Page 1

    1ST  INTERNATIONAL  MEETING   FOR  CHAMBER  MUSIC     1.°  Encontro  Internacional   para  Música  de  Câmara           16  —  18  January  2012   Music  Department   University  of  Évora,  Portugal      

   

Unidade de  Investigação  em  

Conference affiliated  to  the  

Música e  Musicologia  (UnIMeM)  

Royal Music  Association  

   


1ST INTERNATIONAL  MEETING   FOR  CHAMBER  MUSIC         16  —  18  January  2012   Unidade  de  Investigação  em  Música  e  Musicologia  -­‐  UnIMeM   University  of  Évora,  Portugal                   Zoltan  Paulinyi  (organizer)       Title:  1st  International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   3rd  Edition,  June  1,  2012.   Edited  by  Zoltan  Paulinyi  (organizer).   ISBN:  978-­‐989-­‐97780-­‐0-­‐9     EXPEDIENT   Director  of  the  Music  Department  of  the  University  of  Évora   Dr  Christopher  Bochmann     Director  of  UnIMeM  of  the  University  of  Évora   Dr  Benoît  Gibson   2  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Table of  Contents   ABOUT  THE  MEETING  FOR  CHAMBER  MUSIC   ZOLTAN  PAULINYI  (UNIMEM,  PORTUGAL;  OSTNCS,  BRASIL)  .............................................................................................  7   SOBRE  O  ENCONTRO  DE  MÚSICA  DE  CÂMARA   ZOLTAN  PAULINYI  (UNIMEM,  PORTUGAL;  OSTNCS,  BRASIL)  .............................................................................................  8   TIMETABLE  .................................................................................................................................................................  7   ABOUT  THE  COMPOSERS  /  SOBRE  OS  COMPOSITORES  ..............................................................................  12   COLLECTIVE  DOCUMENT:  FURTHER  ACTIONS  AFTER  THE  MEETING  ..................................................  17   SOBRE  OS  INTÉRPRETES  /  ABOUT  THE  PERFORMERS  ...............................................................................  19   ESTUDO,  PARA  QUARTETO  DE  CLARINETES:  MANIPULAÇÃO  DE  IMAGENS  ACÚSTICAS  POR  MEIO   DE  IMAGENS  VISUAIS   ALEXANDRE  FICAGNA  (UEL/UNICAMP,  BRASIL)  ..................................................................................................................  28   ASPECTOS  ANALÍTICOS  TEXTURAIS  DA  PEÇA  INTERDEPENDÊNCIAS  PARA  QUARTETO  DE   CLARINETAS   J.  ORLANDO  ALVES  (UNIVERSIDADE  FEDERAL  DA  PARAÍBA  –  UFPB,  BRASIL)  ...............................................................  44   O  USO  DE  METÁFORAS  E  ELEMENTOS  POLI-­‐ESTILÍSTICOS  EM  “VEM  DOS  QUATRO  VENTOS  -­‐  EZ.   37:9”,  PARA  QUARTETO  DE  CLARINETAS.   DR.  MARCOS  VIEIRA  LUCAS  (UNIVERSIDADE  FEDERAL  DO  ESTADO  DO  RIO  DE  JANEIRO  -­‐  UNIRIO,  BRASIL)  .........  48   MENSAGENS  PARA  O  PASSADO:  “V  MHLÁCH...  1912”   SÉRGIO  AZEVEDO  (ESML  –  PORTUGAL)  .................................................................................................................................  56   COMPOSITION-­‐AS-­‐RESEARCH:  CONNECTING  FLIGHTS  II  FOR  CLARINET  QUARTET  –  A  RESEARCH   DISSEMINATION  METHODOLOGY  FOR  COMPOSERS   DR  MARTIN  BLAIN  (MANCHESTER  METROPOLITAN  UNIVERSITY,  ENGLAND)  ...............................................................  68   WAYANG  KULIT  EMPAT  (SHADOW  PUPPET  NO.4)   AINOLNAIM  (MALAYSIA/  UK)  ...................................................................................................................................................  89  

3

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Delegates from   left   to   right:   Zoltan   Paulinyi,   Marcos   Lucas,   Alexandre   Ficagna,   [   ],   Ainol   Naim,   Pedro   Francisco,   Martin   Blain,   Sandra   Ochoa,   Daniel   Monteiro,   Ana   Margarida,   Ana   Botelho,   Hélia  Varanda,  Diana  Sousa.                                           Volume  edited  by  Zoltan  Paulinyi  for  UnIMeM,  2012.   Score   at   cover   page:   Christopher   Bochmann's   Dialogue   III   for   violin   and   bassoon   dedicated   to   Duo  SPES.  

4

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Useful contacts  in  Évora     International  telephone  code:  +351  for  Portugal.     Hospital  do  Espírito  Santo.  Address:  Largo  Senhor  da  Pobreza     Phone:  266  740  100   http://www.hevora.min-­‐saude.pt/   sec.ca@hevora.min-­‐saude.pt     Police  at  Rua  Francisco  S.  Lusitano  Telefone:  266  702  022     University  of  Évora:  Music  Department.  Phone  +351.266760260   http://www.uevora.pt/conhecer/unidades_organicas/escolas/escola_de_artes/departa mento_de_musica   Unimem:  http://www.unimem.uevora.pt/     Taxi:  266  734  734     Tourism  Office  at  Praça  do  Giraldo,  73.  Phone:  266  777  071   http://www2.cm-­‐evora.pt/guiaturistico/results_utilidades.asp    

5

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


How to  arrive  in  Évora   From   the   Lisbon   Airport,   take   a   taxi   to   the   bus   station   "Estação   7   Rios"   (about   €8   on   weekdays,  the  double  on  weekends).  The  buses  go  hourly  to  Évora  until  10  pm.  The  journey  is   less  than  2  hours  long.  Even  a  direct  bus  may  collect  passengers  in  a  city  before  Évora.  One   can  buy  bus  tickets  in  advance  at  http://www.rede-­‐expressos.pt/default.aspx  .  In  Portugal,  be   prepared  to  pay  most  of  the  bills  in  cash.   There   is   a   train   service   to   Évora   four   times   a   day   also   from   "7   Rios"   station   in   Lisbon.   The  train  station  entrance  is  opposite  to  the  bus  station.  The  journey,  by  train,  takes  about  one   hour   and   half.   Please,   check   the   timetable   and   pricing   at   http://www.cp.pt   .   Document   directly  available  at:   <http://www.cp.pt/StaticFiles/CP/Imagens/PDF/Passageiros/horarios/regional/lisboa _evora_beja_funcheira.pdf>   In   case   one   rents   a   car,  please  take  A2  and  A6  from  Lisbon  do  Évora  (route  with  tolls,   about  130  Km).  Avoid  the  slow  and  unsecure  toll  free  National  roads,  especially  on  rainy  days.   Free   parking   is   outside   the   city   walls.   During   the   day,   it   is   difficult   to   find   parking   near   the   University.   Évora   has   a   small   city   centre   inside   the   walls,   which   contains   most   of   the   University  Departments:  one  can  cross  the  city  within  20  minutes  walking.     The  Music  Department  of  University  of  Évora  is  located  at  Rua  do  Raimundo:   http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=211156329066085900876.0004b26aa0c8b1f 1f4a58&msa=0&ll=38.568066,-­‐7.911766&spn=0.008003,0.016501   There  are  many  hotels  in  Évora.  The  IBIS  Évora,  for  example,  is  a  standard  touristic  one,   quite  near  both  to  the  bus  station  and  to  the  Music  Department.  http://www.ibishotel.com/   The  IBIS  is  within  a  walking  distance  from  the  Bus  Station.  Taxi  costs  about  €5  in  Évora,   from  each  station.  There  are  many  other  hotels  nearby  the  Music  Department,  for  all  budgets.  

6

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


About the  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music     Zoltan  Paulinyi  (UnIMeM,  Portugal;  OSTNCS,  Brasil)  1   Paulinyi@yahoo.com, http://English.Paulinyi.com

The  "International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music"  has  two  main  objectives:  to  encourage   the   Music   Department   of   University   of   Évora   alumni   into   scientific   initiation   and   their   artistic   expansion  toward  contemporary  music;  to  promote  the  international  dialogue  among  current   composers  and  their  performers.  For  this  meeting,  the  academic  short  seminars  are  followed   by  the  concerts  presenting  the  musical  pieces  selected  by  teachers  and  students.  Because  of   the   prodigal   amount   of   international   submissions,   feasible   works   were   selected   among   the   composers  who  accepted  to  come  to  the  event.   This   meeting   inherits   the   tenacious   efforts   of   the   seven   "Violin   and   Chamber   Music   Meetings"  started  in  Brasília,  Brazil,  since  December  2007.  The  institutional  embrace  by  the   Research   Centre   in   Music   and   Musicology   ("Unidade   de   Investigação   em   Música   e   Musicologia",   UnIMeM)   of   the   University   of   Évora   enlarges   this   Meeting   by   joining   international   composers   and   more   variety   of   ensembles.   Indirectly,   this   event   is   inserted   into   the  University  winner  project  under  "Bento  de  Jesus  Caraça  Program"  2011/2012,  a  fact  that   immediately   team   up   eager   undergraduate   students   and   ensembles.   At   the   final   stage,   the   Royal   Music   Association   (RMA)   also   joined   this   event   by   promoting   it   among   its   members.   This  signalizes  an  increasing  support  to  a  bigger  Meeting  in  the  last  week  of  June  2012.   An   admired   human   fact   of   this   meeting   is   the   openhanded   endeavour   of   all   participants.   Each   one   acts   in   the   other's   benefits:   composers,   for   the   performers'   success;   performers,   teachers  and  staff,  for  the  composers  and  participants'  sake.  I  thank  the  voluntary  enrolment   of   all   participants,   especially   the   students,   the   encouragement   by   teachers   and   professors   Eduardo   Sirtori,   Dr   Christopher   Bochmann,   director   of   the   Music   Department,   Dr   Benoît   Gibson   (UnIMeM),   Dr   Ana   Telles;   the   suggestions   by   secretaries   Maria   de   Fátima,   Maria   Ana   e   Manoela   de   Barros;   and   the   RMA.   I   thank   the   spiritual   support   by   the   University   Pastoral,   whose  holy  mass  opens  this  Meeting  at  the  Holy  Spirit  Church,  seed  of  the  University  of  Évora.                                                                                                                   1  Organizer  of  this  Meeting.  Homepage  of  the  event:     <http://paulinyi.blogspot.com/2011/11/encontro-­‐internacional-­‐de-­‐musica-­‐de.html>   7  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Sobre o  Encontro  de  Música  de  Câmara   Zoltan  Paulinyi  (UnIMeM,  Portugal;  OSTNCS,  Brasil)   Paulinyi@yahoo.com, http://English.Paulinyi.com 1

O   "Encontro   Internacional   de   Música   de   Câmara"   orienta-­‐se   para   duplo   objetivo:   incentivar   a   iniciação   científica   e   expansão   artística   contemporânea   dos   alunos   do   Departamento   de   Música   da   Universidade   de   Évora;   promover   o   diálogo   internacional   de   compositores  atuais  com  seus  intérpretes.  Para  isso,  estabeleceu-­‐se  o  formato  acadêmico  de   seminários   curtos   seguidos   de   apresentações   musicais   das   obras   selecionadas   pelo   corpo   docente   e   discente.   Devido   à   generosa   quantidade   de   submissões   internacionais,   selecionaram-­‐se  obras  exequíveis  cujos  autores  se  dispuseram  a  vir  pessoalmente  ao  evento.   Este   Encontro   herda   perseverante   esforço   dos   sete   "Encontros   de   Violino   e   Música   de   Câmara"   iniciados   em   Brasília,   Brasil,   a   partir   de   dezembro   de   2007.   O   acolhimento   institucional   pela   Unidade   de   Investigação   em   Música   e   Musicologia   (UnIMeM)   da   Universidade   de   Évora   alarga   o   Encontro   na   inclusão   de   compositores   internacionais   e   na   maior   diversidade   de   grupos   de   câmara.   Indiretamente,   o   evento   insere-­‐se   no   projeto   do   vencedor   do   Programa   Bento   de   Jesus   Caraça   2011/2012   da   própria   Universidade,   fato   que   imediatamente  agrega  entusiasmados  alunos  e  grupos  de  câmara  da  graduação.  Na  fase  final   da   organização,   também   a   Royal   Music   Association   (RMA)   acolheu   o   Encontro   oferecendo   apoio   na   divulgação   entre   seus   associados.   Isto   sinaliza   apoio   crescente   para   uma   reedição   ampliada  deste  Encontro  na  última  semana  de  junho  de  2012.   Um   aspecto   humano   admirável   deste   Encontro   é   o   empenho   desprendido   de   todos   os   participantes.   Cada   um   age   em   benefício   do   próximo:   compositores,   pelo   destaque   dos   intérpretes;   intérpretes,   professores   e   organizadores,   pelo   bem   dos   compositores   e   participantes.  Agradeço  a  participação  voluntária  de  todos  os  envolvidos,  principalmente  dos   alunos,   do   incentivo   dos   professores   Eduardo   Sirtori,   Dr.   Christopher   Bochmann,   diretor   do   Departamento   de   Música,   Dr.   Benoît   Gibson   (UnIMeM),   Dra.   Ana   Telles,   das   sugestões   das   secretárias   Maria   de   Fátima,   Maria   Ana   e   Manoela   de   Barros,   e   do   RMA.   Agradeço   o   apoio   espiritual  da  Pastoral  Universitária,  cuja  santa  missa  abre  o  evento  na  Igreja  do  Espírito  Santo,   origem  da  própria  Universidade  de  Évora.                                                                                                                   1  Organizador  do  Encontro.  Homepage  do  evento:    <http://paulinyi.blogspot.com/2011/11/encontro-­‐internacional-­‐de-­‐musica-­‐de.html>   8  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


TIMETABLE   January  16,  2012,  for  opening  activities:   19:15  -­‐  Roman  Catholic  Mass  at  the  Holy  Spirit  Church,  next  to  the  University  Rectorate.     January  17,  2012:   Lectures  at  "Anexo"  Hall,  1st  floor,   Department  of  Music,  University  of  Évora,  January  17,  2012.   14:00  -­‐  Set  up  of  the  video  system.   14:15  -­‐  Welcome  by  Dr  Christopher  Bochmann  (Portugal)   14:30  -­‐  Alexandre  Ficagna  (Under  PhD  course  at  UNICAMP,  Brazil)   15:00  -­‐  Dr  Marcos  Lucas  (Brazil)   (15:30  -­‐  Dr  Orlando  Alves)   16:00  -­‐  (break)     16:30  -­‐  Ainolnaim  Azizol  (Malaysia,  under  master's  study  at  UK)   17:00  -­‐  Dr  Martin  Blain  (UK)   (17:30  -­‐  Dr  Sérgio  Azevedo)   18:00  -­‐  (break)     Concerts  at  the  Music  Department:   18:30  -­‐  Chamber  concert  PROGRAM  1  -­‐  Prof.  Sirtori's  class.   19:30  -­‐  Chamber  concert  PROGRAM  2  -­‐  Trio  "Spiritus  Musicum"  and  Quartet  "Da  Capo",   Prof.  Paulinyi's  class.     January  18,  2012,  for  closing  activities:   12:00  -­‐  Roman  Catholic  Mass  at  the  Saint  Anthony  Church,  Giraldo's  Square  at  the  City   Centre.  

