLD, BEAUTIFUL DRESSES HAVE HER VEGAS-BOUND

food+drink music+events fashion/lifestyle local attractions maps


Seating for six, (or one if people aren't your thing)

MADE HERE

View the Edward + our entire collection at arealifestyle.ca 249 – 2nd Avenue South


the city

Minimalism Comes to yxe A More Meaningful Life with Less Stuff

Text by Carmen Villadar Saskatoon is a city that embraces grassroots initiatives, especially when these give value to their residents. One such recent initiative introduces the positive aspects of living a minimalist lifestyle: “Less stuff, more freedom.” Not surprisingly, there is a community of residents that have shown an interest in minimalism or have been living a minimalist lifestyle in line with their own situations or preferences. This small group answered the call for likeminded people at the first Saskatoon Minimalists Meet-Up held at The Local Coffee Bar in downtown Saskatoon in early February. Those in attendance were from a wide range of backgrounds with obviously different circumstances. Some people sought guidance on how to start reducing the clutter in their homes, while others sought moral support to deal with the pressures of feeling the need to own certain stuff that society (including family and friends) tend to equate with “success”. Others still felt a general interest in the minimalist lifestyle and wanted to know where and how to begin. Saskatoon Minimalists was included as part of

free

flow

the Minimalist.Org 100-City Meet-Ups founded by Americans Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus. Some minimalist concepts include questioning and paring down what we own, and understanding the idea of “living with enough”. A common start for many minimalists is getting rid of their TV, their car and sometimes even their house. The Minimalists’ website suggests a 21-day plan for beginning the journey to a minimalist way of living. Minimalist group statement: “Minimalism is a lifestyle that helps people question what things add value to their lives. By clearing the clutter from life’s path, we can all make room for the most important aspects of life: health, relationships, passion, growth and contribution (to society).” Millburn and Nicodemus will be in Saskatoon on July 26 to promote their new book, “Everything That Remains”.

January 24 to March 30, 2014

Contemporary Drawings from the National Gallery of Canada Organized by the National Gallery of Canada

Trace Nelson: Walls of Intrigue and Cabinets of Curiosity Organized by Open Space.

Trace Nelson, installation view of Walls of Intrigue

For more information on the minimalist movement, visit TheMinimalists.com, email saskatoonminimalists@gmail.com or check them out on twitter: @YXEminimalists.

www.mendel.ca

by

T H U R S D AY S

T h u r s d a y,

20 March 9pm *-this is a one-time exception

to

midnight

243 2nd Ave. South

Tickets: $20* • Wine tastings • H y p n o t i s t • $100s in prize giveaways 2014 MARCH

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FEB 4 12.50PM SH50 Flow MAG Print Ad Due FEB10.indd 2/4/2014 1 12:49 PM


editor’s notes A Toast to Working with Good People

IN EACH ISSUE

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Most cities in the Northern Hemisphere experience March as the start of spring and warmer temperatures. In Saskatoon, that’s seldom the case: rather than enjoy the outdoors we end up spending more time indoors than we would like. The constant vigil against the flu bug may have subsided by now but not cabin fever. Our feature this month is about space: big, open, welcoming spaces; spaces that offer room to breathe in a part of the world where we’re forced to stay indoors for half of the year. Indoor spaces are arguably more important to us than to most other people on the planet: they offer refuge from the cold, room for conversation and reflection, and—as mirrors of the larger society— they invite us to be ourselves. Saskatoon’s spaces also bring out the best in personal expression. Jennilee Cardinal-Schultz (p. 18) found that out by investigating the upcycling trend among local designers who use what’s around us to make what some might consider wearable art. Any surprise that a fashion shoot about upcycled clothing took place in a furniture store that features reclaimed furniture? This month there’s no excuse not to stay indoors: there are concerts (pp 6–10); an epic

film in a hallowed movie theatre (p. 10); subtle interplays of light, colour and texture in the city’s main public art gallery (p. 10); and, the aroma of fresh coffee or exotic cuisine in a new café or restaurant (p. 23). Even if the weather only warms up slowly, March is worth celebrating. There’s Mardi Gras— Tuesday, March 4 (go stuff yourself full of Cajun/ creole goodness; check the “Global” restaurant listings on p. 24). International Women’s Day— Saturday, March 8, to honour all women (not just those we love) with flowers, a few kind words or even a night out with the Symphony (see p. 6). And St. Patrick’s Day—Monday, March 17: join with the city’s many new Irish residents for a hearty toast to their patron saint (just not with green beer). Slainte!

FreshWest Media Ltd. 106-220 20th Street West Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7M0W9 306-261-0883 info@freshwestmedia.com

Editor Paul Miazga Senior Art Director Zhanybek Nurgozhayev Map Designer Danna Contreras-Chapa Ad Designers Zhanybek Nurgozhayev, Danna Contreras-Chapa, Ashley Sampson Proofreader Olga Bondarenko

Advertising Inquiries Paul Miazga 306-261-0883 sales@freshwestmedia.com

Contributors Jennilee Cardinal-Schultz, Paul Miazga, Lisa Patrick, Mandy Pravda, Lynette Suchar, Mike Tory, Carmen Villadar, Rebecca Windjack

Published 12 times per year by FreshWest Media Ltd. Readership: 25,000 (estimated) in Saskatoon and area.

Contributing Photographers Greer Frances, Carlene Haday, Liz Hartman, Diane Herron, Paul Miazga, Adeel Salman, Hillary Simon-Worobec, Lynette Suchar, Mark Tiu

Copyright (2014) by FreshWest Media Ltd. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed, written consent of the publisher.

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f secret Saskatoon 30 PLUS: 7

SASK MUSIC THE WINE GUY FOOD REVIEWS

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FreshWest Media Ltd. is proud to feature the work of the following photographers:

Mark Tiu

(Facebook.com/marktiuphotography)

Paul Miazga Publisher and Editor paul@freshwestmedia.com

Printing TC Transcontinental Distribution FreshWest Media Ltd., Canada Post

Greer Frances

(greerfrances.com)

greerfrances FreshWest Media Ltd. is proud to partner with Tourism Saskatoon, experience downtown and other local tourism promotion agencies.

FRESHWEST MEDIA LTD. President and Publisher Paul Miazga Project Consultants Käthe Lemon (Redpoint Media), Michael Miazga (Open Storage Solutions), Terry Rock (cSPACE), Carmen Villadar (@digitalfemme)


contents SHEVCHENKO

MARCH 2014

The voice and the muse of Ukrainians everywhere

WELCOME TO OUR SPACE

UKRAINIAN MUSEUM OF CANADA 910 Spadina Cres. E, 306 244 3800

Showing until March 17 Free Admission with ad Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Sunday 1-5

w w w. umc . sk.c a

A small city knows how to show its inner beauty Photo of Luna+Hill interior by Diane Herron

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UPCYCLED, WITH APLOMB Local designers love to reclaim and re-imagine By Jennilee Cardinal-Schultz

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MELISSA SQUIRE CHIC Local designers love to reclaim and re-imagine By Mandy Pravda Cover photo by Mark Tiu; furnishings provided by IFW; staging by Fresh Living; light fixtures by Richardson Lighting; the “Rosewood 219” showhome by and made available thanks to Westridge Homes; men’s clothing provided by David’s Distinctive Men’s Apparel; women’s clothing and accessories by Tryst Boutique; Anthony and Heidi appear courtesy of Masala Model & Talent

20 306.652.0909

GREEN BEER? BE SERIOUS Or at least be more discerning on St. Paddy’s By Mike Tory

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Varsity Common 107 - 1526 8 th Street East Saskatoon w w w. b e r n a r d c a l l e b a u t . c o m

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events calendar

Sat08 Music is GREAT Britain

7:30pm; tickets from $18 To celebrate the majesty of choral music and British composers Benjamin Britten (“Four Sea Interludes”), Vaughn Williams (“A Sea Symphony”) and Matthew Becker (with a newly commissioned work), Maestro Victor Sawa and the SSO join with soloists Peter McGillivray (baritone), Monica Huisman (soprano) and local choirs for this event. Saskatoonsymphony.org. TCU Place (35 22nd St. East, 306975-7777; tcutickets.ca)

Lady Antebellum

Thu06

7pm; tickets from $39.75 Catch one of country music’s hottest acts Lady Antebellum (“Need You Now”, “Love Don’t Live Here”) in Saskatoon during their “Take Me Downtown” tour. The band comprises Nashville’s very own Dave Haywood, Hillary Scott and Charles Kelley. Opening for them will be Kip Moore and Kacey Musgraves. Credit Union Centre (3515 Thatcher Ave., 306938-7800; creditunioncentre.com)

Sat15

At the Movies – An Oscars Wrap Party

7:30pm; tickets from $35 Join in the Academy Awards celebrations with Maestro Victor Sawa and the SSO as they play famous Oscar-winning movie scores from The King and I to Star Wars and more. For more details, visit Saskatoonsymphony.org. TCU Place (35 22nd St. East, 306-975-7777; tcutickets.ca)

Sat15

Diana Panton Quartet

8pm; tickets $40/members $30 Light, sensuous and playful, Diana Panton’s vocals have captivated audiences far and wide. Panton’s performance will include classic jazz standards and her own compositions. Accompanying her will be Don Thompson (piano/bass), Reg Schwager (guitar) and Phil Dwyer (tenor sax/piano). The Bassment (202 4th Ave. North, 306683-2277; thebassment.ca)

Thu20–Sun23 University Cup Men’s Hockey

7pm; 4-game ticket package $125 Fast-paced men’s university hockey action as the U of S Huskies host the winning teams from the Canada West, Atlantic and Ontario conferences in a final four CIS showdown. Credit Union Centre (3515 Thatcher Ave., 306-938-7800; creditunioncentre.com)

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Shumka at 50! 7:30pm; tickets from $35 Celebrate 50 years of Shumka’s Ukrainian dance traditions in a whirlwind of colour, power and grace. Their performance will feature retrospective and all-new works highlighting the 45-member troupe’s unique style and energy in a breathtakingly powerful fourpart production. Don’t miss it! TCU Place (35 22nd St. East, 306975-7777; tcutickets.ca)

Sat29


Coming Soon

to a Living Room

Near You! Text by Rebecca Windjack

If you’re a naturally social host and a music lover with a bit of room in your home, then you’re an ideal candidate for hosting a house concert! Although in the past it may have been perceived as a prestigious and expensive experience to host a private show, hosting a house concert in your own comfortable space is actually a great way to bring together friends and share your passion for grassroots music. Here’s how it works: as a host, you’re in charge of promoting the show to your friends, family and community. Since artists need to earn a living, the host charges guests admission (as presold tickets or as cover at the door), and this, along with any income from record or merchandise sales, goes to the artist. House concerts are generally unplugged (no sound system); it’s just a solo artist, duo or larger band (space permitting) performing live in your living room, kitchen or garage. It’s a great way to get creative with your living space, since as the host you are responsible for setting up a stage area, which obviously won’t have all the bells and whistles of a stadium show—just a space big enough to accommodate the artist/duo/band so that guests can see and hear comfortably. Some hosts run the evening as a potluck supper for those attending. Oftentimes hosts will provide the artist with a meal (or more) and even a place to sleep. So, what’s the incentive, other than for the sheer love of music and an excuse to get together with friends? Well, there are multiple reasons, but a few standouts might include hosting an entirely unique show, getting to know a touring artist on a much more personal level, sharing live music with your community, and supporting the artists that play music you love! [Editor’s note: one local resident has become rather well known for her house concerts, posting shows, photos, videos and more online. See www.gilliansnider.com/page3/page3.html.] For more information on house concerts, check out www.homeroutes.ca. SaskMusic (www.saskmusic.org) represents, promotes and develops the commercial music industry of our province with programming including career advice, artist listings, workshops, marketing, networking opportunities and more. Our artists and music professionals hail from across the province, and work in pretty much every genre you can imagine. @SaskMusic

who?

Community Support Program Pilot Project

What?

Safe streets for all

When?

Year-round foot patrols

Where?

Downtown, Riversdale & Broadway Business Improvements Districts (BIDs)

roach To A Total App lth Safety & Hea Community,

Why?

Address public concerns of street safety and provide support • Spot someone in need of help… Call Community Support! • Feeling uncomfortable… Call Community Support! City of Saskatoon Street Activity Steering Committee The City of Saskatoon Street Activity Steering Committee oversees the Community Support Program. The committee includes the Executive Directors from the Downtown, Riversdale and Broadway Business Improvement Districts, the Saskatoon Anti-Poverty Coalition, Saskatoon Police Service and the City of Saskatoon.

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events calendar

Mon10

Buffy Sainte-Marie

7:30pm; tickets $37 Self-taught singer, songwriter, musician, social activist and educator, Buffy SainteMarie is well-known for her philosophical lyrics that focus on love, Aboriginal issues and mysticism. An inspiring performer and home-grown in southern Saskatchewan! Broadway Theatre (715 Broadway Ave., 306652-6556)

! k c o n K ! Knock Celtic Woman – The Emerald Tour

Please drink responsibly. Don’t drink and drive.

7pm; tickets from $39 From modern songs to traditional Celtic tunes, Celtic Woman (vocalists Chloë Agnew, Órla Fallon, Lisa Kelly and Méav Ní Mhaolchatha, plus fiddler Máiréad Nesbitt) offers a spring treat to make anyone feel a bit more Irish. TCU Place (35 22nd St. East, 306-975-7777; tcutickets.ca)

Phillip Phillips

Sun23

7:30pm; tickets from $35 Winner of Season 11 on American Idol, the raspy-voiced American has rocketed to stardom with his hits “Home” and “Gone, Gone, Gone”. Check out this young performer whose star is sure to continue rising. TCU Place (35 22nd St. East, 306-975-7777; tcutickets.ca)

lery e distil Visit thchase your to pur ttle today! own bo

Fri28 Mounties

1925 Avenue B N. Saskatoon, SK 306.979.7280 www.luckybastard.ca

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Wed19

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10pm; tickets $18 This special concert of the Mounties combines Juno Award-winning alt-country star Hawksley Workman, frontman Steve Bays of Hot Hot Heat and indie rock stalwart Ryan Dahle (Limblifter, Age of Electric). Opening will be Rich Aucoin and JPNS Girls. Original Canadian music at its best. Amigo’s Cantina (806 Dufferin Ave., 306-6524912; Amigos25.ca)


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events+listings Mon03 Brent Butt

7:30pm; tickets from $27.50 The pride of Tisdale, SK, comedian and writer Brent Butt came to fame nationwide with his role as Brent Leroy on the CTV sitcom Corner Gas. Check out this very laugh-worthy live performance. TCU Place (35 22nd St. East, 306975-7777; tcutickets.ca)

Our Country’s Good

Wed19–Sat29

8pm; tickets $17 Timberlake Wertenbaker’s masterpiece is set in 1789, New South Wales, Australia: Ambitious Second Lieutenant Ralph wants to curry favour with the Governor. A play is proposed to celebrate the King’s birthday featuring transported criminals. Based on real life events, the play offers a forceful (and often humourous) statement on the transformative potential of theatre and the civilizing power of the arts. Directed by Pamela Haig Bartley. Greystone Theatre (John Mitchell Building, 118 Science Pl., U of S campus, 306-966-5559; arts.usask.ca/drama)

Thu27 Cleopatra (1963)

Through Sun30

Contemporary Drawings from the National Gallery of Canada Open daily from 9am–9pm; free admission Modern works by twenty Canadian and international artists explore and reproduce concepts about our knowledge of the world through drawing. Also showing: Tracey Nelson: Walls of Intrigue and Cabinets of Curiosity. Fuzzy, handcrafted sock monkeys inspire conversations about DIY culture, play, craft and our views of nature. Mendel Art Gallery (950 Spadina Cres. East, 306-975-7610; mendel.ca)

LIVE MUSIC

Amigo’s Cantina (806 Dufferin Ave., 306-652-4912;

amigos25.ca) Shows at 10pm and tickets $10 unless otherwise noted. Mar. 1: Rah Rah w/ Foam Lake and Sydney York Mar. 2: The Pack A.D. w/ Pandas in Japan Mar. 6: Wake Owl w/ Lyons Mar. 7: Basement Paintings w/ Black Tremor Mar. 8: Gunner and Smith w/ Coldest Night of the Year and Megan Nash Mar. 13: The Residuals Mar. 14: Young Benjamins w/ Scenic Route to Alaska and John Antoniuk Mar. 15: Concert for Change feat. Wolfen Rabbits, The Northern Lights and Wizards Mar. 16: Electric Six w/ The Mohrs ($15) Mar. 17: Wenches and Rogues w/ Across the Pond Mar. 23: Islands with Escondido

The Bassment (204 4th Ave. North, 306-652-4700;

thebassment.ca) Mar. 1: David Braid’s Octagon Chamber (8pm; tickets $25/members $20) Mar. 4: Old Man Luedecke w/ Jordie Lane (8pm; $23/$17) Mar. 7: U of S Jazz Ensemble (9pm; $15/$10) Mar. 8: The Once (8pm; $23/$17)

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Mar. 14: The Fretless (9pm; $25/$20) Mar. 21–22: Rosie and the Riveters (Thu 8pm, Fri 9pm; $23/$17) Mar. 22: Solstice (8pm; $23/$17) Mar. 27: Steve Dawson (8pm; $23/$17) Mar. 28: Caladh Nua (9pm; $25/$20) Mar. 29: Melissa Lauren (8pm; $23/$17)

Broadway Theatre (715 Broadway Ave., 306-652-6556; broadwaytheatre.ca) Mar. 9: The April Verch Band (7:30pm; tickets $27) Mar. 16: Martin Sexton (7:30pm; $27)

Louis’ (93 Campus Dr., 306-966-7000; usask.ca/louis

Mar. 3: Louis’ Country Cabaret feat. Tebey w/ MacKenzie Porter (8pm; tickets $21) Mar. 8: Royal Canoe w/ Friends of Foes (8pm; tickets $14.75) Mar. 31: Against Me w/ Laura Stevenson and Cheap Girls (8pm; $25)

O’Brians Event Centre (211 2nd Ave. South, 306-

956-1000; obrianseventcentre.ca) Mar. 13: The Mavericks w/ guests (7pm; tickets $45/ VIP $65) Mar. 18: Matt Webb (Marianas Trench) w/ Fake Share–Real Zombie! and guests (7pm; $15) Mar. 28: Young the Giant w/ Vance Joy (7pm; $31)

7pm; tickets $8/series pass $65 Riversdale’s beloved theatre continues its “Epic Film Night” series of Hollywood classics that started in January with Dr. Zhivago. In March it’s Cleopatra starring Elizabeth Taylor, who earned a then-record $1 million for the film, which also won four Academy Awards. At 248 minutes, it—like all the other films in this series—will require lots of popcorn. The Roxy Theatre (320 20th St. West, 306-955-8642; rainbowcinemas.ca)

Vangelis Tavern (801 Broadway Ave., 306-652-

5173; Facebook.com/VangelisTavernSaskatoon) Mar. 15: Sleepy Sun w/ guests (10pm; tickets $12 in advance/$15 at the door) Mar. 27: Jay Malinowski & The Deadcoast w/ Astral Swans (9pm; $12/$15) Mar. 28: The Glorious Sons w/ guests (10pm; $12/$15)

Third Avenue Centre (304 3rd Ave. North)

Mar. 22: Amati Quartet (2pm, 7:30pm; tickets $30). The U of S Amati Quartet performs the second concert in their Beethoven Cycle of string quartets, playing on rare, 17th-century instruments (amatiquartet.usask.ca).