9

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


PROGRAM 1  (January  17,  18:30  at  the  Great  Hall)       G.P.  Telemann  (1681  –  1767)   Da  Sonate  in  e-­‐moll  (original  para  viola  da  gamba)   Cantabile  -­‐  Allegro   Bassoon:  Rodrigo  Cenalmor  Martín.     C.  Saint  Saens  (1835  –  1921)   da  Sonate  en  Sol  M  pour  basson  et  piano  op.168   Allegro  moderato  -­‐  Allegro  Scherzando   Bassoon:  Monica  Acosta.     H.  Villa-­‐Lobos  (1887  –  1959)   "Ciranda  das  Sete  Notas"  para  fagote  e  cordas  (1958)   Bassoon:  Sandra  Ochoa.     A.  Tansman  (1897-­‐1986)   da  "Sonatine"  pour  basson  et  piano   -­‐Allegro  con  Moto  -­‐  Largo  Cantabile   Bassoon:  Jorge  López  Tejado.     Sergio  Azevedo  (*1968)   "3  Miniaturas  para  fagote  solo"   -­‐Presto,  Giocoso  -­‐Arioso  -­‐Meccanico   Bassoon:  Eduardo  Sirtori.     Piano:  Ian  Mikirtoumov  

10

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


PROGRAM 2  (January  17,  19:30  at  the  Mirrors  Hall)       Ainolnaim  (Malaysia/UK)  -­‐  Wayang  Kulit  Empat  (Shadow  Play  No.4)     Trio  "Spiritus  Musicum":   Daniel  Monteiro  (clarinete)   Sandra  Ochoa  (fagote/bassoon)   José  Leitão  (piano)         Martin  Blain  (UK)  -­‐  Connecting  Flights  II  for  Clarinet  Quartet  (II  /  III)   Alexandre  Ficagna  (Brazil)  -­‐  Estudo  (2011)   Marcos  Lucas  (Brazil/UK)  -­‐  Vem  dos  Quatro  Ventos  Ez.37:9      

(I -­‐  O  Breath  /  II  -­‐  Fantasia)  

Clarinet  Quartet  "Da  Capo":   Ana  Filipa  Botelho   Ana  Margarida  Neto   Diana  Sousa   Hélia  Varanda    

11

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


About the  composers  /  Sobre  os  compositores     Alexandre  Ficagna  é  graduado  em  Música  (Licenciatura)  pela  Universidade  Estadual  de   Londrina  (UEL),  onde  trabalha  atualmente  como  professor  colaborador.  Possui  Mestrado  em   Música   (Processos   Criativos)   pela   Universidade   Estadual   de   Campinas   (Unicamp),   com   orientação   da   profa.   Dra.   Denise   Garcia.   Cursa   Doutorado   na   mesma   área   de   concentração,   também   pela   Unicamp,   com   orientação   do   prof.   Dr.   Silvio   Ferraz.   Suas   composições   foram   executadas   em   diversas   cidades   brasileiras   (Londrina,   Curitiba,   Campinas,   São   Paulo,   Belo   Horizonte).   Recentemente   foi   um   dos   59   contemplados   com   o   XIX   Prêmio   Funarte   de   Composição  Clássica,  com  o  trio  "Vento  na  Janela".   alexandre_ficagna@yahoo.com.br     Marcos   Lucas   (RJ-­‐1964)   é   Doutor   em   Composição   Musical   pela   University   of   Manchester   (Inglaterra).   Suas   obras   já   foram   apresentadas   na   Inglaterra,   Irlanda,   Escócia,   EUA,   Alemanha,   Itália,   Espanha,   Eslovênia,   Malta,   Chipre   e   Brasil,   por   grupos   como   London   Sinfonietta,   Pierrot   Lunaire   Ensemble,   Janus   Ensemble,   Paragon   Ensemble   Scotland,   Gemini   Ensemble,   Lindsay   String   Quartet,   Orquestra   Sinfônica   Brasileira,   Orquestra   Sinfônica   Nacional,   Orquestra   Filarmônica   de   Minas   Gerais,   Camerata   Antiqua   de   Curitiba,   Quarteto   Radamés  Gnattalli,  Cron,  Grupo  Música  Nova,  GNU,  Calíope  e  em  Festivais  como  ISCM  World   Music  Days  (Ljubliana),  State  of  the  Nation  (Londres),  VI  Festival  de  Música  Contemporânea   Tres   Cantos   (Madrid),   Festival   Spazio   900   (Cremona),   Bienais   de   Mùsica   Brasileira   Contemporânea   e   Panorama   da   Música   Brasileira   Atual   (Rio   de   Janeiro).   Possui   vários   prêmios  e  menções  honrosas  (Procter  Gregg  Award  1996,  Funarte  2001,  Camargo  Guarnieri   2008,  Tinta  Fresca  2010).  Sua  ópera  “O  Pescador  e  Sua  Alma”  estreou  em  2006-­‐7  nos  CCBBs   de  Brasília  e  Rio  recebendo  32  récitas.  Desde  2002,  leciona  composição,  harmonia  e  análise  na   UNIRIO  onde  também  dirige  o  grupo  de  música  contemporânea  GNU.  Tem  proferido  palestras   sobre   música   brasileira   contemporânea   no   Brasil   e   no   exterior.   É   membro,   desde   2005   do   grupo  de  compositores  Prelúdio  21.   m.v.lucas@uol.com.br     O   quarteto   de   clarinetas   “Vem   dos   Quatro   Ventos”  foi   composto   em   2009   sob   encomenda   do   Quarteto   Experimental,   e   estreada   em   Maio   de   2009   no   Centro   Cultural   da  

12

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Justiça Federal   (CCJF)   no   Rio   de   Janeiro/Brasil.   A   obra   possui   dois   movimentos   curtos   com   duração  total  aproximada  de  7  minutos.   O   primeiro   movimento   baseia-­‐se   numa   passagem   bíblica   do   profeta   Ezequiel,   37:9:   “Então  ele  me  disse:  Profetiza  ao  fôlego  da  vida,  profetiza  ó  filho  do  homem,  e  dize  ao  fôlego   da  vida:  Assim  diz  o  Senhor  Deus:  Vem  dos  Quatro  Ventos,  ó  fôlego  da  vida,  e  assopra  sobre   esses   mortos   para   que   vivam”.   O   sopro   da   vida,   explorado   através   do   uso   de   técnicas   expandidas,   é   aqui   interpretado   como   uma   metáfora   do   próprio   ato   da   criação   artística.  O   Segundo  movimento  é  uma  pequena  fantasia  em  homenagem  ao  compositor  Alfred  Schnittke   (1934-­‐1998),   que   ficou   conhecido   pelo   emprego   de   técnicas   ‘poli-­‐estilísticas’.   Tal   como   na   obra   do   compositor   russo,   neste   movimento   fazemos   referências   diretas   e   indiretas   à   diferentes  linguagens  e  estilos.     J.   Orlando   Alves   é   natural   de   Lavras   -­‐   MG   (13   mar.   1970).   Bacharel   em   Composição   Musical   pela   UFRJ   (1988),   Mestre   em   Composição   pela   UFRJ   (2001)   e   Doutor   em   Música   –   Processos   Criativos   –   pela   UNICAMP   (2005).   Professor   Adjunto   de   Composição   Musical   da   UFPB   desde   fevereiro   de   2006   e   Coordenador   do   COMPOMUS   desde   fevereiro   de   2007.   Faz   parte   do   grupo   Prelúdio   21:   Compositores   do   Presente,   junto   com   Alexandre   Schubert,   Caio   Senna,  Heber  Schünemann,  Marcos  Lucas,  Neder  Nassaro  e  Sérgio  Roberto  de  Oliveira.   Premiado  em  1.o  lugar  no  Primeiro  Concurso  FUNARTE  de  Composição,  na  categoria  II  –   Duos,   com   a   obra   Pantomimas,   para   clarineta   e   fagote.   Foi   premiado   também   em   2.o   lugar   no   mesmo  concurso,  na  categoria  IV  –  Quintetos,  com  a  obra  Quinctus,  para  quinteto  de  sopros.   No   VII   Concurso   Nacional   de   Composição   Musical   do   IBEU,   obteve   o   1.o   lugar   com   a   obra   Quantum,   para   quinteto   de   sopros.   Recebeu   Menção   Honrosa   no   Concurso   Nacional   de   Composição   Camargo   Guarnieri,   promovido   pela   Orquestra   Sinfônica   da   USP,   com   a   obra   orquestral   Circinus.   Foi   um   dos   oito   finalistas   do   VIII   Concurso   Nacional   de   Composição   IBEU   2006,   com   a   obra   In   "   Sessions",   para   Big   Band.   Premiado   em   3.°   lugar   no   Concurso   SESIMINAS  de  Composição  para  Orquestra  de  Câmara,  Belo  Horizonte  -­‐  MG,  7  nov.  2006.  Em   2009,  recebeu  a  Bolsa  FUNARTE  no  Programa  de  Estímulo  à  Criação  Artística.   jorlandoalves2006@gmail.com     Ainolnaim   Azizol   is  one  of  Malaysia’s  upcoming,  young  pianist-­‐composer.  He  received   his   formal   music   education   at   the   tender   age   of   9,   later   on   studying   piano   performance   and   pedagogy  at  the  University  Of  Science  Malaysia  (USM).  As  for  composing,  this  young  composer   self-­‐thought  himself  all  the  basics.  With  a  driving  passion  in  exploring  his  musical  sense  and   13  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


thought in  composition,  he  was  accepted  to  further  his  master’s    study  in  music  composition   and   technology   at   the   Birmingham   Conservatoire   under   the   guidance   of    Joe   Cutler,   Simon   Hall,  Ed  Bennett,  Geoff  Hann  and  among  others.  Ainol  has  written  a  range  of  compositions  and   most  of  his  works  was  written  for  both  western  instruments  and  Malay  Gamelan  in  form  of   contemporary   –   styled   music.   Some   of   his   music   has   won   several   music   composition   competitions  and  also  has  been  selected  for  various  performances  such  as  the  2011  Malaysia   Young  Composers  Concert      Series,  2011  Young  Composers  in  Southeast  Asia  Competition  and   Music   Festival   Bandung   by   the   Goethe   Institute   &   UPI    -­‐   Indonesia,   Carl   von   Ossietzky   Composition   Competition   by   the   University   of   Oldenburg,   Music   Department   2011/12   Germany,  International  Chamber  Music  Meeting  by  the  University  of  Evora,  Portugal  2011  etc.   Besides   that,   he   was   commissioned   to   compose   new   gamelan   music   by   the   Malaysian   Government  –  Department  of  Cultural  and  Arts  2010/11.   Webpage:  http://www.ainolnaim.wordpress.com   anllume@gmail.com       Martin   Blain   is   a   Senior   Research   Fellow   at   Manchester   Metropolitan   University.   Martin’s   works   have   been   performed   in   Europe,   China,   and   the   USA   by   a   variety   of   leading   soloists   and   ensembles.   His   Percussion   Quartet   was   recently   featured   at   the   Cutting   Edge   Festival   in   London   by   BackBeat   Percussion   Ensemble   and   this   work   has   received   performances  in  China  and  the  USA  (BackBeat  awarded  1st  Prize  at  the  Concert  Artists  Guild   International  Competition).  Martin’s  works  have  also  received  performances  by  such  leading   new   music   ensembles   as   Equivox,   Vamos,   Black   Hair,   The   Composers’   Ensemble   and   his   orchestral  work  Fever  Pitch  was  performed  by  The  English  National  Philharmonic.  Martin  is   also  a  founder  member  of  the  laptop  ensemble  MMUle  where  he  continues  to  develop  works   that  combine  acoustic  instruments  with  laptop  performers.  He  is  currently  working  with  the   experimental  theatre  company  Proto-­‐type  Theatre  on  the  development  of  a  laptop  opera.   M.A.Blain@mmu.ac.uk       Programme  Notes:  Connecting  Flights  II  for  Clarinet  Quartet   Connecting  Flights  II  is  a  three-­‐movement  work  for  Clarinet  Quartet  that  takes  about  15   minutes   to   complete.   The   work   is   part   of   a   cycle   of   compositions   concerned   with   the   development  of  rhythmic  and  harmonic  structures  within  a  post-­‐serial  framework.  The  first   movement  is  built  on  a  motor  rhythm  developed  from  a  series  of  small  motivic  fragments  –   14  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


these are  combined  and  manipulated  in  a  variety  of  settings  throughout  the  work.  The  second   movement  is  shorter  than  the  first  and  is  designed  to  release  much  of  the  tension  generated  in   the  first  movement.  Whilst  providing  some  release  from  the  chaotic  harmonic  and  rhythmic   structures  in  the  first  movement,  the  second  movement  also  functions  as  a  structural  upbeat   to  the  final  movement  where  we  see  a  return  of  the  harmonic  and  rhythmic  structures  of  the   opening  movement:  here  the  motivic  material  is  reworked  and  developed  into  new  textures.     Sérgio   Azevedo   (born   August   23,   1968)   is   a   Portuguese   composer.   He   also   writes   articles  and  books  about  music,  collaborates  often  with  the  National  Radio  Broadcasting,  and   is  a  teacher  at  the  Escola  Superior  de  Música  de  Lisboa  (ESML)  since  1993.   Born   in   Coimbra,   Portugal   in   1968,   he   studied   composition   at   the   Academia   de   Amadores   de   Música   (Lisbon)   with   composer   Fernando   Lopes-­‐Graça,   and   finished   his   studies   of   composition   at   the   Escola   Superior   de   Música   de   Lisboa,   with   Christopher   Bochmann   (a   disciple   of   the   mythic   Nadia   Boulanger)   and   Constança   Capdeville   with   the   highest   classification   (20/20).   Azevedo   followed   several   seminars   at   IRCAM   and   other   institutions,   and   worked   in   short   periods   with   composers   like   Emmanuel   Nunes   (at   the   Gulbenkian   Foundation),   Tristan   Murail,   Phillipe   Manoury,   Luca   Francesconi,   Mary   Finsterer,   Jorge   Peixinho,  Louis  Andriessen  and  Simon  Bainbridge.   Azevedo   won   several   prizes   of   composition,   in   Portugal   and   abroad   (like   the   United   Nations   Prize),   and   his   works   have   been   played   and   commissioned   regularly   in   several   countries   (Spain,   France,   United   Kingdom,   Austria,   Germany,   Bulgaria,   Brasil,   Colombia,   Canada,  USA,  Italy,  etc.)  by  prestigious  ensembles,  soloists  and  conductors  (Luca  Pfaff,  Pascal   Roffé,   Jürgen   Bruns,   Nikolai   Lalov,   Brian   Schembri,   Fabian   Panisello,   Bruno   Belthoise,   Aline   Czerny,   Lorraine   Vaillancourt,   Artur   Pizarro,   António   Rosado,   Miguel   Borges   Coelho,   Anne   Kaasa,   Marc   Foster,   Jose   Ramon   Encinar,   Brian   Schembri,   Ronald   Corp,   Galliard   Ensemble,   Proyecto   Gerhard,   Le   Concert   Impromptu,   Remix   Ensemble,   Ensemble   Télémaque,   Plural   Ensemble,   Nouvel   Ensemble   Moderne,   Kammersymphonie   Berlin,   etc.),   some   of   them   being   available  in  commercial  CD's.   Azevedo   works   frequently   with   schools  and  students,  composing  a  great  deal  of  didactic   pieces,   ranging   from   piano   solo   to   small   ensembles   and   school   orchestras,   and   also   with   children's   choirs,   collaborating   mainly   with   conductor   Joana   Raposo.   He   is   also   a   prolific   writer   on   music,   and   published   two   books:   "A   Invenção   dos   Sons"   (Caminho,   Lisbon   1999)   and   "Olga   Prats   -­‐   An   Extraordinary   Piano"   (Bizâncio,   Lisbon   2007),   and   has   contributed   articles   to   many   publications,   such   as   "The   New   Grove   Dictionary   of   Music   and   Musicians",   15  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