LIVE THEATRE

Saskatchewan Native Theatre Company

Mar. 5–12: Réunir by PJ Prudat (1pm, 8pm/times vary; tickets $12). An homage to Metis culture. Mar. 26–Apr. 6: Dreary and Izzy by Tara Beagan (8pm; tickets $23). Dierdre struggles to care for her older sister Isabelle when help arrives. For tickets call 306-384-7727 or see persephonetheatre.org. Studio 914 (914 20th St. West; sntc.ca)

Persephone Theatre (100 Spadina Cres. East, 306384-7727; persephonetheatre.org) Mar. 12–30: Equivocation by Bill Cain (2pm, 8pm/ times vary; tickets $26). A gripping political thriller.


Get the goods... on

Why do you like the Broadway district? “I love Broadway because it has such a warm and welcoming vibe to it, the community is a huge supporter of local businesses and we all truly appreciate it.” – Deborah Perry Optika Eclectic Eyeware

Optika has always catered to the funky and the unique in terms of fashion and style. Our customer service is what has brought new customers and returning ones to us. We enjoy having eyewear that you won’t see everywhere else, and providing the best care that we can. Deborah’s colourful Frank Lyman top and Carina necklace provide a vivid contrast to her sleek Mavi “Alexa” jeans, all available at Broadway’s trend-setting women’s wear boutique The Sandbox in the City. Improve your life style with proper fitting, good supportive shoes from Foster’s Shoes. This pair of Spanish-made Portofinos in “Botella” green, with removable insole and all-leather interiors, complete Deborah’s funky, ultra-mobile look. Exceptional attention to detail in Deborah’s hairstyle and makeup are the hallmarks of Chrome Spa Salon, which offers head-to-toe pampering because you deserve the best! From massage to manicure, hair styling to skin care, we put customer service first! Fresh and colourful like spring itself, Bill’s House of Flowers creates decorative, delightful and always in-demand floral and other arrangements such as this gorgeous mix of yellow roses, calla lilies and gerbera daisies. Mark Tiu Photography

Bill’s House of Flowers

2014 MARCH

Join us on Broadway... every day! | directory online at onbroadway.ca | on Facebook | @OnBroadwaySK

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feature “The mother art is architecture. Without an architecture of our own we have no soul of our own civilization.” – Frank Lloyd Wright

Text by Paul Miazga Photos by Diane Herron, Adeel Salman, Hillary Simon-Worobec, Mark Tiu and as noted

A Small City of Great Spaces I’ve long wanted to showcase the city’s grandest indoor spaces (large and small). Not out of a need to boast or brag about them but 12

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to reassure myself that there are reasons for wanting to live through not just one or two Saskatchewan winters but a lifetime of them.

(Adeel Salman)


(Google images)

(Adeel Salman)

(Mark Tiu)

To organize space starting with nothing takes vision, true artistry and a sense of purpose. The city’s founders surely had an eye on the future when you consider how many properties from a century ago remain virtually untouched to this day or have been merely updated— repurposed—to serve new needs. The rapid economic development since 2007 has brought new minds and new ideas—settlers of a sort like those that first homesteaded in the area—to help shape the physical landscape, to craft a community and by doing so exert influence over its collective psyche.

Clockwise from opposite left: a staircase in the Delta Bessborough Hotel (completed in 1932); the foyer of the Senator Hotel (1908); a dining car in Saskatoon Station Place restaurant (c. 1907); massive crystal chandeliers in the main hallway of Mediterranno restaurant in the Drinkle No. 3 building (1912); and, the flying buttresses of the Third Avenue United Church (1913).

(Google images)

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feature

(Mark Tiu)

“Architecture is basically the design of interiors, the art of organizing interior space.” – Philip Cortelyou Johnson The city we share invites us to explore its various facets and nuances, whether old, new, traditional, avant-garde or just plain eclectic. It takes a wise person to build incomparably beautiful space but only the eyes of a child to admire it. We are, after all, human and the spaces we readily share attest to that.

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Clockwise starting from above: the airy expanse of the College of Agriculture building on the U of S campus (1991); flowers and plants surround the fountain in the Civic Conservatory adjacent to the Mendel Art Gallery (1964); a staircase as focal point in the Geology building at the U of S (1986); award-winning, environmentally conscious design on display at Innovation Place (1977).

(Paul Miazga)


(Mark Tiu)

Hillary Simon-Worobec)

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feature

“Taste is relative, but to be positive and vital it must respect the past, accept the present and look forward with enthusiasm to the future.” – Eleanor McMillen Brown

(Mark Tiu)

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(Courtesy photo)

(Diane Herron)

Hillary Simon-Worobec)

(Mark Tiu)

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fashion Text by Jennilee Cardinal-Schultz Photos by Carlene Haday Shoot coordinator: Jennilee Cardinal-Schultz Styling and fashion coordinator: Chelsey Gruza Hair by Amanda Dreis (Chop Chop Salon) Makeup by Vamp Make-up Model: Danyelle Shot on location at Green Ark Collected Home

Essentially, upcycling is turning something old into something new, but in the fashion industry it means so much more than that, especially these days. With consumers seeking environmentally conscious products, the demand for the quality found in vintage pieces and the constant search for something unique has created a wider appreciation for new fashions made from old pieces. International brands and local designers both are offering upcycled garments and accessories, sometimes made from the most unlikely sources, and they have Saskatoon’s fashion lovers falling in love with the old all over again.

Less is More:

Upcycled & In Style 18

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<<<Sewing Gene Jean McKenzie of Sewing Gene found her upcycling inspiration on the handmade and vintage marketplace website www.etsy.com. “About six years ago, I was browsing etsy and saw upcycled sweater coats. I fell in love and made one for myself. After that, I was hooked,” says McKenzie. Finding pieces to upcycle at thrift shops, yard sales and friends’ closets, McKenzie creates gorgeous one-of-a-kind sweaters as well as jackets and dresses, all designed to properly flatter the female figure. A lot of time is spent deciding on colour and texture combinations, choosing pieces carefully from her stash of sweaters to upcycle. “I work on my pieces till I feel they are complete. If I’m not happy, I won’t sell it until I am,” McKenzie says. Sewing Gene is available at Alchemy Clothing and online at Sewinggene.etsy.com. McKenzie also accepts custom orders by phone at 306-5140551 or via email at sewinggene@gmail.com. Hope’s Tab Purses To make just one Hope’s Tabs Purse it takes more than 500 pop can tabs and a whole lot of time. That’s also a lot of pop. At first glance, you see a beautiful hand bag; however, it’s only when you look closer that you realize that the entire bag is immaculately woven using tabs and cord, giving you an appreciation for the effort and care that went into its creation. Hope’s Tabs purses are available at Alchemy Clothing and Salon.

<<<Chelsey Gruza, Designer & Stylist For this Saskatoon designer and stylist, upcycling has been an integral part of her designs— both out of necessity and love. “If I can’t find the pieces I’d like for a project I’m styling, I create what I see in my mind from other clothing, jewellery and sometimes even home décor,” says Gruza. A thrift shop connoisseur of sorts, Gruza spends hours going through others’ discarded items to find her treasures. “Sometimes, the pieces I find are perfect, other times the fabric is gorgeous but the style could be updated a bit so I rework it till I’m satisfied.” The dress Gruza created for this photo shoot is made from a vintage camisole found at Value Village, feather boas from a garage sale and floral décor left over from Christmas. Chelsey’s pieces are available by contacting her by email at chelseygruza@hotmail.com or following her on Instagram: @cgruza.

Art Re-worked It’ s not just local designers who have been embracing upcycling; Saskatoon boutiques have been sourcing some of their fashions from both local and international designers who specialize in this trend. Tonic on 2nd Avenue North downtown carries dresses by Ark Reworked, an international line specializing in giving a second life to vintage dresses and fabric. “Every piece in the line is oneof-kind,” says Tonic owner Roxanne Woodley. “That really makes the dresses special. Our customers have been loving the vintage reworked dresses and the feelings of nostalgia you get when you’re wearing one.” <<<Seaworthy Jewelry Seaworthy designer Marisa Howard of Portland, OR, finds her inspiration in geometric shapes and textile patterns form the 1930s. Her jewellery is made from a combination of vintage pieces and handmade, mixed metal pieces. Seaworthy Jewelry is available in Riversdale at Green Ark. <<<Green Ark What better location to shoot upcycled fashions than Green Ark Collected Home? This furniture and home décor shop on 20th Street West is owned by Noah Rossmo and Allie Perrin, who specialize in new, refinished and reworked pieces made from repurposed materials. They also do custom build services and design consultations. Rossmo and Perrin are very passionate about offering Saskatoon eco-conscious furniture and they are very proud that most of the furnishings and home décor items in their shop are made from recycled materials, a fact that is very much appreciated by their customers as well. They also have a love affair with the stories behind the salvaged pieces they find to rework. “I love that intrinsic character that much of the salvaged products in our shop have,” says Perrin. “I love dings (blemishes) and age similar to (that found in) vintage jewellery. You can look at a piece and imagine where it came from and who has previously owned it. “We have pieces in our shop that are literally made of wood salvaged from the space next door to us as well as the Adilman Department Store building,” she adds. “It’s just great to be able to have a piece that’s special and has local history like that and still is so beautiful.” Rossmo and Perrin do most refinishing work themselves, but they also work with other woodworkers whose furnishings are available in the store.

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design Text by Mandy Pravda Photos as credited

Presented by

Melissa Squire: The City’s Vegas Vixen

Yvette Benard, the nail technician at Alchemy Studio and Salon, also tied the knot very recently. The handsewn lace top was sculpted right on her frame to ensure the best fit! This dress, complete with a 1.5-meter train, has two wearable layers. Under the lace is a slinky, low-back satin dress. Her one-of-a-kind guipure lace dress and hair piece had a stunning effect for their beach wedding in Mexico. Courtesy photo Visit Alchemy for Melissa Squire designs as well as to visit other featured local designers. Alchemy 615 2nd Ave. North, 306 244 5444 melissasquirefashiondesign.com

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For a woman with a special day approaching—perhaps it is a celebration of love or a career milestone—finding the perfect dress for that special occasion can be quite a challenge. Whatever the event, a perfect dress that fits like a dream—the show-stopper, a dress like no other—should reflect your personality and style. Enter versatile Saskatoon designer Melissa Squire, who specializes in custom gowns and whose style has been described as “badass pretty”, with a brand inspired by a 1950’s pinup look and an edgy, rockabilly attitude. She has been creating signature looks for women, and making their dreams come true, for over six years. Among her favourite projects are customized wedding and graduation dresses that come across as funky and elegant, with an edge not often seen at special occasions. Melissa also makes some handy reversible dresses: how they are worn depends on the need for an evening out or a daily wear look. She even designs funky children’s dresses that feature lots of colour, with prints and patterns to capture the cute and playful side of stylish

young people—it proves its worth when planning for a wedding party! It hasn’t just been local brides and grads who have fallen for Melissa’s one-of-a-kind, rockergirl custom couture: Vegas is also calling! Melissa Squire has been invited to participate in the Viva Las Vegas Rockabilly Fashion Show on April 18 alongside the likes of Lucy B, MayMac and Retro Ruthie. Viva Las Vegas is the biggest Rockabilly party in the world, with Greasers and Dollies hailing from Europe, Australia and even Japan. What better place for Melissa to debut her highly anticipated collection, “Vegas Vixens”?! Inspired by the heyday of Las Vegas’ Fremont Street, Melissa’s latest collection celebrates the retro glitz and glamour of that era but with her own punk-rock twist.  For those who can’t make it to Vegas for the debut of Vegas Vixens, follow Melissa’s exciting debut at Viva Las Vegas on Facebook by liking Alchemy Clothing and Salon and following @melissasquire on Instagram: #VegasVixens, #VivaLasVegas and #MelissaSquireDoesVegas. 

This custom grad dress for Kierra Godlien is 4-in-1! The lace layer is separate and can be worn with the whole, or removed to showcase the sweetheart strapless teal dress underneath. The fitted under layer

is also reversible to plain black so it can be worn with teal or black underneath with black lace on top! Versatility at is finest! Photo by Warne Photography


Gin Belhumeur’s dress for her October nuptials was one she also modeled in the Faux Paws Show last fall in Saskatoon. The feather trim, corseted back and shear lace midriff make this dress glamorous and sexy. This convertible design can have a scalloped hem with several gathering strips up the skirt and also has a lace-up back. The top hat style fascinator with a double birdcage veil finished the look. Courtesy photo

This custom wedding dress for Chaela Herrington, who wore it to the Supervixen Fashion show after her wedding (as featured here, hence the mask!), has a lace-up back and a removable crinoline with matching hair piece. Photo by Festivale Photomedia This custom wedding dress for Breanna Needham is adorned with a beautiful black lace train and tiny black buttons down the back. A fitted dress, this beauty hugged the bride’s curves while

This custom dress for Jacqueline Reis was a hit at her colourful, outdoor wedding. Layers upon layers of hand-stitched tulle on the skirt, beautiful silver guipure lace top, and corseted back all the way up to the neck made for a unique and gorgeous gown. Photo by Appl Photo the high slit made sure it to not hinder her moves on the dance floor! Men’s ties, bridal party fascinators and belts were also handmade for this classy, old Hollywood winter wedding and masquerade. Photo by MJ&Co.

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food+drink

Text by Paul Miazga Photos by Greer Frances

5-Mushroom Stuffed Beef Tenderloin By Evan Niekamp

Driving down 8th Street with his mom to his first kitchen job at 16 years of age, Red Seal Executive Chef Evan Niekamp of Rembrandt’s Steakhouse in the Senator Hotel remembered thinking to himself that this was going to be the start of something big. “A friend asked me if I’d like a job washing dishes and I thought, ‘Yeah!’ While my other friends wanted to go out partying, I was quickly getting into the idea of cooking for a living,” he says. After high school Niekamp studied culinary arts at the SIAST Woodland and Palliser campuses (in Prince Albert and Moose Jaw, respectively), while working at the clubhouse in the Waskesiu Golf Course for his apprenticeship. He’s never looked back. Niekamp has always felt at home in the kitchen, and he’s worked in some

of the best this province has seen over the past fifteen years or so: the Boffins Club, the Hole in the Wall, erstwhile dining hubs Tarragons, the Barking Fish and John’s Prime Rib (where Hudson’s is today) and even a short stint in the butcher shop at the Bulk Cheese Warehouse on Broadway Avenue. “The thing is, I love grilling meats,” Niekamp says. “In the kitchen you have your sauciers, your pastry chefs, your gardes mangers, and then you have your grillardins— the meat specialists. “You have to let the ingredients do the talking for you,” he says of his métier in meats. “There’s no need to drown a great piece of meat in a thick sauce. Same with the mushrooms: there’s no butter in there, and the mushrooms will lose water as they reduce, sealing the flavour in. It’s all very simple. Why hide these amazing flavours?”

Ingredients Piece of beef tenderloin (approx. 700g/25oz) 50g each of preferred mushrooms (button, Porcini, oyster, chanterelle, Portobello, etc.) 2-3 cloves garlic, finely chopped

20g fresh parsley, chopped 1 sprig fresh thyme, leaves picked splash of white wine 1 tsp olive oil salt and freshly cracked black pepper cotton string for tying

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Directions Heat the oil in small frying pan over medium heat and sauté garlic until aromatic. Add the chopped mushrooms and fry until they begin to brown and soften (about 5 minutes). Add the chopped parsley, thyme, a dash of salt and pepper and then continue frying for another minute. Add the wine to deglaze the pan then remove the mushrooms and allow to cool completely. Using a sharp filleting knife, trim all excess fat and sinew from the outside of the tenderloin. Butterfly the tenderloin by cutting lengthwise down the centre about twothirds of the way through to approx. 2-3cm from the bottom, being careful not to cut all the way through. Open the tenderloin up and make a similar cut into the meat to open the tenderloin completely (it should be roughly equal in thickness all the way across). Place an equal amount of the mushroom stuffing lengthwise along the centre of the meat in the direction of

the cut and then roll the meat over the stuffing, being careful to tuck the beef underneath and maintain a consistent layer of mushrooms all the way across. Tie the beef firmly in 2cm intervals across the tenderloin until the entire piece has been secured, then cut the meat into approx. 200-250g (7-8oz) portions. [The number of portions will depend on the size of the initial piece of tenderloin.] Lightly season the tenderloin with salt and pepper all over and then, using a dry, oven-proof skillet or pan, sear the sides of the meat that have been tied until golden brown. Do not sear the sides of the tenderloin where the mushrooms are exposed. Place the meat on one of the exposed sides and then put the pan into an oven pre-heated to 180C (375F) for 7-8 minutes. Remove from oven, cut and remove the strings, and serve with Dauphinois potatoes, braised asparagus and a red wine reduction sauce to garnish. Serve hot.