and works  for  other  prestigious  magazines  and  CD  labels,  like  Naxos.  He  was  also  author  of   broadcastings  at  RDP  -­‐  Antena  2  and  member  of  the  CESEM,  Center  for  Aesthetic  and  Music   Studies  from  1993  to  2007.   In  2007  Azevedo  begun  his  doctorate  degree  at  Minho  University  with  Elisa  Lessa  and   Christopher   Bochmann.   Azevedo   has   composed   more   than   150   works   to   date,   mostly   orchestral  and  chamber  music  pieces,  in  several  forms,  and  his  music  is  performed  regularly   in  Portugal  and  abroad.  He  is,  since  1993,  a  teacher  at  the  Lisbon  Superior  School  of  Music.  His   music  is  published  by  AVA  -­‐  Musical  Editions  (www.editions-­‐ava.com).   sergioazevedo68@gmail.com  

16

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Collective document:  further  actions  after  the  Meeting     The  participants  where  stimulated  to  respond  the  following  questions.   1. How  this  meeting  changed  your  composition/performance?   2. What  can  you  do  for  promoting  this  Meeting  and  developing  new  plans  together?     Martin  Blain:   1. The   Encontro   Internacional   de   Música   de   Câmara   initiative   has   provided   an   exciting   opportunity   for   composers   and   performers   to   meet   in   an   academic   setting   to   discuss   and   celebrate   issues   in   current   compositional   practice.   The   Meeting   has,   for   me,   reaffirmed   the   importance   for   composers   to   work   closely   with  committed  performers  on  the  development  of  new  works  –  a  big  thank  you   to  Da  Capo  for  the  contribution  to  the  success  of  this  event.   2. I   would   be   happy   to   host,   through   my   own   University,   a   similar   event   that   promotes   the   development   of   compositional   practice   with   the   support   of   performers.         Marcos  Lucas:   1. This  meeting  was  an  important  chance  to  hear  other  composers  aproach  to  music   and  to  listen  to  a  carefully  rehearsed  performance  of  my  clarinet  quartet    "Vem   dos  Quatro  ventos"  I  particularly  like  to  work  with  student  performers  and  this   interchange   of   experiences   was   an   important   feedback   to   my   compositional   output.   2. Having  participated  in  this  edition  of  the  Chamber  Music  Festival  in  Évora,  I  can   make  some  publicity  of  it  to  my  colleagues  at  UNIRIO,  where  I  am  a  lecturer.  I  am   also   a   member   of   a   composer´s   group   called   "Prelúdio   21",   and   can   encourage   their  participation  in  the  future  editions  of  this  event.     Alexandre  Ficagna:   1. De   duas   maneiras:   assistir   à   execução   da   peça   permitiu   observar   como   esta   funciona   no   palco,   o   que   ficou   bom   e   o   que   pode   melhorar;   e   o   contato   com   os   compositores,   cuja   troca   de   experiências   me   estimulou   a   explorar   aspectos   da   composição  para  os  quais  eu  não  havia  me  interessado  até  então.   17  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


2. Quanto à   promoção   do   Evento,   como   sou   um   professor   "novato",   ainda   não   conheço   os   mecanismos   institucionais.   O   que   poderia   fazer   é   divulgá-­‐lo   entre   alunos   e   colegas   de   outras   universidades,   enfatizando   sua   importância   e   recomendando  a  participação.     Ainolnaim:   1. I'm   very   excited   throughout   the   meeting   and   pleased   with   the   warmness   of   the   Music  Department's  community.   2. It   would   be   great   if   the   program   could   be   held   more   than   a   day   where   we   can   have  more  chance  to  work  closer  with  the  performer  and  the  students.  I  hope  the   students   can   involve   more   in   the   meeting;   perhaps   they   could   have   the   chance   in   managing  the  process  of  the  meeting  program.    

Zoltan Paulinyi:   1. This   meeting,   more   than   a   dialogue,   offers   a   new   channel   for   "communication".   A   dialogue   can   easily   fail   in   case   a   listener   does   not   receive   the   message,   for   any   reason.   Nevertheless,   "communicate"   means   "put   something   in   common".   This   Meeting   communicates,   shares   and   publishes   singular   creative   contributions   from   the   composers,   opposed   to   more   exhausted   media   that   would   prefer   tasteless  impersonal  works.   2. I  am  glad  to  announce  the  next  Meeting  in  24-­‐29  June  2012  will  premiere  works   by   Christopher   Bochmann   and   Z.   Paulinyi   at   the   University   of   Évora.   There   is   already  

a

call

for

new

works

posted

at

<

http://paulinyi.blogspot.com/2011/12/international-­‐meeting-­‐june-­‐2012.html>, both   for   composers   and   performers.   Lecturers   from   other   fields   (History,   Sociology,   Literature,   Philosophy,   etc)   may   also   propose   seminars   to   the   organizer  (mailto:Paulinyi@yahoo.com).    

18

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Sobre os  Intérpretes  /  About  the  Performers  

Trio Spiritus  Musicum     Clarinet: Daniel Monteiro +351914401815 – danielfpmonteiro@gmail.com Bassoon: Sandra Ochoa +351913323420 – sandra_gochoa@hotmail.com Piano: José Leitão +351966329124 – josepiano25@hotmail.com    

O Trio Spiritus Musicum foi formado acerca de um ano por três alunos da Universidade de Évora, Daniel Monteiro, clarinete, Sandra Ochoa, Fagote e José Leitão, piano. Este grupo surgiu da vontade dos seus membros em realizar concertos e procurar conhecer o variado repertório desta formação. O seu repertório vai desde o clássico ao contemporâneo passando por Glinka, Villa Lobos e Ainolnaim Azizol. A música contemporânea é uma das prioridades deste grupo que visa o contacto direto com os compositores para a estreia de novas obras e novas oportunidades profissionais. O desenvolvimento deste grupo deve-se também à colaboração do violinista/compositor Zoltan Paulinyi. O Trio Spiritus Musicum encontra-se sempre aberto a novas propostas e desafios que surjam, pois todas são vistas como novas oportunidades.

Spiritus Musicum Trio was formed about a year for three students of the University of Évora, Daniel Monteiro, clarinet, Sandra Ochoa, bassoon and José Leitão, piano. This group arose from the desire of its members to play at concerts and get to know the varied repertoire of this formation. Their repertoire ranges from classical through contemporary music, like Glinka, Villa Lobos and Ainolnaim Azizol. Contemporary music is one of the priorities of this group that seeks direct contact with the composers for the premiere of new works and new professional opportunities. The development of this group is also due to the collaboration of violinist / composerZoltan Paulinyi. Trio Spiritus Musicum is always open to new proposals and challenges that arise, because all are seen as opportunities.

19

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Sandra Gonçalves Ochoa was born on 10/12/1987 in Germany, began her musical studies in 1998 at the Musik- und Kunstschule Remscheid in the Piano Class with Professor Harald Müller. In 2004 she began her studies in the Bassoon Class of Professor Zsolt Pap in the Professional School of Art Mirandela. In 2006 she began studying the Contrabassoon taking private lessons with Professor Robert Glassburner. In 2009 she joined the Academia Nacional Superior de Orquestra in the bassoon class of Professor Franz Dörsam. Currently she is student at the University of Évora in the Bassoon class of Professor Eduardo Sirtori, being in the last year of the degree course in music interpretation. She participated in master classes and worked with Teachers: Carolino Carreira, Robert Glassburner, Catherine Stockwell, Robert Giaccaglia, Yoko Matsuki and Eduardo Sirtori. She was a member of chamber music groups, a reed trio, Woodwind Quartet, Woodwind Trio and Classical Quintet where she worked under guidance of Candida Oliveira, Inês Fernandes, Robert Glassburner, Professor Claudio Alberti and Professor Kalervo Kulmala. Participated in stages with the Esproarte Orchestra where she worked with conductors: Pedro Neves, Alberto Roque, Paco Soares, António Saiote, Francessco Belli, Artur Pinho and Cristobal Soler. She also participated in the 1st Stage of the National Academic Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, where she worked with Catherine Stockwell and conductor Michael Zilm, on the 2nd Stage of the PiagetMirandela Symphony Orchestra with conductor Christopher Bochmann, Easter Workshop 2008 at the on Metropolitan Conservatory of Music of Lisbon working with Maestro Pedro Neves and Rui Carreira and Professor Ricardo Santos, the 15th stage of the Templars with the Maestro Octávio Mas Arocas, Orchestra Aproarte with Maestro Ernst Schelle, also in the 2nd Stage of the Metropolitana Academic Orchestra and the Fondazione Gustav Mahler Stiftung 2010 under the guidance of M. Philipp von Steinaecker and Professor Andreas Gosling. She also developed orchestral work, acting in orchestras like: Orquestra Académica Metropolitana, Orquestra Metropolitana de Lisboa, Orquestra Académica de Castelo Branco, Orquestra Sinfónica da Póvoa de Varzim, Orquestra Sinfónica da Universidade do Minho, Banda Sinfónica Portuguesa and Ensemble Contemporaneous. Under the direction of musical directors: Jean Marc Burfin, Osvaldo Ferreira, Francisco Ferreira, Cesário Costa and Vera Baptista.

Sandra Gonçalves  Ochoa   @  sandra_gochoa@hotmail.com     (  00351/913323420     Sandra Gonçalves Ochoa, nascida em 10.12.1987 na Alemanha, iniciou os seus estudos musicais em 1998 na Musik- und Kunstschule Remscheid, na Classe de Piano com o professor Harald Müller. Em 2004 começou os seus estudos na Classe de Fagote com o professor Zsolt Pap na Escola Profissional de Arte de Mirandela. Em 2006 iniciou os estudos no Contrafagote, tendo aulas privadas com o professor Robert Glassburner. Em 2009 ingressou na Academia Nacional Superior de Orquestra na classe de Fagote do professor Franz Dörsam. Actualmente é estudante da Universidade de Évora na classe de Fagote do professor Eduardo Sirtori, encontrando-se no último ano de licenciatura do curso de Música no ramo interpretação. Participou e trabalhou em Master Classes com os Professores Carolino Carreira, Robert Glassburner, Catherine Stockwell, Roberto Giaccaglia, Yoko Matsuki e Eduardo Sirtori, Foi membro em grupos de Música de Câmara, em trio de palhetas, quarteto de Madeiras, trio de Madeiras e Quinteto Clássico onde trabalhou sobre orientação de Cândida Oliveira, Inês Fernandes e Robert Glassburner, Prof. Claudio Alberti, Prof. Kalervo Kulmala. Participou em Estágios de Orquestra da Esproarte onde trabalhou com os Maestros: Pedro Neves, Alberto Roque, Paco Soares, António Saiote, Francessco Belli, Artur Pinho e Cristobal Soler. Participou também no 1° Estágio Nacional da Orquestra Sinfónica Académica Metropolitana, no qual trabalhou com Catherine Stockwell e o Maestro Michael Zilm, no 2° Estágio da Orquestra Sinfónica Piaget-Mirandela com o Maestro Christopher Bochmann, no Workshop Páscoa 2008 no Conservatório Metropolitano de Música de Lisboa trabalhando com os Maestros Pedro Neves e Rui Carreira e o professor Ricardo Santos; 15º Estágio dos Templários com o Maestro Octávio Mas Arocas, Orquestra Aproarte com o Maestro Ernst Schelle, também no 2º Estágio da Orquestra Académica Metropoliotana e no Estágio Fondazione Gustav Mahler Stiftung 2010 sob orientação de M. Philipp von Steinaecker, Prof. Andreas Gosling . Desenvolveu também actividade orquestral, actuando em Orquestras como: Orquestra Académica Metropolitana, Orquestra Metropolitana de Lisboa, Orquestra Académica de Castelo Branco, Orquestra Sinfónica da Póvoa de Varzim e Orquestra Sinfónica da Universidade do Minho, Banda Sinfónica Portuguesa e Ensemble Contemporaneus. Sobre direccão de vários maestros: Jean Marc Burfin, Osvaldo Ferreira, Francisco Ferreira, Cesário Costa e Vera Baptista.

20

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Daniel Filipe Pereira Monteiro +351914401815 danielfpmonteiro@gmail.com   Daniel Monteiro nasceu em Resende, Viseu, Portugal em 10 de Maio de 1986. Iniciou os estudos musicais na Fundação Conservatório Regional de Gaia (FCRG) no ano letivo de 2000/2001 na classe do Prof. Luís Filipe Santos, continuando em 2003/2004 na classe do Prof. Nuno Pinto até 2007/2008. Em 2009/2010 frequenta o curso livre de clarinete na Academia Nacional Superior de Orquestra com o Prof. Jorge Camacho. No ano seguinte é admitido no Curso de música da Universidade de Évora, variante de clarinete, frequentando atualmente o 2º ano da licenciatura na classe do Prof. Etienne Lamaison. Participou em diversos Master Classes com Clarinetes Ad Libitum, Iva Barbosa, Nuno Silva, Rui Martins, Luís Gomes, Nuno Pinto, António Saiote e Dominique Vidal. Colaborou ainda com Orquestra Nacional de Sopros dos Templários, Orquestra de Sopros da FCRG, Orquestra Sinfónica da Feira, Orquestra de Sopros Metropolitana de Lisboa, Ensemble Contemporâneos e Coral Sinfónico de Portugal. Desde 2006 é membro assíduo da Orquestra Filarmonia de Gaia. Trabalhou com maestros como Saúl Silva, Lino Pinto, Mário Mateus, Paulo Martins, Pedro Neves, Vera Baptista, Octávio Mas Arocas, Sergi Pellegrini, Guven Yaslicam, Ovidiu Marinescu, Florin Totan, Nayden Todorov, German Cáceres, Berislav Skenderovic, entre outros. Atualmente leciona a disciplina de clarinete na FCRG.