Beware the Dyes of March

Text by Mike Tory

Green beer?! Have a taste of better Irish libations this St. Patrick’s Day Growing up in Europe, I’ve always associated this time of year (March in particular) with the colour green—an abundance of new leaves on the trees, the green, green grass of meadows filled with leaping lambs. Now, I have come to realise that this clearly isn’t happening here… So, I have been forced to turn for solace to the only other part of March where green really is the colour–St. Patrick’s day! From what I’ve experienced so far, you guys actually take it more seriously as a reason to party here than they do in Ireland, with one exception…The Green Beer!!?? I mean, really, who does that?? In my capacity as your alcohol ad-

LOUNGES/PUBS

visor, I thought it prudent to explore some other more genuine options, which, while not all Irish in origin, at least have some relevance to the great Irish drinking traditions!

Coopers Best Extra Stout (IAM $4.50) It may be Australian, but it’s a true testament to the dark roast and full flavours of the real “Black stuff”. And if you were to even consider adding green dye to stout, it would probably explode, or turn you into a kangaroo. a short walk from the Bes and popular with all ages. Open daily from 11am. $$$

South, 306-244-9899; 2ndavegrill.com. A Ideal for food or drinks before or after an downtown favourite for 5 o’clock drinks. event at TCU Place. In the Holiday Inn. Open daily 6:30am–11pm. $$ Open Mon–Sat from 11am. $$ 6Twelve Lounge 612 Spadina Cres. East The James Hotel Lobby Bar 620 (in the Sheraton Cavalier Hotel), 306-652- Spadina Cres. East, 306-244-6446; thejameshotel.ca. Upscale, decadent and 6770; 6twelve.ca. Original cocktails and well-hidden. Open daily from 4pm. $$$ atmosphere. Open daily from 11am. $$$

O’Shea’s Irish Pub 222 2nd Ave. South,

306-384-7444; osheasirishpub.ca. Check the separate door for Leprechauns on the (Google images) way in. Open daily from 11am. $$ Hudson’s Taphouse 401 21st St. East, 306-974-0944; hudsonstaphouse.com. Just Spadina Freehouse 608 Spadina Cres. 651-2255; flintsaloon.com. Martinis and finger foods. Open daily from 4pm. $$$

101 C 20t h S t . West 306 954 3355

A cocktail that pays tribute to local products! Spray a chilled martini glass with a couple shots of LB Absinthe Bettah Bitters. Poor 1 oz Lucky Bastard Vodka and 2oz Living Sky Apple wine into a shaker full of ice and shake! Pour into a martini glass and top of with—this is my favourite part of the drink—some “Lonesome Ewe” craft beer from Saskatoon Brewery! It should come out a fairly dark, grass-like green!

Writer’s Tears Irish Whiskey (IAM $79 for 700ml, $8.50 for 50ml mini/ Rook & Raven) It’s a real treat to find a true, small-batch Irish whiskey here in Toon town… seriously smooth and wonderfully Irish.

2nd Avenue Bar & Grill 123 2nd Ave. The Hub 101 Pacific Ave., 306-986-5000.

Flint Saloon 259 2nd Ave. South, 306-

LEAPING LAMB

Happy March! Slainte! East, 306-668-1000; thefreehouse.com. Always buzzing with live music and good convo. Open Mon–Sat from 11am. $$

Winston’s English Pub 243 21st St.

East, 306-374-7468; winstonspub.ca. The most beers on tap in town and Old World charm. Open daily from 11am. $$

The Woods Ale House 148 2nd Ave.

North, 306-652-5883; woodsalehouse. com. Craft beers from Paddock Wood, plus food and music. Open Mon–Thu 11am–midnight, Fri–Sat 11am–2am. $$

The Yard & Flagon 718 Broadway Ave., 306-653-8883; yardandflagon.ca. The go-to spot on Broadway for a pint and a burger. Open daily from 11am. $$

@riversdaledeli

NEWLY OPENED Asian Hut 320 Ave. C South, 306-

954-0188. Open Mon–Fri 11am–2pm, 5–9pm, Sat–Sun 11am–9pm. $ Citizen Cafe & Bakery 18 23rd St. East, 306-343-1043. Open Mon–Fri 7am– 5pm, Sat 10am–4pm. $$ Habesha Ethiopian Restaurant 255 3rd Ave. South, 306-954-3009. $$ Little Bird Patisserie 258 Ave. B South, 306384-4663. Open Tue–Sun 10am–5pm. $$ The Local Coffee Bar 167 3rd Ave. South, 306-955-2101. Open Mon–Thu 7am–7pm, Fri–Sat 7am–10pm. $$ New Fuhao Restaurant 313 20th St. West, 306-954-2888. Open daily 11am–9pm. $

@yxedeli

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food+drink CAFÉS & DINERS Café Noir 157 2nd Ave. North, 306-249-2554; on

Facebook. Refreshingly cheery and prompt service. Good nibbles too. Open Mon–Sat 7am–5pm. $

Christie’s Il Secondo 802C Broadway Ave., 306-3840506; on Facebook: Christies-Il-Secondo. Sit by the windows and tuck into pizza or panini while watching the world go by. Open Tue–Sat 10am–8pm. $$

CHINESE

Genesis 901 22nd St. West, 306-244-5516

Find your way to this spot in a tiny strip mall and have at the crab Rangoon, succulent lemon chicken and more. Open Mon–Sat 11am–9pm. $$ Jin Jin Dumpling Cuisine 416 20th St. West, 306-2441891. Try the dumplings (pan-fried and steamed) and items on the menu circled in blue pen. Open Mon– Thu 9:30am–10:30pm, Fri–Sun 9:30am–11:30pm. $

City Perks 801 7th Ave. North, 306-664-2060; cityperks. Lin’s Kitchen 316 Ave. C South, 306-244-1330.

ca. Tastefully lit, great coffee and a top spot for weekend brunch. Open Mon–Fri 7:30am–6pm, Sat–Sun 10am–6pm. $

Collective Coffee 220B 20th St. West; collectivecoffee.

Szechuan and Hunanese cooking; several daily specials on the wipe board. Lunches for under $10. Open daily 10:30am–3pm, 5–10:30pm. $

Mandarin Restaurant 245 20th St. West, 306-244-

1818. One of the city’s tried-and-true places for dim sum. Order ahead for their Peking Duck or spring for fresh seafood. Open Thu–Tue 11am–8pm. $$ Szechuan Kitchen 835 Broadway Ave., 306-664d’Lish by Tish Café 702A 14th St. East, 306-6528668; szechuankitchen.ca. A busy eatery with daily 5483; on Facebook: livingdlish. A sublime hideaway in specials and worth a visit if in the Broadway area. Open the Broadway district with its cozy nooks and deliciously Sun–Thu 11am–9:30pm, Fri–Sat 11am–10:30pm. $$ fresh food. Open daily 8am–10pm. $ Taste Legend 423 20th St. West, 306-665-3388. Museo Coffee Two locations: 950 Spadina Cres. East; Some of the city’s most authentic old-world Szechuan 730A Broadway Ave., 306-651-3933; museocoffee. and Cantonese cuisine. Noodles made fresh daily. com. European styling and service in the Mendel Art Open Thu–Tue 11am–9pm. $ Gallery and on Broadway. Open daily 8am–6pm. $ Tsui King Lao 208 Ave. H North, 306-665-8866. com. Inside the 220 co-work space, it’s the place to see and be seen in Riversdale. Open Mon–Thu 8am–6pm, Fri–Sat 8am–10pm, Sun 10am–6pm. $

Mystic Java Two locations: 128 4th Ave. South,

Seafood and hot pot selections, plus Peking Duck, 306-954-2404; 3929 8th St. East, 306-374-5282. Dark, spicy ginger beef and vegetarian mains. Open Tue–Sat woodsy space with loose-leaf teas desserts and music. 11am–9:30pm, Sun 11am–9pm. $ Open Mon–Sat 8am–11pm, Sun 8am–6pm. $ Yip Hong’s Dim Sum 1501 8th St. East, 306-956-3375.

GLOBAL Afghan Kabob & Donair 3-100 2nd Ave. South, 306-4772255. The full menus is worth a sit-down meal, though the kebabs are always nice. Open Mon–Sat 11am–10pm. $

Bon Temps Café 223 2nd Ave. South, 306-242-6617. Seafood creole, chicken and sausage Jambalaya, BBQ shrimp and mash, plus the aptly named Big Messy. Open daily 11am–9pm. $$

Cesar’s Cakes & Cafe 11-3000 Diefenbaker Dr., 306-

244-1188. Filipino arroz caldo (chicken soup with rice), kare kare (peanut stew with beef) and more at this unassuming spot. Open Tue–Sat 8am–8pm, Sun 8am–5pm. $

Konga Café 204 Ave. H North, 306-244-7867;

kongacafe.com. The place to go for classic Jamaican jerk chicken or banana fritters. Open Tue–Sat 11am– 9pm, Fri–Sat 11am–11pm. $

Lebanese Kitchen 1206 Emerson Ave., 306-242-

8892. Fast and friendly service, great kebabs, falafels, hummus, tabbouleh and more. Open Mon–Sat 11am–9pm. $

Mardi Gras Grill 239 Idylwyld Dr. South, 306-382-

1795; on Facebook: mardigrasgrillrestaurant. Cajun and creole po’ boys (gator!), seafood etouffé and more. Open Tue–Wed noon–9pm, Thu–Sun 11am–10pm. $$

Saba’s African Cuisine 901 22nd St. West, 306-933-

4447. Use the bread, called injera, and with your hands scoop up spicy servings of delicious Ethiopian/ Eritrean food. Open Tue–Sun 4:30–10:30pm. $$

Wanuskewin Restaurant Wanuskewin Heritage Park, 306-931-6767; wanuskewin.com. Enjoy the

Park Café 512 20th St. West, 306-652-6781; parkcafe.ca. Arrive early on weekends to avoid the lineups for their dim surroundings and “First Nations cuisine with a modern As classic a diner experience as it gets. Open daily 8am–4pm. $

sum, which is the best in town. Open Fri–Wed 11am– 9:30pm, Fri–Sat 11am–10:30pm, Sun 10am–9pm. $$

flair.” Open daily 9am–4:30pm, holidays 11am–4:30pm. $

Downtown Saskatoon Style

100% Non Smoking • Free High Speed Internet • Business Centre Meeting and Event Space • Heated Indoor Parkade • Pool & Fitness Centre The Hub Café • The Hub Restaurant & Lounge

101 Pacifc Avenue – Saskatoon 306.986.5000 1.800.HOLIDAY (465.4329)

www.holidayinn.com 24 f low MARCH 2014


Key: $ - meals under $15; $$ - $15–30; $$$ - over $30

BRAZILIAN

FINE/FUSION DINING

Saboroso Brazilian Steakhouse 40-2600 8th St. East, Ayden Kitchen & Bar 265 3rd Ave. South, 306-954-

306-249-4454; saboroso.ca. Traditional beef, chicken, 2950. Former Top Chef Canada winner Dale MacKay pineapple and more on the rodizio. Open Mon–Thu opens his latest upscale creation. Open Mon–Fri 11:30am from 4:30pm, Fri–Sat from 4pm, Sun 10:30am–2pm. $$ –3:30pm, 5:30–11pm, Sat 5:30–11pm. $$$ Bliss Fine Food 1002 Broadway Ave., 306-477-2077 blissfinefood.com. Appetizers, salads and mains with a touch SE ASIAN Ding Dong 105 21st St. East, 306-664-2232. Cheap of elegance. Open Tue–Sat 11am–2pm and from 5pm. $$$ and authentic pan-Asian cuisine at this friendly spot in The Hollows 334 Ave. C South, 306-652-1505; thehollows.ca. An eclectic eatery presenting local the Canada Building. Open Mon–Sat 11am–8pm. $ Golden Pagoda 411 2nd Ave. North, 306-668-9114; foods in novel ways. Open Wed–Thu 3–10pm, Fri–Sat 11am–3pm, 5–11pm, Sun 11am–2pm. $$$ goldenpagoda.ca. While the green tea salad is truly The Ivy Dining & Lounge 301 Ontario Ave., 306-384unique, the coconut chicken soup is what to order. 4444; ivydiningandlounge.com. Upscale dining and service Open Mon–Fri 11am–2pm, Mon–Sat 5–9pm. $$ to match. Open Mon–Fri 11am–2pm, 4–11pm; Sat 4pm– Keo’s 1013 Broadway Ave., 306-652-2533. Lao, Thai midnight; Sun 5–9pm. $$$ and Cambodian mainstays in one locale. Open Sun– John’s Victorian Steakhouse 2033 Ave. B North, Mon 4:30–10pm, Tue–Sat 11am–2pm, 4:30–9pm. $$ 306-664-2313; johnsvictorian.com. Found in the city’s Lien Thanh 311 Ave. A South, 306-933-4299. A north end, this spot attracts the well-heeled. Open charming old couple serve up homecooked meals at Mon–Sat 4:30–9:30pm. $$$ this hole in the wall. Open Tue–Sat 11am–9pm. $ Leyda’s 112 20th St. West, 306-244-0707; on Facebook: Royal Thai 2-325 3rd Ave. North, 306-244-8424; leydas. Gluten- and nut-free “experiential” cooking. come.to/RoyalThai. Great Thai curries, noodle dishes Flowing, open kitchen design. Health-positive choices and beyond. Open Mon–Sat 11am–9pm, Sun 4–9pm. $ on their simple menu. Open Tue–Sat 11am–10pm. $$ Saskatoon Asian 136 2nd Ave. South, 306-665Prairie Harvest Café 2917 Early Dr., 306-242-2928; 5959. Pan-Asian cuisine in a sunny upstairs dining room. prairieharvestcafe.com. Recently ranked among the top Open Mon-Sat 11am–2:30pm, 4:30–9pm. $$ 100 restaurants in Canada. Open Tue–Thu 11am–9pm, Fri–Sat 11am–10pm. $$ Sawadee Bistro 101-129 2nd Ave. North, 306-6525367. Spice to take your breath away. Open Tue–Fri Rembrandt’s Steakhouse 243 21st St. East, 306-244 11:30am–2:30pm, 4:30–9:30pm, Sat 11:30am–9pm. $$ 8555; rembrandts.ca. Edwardian décor, attentive Spicy Garden 1501 8th St. East, 306-373-8585; service, great steaks and the city’s deepest wine list. spicygarden.ca. Top eats in this busy strip mall. Open Open Mon–Thu 7am–11pm, Fri 7am–midnight, Sun, Tue–Thu 11am–8pm, Fri–Sat 11am–9pm. $ Sat 8am–midnight, Sun 10am–2pm. $$$

JAPANESE, KOREAN Fuzion Sushi & Deli 2-100 2nd Ave. South, 306-244-

2005. Various types of sushi rolls, rice and noodle bowls, plus bubble tea. Open Mon–Sat 10:30am–9pm. $

Go for Sushi 2105 8th St. East, 306-931-8898.

All-you-can-eat sushi on the east side (next to Doug’s Spoke ‘n’ Sport). Open daily 11am–10pm. $

Nisen 240 22nd St. East, 306-653-8188. All-you-can-eat sushi in the city centre. Open Tue–Sun 11am–9:30pm. $

Otowa 227 2nd Ave. South, 306-651-3888. Lunch specials for under $12 such as sukiyaki beef and teriyaki salmon. Open Mon–Sat 11am–9pm. $$

Samurai 601 Spadina Cres. East, 306-683-6926. True Japanese teppan yaki—with all the fire and flair (in the Delta Bessborough Hotel). Open daily 5–10pm. $$$

Sushiro 737B 10th St. East, 306-665-5557; sushiro.

com. Broadway’s best sushi and eclectic Japanese fare. Reservations a must. Open Mon–Sat 5pm–midnight. $$$

Seoul 334 20th St. West, 306-652-2310; seoulsaskatoon.

com. Use the iPad menus to order kimchee, bibimbap and table-top barbecued meats. Open Mon–Sat 11am–9pm. $$

MEXICAN/LATIN AM. EE Burritos 102 Ave. P South, 306-343-6264; eeburritos. com. Friday night salsa dance parties and El Salvadorean food as featured on The Food Network. Open Mon–Thu 10am–9pm, Fri 10am–2:30am, Sat 11am–9pm. $$

Las Palapas Resort Grill 901 Victoria Ave., 306-

244-5556; laspalapas.ca. Go for the food, return for the fun in this buzzing eatery and lounge. Open daily 11am–11pm. $$

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food+drink

Text and photos by Lynette Suchar

Food Cravings | Filipino Food With one bite if often seems I travel around the world and through time. That’s how I felt after my first experience with Filipino food I visited two Saskatoon locations this past month—Cesar’s Cakes and Café (11–3000 Diefenbaker Drive) and Lasa Restaurant and Lounge (3027 Millar Avenue) to educate my tastebuds on this very surprising and rewarding cuisine. The most pleasant surprise for me was the significant Spanish influence in the language and the dishes. At Cesar’s the menu is full of dishes that are now personal favourites, such as pan de coco (coconut bread) and leche flan (custard dessert with caramel). And I shouldn’t forget adobo, one of the most popular Filipino treats: the meat, usually chicken or pork, is marinated in vinegar, soy sauce and spices before cooking. Delicious! Paella and fruit salsa are two other items commonly seen on Filipino menus. The mango salsa that accompanied my Tilapia fish at Lasa (which means “flavour” in Tagalog) took me right back to the beach in Mexico. Nearly 500 years since Magellan, Filipino food seems naturally woven together with a sultry Spanish flare. Spain isn’t the only country to positively contribute to the hotpot of flavours in Filipino food. You can taste Chinese, Vietnamese and American touches as well. Lumpia, spring rolls, are on the menu at both restaurant. These morsels of meat, shredded carrot, cabbage and green onion are delicious, especially when dipped in the sweet and spicy chili sauce at Cesar’s. Pancit, or stir-fried noodles, and fried rice are also two standard sides that