Daniel Monteiro was born in Resende, Viseu, Portugal on May 10, 1986. He began his musical studies at the Fundação Conservatório Regional de Gaia (FCRG) in academic year 2000/2001 in the class of Professor Luis Filipe Santos, and continued in 2003/2004 with professor Nuno Pinto until 2007/2008. In 2009/2010 he attended the free course of clarinet in the Academia Nacional Superior de Orquestra with Professor Jorge Camacho. On the following year is admitted to the course of music at the University of Évora, variant clarinet, where currently attends on the 2nd year of degree in the class of Professor Etienne Lamaison. He participated in several Master Classes with Clarinetes Ad Libitum , Iva Barbosa, Nuno Silva, Rui Martins, Luis Gomes, Nuno Pinto, António Saiote and DominiqueVidal. Also collaborated with Orquestra Nacional de Sopros dos Templários, Orquestra de Sopros da FCRG, Orquestra Sinfónica da Feira, Orquestra de Sopros Metropolitana de Lisboa, Ensemble Contemporâneos e Coral Sinfónico de Portugal. Desde 2006 é membro assíduo da Orquestra Filarmonia de Gaia. He worked with conductors such as Saúl Silva, Lino Pinto, Mário Mateus, Paulo Martins, Pedro Neves, Vera Baptista, Octávio Mas Arocas, Sergi Pellegrini, Guven Yasli cam, Ovidiu Marinescu, Florin Tottan, Nayden Todorov, German Cáceres, Berislav Skenderovic, among others. Currently teaches clarinet at the FCRG.

21

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


José António   Martins   Leitão   (piano),  iniciou  os  seus  estudos  musicais  aos  8  anos  de   idade  na  classe  de  piano  com  um  professor  particular  Fausto  Abalroado.     Com   12   anos   integrou-­‐se   na   Academia   de   Música   de   Elvas   na   classe   de   piano,   onde   estudou  com  a  Prof.  Rosário  Sousa  6  anos,  nos  quais  em  3  anos  fez  5  graus,  mais  tarde,  aos  17   anos  de  idade  terminou  o  8º  grau  com  média  de  17  valores.  Enquanto  ligado  à  Academia  de   Música   de   Elvas,   participou   também   no   ciclo   de   concertos   da   Primavera   em   Elvas   onde   partilhou  um  recital  com  o  Maestro  António  Victorino  D'Almeida.     Actualmente  está  na  Universidade  de  Évora  no  ramo  de  interpretação  a  estudar  com  a   Prof.   Dra.   Ana   Teles.   Durante   a   sua   formação   musical   fez   vários   cursos   de   aperfeiçoamento   musical  dos  quais  se  destacam  as  masterclasses  com  o  Professor  Doutor  Christopher  Simonet   e  com  a  Professora  Doutora  Sara  Buechner.          

22

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Ana Margarida Martins de Carvalho Neto nasceu a 30 de Novembro de 1992 em Cascais. Iniciou os seus estudos musicais com 11 anos de idade, tendo começado com a aprendizagem no clarinete com o professor Paulo Gaspar em Azambuja. Em 2007 matriculou-se no Conservatório Metropolitano de Música de Lisboa na classe de clarinete com o professor Jorge Camacho. No ano seguinte entrou para o Curso Profissional de Instrumentista de Sopro na Escola Profissional Metropolitana na classe dos professores Jorge Camacho e Iva Barbosa. Durante os seus anos de estudo musical frequentou diversas masterclasses e workshops de clarinete, estilo clássico e jazz, com os professores Paulo Gaspar, Jorge Camacho, Iva Barbosa, Cândida de Oliveira, António Saiote, Juan Férrer ,Steve Cohen Valdemar Rodriguez, Márcio Pereira, Nuno Antunes, Nuno Silva, Luís Gomes, Rui Martins, entre outros. Fez diversos workshops de orquestra, tendo inclusivamente estado presente nos cursos de Páscoa e de Verão organizados pela Metropolitana, no “Music Summer School” organizado pela Musinaction, na “Musicalta 2010” na Alsácia, em França, onde realizou diversos concertos pela região com um quinteto de clarinetes, e também na Orquestra Ibero-Americana, sob a direcção de António Saiote em Arcos de Valdevez. Em 2009 participou no 3º Concurso José Augusto Alegria organizado pela Eborae Musica tendo obtido o 1º prémio do 2º Escalão e porteriormente gravado para a Antena 2. Actualmente frequenta o 1º ano de licenciatura na Universidade de Évora com o professor Etienne Lamaison.

Ana Margarida Martins de Carvalho Neto was born at 30th of November 1992 in Cascais. At the age of 11 she started her musical studies with Paulo Gaspar, a clarinet teacher in Azambuja. In 2007 Ana entered in the Metropolitan Conservatory in Lisbon when she studied clarinet with Jorge Camacho. One year later she started a professional course of orchestral music players in OML, Lisbon, in the class of Jorge Camacho and later with Iva Barbosa. During her musical studies Ana took part in many master classes and workshops of clarinet, Jazz and Classic style, with Paulo Gaspar, Jorge Camacho, Iva Barbosa, Cândida de Oliveira, António Saiote, Juan Férrer, Steve Cohen, Valdemar Rodriguez, Márcio Pereira, Nuno Antunes, Nuno Silva, Luís Gomes, Rui Martins, etc. Beside of clarinet workshops, Ana also took part in many orchestral workshops. She participated in Summer and Easter workshops organized by OML, where she studied for four years, in the “Music Summer School” organized by Musinaction, in “Musicalta” festival in 2010 in Alsace, France, where she was part of many concerts with a quintet of clarinets along the region, and also in the IberoAmerican Orchestra, with the conduction of António Saiote in Arcos de Valdevez. In 2009 Ana won the 1st prize in a competition named “3º Concurso José Augusto Alegria” in Évora, organized by Eborae Musica and did a recording to a national radio, Antena 2. Currently she is in the 1st year of graduation in Clarinet in the University of Évora with the teacher Etienne Lamaison.

23

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Ana Filipa Casaca Botelho nasceu a 28 de Agosto de 1993 em Castro Verde. Iniciou os seus estudos musicais em clarinete com 11 anos de idade no Conservatório Regional do Baixo Alentejo. Terminou o 8º grau em 2011 na classe do professor Hernâni Moura. Durante os seus anos de estudo musical participou em diversas masterclasses e workshops de clarinete em Portugal com os professores António Saiote, Steve Cohen, Filipe Dias, Nuno Pinto, em Espanha com Juan Ferrer e em França com António Saiote. Participou também em diversos estágios de orquestra tais como: Orquestra Sinfónica Juvenil Portuguesa, sob a direcção de Christopher Bochmann e Orquestra Iberoamericana, sob a direcção de António Saiote. Em 2010 esteve presente no festival «Musicalta» na Alsácia, em França, onde realizou diversos concertos pela região com um quinteto de clarinetes. Actualmente frequenta o primeiro ano em clarinete na Universidade de Évora, sob a orientação do professor Etienne Lamaison, e participa no «Grupo de Música Contemporânea» orientado pelo professor Christopher Bochmann inserido nas actividades curriculares da universidade.

Ana Filipa Casaca Botelho was born at 28th of August 1993 in Castro Verde. At the age of 11 she started her musical studies in clarinet in the Regional Conservatory of Baixo Alentejo. She finished her 8th degree in 2011 in the clarinet class of Hernâni Moura. During her musical studies Ana took part in many master classes and workshops of clarinet in Portugal with António Saiote, Steve Cohen, Filipe Dias, Nuno Pinto, in Spain with Juan Férrer and in France with António Saiote. Ana took part in many orchestral academies as the Portuguese Junior Symphonic Orchestra with the conductor Christopher Bochmann and the Ibero-American Orchestra with the conductor António Saiote. In 2010 Ana took part in “Musicalta” festival in Alsace, France, where she was part of many concerts with a quintet of clarinets along the region. Nowadays she is in the 1st year of graduation in Clarinet in the University of Évora with the teacher Etienne Lamaison and she is part of the “Contemporary Chamber Music” with the conduction of Christopher Bochman, which is included in the curricular activities of the university.

24

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Diana Raquel Jesus de Sousa nasceu a 26 de Março de 1990 na Madeira. Iniciou os seus estudos musicais em 2002 no Conservatório – Escola Profissional das Artes da Madeira na classe do Prof. Manuel Barros e concluiu o Curso Profissional de Instrumentista com o Prof. Robert Donald Bramley. É de salientar que esteve em países como a Finlândia (Helsínquia) e Itália (Milão) em projecto de Intercâmbio através do mesmo Conservatório.

Trabalhou em Masterclasses com os professores: Nuno Silva, Luís Gomes, Rui Martins, Vítor Matos, Emídio Costa, entre outros. Em 2011 participou no Workshop de Páscoa da Orquestra Metropolitana de Lisboa “Júnior” sob a orientação do Maestro Pedro Neves. Actualmente frequenta o 1º Ano de Licenciatura em Clarinete na Universidade de Évora na classe do Prof. Etienne Lamaison.

Diana Raquel Jesus de Sousa was born at 26th of March 1990 in Madeira. She started her musical studies in 2002 in the Professional School of Arts in Madeira with Manuel Barros and finished the Professional Course with Robert Donald Bramley. It is noteworthy that Diana was in countries like Finland (Helsinki) and Italy (Milan) in a dealing project with the Conservatory. She has worked in master classes with: Nuno Silva, Luís Gomes, Rui Martins, Vitor Matos, Emídio Costa, etc. In 2011 she participated in the Easter Masterclass of OML, in Lisbon with the conductor Pedro Neves. Currently Diana is in the 1st year of graduation in Clarinet in the University of Évora with the teacher Etienne Lamaison.

25

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Hélia Cristina Matado Varanda nasceu no dia 24 de Novembro de 1992 em Moura. Iniciou os seus estudos musicais com 9 anos em Alcáçovas. Em 2005 entrou para o Conservatório Regional do Baixo Alentejo – Secção de Moura onde começou por estudar com o Professor Emídio Costa e posteriormente com o Professor Filipe Dias. Em Julho de 2011 ficou em 2ºlugar no concurso “Prémio José Augusto Alegria” e em Novembro fez uma gravação para a Antena 2. Ao longo do seu percurso fez vários estágios de orquestra de sopros e masterclass de Clarinete com professores como Fausto…, Rui Martins, Nuno Silva, Luís Gomes, entre outros. Actualmente encontra-se no 1º ano de Licenciatura em Clarinete, na Universidade de Évora, sob a orientação do Professor Etienne Lamaison.

Hélia Cristina Matado Varanda was born at 24th of November 1992 in Moura. She started her musical studies at the age of 9 in Alcáçovas. In 2005 she entered the Regional Conservatory of Baixo Alentejo – Section of Moura, where she started studying with Emídio Costa and later with Filipe Dias, both of them clarinet performers and teachers. In July 2011 Hélia won the 2nd prize in the competition “Prémio José Augusto Alegria” and in November she did a recording to a national radio, Antena 2. During her musical studies Hélia took part in many orchestral academies and master classes of clarinet with Fausto, Rui Martins, Nuno Silva, Luís Gomes, etc. Nowadays Hélia is in the 1st year of graduation in Clarinet in the University of Évora with the teacher Etienne Lamaison.

 

26

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


COMPOSERS' PAPERS    

27

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Estudo, para  quarteto  de  clarinetes:  manipulação  de  imagens   acústicas  por  meio  de  imagens  visuais     Alexandre  Ficagna  (UEL/Unicamp,  Brasil)     alexandre_ficagna@yahoo.com.br   Resumo.  Descrição  do  processo  de  criação  da  peça  "Estudo",  para  quarteto  de  clarinetes,  em   que   o   ato   de   desenhar   fez   parte   do   processo   criativo   e   antecedeu   o   detalhamento   composicional  na  partitura:  trata-­‐se  portanto  da  manipulação  de  imagens  acústicas  por  meio   de  imagens  visuais.  A  influência  da  visualidade  no  processo  de  composição  musical  tem  sido   enfatizada   sobretudo   por   Sciarrino   (1998),   e   pode   ser   observada   no   processo   de   diversos   compositores;   destacamos   Xenakis   como   exemplo   do   que   chamamos   de   abordagem   direta   neste   tipo   de   relação.   Nortearam   a   composição   de   “Estudo”   os   conceitos   de   "legibilidade   acústica"   e   "estados,   eventos   e   transformações".   Deve-­‐se   ressaltar   que   não   se   trata   da   mera   transposição   do   desenho   em   uma   partitura   gráfica,   mas   de   um   processo   que   envolve   a   tensão   entre  o  ato  de  desenhar  livremente  e  o  posterior  detalhamento  composicional.   Palavras-­‐chaves:  legibilidade  acústica;  estados,  eventos  e  transformações;  imagem  acústica.     Abstract.  In  the  creative  process  of  “Study”,  for  clarinet   quartet,  the  piece  was  first  composed   with   drawings,   which   means   the   manipulation   of   acoustical   images   through   visual   ones.   Sciarrino   emphasizes   the   visual   aspects   that   take   part   in   the   music   composition   process,   observable  in  many  composers'  sketches;  as  an  example  of  a  direct  approach  to  visual  models   we   mention   Xenakis   and   some   compositional   strategies   he   developed   from   this   relation.   Before   looking   at   “Study”   itself,   it's   important     to   present   two   important   concepts   that   took   part  in  its  creative  process:  “acoustical  reading”  and  “states,  events  and  transformations”.  One   must  say  this  is  not  about  graphical  scores,  but  a  sort  of  tension  between  drawing  freely  and   writing  techniques.   Keywords:  acoustical  readability;  states,  events  and  transformations;  acoustical  image.       Introdução   Estudo,  para  quarteto  de  clarinetes1,  é  parte  da  pesquisa  de  doutorado  (em  elaboração)   intitulada  provisoriamente  “Modelos  visuais  e  composição  de  sonoridades”,  sendo  a  primeira   experiência   de   composição   conscientemente   orientada   por   elementos   visuais   fruto   deste   trabalho.   Em   Estudo,   o   ato   de   desenhar   fez   parte   do   processo   criativo   e   antecedeu   o   detalhamento  composicional  na  partitura:  as  estratégias  e  modelos  composicionais  surgiram   a   partir   de   uma   abordagem   direta   do   modelo   visual,   que   foi   criado   e   alterado   através   de   desenhos  e  grafismos.                                                                                                                     1    Instrumentação:  3  clarinetes  soprano  e  um  baixo,  todos  em  Bb.  A  peça  foi  um  pedido  do  clarinetista  e   professor  do  curso  de  Música  da  Universidade  Federal  de  São  Carlos  (Brasil),  José  Alessandro  Silva.    

28

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Veremos que   não   se   trata   da   transposição   de   um   desenho   para   partitura   gráfica,   mas   de   um   processo   de   intermodulação   entre   o   modelo   visual   e   as   estratégias   composicionais   (que   tornam  sonoro  o  modelo  visual    através  da  escrita).  O  que  se  busca  criar  é  uma  metodologia   composicional   em   que   a   utilização   de   desenhos   permita   trabalhar   a   composição   no   tempo,   numa  velocidade  mais  próxima  da  intuição,  antecedendo  o  detalhamento  na  partitura.  Scelsi   faz  uma  comparação  que  ilustra  essa  problemática:   ...   para   um   pintor   Zen   que   possui   a   inspiração   autêntica,   resulta   possível   cobrir   uma   superfície,   ainda   que   vasta,   em   poucos   minutos;   para   um   músico,   a   coisa   é   bem   diversa.   Uma   partitura   de   música,   ainda   que   de   piano,   contém   milhares   de   signos,   entre   notas,   acentos,   ligaduras,   sinais   de   cor,   de   expressão   etc,   além   do   tempo   necessário   para   calcular   e   sincronizar   os   ritmos   e   a   escrita   das   várias   partes.   ...     o   tempo  necessário  para  a  transcrição  é  muito  superior  à  percepção  da  inspiração,  que  é   sempre  velocíssima,  não  importa  como  seja  recebida  (Scelsi  citado  por  Siqueira,  2006,   p.73  -­‐  tradução  de  A.  Siqueira).    

Há também   um   outro   aspecto:   veremos   que   a   visualidade   acaba   “impregnando”   o   resultado   sonoro,   o   que   Angius   (2007)   chama   de   legibilidade  acústica.   Igualmente   importante   para   a   composição   de   Estudo     foram   as   noções   de   estados,  eventos   e   transformações   (Ligeti,   1993).   Antes   de   abordá-­‐los,   convém   ressaltar   a   influência   dos   processos   de   organização   visuais   na  composição  musical,  tal  como  constata  Sciarrino.  Como  breve  exemplo  das  possibilidades   composicionais   advindas   da   utilização   de   modelos   visuais,   observaremos   algumas   estratégias     desenvolvidas   pelo   compositor   grego   Iannis   Xenakis   a   partir   do   que   chamamos   de   “abordagem   direta   ou   analógica”   do   modelo   visual2.   Ao   descrevermos   o   processo   de   criação   de  Estudo  nos  concentraremos  sobre  a  relação  recíproca  entre  o  modelo  visual  e  estratégias   de  escrita.     1  –  Visualidade  e  composição  musical   Pode-­‐se   constatar   a   intersecção   dos   diversos   sentidos   realizada   pela     escuta   musical   quando   se   observa   que,   mesmo   numa   obra   destinada   ao   estudo   das   qualidades   sonoras   destituídas   de   referência   causal   -­‐   como   o   Tratado  dos  Objetos  Musicais  (Schaeffer,   1966)   -­‐   o   emprego  de  terminologia  advinda  do  tato,  visão  e  propriocepção,  é  constante:  fala-­‐se  de  sons   rugosos,  opacos,  de  objetos  sonoros  gestuais,  texturais,  etc.   O  que  para  Schaeffer  era  uma  aproximação  pouco  precisa,  para  Sciarrino  (1998,  p.61),  já   na   definição   primária   das   qualidades   do   som   empregamos   critérios   provenientes   de   outras   sensações,  o  que  reflete  a  globalidade  da  percepção  humana:  mesmo  quando  falamos  de  sons                                                                                                                  

2  Outra  abordagem  seria  a  “indireta  ou  metafórica/conceitual”,  em  que  o  compositor  não  chega  a  explorar   as  possibilidades  do  suporte  visual  ipso  facto:  as  imagens  são  manipuladas  diretamente  como  imagens  acústicas   (via  escrita  ou  improvisação).  

29

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


agudos e   graves   estamos   utilizando   critérios   de   proveniência   tátil,   ainda   que   nenhum   som   pique  ou  possa  ter  seu  peso  avaliado  com  nosso  corpo  (Sciarrino,  1998,  p.61).     Ora,   se   a   mais   de   dois   milênios   utilizamos   suportes   visuais   para   escrever   -­‐   e   pelo   menos   desde   Perotin   para   compor   -­‐   então   é   possível   que   “alguma   coisa   do   espaço,   do   visual,   foi   passada  diretamente  para  a  música”  (Sciarrino  citado  por  Giacco,  2001,  p.32  –  tradução  de  A.   Ficagna).  Não  se  trata  do  visual  sustentando  ou  decifrando  o  sonoro,  mas  da  organização  do   sonoro  a  partir  de  critérios  visuais  (Sciarrino,  1998,  p.92)3.   Como   breve   exemplo   da   manipulação   de   imagens   visuais   como   se   fossem   imagens   acústicas    –  mesmo  processo  de  Estudo  –  observaremos  algumas  estratégias  composicionais   elaboradas  por  Xenakis.     2  –  Abordagem  direta  de  modelos  visuais:  um  breve  exemplo   Conhecido   pela   formalização   matemática   do   seu   processo   composicional,   Xenakis   diversas   vezes   recorreu   a   desenhos   para   imaginar   fenômenos   e   processos   sonoros,   revelando   uma   imaginação   visual   certamente   ligada   à   sua   formação   como   arquiteto.   Facilmente   pode-­‐se   encontrar  textos  do  compositor  relacionando  música  e  arquitetura;  além  disso  são  frequentes   em   seus   livros   esboços   composicionais   realizados   com   o   auxílio   de   gráficos   (para   exemplos,   ver:  Xenakis,  1963,  1971).   Segundo  Gibson  (2010),  o  uso  de  gráficos  não  apenas  lhe  permitiu  lidar  de  modo  mais   efetivo  com  a  representação  dos  sons  contínuos  e  com  a  visualização  da  evolução  global  dos   eventos   sonoros   (como   nas   nuvens   ou   massas  de  sons),   mas   o   levou   a   uma   “abordagem   gráfica   da  composição”4.     Foi   com   o   auxílio   de   gráficos   que   Xenakis   trabalhou   suas   principais   imagens   acústico-­‐ visuais:     1) equivalência  entre  glissando  e  linha,  elemento  de  intersecção  Música/Arquitetura,   como   pode   ser   observado   na   similaridade   entre   os   esboços   de   Metastasis   e   a   maquete  do  Pavilhão  Philips.  

                                                                                                              3  

 Diferentemente  de  Sciarrino  –  cujo  interesse  reside  nas  modalidades  de  organização  comuns  às  artes   visuais   e   à   música   –   a   questão   para   o   musicólogo   François   Delalande   parte   de   uma   conquista   artesanal:   a   utilização   de   um   suporte   visual   de   registro   (notação)   como   suporte   de   criação,   a  escrita.   Assim,   da   Ars   Nova   à   música  serial  têm-­‐se  um  paradigma  tecnológico    (relação  entre  um  suporte  material  com  uma  prática  musical)   caracterizado   pela   “arte   de   tecer   linhas   melódicas   controlando   as   superposições   'verticais'”   (Delalande,   2001,   p.38).  Em  nosso  trabalho  consideramos  as  duas  perspectivas,  mas  com  ênfase  na  concepção  de  Sciarrino.   4    Esta  abordagem  deve  sua  operacionalização  à  concepção  do  compositor  de  que  tempo  e  espaço  seriam   de  uma  mesma  ordem  estrutural  subjacente,  podendo  então  o  tempo  ser  concebido  como  uma  série  de  pontos   formando  uma  linha  reta  (Xenakis,  1963,  p.26).  

30

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Figura 1:  esboço  dos  compassos  309  a  314  de  Metastasis  (Xenakis,  1963,  p.22).  

Figura 2:  esboço  final  do  Pavilhão  Philips  (XENAKIS,  1963,  p.25).  

2) elaboração  da  técnica  conhecida  como  “arborescências”,  que  difere  das  texturas  de   glissandi   pela   coordenação   das   linhas   e   não   apenas   pela   superposição   das   mesmas;   um  exemplo  pode  ser  observado  na  figura  abaixo:  

31

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Figura 3:  gráfico  de  Xenakis  para  as  arborescências  de  Erikhton5.  

3) manipulação   de   eventos   massivos,   sejam   texturas   de   glissandi   ou   as   chamadas   “nuvens   de   sons”   (ou   “ser   massivo”   de   sons   descontínuos).   Neste   segundo   caso,   a   equivalência   é   estabelecida   entre   pontos   e   sons   percussivos   (pizzicati   de   cordas,   por   exemplo).   Na   figura   a   seguir,   o   gráfico   construído   com   auxílio   da   equação   gaussiana   é   “esburacado”,   processo   que   Solomos   (2001)   compara   tanto   com   a   filtragem   da   música   eletroacústica   quando   ao   ato   de   esculpir   uma   estátua   numa   pedra6.  

                                                                                                              5  

Extraído  de  http://www.univ-­‐montp3.fr/~solomos/7.html      Segundo   o   próprio   compositor:   “a   distribuição   é   gaussiana   mas   a   forma   geométrica   é   uma   modulação   plástica  da  matéria  sonora”  (Xenakis,  1971,  p.13,  tradução  livre).   6  

32

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Figura 4:  gráfico  dos  compassos  52-­‐59  de  Pithoprakta  (XENAKIS,  1963,  p.31)  

Pode-­‐se   observar   que   as   três   estratégias   aqui   brevemente   apresentadas   são   basicamente   manipulações   de   linhas   e   pontos   com   o   auxílio   de   um   gráfico.   Para   Solomos   (2001),  a  utilização  de  gráficos  permitia  a  Xenakis  conceber  e  experimentar  visualmente  suas   sonoridades7.     3  –  Legibilidade  acústica   Em  Xenakis,  imaginação  visual  e  imaginação  sonora  estão  de  tal  forma  atreladas  que  a   partir   da   escuta   tem-­‐se   a   impressão   de   encontrar   o   “fundamento   visual”   de   diversas   sonoridades.   Solomos   (2001)   recorre   a   transcrições   gráficas   para   explicitar   este   tipo   de   relação:  um  exemplo  é  a  transcrição  dos  compassos  291-­‐303  de  Terretektorh,  que  revela  os   “trançados”  que  caracterizam  partes  importantes  da  peça.  

                                                                                                              7    Entendemos  sonoridade  como  o  som  (fenômeno  físico)  utilizado  musicalmente.  De  maneira  geral,  uma   sonoridade  é  formada  por  diversos  sons,  sobrepostos,  justapostos  ou  “entrelaçados”.  

33

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Figura 5:    Terretektorh,  compassos  291-­‐303,  transcrição  gráfica  de  Makis  Solomos8  

Essa  característica  de  uma  obra  musical,  em  que  uma  sonoridade  parece  revelar  o  que   teria   sido   sua   origem   visual,   Angius   chama   de   legibilidade   acústica9.   Referindo-­‐se   à   peça   Anamorfosi,  de  Sciarrino,  Angius  (2007,  p.88)  menciona  o  conceito  e  aponta  que  o  que  torna   possível  caracterizar  os  diversos  planos  sonoros  em  correlação  com  a  ideia  central  da  imagem   aquática   é   o   processo   de   estratificação   da   figura   sonora   sem   renunciar   à   sua   legibilidade   acústica.   Giacco   (2001,   p.45)   não   menciona   o   conceito,   mas   observa   que   no   projeto   de   uma   nova  peça,  Sciarrino  parece  servir-­‐se   de   princípios   traduzíveis   em   pontos   e   linhas,   aplicando-­‐ os  mais  aos  processos  sonoros  do  que  a  cada  som.     4  –  Estudo,  primeira  etapa:  modelo  visual   Como  comentado  anteriormente,  a  composição  da  peça  começou  pelo  ato  de  desenhar:   imagens   acústicas   foram   trabalhadas   visualmente   imaginando-­‐se   estados,   eventos   e   transformações10,  para  depois  se  tornarem  sonoras  através  de  estratégias  composicionais.                                                                                                                   8  

Extraído  de  http://www.univ-­‐montp3.fr/~solomos/18.html.      Ou  visibilidade  acústica.  Segundo  Ferraz,  seria  “como  se  pudéssemos  ver  o  som,  a  origem  ótico-­‐pictórica   do  som”  (Ferraz,  1997).   10    A   partir   das   imagens   visuais   e   táteis   de   um   sonho   que   teve   quando   criança,   Ligeti   elabora   noções   formais   que   consideram   a   inexorabilidade   da   passagem   do   tempo.   Em   Apparitions,   texturas   sonoras   estáticas     reagem  em  maior  ou  menor  grau  à  emergência  de  eventos;  o  grau  de  transformação  de  ambos  é  recíproco,  o  que   impede   o   retorno   dos   elementos:   os   estados   transformados   requerem   eventos   com   características   ainda   mais   novas   (de   registro,   cor,   densidade,   intensidade,   etc)   para   serem   transformados.   Neste   modelo   é   o   compositor   quem   cria   a   impressão   aparente   de   relação   causal   entre   um   evento   e   uma   determinada   transformação   do   estado   (Ligeti,  1993,  p.169-­‐170).   9  

34

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Depois de  alguns  esboços,  em  que  procurei  detalhar  visualmente  o  que  seria  textura  de   base   (figura   6),   senti   a   necessidade   de   recorrer   à   partitura   para   esboçar   uma   espécie   de   campo   harmônico-­‐textural.   Ao   voltar   a   desenhar,   pareceu-­‐me   mais   frutífero   outro   tipo   de   visualização   (uma   vez   que   sua   imagem   acústica   tornava-­‐se   mais   clara):   após   mapear   algumas   possibilidades   de   relação   estado-­‐evento-­‐transformação     (figura   7),   resolvi   simplificar   o   desenho   e   representar   o   conjunto   instrumental   de   modo   mais   esquemático,   quatro   linhas   retas   representando   o   “estado”;   retângulos   com   diversos   tamanhos   e   hachuras   como   os   eventos   e   suas   transformações;   ondulações   e   outros   desenhos   como   as   reações   do   estado   aos   eventos   (a   permanência   das   ondulações,   por   exemplo,   significaria   transformação   do   estado)   (figura  8).     Este  outro  modo  de  visualização  permitiu  imaginar  outras  “faces”  das  imagens  acústicas:   o  grau  de  impacto  e  propagação  de  uma  transformação,  a  possibilidade  de  explorar  não  só  o   espaço  vertical  das  alturas,  mas  horizontal  da  posição  dos  instrumentos  no  palco,  etc.    