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accompany many Filipino meals. Speaking of rice, you must love the stuff to truly enjoy a Filipino meal. Rice is eaten for breakfast, lunch and supper. White, stir-fried or soy sauce-laden, rice takes up half of the plate with most entrees. Another Filipino staple is meat. Vegetarians will find few options on the menu at either restaurant I visited as meat is served at all meals. If you’re a breakfast lover like me, Lasa serves their traditional Filipino silog breakfast dishes of rice, eggs and meat all day. My lunch companion at Lasa had tapsilog: marinated beef slices over garlic-fried rice, topped with a fried egg. It’s comfort food at its best on a blizzardy afternoon. Other dishes of note are longsilog (marinated sausages) and tosilog (marinated pork), served as above. There’s a delicious vegetable dish at Cesar’s called pinakbet, made with traditionally stewed vegetables including okra, bitter melon, eggplant, squash and green beans, all cooked in shrimp paste. I love the very Asian mix of sweet, salty, sour, bitter and spicy flavours in this dish! The heavy meat-and-rice dishes of Filipino cooking might not be for everyone but the desserts certainly are. As a coconut lover I lucked out. Besides the flan (who doesn’t love eggs, cream and sugar blended together?), I also delighted in the traditional Christmas dessert, kutsinta, made with rice flour, sugar and lye water—which helps break down the

fibres to create a jelly-like consistency—sprinkled with coconut. It’s a little bit of heaven. Cesar’s makes this and a huge selection of other Filipino desserts, breads and pastries. Another dessert that both restaurants offer is halo-halo. I had something almost identical at a Korean restaurant in the city—more cultural

crossover. This traditional dessert of crushed ice, jackfruit, tapioca, coconut, sweetened condensed milk, beans and ice cream is best saved for a warm summer day. The evolution of food in the Philippines has created a multicultural cuisine that remains uniquely Filipino. Mabuting gana! (“Bon appetit!”)


Key: $ - meals under $15; $$ - $15–30; $$$ - over $30

EUROPEAN Aroma 405 20th St. East (Radisson Hotel), 306-667-

2358. Wood oven-fired pizzas, steaks and Mediterraneaninspired dishes, with vegan and gluten-free menu options. Open daily 6:30am–2pm and 4:30–10pm. $$

Grill

Congress Beer House 215 2nd Ave. South, 306-

974-6717; on Facebook: Congress-Beer-House. Chef Cole Dobranski knows how to impress. Good beer selections too. Open daily 11am–2am. $$

David’s Restaurant 294 Venture Cres., 306-664-1133.

Hearty? Try the Kasseler Rippenspeer (smoked pork loin) or the German platter (consisting of spatzle, bratwurst, pork schnitzel, red cabbage and sauerkraut). Open daily 6am–2pm, 5–8pm. $$

Duck Duck Goose Tapas Bar 616 10th St. East, 306-

649-3825; duckduckgoosetapas.com. The only place in town to get Spanish tapas. And some smashing cocktails. Open Mon–Fri 4pm–midnight, Sat 11am–midnight. $$

Mediterranno 119 3rd Ave. South, 306-244-4777;

mediterranno.com. Beautifully restored restaurant in the 100-year-old Drinkle Building offering two-for-one pizzas Thursday nights, plus superb Greek and French mains. Open Mon–Thu 11am–9pm; Fri 11am–10pm; Sat 4–10pm. $$

DELICIOUSLY

AUTHENTIC CAJUN

&

CREOLE CUISINE

239 Idywyld Dr. South, 306.382.1795 Tuesday–Wednesday 12pm-9pm Thursday–Saturday 12pm-10pm mardigrasgrillrestaurant

Elegant Personal Catering & cakes for any sized group.

Fresh Local

Specialty Saskatoon Berry themes available.

Truffles Bistro 230 21st St. East, 306-373-7779;

trufflesbistro.ca. Parisian charm, superb brunches and a three-course Table d’hôte at one of the city’s most beloved eateries. Open Mon–Fri 11:30am–3pm; Mon–Sat from 5pm; Sat 10am–2:30pm, Sun 10:30am–2pm. $$$

ITALIAN Bottega Trattoria 110 2nd Ave. North, 306-954-2932; on

Facebook: BottegaTrattoria. Master Chef Amedeo Vallati presents authentic Italian dining using fresh, simple ingredients. Open Mon–Sat 11am–11pm; Sun 11am–9pm. $$

Contact Grace Whittington or Heather Bekar for a consultation

riverbendcatering@hotmail.ca Facebook/RiverbendPlantationMarketCafe Twitter@riverbendcafe

Saskatoon Farmers’ Market 414 Ave B South 306 975 2010

Il Salici Ristorante 382 Cartwright St., 306-956-1100;

willowsgolf.com. Rustic Italian fare in a delightful setting at the Willow’s Golf Course. Open Mon–Sat 11am–2pm, 5–10pm, Sun 10am–2pm. $$

Taverna 219 21st St. East, 306-652-6366. A staple for

Italian dining in the city centre for decades, Taverna offers a taste of Italy with daily specials on the wipeboard. Open Mon–Fri 11am–10pm, Sat–Sun 5–10pm. $$

Two Gun Quiche House 35 20th St. West, 306-380-5209;

on Facebook: Two-Gun-Quiche-House. The story behind the name rivals Chef Bill Mathews’ food. Try the quiche with house-made Italian pork sausage and roasted peppers. Open Tue–Sat 8am–5pm. $

SOUTH ASIAN Black Pepper 5-1501 8th St. East, 306-244-6777; on

Facebook: Black-Pepper-Restaurant. A great place for curry or vegetarian eats on the city’s east side. Open Tue–Fri 11:30am–2pm, Fri–Sat 5–9pm. $

Mogul Divaan 2115 22nd St. West, 306-343-5005;

ven o a z z ed pi r fi d ches n Woo u l arian t e ials g c e e V p s rink d y l t Nigh

moguldivaan.com. This Pakistani spot has a delicious buffet made fresh daily from old family recipes. Open Tue–Sat 11:30am–10pm, Sun 11:30am–9pm. $

Passage to India 440 2nd Ave. North, 306-477-7164. Simple and satisfying Indian food (special thali!) just north of downtown. Open Mon–Sat 11am–2:30pm, 4:30–8:30pm. $$

Spicy Bite Two locations: 113 3rd Ave. South, 306-374-

4774; myspicybite.com. The city’s best Indian buffet for either lunch or supper. Open Sun–Wed 11am–10pm, Thu–Sat 11am–3am. $$

sic ) u m e v Li t (No cover

ri, Sa Wed, F

Mon - Thu 11am till 12am Fri - Sat 11am till 2am Closed Sunday 306-668-1000 608 Spadina Cres E 2014 MARCH

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7

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McKERCHER DRIVE

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U of S campus

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12TH STREET E. The Marr Residence

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10TH STREET E.

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14TH STREET E.

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The Refinery Broadway Theatre Affinity Gallery

1

C

MAIN STREET

D

8TH STREET E.

E

DUFFERIN AVENUE

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Br

Park

A

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Ukrainian Museum of Canada

Meewasin Valley Centre

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8

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10 T E.

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VICTORIA AVENUE

Outdoor skating rink*

1

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7

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Tourism Saskatoon

Br

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5 21 ST STR EE

11

Kinsmen Park

ay

3

ET E .

9

Remai Arts Centre

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9 Mendel Art Gallery

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Scotia Centre

Galaxy Cinemas

River Landing

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Frances Morrison Library

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1

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Traffic Bridge

F

Midtown Plaza

Sen. Sid Buckwold Bridge

19TH STREET W. Saskatoon Farmers’ Market

2

9

7

Third Avenue Centre

City Hall

8

CLARENCE AVENUE

E

6

STC Bus Depot www.stcbus.com Downtown 2 3 RD bus terminal STR EET E.

TCU YMCA Place

AVENUE A S.

aka gallery Roxy Theatre 20TH STREET W.

7

5

6*

IDYLWYLD DRIVE

AVENUE C S.

AVENUE E S.

D

6

2 5 TH

4

The Willows Dakota Dunes Casino (20 min. south)

J

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oa Br

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5

4

3

BOULEVARD

9

I

DRIVE BOYCHUK

3

22ND STREET W.

H

Lakewood Civic Centre

Hwy 11

4

AVENUE B N.

AVENUE D N.

B

Market Mall

CIRCLE DRIVE

24TH STREET W.

2

G

CIRCLE DRIVE

Beaver Creek Conservation Area (10 min. south)

y

5

Wildwood The Centre Park at Circle & 8th

ACADIA DRIVE KINGSMERE

map

Hw

Stonebridge

3

2

AVENUE

1

STREET 3 MAIN 8TH STREET E.

RUTH STREET Prairieland So Dri uth ve Circ Park Western Bri le dg Development e Museum

F

115 STREET

14TH STREET

TAYLOR STREET

Erindale Centre

TH

Saskatoon Field House

Griffiths Stadium

ARLINGTON

2

map 2 map 3

E

COLLEGE DRIVE

PRESTON AVENUE

#23 Montgomery/ Hampton Village #60 Confederation/ Lakeridge #2 8th Street/ Meadowgreen #17 Market Mall/Lorne Ave. Stonebridge/Clarence Ave. #70 Lawson Heights/ Silverspring #12 Airport/Downtown Adult one-way fare: $3 Click & Go bus info: http://ww9.saskatoon.ca:83

1

A

T STREE DIEPPE VIA Rail passenger Holiday terminal www.viarail.ca Park

ATTRIDGE DRIVE SaskTel Soccer Centre

University of Saskatchewan

H

Hwy 219

L

Key city bus routes

Forestry Farm Park

Preston Landing

C

D

Circle Drive Bridge

CUMBERLAND AVENUE

K

11TH STREET W.