Figura 6:  visualização  inicial  -­‐  primeiro  evento  e  impacto  na  textura  de  base,  com  propagação  pela  tessitura.    

Figura  7:  mapeamento  de  algumas  possibilidades  de  alterações  para  estados  e  eventos.  

35

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Figura 8:  visualização  final  -­‐  evento  e  primeiras  alterações  do  estado.  Detalhe  para  as  anotações   complementares,  considerando  a  propagação  de  um  instrumento  a  outro.    

Como é  possível  observar  na  figura  anterior,  comparando-­‐a  às  primeiras  transformações   nos   compassos   18   e   19   (figura   9),   os   estados   foram   criados   guardando   alguma   intenção   de   similitude  entre  as  morfologias  visuais  e  sonoras,  diferentemente  dos  eventos,  cujas  imagens   acústicas  foram  elaboradas  posteriormente.    

Figura 9:  compassos  17-­‐21,  onde  se  observa  similitudes  e  diferenças  em  relação  ao  modelo  visual11.    

As figuras  6  a  9  sumarizam  a  cronologia  do  processo  composicional  e  revelam  que,  dos   esboços   iniciais   ao   resultado   final,   a   utilização   de   outro   tipo   de   visualização,   bem   como   a   passagem   pela   partitura,   levaram   à   alteração   do   plano   inicial:   a   textura   de   trinados,   de   estado   inicial  passa  a  transformação,  predominando  no  início  da  peça  notas  longas,  permitindo  que   pequenas  alterações  tornem-­‐se  sensíveis.   Certamente  houve  influência  do  espaço  homogêneo  da  partitura  nestas  alterações,  o  que   não  modifica  a  natureza  desta  primeira  etapa:  a    concentração  do  trabalho  sobre  as  relações   dos   materiais   sonoros   (grau   e   tipo   de   alteração,   se   por   impacto   ou   “emergência”,   por   exemplo),   as   morfologias   dos   estados   e   suas   transformações   (por   alteração   de   mobilidade,   densidade,  ocupação  espacial,  etc),  bem  como  o  agenciamento  temporal  destes  elementos.  A   figura  10  mostra  o  esboço  visual  da  peça.                                                                                                                   11    Em   todos   os   exemplos   os   instrumentos   estarão   escritos   um   tom   acima   da   altura   real   (inclusive   o   clarinete  baixo).  

36

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Figura 10:  esboço  visual  de  Estudo.  

  5  –  Estudo,  segunda  etapa:  estratégias  de  escrita   Por   uma   questão   de   clareza   na   exposição   do   texto   optou-­‐se   pela   separação   a   seguir,   sempre   mantendo   em   mente   a   não   linearidade   do   processo,   em   que   muitas   vezes   um   aspecto   define-­‐se   mais   claramente   somente   quando   outro,   a   princípio   distinto,   começa   a   ser   vislumbrado.     5.1  –  Campo  harmônico-­‐textural   Na   passagem   pela   partitura   descrita   na   etapa   anterior,   estabeleceu-­‐se   apenas   o   que   seriam   os   dois   conjuntos   de   alturas   a   serem   utilizados   na   peça,   a   princípio   em   alternância,   mas   com   passagens   graduais   de   um   a   outro:   o   primeiro   é   uma   aproximação   temperada   de   uma  série  harmônica  constituída  apenas  de  parciais  ímpares  (como  o  espectro  do  clarinete),  a   partir  do  5º  parcial  de  um  Fá  subgrave;  o  segundo,  a  partir  do  rearranjo  das  alturas  obtidas   com   a   sobreposição   de   diferentes   multifônicos,   uma   aproximação   de   uma   série   harmônica   defectiva  de  Dó,  quarta  abaixo  da  anterior,  a  partir  do  7º  parcial.    

37

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Figura 11:  conjuntos  iniciais  de  alturas.  

As alturas   foram   permutadas   e   dispostas   em   duas   sequências   fixas   de   modo   a     manter   a   ocupação  espacial  e  a  densidade  harmônica  uniformes  mas  em  permanente  variação.  Apesar   de   sempre   percorridas   na   mesma   ordem   as   sequências   raramente   se   repetem:   omissões   de   um   termo   a   outro   foram   livremente   utilizadas.   Determinadas   omissões,   contudo,   permitiam   contrações   nas   regiões   grave,   média   e   aguda   do   conjunto:   nestes   momentos,   que   iniciam   a   partir  do  c.32,  fez-­‐se  a  transição  gradual  de  uma  cor  harmônica  à  outra.    

Figura  12:  sequências  –  a  disposição  na  tessitura  é  fixa.  A  ordem  só  é  alterada  através  de  omissões  de  um   elemento  a  outro.    

Destacamos a  seguir  (figura  13)  um  fragmento  do  desenho  em  que  há  a  sugestão  para  

mudança de   cor   harmônica   emergindo   da   textura,   diferentemente   da   estratégia   de   incrustação,  reservada  aos  eventos.  Interessante  observar  que  no  modelo  visual  esse  tipo  de   transformação  ocorre  pontualmente,  predominando  as  do  tipo  “proliferação  de  impacto”.  No   entanto,   a   partir   da   metade   de   Estudo   a   nova   estratégia   se   estende   às   às   transformações   texturais  e  torna-­‐se  predominante.  Veremos  que  o  modelo  visual  não  é  norma,  o  que  permite   sua  intermodulação  com  as  estratégias  de  escrita.    

Figura 13:  a  linha  pontilhada  e  os  contornos  sugerem  transformações  por  “emergência”.      

Quando comentamos  sobre  o  desenho,  vimos  que  havia  a  intenção  de  que  os  eventos  

fossem contrastantes   aos   estados:   sendo   estes   texturais   e   estáticos,   com   conjuntos   harmônicos   definidos,   os   eventos   deveriam,   ao   menos   no   princípio,   ser   gestuais   e   38  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


harmonicamente conflitantes.   Entretanto,   na   etapa   seguinte,   passam   a   ser   concebidos   de   modo   a   “contaminar”   os   estados,   morfológica   e   harmonicamente,   ainda   que   mantendo   a   oposição  gestual  X  textural  (exemplo:  figura  9).    

As “emergências   texturais”   que   ocorrem   a   partir   do   c.36   iniciam   um   processo   que  

conduz à   indiferenciação,   textural   e   harmônica.   Inicialmente   através   de   arpejos,   misturando   os  conjuntos,  depois  através  de  escalas,  com  fragmentos  de  tons  inteiros  e  cromatismos,  até   um   ponto   de   saturação   (c.59)   que   relega   a   alguns   poucos   trinados   resquícios   dos   estados   anteriores.    

As transformações   subsequentes   são   mais   incisivas:   escalas   tornam-­‐se   amplos  

glissandos; estes  são  transformados  numa  textura  de  multifônicos  superpostos.  

Figura 14:  Estudo,  c.35-­‐39.  

Figura 15:  Estudo,  c.59.  

A   imagem   acústica   inicial   previa   uma   textura   contínua,   a   princípio   estática,   com   certa   “plasticidade”  dentro  de  alguns  limites,  sobre  a  qual  contrastariam  os  primeiros  eventos.  Para   tornar   sonora   esta   característica,   ausente   a   partir   do   segundo   modo   de   visualização   (após   a   passagem  pela  partitura),  optou-­‐se  por  “borrar”  a  definição  harmônica  através  de  oscilações   microtonais  em  torno  das  alturas  sustentadas  (observável  na  figura  9).      

39

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


5.2 –  Durações  e  espaço   Na   tentativa   de   concretizar   a   imagem   acima,   era   preciso   que   também   as   durações   permitissem  tal  plasticidade,  ainda  que  a  textura  progrida  lentamente.  A  solução  encontrada  -­‐   aplicada   tanto   às   propagações   no   espaço   das   alturas   quanto   dos   instrumentos   no   palco   -­‐   foi   a   criação  de  uma  espécie  de  talea  global12.   A   característica   deste   dispositivo   seria   repetir-­‐se   sempre   associado   a   uma   nova   conformação   de   alturas   e/ou   alternância   entre   os   instrumentos.   A   “talea”   é   constituída   de   agrupamentos  de  6,  8,  6,  5,  7,  6  e  5  semicolcheias,  uma  espécie  de  oscilação  irregular  que  se   repete   a   cada   43   durações   (aproximadamente   16''   no   andamento   inicial   da   peça),   sensível   apenas   como   ligeira   oscilação   em   torno   de   uma   duração   média.   No   decorrer   da   peça   a   necessidade  por  um  aumento  na  taxa  de  movimentação  global  leva  a  reduções  proporcionais   segundo  uma  regra  arbitrária:  a  soma  deveria  sempre  resultar  num  número  primo.   Com   relação   ao   espaço,   como   a   talea   posiciona   as   mudanças   uma   após   a   outra,   de   um   instrumento   a   outro,   e   como   no   desenho   havia   a   intenção   de   considerar   a   propagação   dos   elementos   também   na   “panorâmica”   (evitando   uma   espécie   de   “monotonia   espacial”),   mapeou-­‐se   quais   combinações   poderia   se   obter   com   a   disposição   tradicional   do   quarteto   (figura  16).  Não  foi  considerada  uma  distribuição  do  tipo  “aleatória”,  mas  alterações  na  ordem   dos   instrumentos   seguem   o   princípio   de   “omissão”   relativo   às   alturas:   em   certos   momentos   um   instrumento   não   realiza   a   mudança   prevista,   invertendo   a   ordem   com   aquele   que   a   realizaria  em  sua  sequência,  o  que  permitiu  variar  a  disposição  espacial  dentro  da  estrutura   da  talea,  sem  romper  o  movimento  contínuo  da  textura.       Considerações  finais   A   conversão   de   uma   imagem   acústica   em   imagem   visual   permite     manipulações   que   são   da   ordem   do   visual,   posteriormente   convertidas   em   sonoras   na   escritura   instrumental,   ou   seja,   manipula-­‐se   sonoridades   e   processos   sonoros   através   de   estratégias   visuais.   O   interessante   nesse   modelo   é   a   abordagem   da   visualidade   considerando   o   dinamismo   temporal.   O   que   se   percebe   desde   a   primeira   etapa   do   processo   criativo   de   Estudo   é   que   o   próprio   esboço   visual   da   peça   (o   desenho)   influencia   o   processo   composicional,   trazendo   elementos   de   “legibilidade   acústica”   para   relacionarem-­‐se   com   o   detalhamento   na   partitura:   a   participação   ativa   da   visualidade   na   elaboração   das   estratégias   composicionais   torna   o   jogo   mais   complexo   ao   explicitar   elementos   e   relações   de   outros   sentidos   que   permeiam   o                                                                                                                   12    Como  não  há  uma  fixidez  de  qual  instrumentista  toca  qual  altura,  e  sabendo  que  a  projeção  do  som  no   clarinete  tende  a  variar  pelo  registro,  não  há  um  controle  preciso  sobre  a  projeção  do  som  no  espaço  acústico.  

40

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


território sonoro.   Neste   forma   de   compor   o   modelo   não   é   molde:   não   há   elemento   gerador   de  

unidade, o  processo  é  modulado  por  relações  flexíveis.   Figura  16:  mapeamento  da  passagem  entre  os  instrumentos.  

Figura 17:  detalhe  dos  rascunhos  de  Estudo.  No  exemplo,  a  associação  talea,  sequência  de  notas,  disposição   espacial.    

Uma consequência   desta   abordagem   seria   uma   dinâmica   de   influência   recíproca   entre   materiais   e   estruturas.   Como   exemplo,   a   talea   utilizada   na   peça   agiu   sobre   o   material,   condicionou   algumas   morfologias;   mas   o   material   reagiu,   impôs   modificações   à   talea   (suas  

41

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


contrações e   expansões);   e   assim   sucessivamente,   numa   espécie   de   tensão   entre   o   ato   de   desenhar  livremente  e  o  posterior  detalhamento  composicional13.     Como  o  compromisso  é  com  o  resultado  musical,  não  se  trata  de  fazer  música  descritiva,   de  seguir  o  desenho  à  risca,  mas  de  proliferar  possibilidades  a  partir  da  influência  recíproca   entre   dois   campos   de   fabulação   que,   na   escuta,   podem   ser   tão   visuais   quanto   sonoros:   desenho  e  partitura.     Agradecimentos   Agradeço   ao   meu   orientador,   o   compositor   e   professor   Dr.   Silvio   Ferraz,   pelo   estímulo   e   ensinamentos,  teóricos  e  composicionais.   Agradeço  ao  Programa  de  Pós-­‐Graduação  em  Música  e  ao  Fundo  de  Apoio  ao  Ensino,  à   Pesquisa  e  Extensão  (FAEPEX),  ambos  da  Unicamp,    por  fornecerem  grande  parte  do  auxílio   financeiro  necessário  à  minha  participação  neste  evento.   Agradeço  à  Universidade  Estadual  de  Londrina  (UEL),  em  especial  ao  Departamento  de   Música  e  Teatro  e  ao  Centro  de  Educação,  Comunicação  e  Artes,  pelo  suporte  para  concessão     da  minha  licença  docente  e  também  pelo  auxílio  financeiro.   Agradeço  ao  quarteto  “Da  Capo”  por  aceitarem  interpretar  minha  peça.   Por   fim,   parabenizo   e   agradeço   à   Universidade   de   Évora,   ao   seu   diretor,   Dr.   Christopher   Brochmann,   e   em   especial   a   Zoltan   Paulinyi,   pela   aceitação   de   minha   peça,   pelas   atenciosas   respostas  às  minhas  dúvidas  e  pela  organização  do  evento.     Referências   Angius,   M.   (2007).   Vanitas   e   Altre   Anamorfosi.   In   Come   avvicinare   il   silenzio:   la   musica   di   salvatore  sciarrino.  (pp.85-­‐100).  Roma:  Rai  Eri.   Delalande,   F.   (2001).   Le   Son   des   Musiques:   entre   technologie   et   esthétique.   Paris:   Buchet/Chastel.   Ferraz,   S.   (1997).   Cadernos   de   análises.   Acedido   em   Dez.   16,   2011,   em   http://silvioferraz.mus.br/desenhos_analises/varese_desenho.html     Ferraz,  S.  &  Ficagna,  A.  (2011).  Escrever  o  som  sem  desfazer  o  tempo:  visualidade  e  composição   de  sonoridades.  Artigo  aguardando  parecer  para  publicação.     Giacco,  G.  (2010).  La  notion  de  figure  chez  Salvatore  Sciarrino.  Paris:  Harmattan.                                                                                                                  