The Mall at Lawson Heights

CLARENCE AVENUE

J

D

H

13

LORNE AVENUE

I

7

V RI

FAIRLIGHT

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y

H

21

6 E

AVENUE W S.

H

Shaw Centre

Comfort Cabs (306-664-6464) Radio Cabs (306-242-1221) United/BlueLine (306-652-2222)

Harry Bailey Aquatic The Weir Centre

12

18 22ND STREET W.

Taxi companies E RIV ED OR Lawson N E L Civic Centre PINEH OUSE DRIVE

1 CIRCLE DRIVE

14 29TH STREET

AVENUE H S.

1

33RD STREET

B

McORMOND DRIVE

IV

Hwy 14

E

N

KENDERDINE ROAD

Confederation Mall

E

DR

DIEFENBAKER

L RC CI

IV

19 2

Silverwood Park

CENTRAL AVENUE

F

DR

AVENUE P N.

CONFEDERATION DRIVE E

City leisure facilities online at Saskatoon.ca

8 IDYLWYLD DRIVE

10

Leisure facilities

G

16

QUEBEC AVENUE

Hospitals

4

7 15 20 AVENUE C N.

E

H

CLAYPOOL DRIVE

13 A

LOWE ROAD

Fuel stations

AIRPORT DRIVE

Flight arrival/departure information: www.yxe.ca/flights

Information

51ST STREET

WA R

Commercial area

i

FAITHFULL AVENUE

Transportation hubs D

12

ER SI

Saskatoon John G. Diefenbaker International Airport (YXE)

Points of interest

C

11

IV

60TH STREET

Theatres/concert venues Museums/galleries

10

W

16

ER CH AT TH

9

Wanuskewin Heritage Park (5 min. north)

S. S HITESWAN ask atch DRIVE ewa n Ri ver

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5 Credit Union Centre AVENUE

Shopping centres

B

6 11

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Hwy 11, 12

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00 Accommodations (citywide) 1. Best Western Blairmore

(H2; 306 Shillington Cres., 306-242-2299)

2. Best Western Harvest Inn

(E6; 1715 Idylwyld Dr. North, 306-244-5552)

3. Colonial Square Inn & Suites

(I8; 1-1301 8th St. East, 306-343-1676)

4. Comfort Inn

(D7; 2155 Northridge Dr., 306-934-1122)

Specializing in lunches & treats for the gluten-free, the vegetarian & the vegan

5. Comfort Suites Saskatoon

(A5; 203 Bill Hunter Ave. 306-955-6565)

6. Confederation Inn

Soups, sandwiches, desserts & baked goods made from the freshest of ingredients Gift certificates now available

(H3; 3330 Fairlight Dr., 306-384-2882)

7. Country Inn & Suites

(D6; 617 Cynthia St., 306-934-3900)

8. Days Inn Saskatoon

(E7; 2000 Idylwyld Dr. North, 306-242-3297)

10-3311 8th St. E

Mon-Sat 10am-7pm

306-933-3385

www.thegriffintakeaway.com

9. Four Points Sheraton Hotel

(K8; 103 Stonebridge Blvd., 306-933-9889)

10. Heritage Inn

(E5; 102 Cardinal Cres., 306-665-8121)

11. Motel 6 Saskatoon (A5; 231 Marquis Dr., 306-665-6688) 12. Northgate Motor Inn

PROUDLY BREWING SINCE 2011

(G7; 706 Idylwyld Dr. North, 306-664-4414)

13. Northwoods Inn & Suites

(G7; 610 Idylwyld Dr. North, 306-244-2901)

14. Ramada Hotel

(F7; 806 Idylwyld Dr. North, 306-665-6500)

15. Sandman Hotel Saskatoon

(D6; 310 Circle Dr. West, 306-477-4844)

16. Saskatoon Inn Hotel

(E6; 2002 Airport Dr., 306-242-1440)

220 20TH STREET WEST

17. Super 8 Saskatoon

(D7; 706 Circle Dr. East, 306-384-8989)

18. Super 8 Saskatoon West

(G5; 1414 22nd St. West, 306-974-2900)

19. Thriftlodge Saskatoon

(E6; 1825 Idylwyld Dr. North, 306-244-2191)

20. Travelodge Hotel Saskatoon

(D6; 106 Circle Dr. West, 306-242-8881)

21. Westgate Motor Inn

(H5; 2501 22nd St. West, 306-382-3722)

00 Accommodations (central) 1. Delta Bessborough Hotel

(E6; 601 Spadina Cres. East, 306-244-5521)

2. Hilton Garden Inn

(C4; 90 22nd St. East, 306-244-2311)

3. Holiday Inn Saskatoon

(C3; 101 Pacific Ave., 306-986-5000)

4. Holiday Inn Express

(D4; 315 Idylwyld Dr. North, 306-384-8844)

NEW STUDENTS GET ONE MONTH OF UNLIMITED YOGA FOR

$50

5. The James Hotel

(E7; 620 Spadina Cres. East, 306-244-6446)

6. Obasa Suites* (3 locations)

(map 2: B4, B6; map 3: B2; Obasasuites.com)

7. Park Town Hotel

(B7; 924 Spadina Cres. East, 1-800-667-3999)

8. Radisson Hotel Saskatoon

(E5; 405 20th St. East, 306-665-3322)

9. Hotel Senator

(D4; 243 21st St. East, 306-244-6141)

10. Sheraton Cavalier Hotel

(D5; 612 Spadina Cres. East, 306-652-6770)

4 - 527 Main St | 306 612 2121 | saskatoon@oneyoga.ca | oneyoga.ca

2014 MARCH

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secret Saskatoon

UK-based artist Tony Stallard’s neon artwork “Land of Berries” on the side of the Remai Arts Centre.

‘Land of Berries’ If you are not much of a theatre goer chances are you have not yet seen a glowing new piece of public art on the north side of Persephone Theatre on Spadina Crescent. The Cree syllabics in this neon art say, “Land of Berries” or, as we know it today, “Saskatoon”. As public art the work is unique to the city and is an affirmation of the city’s Cree heritage. “It is an effort to promote the Cree language and culture,” says Alejandro Romero, a consultant for arts and culture for the City of Saskatoon in the Community Development Department. Romero, who works with the city’s Placemaker Program, says the city is “moving away from ‘rusted metals’, stone and bronze in public art, and (towards) diversity of artists and subject matter.” Placemaker, which has been around for 20 years as part of the city’s Urban Design

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Department, is designed to add decorative notes to Saskatoon in the “BID” (Business Improvement District) areas—downtown, Riversdale and Broadway –and was expanded in 2013 to three new ones. As regards “Land of Berries”, in early 2013 a public call went out for art submissions that considered this new emphasis on diversity. Tony Stallard, large-scale neon light artist from the UK, was one of the first artists to answer the call. When he got the go-ahead he partnered with local Aboriginal arts collective “Tribe” and asked them to suggest three local artists with whom he might work on a project for Saskatoon. They were Joey Arcand (a contemporary artist), Joseph Naytowhow (a writer and storyteller) and Kenneth T. Williams (a playwright). “We thrashed out ideas for about three days,” Stallard said by email of their collaboration, “and it soon become apparent we wanted to use

Text by Lisa Patrick Photo by Liz Hartman

the Cree language in a contemporary format. It seemed natural to go one stage further and actually use phonetics, which in this case were referencing the original name for Saskatoon. “We wanted to bring this very old and ancient name back into use,” Stallard said, “and with the use of neon this allowed a striking counterpoint with the old and the new. It also brought into the equation a political note regarding land appropriation and Canada’s long history with First Nations and this sometimes sticky relationship.” “We need to start peeling the layers off of people’s perceptions of this city,” says Romero, adding that he hopes the art will start some interesting conversations about the Aboriginal presence in the city—a presence which dates back thousands of years. The artwork will remain in place for three years, until November 2016.


ry 22

pm & 7:30 pm

Official Media Sponsor presented by

Music is GREAT Britain

Family Series

Saturday, March 8 TCU Place • 7:30 pm

Music and fun— with kids as the stars

Cla

Instrument petting zoo, musical toy building, more!

Saskatoon Chamber Singers U of S Greystone Singers University Chorus Monica Huisman soprano Peter McGillivray baritone Maestro Victor Sawa conductor Vaughan Williams A Sea Symphony Britten Four Seas Interludes Becker Overture

AN ORCHESTRAL TOY STORY

ies! om the mov ssic music fr

Costume contest!

Special performance by Trevor Wingerter

Saturday, March 15 TCU Place • 7:30 pm

Kevin Chen & Brandon Johnson, violin Persephone School of Theatre students Saskatoon Youth Orchestra members Richard Carnegie, conductor/narrator

Saturday, March 22

2:30 pm Boomtown, Western Development Museum

SaskatoonSymphony.org

Celebrating our 10 th anniversary 2003-2013

230 21st St. East, Saskatoon

306 373 7779

www.truf flesbistro.ca

2014 MARCH

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Call us today to get started!

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Ph: 306 931 1700 Fax: 306 986 1335 Toll-Free 1-877-99-OBASA (62272)


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