13  Segundo   Lachenmann:   “Não   creio   que   possamos   fazer   sem   pensar   em   termos   de   estrutura.   Mas   é   necessário  que  um  tal  pensamento,  e  que  as  próprias  técnicas  estruturais,  sejam  sem  cessar  questionadas  e  se   encontrem  confrontadas  com  a  realidade,  isto  é,  aos  aspectos  reais  do  material  -­‐  é  necessário  que  elas  se  percam,   se  reencontrem  e  se  redefinam.”  (LACHENMANN,  1991,  p.  270)  

42

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Gibson, B.  (2010).  Drawing  musical  ideas.  Iannis  Xenakis  Symposium:  past,  present,  and  future,   1.   New   York.   Acedido   em   Ago.   30,   2011,   em   http://bxmc.poly.edu/xenakis/gibson-­‐ benoît     Lachenmann,   H.   (1991).   Quatre   aspects   fondamentaux   du   material   musical   et   de   l’écoute.   Inharmoniques,  8/9,  261-­‐270.   Ligeti,  G.  (1993).  States,  Events,  Transformations.  Pespectives  of  New  Music,  31-­‐1,  164-­‐171.   Sciarrino,  S.  (1998).  La  figura  della  musica,  da  Beethoven  a  oggi.  Milão:  Ricordi.   Schaeffer,  P.  (1966).  Traité  des  Objets  Musicaux.  Paris:  Seuil.   Siqueira,  A.  R.  (2006).  O  Percurso  Composicional  de  Giacinto  Scelsi:  improvisação,  orientalismo  e   escritura.  Dissertação  de  Mestrado  em  Música.  Belo  Horizonte:  Universidade  Federal  de   Minas  Gerais.   Solomos,   M.   (2001).   Xenakis   as   a   sound   sculptor.   Acedido   em   Ago.   25,   2011,   em     http://www.univ-­‐montp3.fr/~solomos/xenakas.html     Xenakis,  I.  (1971).  Musique;  Architecture.  Tournai:  Casterman.   Xenakis,   I.   (1963).   Musique   Formelles.   Paris:   La   revue   musicale.   Acedido   em   Abr.   23,   2008,   http://www.iannis-­‐xenakis.org/fxe/ecrits/mus_form.html.       Pequena  biografia  sobre  o  autor   Alexandre  Ficagna  é  graduado  em  Música  (Licenciatura)  pela  Universidade   Estadual   de   Londrina   (UEL),   onde   trabalha   atualmente   como   professor   colaborador.   Possui   Mestrado   em   Música   (Processos   Criativos)   pela   Universidade   Estadual   de   Campinas   (Unicamp),   com   orientação   da   compositora   e   professora   Dra.   Denise   Garcia.   Cursa   Doutorado   na   mesma   área   de   concentração,   também   pela   Unicamp,   com   orientação   do   compositor   e   professor   Dr.   Silvio   Ferraz.   Suas   composições   foram   executadas   em   diversas   cidades   brasileiras   (Londrina,   Curitiba,   Campinas,   São   Paulo,   Belo   Horizonte   e   Natal).   Recentemente   foi   um   dos   59   contemplados   com   o   XIX   Prêmio   Funarte   de   Composição   Clássica,  com  o  trio  "Vento  na  Janela".    

43

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Aspectos Analíticos  Texturais  da  Peça  Interdependências  para   Quarteto  de  Clarinetas  

J. Orlando  Alves  (Universidade  Federal  da  Paraíba  –  UFPB,  Brasil)   jorlandoalves2006@gmail.com Abstract:  This  article  aims  to  describe  aspects  of  the  textural  composition  planning  applied  in   the   composition   of   the   piece   Interdependências   for   clarinet   quartet.   The   compositional   planning  uses  analytical  tools  to  generate  the  clusters  or  sound  mass  in  the  composition.  The   qualitative   formulation,   inspired   by   Wallace   Berry,   went   applied   to   calculate   the   textural   conduct.     Resumo:   O  artigo  tem  como  objetivo  descrever  aspectos  do  planejamento  textural  utilizado   na   composição   da   peça   Interdependências  para   Quarteto   de   Clarinetas.   O   planejamento   utiliza   de   ferramentas   analíticas   para   moldar   os   desdobramentos   de   agregados   sonoros   na   composição.  A  formulação  qualitativa,  proposta  por  Wallace  Berry,  foi  aplicada  para  prever  o   comportamento  textural.   Introdução A peça Interdependências, composta para quarteto de clarinetas, foi dedicada e estreada pelo Quarteto Experimental16, no ano de 2009, na série de concertos do Grupo Prelúdio 2117, realizados no Centro Cultural da Justiça Federal do Rio de Janeiro. O princípio que norteou o planejamento composicional da peça foi buscar o controle do grau diferenciado de independência e interdependência entre as camadas texturais. Utilizamos, como referencial teórico no planejamento composicional, a formulação analítica textural proposta por Berry (1987) que busca representar numericamente as relações texturais de independência e interdependência. Esse referencial foi adotado também no planejamento das Disposições Texturais (cinco peças para piano solo), compostas pelo autor do presente artigo em 2003 e descritas analiticamente na tese de doutorado intitulada Invariâncias e Disposições Texturais: do Planejamento Composicional à Reflexão sobre o Processo Criativo (Alves, 2005).

                                                                                                              16 O Quarteto Experimental é formado pelos clarinetistas: Thiago Tavares, Walter Junior, Marcelo Ferreira, Ricardo Ferreira   17 Grupo de compositores formado por Alexandre Schubert, Caio Senna, Neder Nassaro, Marcos Lucas, J. Orlando Alves e Sergio Roberto de Oliveira. O grupo iniciou suas atividades em novembro de 1998. Em 2011, finalizou a 4ª temporada de nove concertos realizados no Centro Cultural da Justiça Federal do Rio de Janeiro. O artigo Prelúdio 21: uma retrospectiva, publicado pela revsita Hodie (Alves & Oliveira, 2011), apresenta um histórico dos treze anos de existência do grupo.

44

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


O planejamento e a realização musical A peça foi estruturada em três seções: uma introdução (comp. 1 a 11), o desenvolvimento (comp. 12 a 54) e uma coda (comp. 55 ao final). A introdução e a coda iniciam com um multifônico, utilizado como recurso tímbrico para demarcar o início das referidas seções. Na introdução é apresentada, gradualmente, a relação de interdependência que será, posteriormente, desenvolvida. Podemos demonstrar essa relação através da formulação de Berry: 1

1 1

2

1 1

3

1 1

1 1 1 1

4

A figura abaixo apresenta os seus compassos iniciais da peça, onde podemos visualizar a interdependência entre a 2ª e a 3ª clarinetas no comp. 3 e a interdependência de três camadas (1ª, 2ª e 3ª clarinetas) no comp. 6.

Fig. 1: seis compassos iniciais da peça.

No desenvolvimento (comp. 12 a 54) ocorre uma intensificação da relação de interdependência, como podemos verificar na figura abaixo, que apresenta os compassos 22 a 26 da peça.

45

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Fig. 2: trecho do desenvolvimento com a intensificação da interdependência entre as camadas

Nessa seção (comp. 35 a 38) também ocorre a gradação planejada da interdependência que vai, pouco a pouco se destacando. Logo após os três compassos de total independência (39 a 41), a relação de interdependência volta, também gradualmente, a tomar espaço. Podemos sintetizar essa idéia na formulação analítica de Berry: 4

3 1

2 1 1

1 2 1

1 1 1 1

1 2 1

1 3

4

A coda (comp. 55 ao final) retoma e intensifica a utilização do multifônico. Essa utilização é interpolada por clusters, articulados em trinados, que se remete também a idéia da interdependência. Conclusão A composição da peça Interdependências foi concebida a partir de um planejamento textural prévio, que traçou procedimentos de inserção da relação de independência e interdependência entre as quatro camadas da instrumentação proposta. No presente trabalho, caracterizamos e exemplificamos a utilização desses procedimentos texturais que nortearam o discurso musical da peça. Como previsto no planejamento, os procedimentos texturais pontuaram o fluxo do discurso sonoro, garantindo o interesse musical. Referências ALVES, J.   Orlando   (2005).   Invariâncias   e   Disposições   Texturais:   do   planejamento   composicional   à   reflexão   sobre   o   processo   criativo.   Tese   de   Doutorado   em   Música.   Universidade  Estadual  de  Campinas.     46  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


BERRY, Wallace   (1987).   Structural   Functions   in   Music.   New   York,   Dover   Publications   inc.,   1976.   ALVES,  J.  Orlando;  OLIVEIRA,  Sergio  Roberto  (2011).  Prelúdio  21:  uma  retrospectiva.  Revista   Hodie,  

Goiânia,

vol.

11,

no.

1,

p.

67-­‐86.

Disponível

em:

http://www.musicahodie.mus.br/11.1/Musica%20Hodie_111.pdf

47

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


O uso  de  metáforas  e  elementos  poli-­‐estilísticos  em  “Vem  dos   Quatro  Ventos  -­‐  Ez.  37:9”,  para  quarteto  de  Clarinetas.   Dr.  Marcos  Vieira  Lucas  (Universidade  Federal  do  Estado  do  Rio  de  Janeiro  -­‐  UNIRIO,  Brasil)   m.v.lucas@uol.com.br Resumo:   Neste   artigo,   discuto   questões   relativas   às   técnicas   de   composição   utilizadas   em   “Vem   dos   Quatro   Ventos   (Ez.   37:9)”,   para   quarteto   de   clarinetas.     Lido   particularmente   com   o   uso  de  metáforas  e  técnicas  poli-­‐estilísticas  desenvolvidas  por  Alfred  Schnittke.     Palavras-­‐chave:  metáfora,  poli-­‐estilismo,  técnicas  expandidas.     Abstract:   In   this   article,   I   focus   on   issues   related   to   the   compositional   techniques   used   in   “Vem   dos   Quatro   Ventos   (Ez.   37:9)”,   for   clarinet   quartet.   I   deal   particularly   with   the   use   of   metaphors  and  polistilistic  techniques  developed  by  Alfred  Schnittke.     Key  words:  metaphor,  polistylism,  extended  techniques.  

Introdução: Pode-se pensar o ato da criação artística, metaforicamente, como um dar vida a algo inanimado, ou ainda, numa visão mais poética, como um sopro de vida que ressuscita alguém da morte. Tal foi a visão do profeta Ezequiel (37:9) quando, guiado pela mão de Deus, viu-se subitamente transportado a um vale repleto de ossos humanos secos e que foram trazidos de volta à vida pela intercessão divina. A passagem inspirou o primeiro movimento de minha obra “Vem dos Quatro Ventos – Ez.37:9”, para quarteto de clarinetas1. O texto bíblico citado abaixo é uma passagem conhecida como “a visão dos ossos secos”: “Veio sobre  mim  a  mão  do  Senhor;  ele  me  levou  pelo  Espírito  do  Senhor  e  me  deixou   no   meio   de   um   vale   que   estava   cheio   de   ossos,   e   me   fez   andar   ao   redor   deles;   eram   mui   numerosos   na   superfície   do   vale   e   estavam   sequíssimos.   Então   me   perguntou:   Filho   do   homem,   acaso,   poderão   reviver   esses   ossos?   Respondi:   Senhor   Deus,   tu   o   sabes.   Disse-­‐me   ele:   Profetiza   a   esses   ossos   e   dize-­‐lhes:   Ossos   secos,   ouvi   a   palavra   do   Senhor  Assim  diz  o  Senhor  Deus  a  esses  ossos:  Eis  que  farei  entrar  o  espírito  em  vós,  e   vivereis.   Porei   tendões   em   vós,   farei   crescer   carne   sobre   vós,   sobre   vós   estenderei   pele   e   porei   em   vós   o   espírito,   e   vivereis.   E   sabereis   que   eu   sou   o   Senhor.   Então   profetizei  segundo  me  fora  ordenado  ;  enquanto  eu  profetizava,  houve  um  ruído,  um   barulho  de  ossos  que  batiam  contra  ossos  e  se  ajuntavam,  cada  osso  ao  seu  osso.  Olhei,   e  eis  que  havia  tendões  sobre  eles,  e  cresceram  as  carnes,  e  se  estendeu  a  pele  sobre   eles,  mas  não  havia  neles  o  espírito.”  

                                                                                                             

1 Composta em 2010, “Vem dos Quatro Ventos – Ez. 37:9” foi encomendada pelo Quarteto Experimental e estreada por este grupo no Espaço Cultural Sérgio Porto no Rio de Janeiro em Setembro de 2010, num dos concertos da série “Prelúdio 21 - Compositores do Presente”. O grupo Prelúdio 21 foi fundado em 1998 e é formado por seis compositores: Alexandre Schubert, Neder Nassaro, Marcos Lucas, Caio Senna, José Orlando Alves, e Sérgio Roberto de Oliveira, e tem por finalidade divulgar sua própria música através de concertos, palestras e entrevistas. Para maiores informações ver: ALVES e OLIVEIRA (2010).

48

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Primeiro Movimento: O primeiro movimento - O Breath - reflete, em seu início, esta visão dos ossos secos, esqueletos que vão aos poucos, através da pregação do profeta Ezequiel, tomando vida, com os tendões, músculos e a carne sendo incorporados aos ossos. Esta visão é “dramatizada” pelo quarteto, que inicia a música com ruídos de ar sem altura definida e ruído das chaves (key slaps), como os ruídos dos ossos se juntando, descritos pelo profeta, (C 1-8, Ex. 1)

Gradualmente o  2º  e  3º  clarinetes  vão  aderindo  a  esta  textura  ruidosa  até  que  o  clarinete   baixo  -­‐  aqui  pensado  como  a  figura  de  Ezequiel  -­‐  “profetiza  aos  ossos”  o  que  é  musicalmente   representado  através  de  pequenos  e  rápidos  fragmentos  melódicos  e  sons  multifônicos  (C.18   a  22,  Ex.  2).    

Mas   faltava   ainda   algo   fundamental   para   que   esses   corpos   pudessem   voltar   à   vida:   O   sopro   divino,   representado   pelo   espírito   que   vem   dos   quatro   ventos   e   assopra   o   ar   nos   pulmões  dos  corpos  inanimados.  Esses  vão  então,  aos  poucos,  se  pondo  de  pé  revelando  um   grande  exército  de  guerreiros  de  Israel  retornando  à  vida.  A  passagem  continua  assim:   “Então   ele   me   disse:   Profetiza   ao   espírito,   profetiza   ó   filho   do   homem,   e   dize-­‐lhe:   Assim   diz   o   Senhor   Deus:   Vem   dos   Quatro   Ventos,   ó   espírito,   e   assopra   sobre   esses   mortos,  para  que  vivam.  Profetizei  como  ele  me  ordenara  e  o  espírito  entrou  neles  e   viveram,  e  se  puseram  em  pé,  um  exército  sobremodo  numeroso”  

49

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Aos poucos os outros clarinetes vão aderindo a essa textura de rápidos fragmentos melódicos e a seção atinge um primeiro clímax no compasso 29. Aqui aparece o primeiro som com altura definida claramente perceptível, pois antes deste momento nenhum som, isoladamente, teve tempo de se destacar da textura. Este dó sustenido é distribuído por três oitavas no ensemble e, nos compassos seguintes, cede lugar a um primeiro acorde: uma tríade maior na primeira inversão com um trítono (G-C#) na voz aguda. Este acorde-motivo é uma espécie de ‘assinatura musical’ que tenho empregado em muitas das obras que compus recentemente, geralmente aparecendo em importantes momentos de articulação formal. (C. 28-31, Ex. 3).

O clarinete baixo ressurge expressivamente num recitativo ornamentado que reitera esta coleção de notas do acorde-motivo, mas acrescenta também outras notas importantes em sua “pregação”, principalmente o fá 2, que mantém relação de trítono inferior com o baixo (Si3) do acorde-motivo (C. 34-44 somente clarinete baixo, Ex. 4).

O   processo   harmônico   que   se   instaura   a   partir   deste   recitativo   do   clarinete   baixo   promove   uma   transformação   gradual   do   acorde-­‐motivo   que,   após   ser   reiterado   e   distorcido   nos  clarinetes  1,  2  e  3,  agora  se  transforma  em  dois  trítonos  superpostos:  fá-­‐si  /  dó#-­‐sol  (C.   44-­‐48,  Ex.  5)  

50

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Há um retorno momentâneo à textura dos compassos 26-28 - o ruído do sopro sem altura definida (C.49-50) - após o qual a música dirige-se a um segundo clímax, sobre a nota ré distribuída pelo ensemble em quatro oitavas. Esta passagem de caráter marcial remete à idéia do exército numeroso que se levanta de volta à vida. As vozes extremas mantém um pedal duplo sobre a nota ré, enquanto que as vozes centrais vão caminhando por movimento contrário, cromaticamente, gerando tensão harmônica. (C.54-59, Ex. 6)

Após  um  curto  trecho  de  certa  independência  polifônica  o  movimento  termina  em  uma   cadência  que  re-­‐contextualiza  o  trítono  si-­‐fá,  dos  compassos  46  e  47  em  novo  acorde  quartal   (C.60-­‐63,  Ex.  7)  

51  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Segundo Movimento: O segundo movimento é uma pequena fantasia em homenagem ao compositor russo Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998). Este ficou conhecido por sua estética poli-estilística que apresentava, entre outros recursos: citações (literais ou modificadas) a distorção, o grotesco, a paródia, o humor e a ironia. Tais características, que marcaram sua produção composicional aproximadamente entre os anos de 1967 e 1988, foram particularmente desenvolvidas em obras como a Segunda Sonata para violino “Quasi una Sonata” (1967-68) ou no Concerto Grosso No1 (1977). Na Fantasia, me aproprio livremente de alguns dos traços do poli-estilismo Schnittkeano, entre eles a citação (literal e modificada), a distorção, e o humor. Após uma curta introdução de doze compassos inicia-se a primeira seção, onde uma citação (não literal) do primeiro movimento dos “Noturnos” de Debussy (Nuages) é estabelecida pelo ensemble (C. 13-16, Ex. 8).

Esta textura é, em seguida, re-apresentada de maneira variada nos clarinetes 1 e 2, agora com as alturas derivadas da escala de tons inteiros (coleção: Bb, C, E, F#, G#), para em seguida sofrer interferência do clarinete 3 e clarinete baixo. Estes últimos apresentam material contrastante tanto pelas alturas utilizadas (coleção: Eb, F, F#, A, B) nos ostinati com dinâmica e articulação e andamento diferentes (C. 17-20, Ex. 9).

52

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Aos poucos o contraste vai se intensificando, tornando-se mais agressivo, como uma discussão, até que o primeiro clarinete desliga-se da textura e inicia outra citação -desta vez literal do concerto para clarinete e orquestra em Lá Maior (K662) de Mozart. O ensemble, aos poucos, parece “contagiar-se” com a música Mozarteana e adere gradativamente à textura literal do acompanhamento do concerto (C.35-37, Ex.10).

Esta teatralidade   dos   instrumentistas   é   outra   característica   marcante   da   música   de   Schnittke,  influenciada  por  sua  atuação  como  compositor  de  música  incidental  e  desenvolvida   em  obras  como  a  Segunda  Sonata,  mencionada  acima,  como  afirma  Peter  Schmelz:   “Em  um  nível  criativo  fundamental,  a  sonata  estava  enraizada  no  drama.  A  Quasi   una   Sonata,  e  especialmente  seu  motivo  B-­‐A-­‐C-­‐H,  foram  baseados  na  partitura  de  Schnittke   para   o   desenho   animado   Glass  Harmonica   (Steklyannaya  garmonika)2.   (Schmelz,   2009,   p.255)  

Uma série  de  arpejos  descendentes  do  acorde  de  Ré  maior  -­‐  elemento  aqui  usado  com   certa   carga   de   humor   -­‐   faz   uma   transição   para   a   próxima   seção   (C.48-­‐58)   que   se   configura   como   uma   versão   bastante   distorcida   do   tema   do   concerto   Mozarteano,   aqui   apresentado   nos   violinos  1  e  2  sobre  uma  textura  estática  no  registro  grave  dos  demais,  como  uma  espécie  de   lamento  que  finaliza  a  obra  (C.  48-­‐52,  Ex.  11).  

                                                                                                              2  “On   a   fundamental   creative   level,   the   sonata   was   rooted   in   drama.   The   Quasi  una  Sonata,   and   especially   its   B-­‐A-­‐ C-­‐H  movive,  were  drawn  from  Schnittke´s  score  to  the  cartoon  Glass  Harmonica  (Steklyannaya  garmonika)”  

53

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Considerações Finais: Vem dos Quatro Ventos é uma obra singela que lida com a questão da criação musical: o trabalho composicional, o artesanato e técnica por um lado, e inspiração (ou intuição) por outro. Seu primeiro movimento é centrado na questão da representação musical através de metáforas, e para isso faz uso de técnicas expandidas como os ruídos de chaves e o sopro sem alturas definidas. No primeiro movimento, encontramos na passagem de Ezequiel 37:9 um texto instigante, tanto em termos de sua significação, como metáfora da criação musical, quanto na sua imagem poética, da qual tiramos partido para concepção geral da obra. Na Fantasia, recorre-se à citação, literal ou não, que é então submetida à diferentes contextos através da distorção e humor, traços presentes na música de Alfred Schnittke. A formação de um compositor envolve o aprendizado de muitas disciplinas como harmonia, contraponto, instrumentação e orquestração, análise, técnicas de composição eletroacústica, música assistida por computador, entre outras. Embora não constituam a composição em si mesma, essas disciplinas são as ferramentas fundamentais que, uma vez articuladas de maneira coerente e original, são as possíveis causas do sucesso de uma obra. Mas existe algo que está além da aquisição destas ferramentas e do domínio das técnicas de composição, e que se manifesta de maneira mais ou menos subjetiva, nem sempre de forma racional. A inspiração, como sugere Jonathan Harvey em seu instigante trabalho sobre o assunto é a “causa oculta”: “pode ser   quase   impossível   para   o   ouvinte   apontar   a   sua   presença   na   obra   acabada,   por   outro   lado,   sem   ela   a   obra   não   possuiria   a   individualidade   pela   qual,   presumivelmente,   nós   a   admiramos.   Inspiração   é   ao   mesmo   tempo   a   influência   mais   misteriosa   em   uma   obra,   e   a   mais   fundamental,   porque   sem   ela   a   identidade   essencial   da  obra  estaria  perdida”  (Harvey,  1999,  p.  x)3.  

                                                                                                             

3 “it   may   be   almost   impossible   for   the   listener   to   pinpoint   its   presence   in   the   finished   work,   yet   without   it   the   work   would   not   have   the   individuality   for   which,   presumably,   we   admire   it.   Inspiration   is   at   once   the   most   mysterious   influence   on   the   work,   and   the   most   fundamental,   because   without   it   the   work´s   essential   identity   would  be  lost”.  

54

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Longe de   querer   discutir   neste   curto   texto   a   pertinência   ou   abrangência   do   termo   “inspiração”,  o  que  Harvey  já  fez  brilhantemente  em  seu  trabalho,  chamo  a  atenção  para  o  fato   de   que   um   dos   significados   correntes   da   palavra   remete   ao   processo   pelo   qual   se   inspira   ar   para  os  pulmões,  uma  interessante  analogia  com  a  passagem  de  Ezequiel  aqui  tomada  como   uma  instância  metafórica  da  criação  artística.   Referências Bibliográficas: ALVES, J.Orlando; OLIVEIRA, Sérgio Roberto. Grupo Prelúdio 21: Uma retrospectiva. In: Musica Hodie

Vol.

11,

No.

1

/

2011.

Disponível

em:

http://www.musicahodie.mus.br/11.1/Musica%20Hodie_111.pdf A BIBLIA SAGRADA, Antigo e Novo Testamento. Tradução para o português por João Ferreira de Almeida. 2ª edição no Brasil, revista e atualizada. São Paulo: Sociedade Bíblica do Brasil, 1993. HARVEY, Jonathan. Music and Inspiration. London, Faber and Faber Limited, 1999. SCHMELZ, Peter J. Such Freedom, if Only Musical – Unofficial Soviet Music during the Thaw. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2009. Marcos Lucas  -­‐  Professor  adjunto,  membro  do  PPGM  e  lotado  no  Departamento  de  Música  da   Universidade  Federal  do  Estado  do  Rio  de  Janeiro  –  UNIRIO  (2002).    Bacharel  em  Composição   Musical   pela   UNIRIO   (1990),   Mestre   em   Composição   pela   UFRJ   (1994),   e   Doutor   em   Música   pela   University   of   Manchester   (1999).   Premiado   em   diversos   concursos   de   composição   no   Brasil  e  Exterior.  Atualmente  realiza  Estágio  Sênior  na  University  of  Salford  -­‐  UK,  na  área  de   Ópera  e  Music  Theatre.  

55

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Mensagens para  o  passado:  “V  mhlách...  1912”     Sérgio  Azevedo  (ESML  –  Portugal)   sergioazevedo68@gmail.com   Abstract.     The   piano   quartet   V   mhlách…   1912   (In   the   mists…   1912),   written   in   2010,   is   based   in   three   fragments  from  V  mhlách,  a  piano-­‐cycle  of  four  pieces,  written  in  1912  by  Moravian  composer   Leoš   Janáček.   This   piece   follows   several   other   pieces   where   I   use,   as   a   departure   point,   elements   from   pieces   from   other   composers:   Lopes-­‐Graça,   Mozart,   Schubert,   etc.   This   process   is  a  form  of  communication  –  through  the  ages  –  with  my  musical  loves,  as  it  develops  some   fragments   towards   unknown   regions.   The   music   resulting   from   this   process,   similar   to   the   hypothetic   cloning   of   vanished   animals   from   fragments   of   DNA,   is   also   a   by-­‐product   of   the   present  age,  something  unavoidable.  The  goal  is  not  re-­‐compose  “in  the  style  of”,  but  melting   present  and  past  in  a  new,  ageless      language,  a  musical  language  working  as  my  private  time-­‐ machine.   Keywords:  quotation,  temporal  communication,  music  as  time  machine.     Resumo.     O   quarteto   com   piano   V  mhlách…  1912   (Nas  brumas…  1912),   escrito   em   2010,   baseia-­‐se   um   três   fragmentos   de   V   mhlách,   ciclo   de   quatro   peças   para   piano,   escritas   em   1912   pelo   compositor  moravo  Leoš  Janáček.  Esta  peça  insere-­‐se  no  seguimento  de  outras  obras  minhas   que   utilizam,   como   ponto   de   partida,   elementos   de   peças   de   diversos   compositores:   Lopes-­‐ Graça,   Mozart,   Schubert,   etc.   Este   processo   é   uma   forma   de   comunicar   –   através   das   eras   –   com  os  meus  amores  musicais,  ao  desenvolver  em  direcções  insuspeitadas  alguns  fragmentos.   Processo   semelhante   a   uma   hipotética   clonagem   de   seres   desaparecidos   a   partir   de   fragmentos   de   ADN,   a   música   resultante   é   porém   também   produto   da   era   actual,   como   não   podia   deixar   de   ser.   Não   se   trata   portanto   de   recompor   “ao   estilo   de”,   mas   de   fundir   presente   e  passado  numa  nova  linguagem  que  se  pretende,  precisamente,  intemporal,  e  que  funciona,  a   nível  pessoal,  como  a  minha  máquina  do  tempo  privada.   Palavras-­‐chaves:  citação,  comunicação  temporal,  música  como  máquina  do  tempo.        

Em 2010   o   Ensemble   Darcos,   com   o   qual   já   tinha   colaborado   em   concertos  

comentados, e  cujo  director  artístico,  o  compositor  Nuno  Corte-­‐Real  havia  sido  meu  aluno  na   ESML,   encomendou-­‐me   uma   obra   para   quarteto   com   piano.   Trata-­‐se   de   uma   formação   com   pouca   história   na   música   portuguesa,   havendo   muito   poucas   peças   para   essa   combinação   instrumental.   No   mesmo   concerto   seria   tocada   a   versão   reduzida   de   Riklada,   de   Janáček,   e   ainda  um  quarteto  com  piano  de  Brahms.  A  proximidade  com  um  dos  compositores  que  fazem   parte  do  meu  panteão  pessoal,  Janáček,  tornou  essa  encomenda  em  algo  muito  especial.  Já  há   vários  anos  que  em  certas  peças  utilizo  fragmentos  de  outras  obras  para  com  eles  construir   56  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


algo novo,   algo   que,   no   meu   universo   pessoal,   representa   uma   comunicação   com   o   passado,   uma   linha   directa   com   compositores   que,   para   mim,   são   muito   mais   do   que   meros   nomes   numa  enciclopédia:  fisicamente  desaparecidos,  vivem  porém  nas  suas  obras,  e  permitem-­‐me   comunicar  com  eles  através  do  meio  comum  que  nos  une:  a  composição  musical.     Escrever  uma  nova  obra  é  criar  um  novo  universo;  cada  começo  de  uma  nova  obra  é   um   novo   Big   Bang   que   despoleta   energia   e   forma   novos   mundos,   mundos   em   perpétua   expansão.   Sabia   que   Janáček   tivera   planos   para   um   trio   com   piano,   e   que   vários   motivos   da   Sonata   para   Violino   terão   sido   retirados   desse   projecto   que,   ou   nunca   foi   terminado,   ou   foi   destruído  pelo  compositor.  Não  querendo  porém  usar  fragmentos  dessa  maravilhosa  sonata,   por   diversas   razões   que   não   interessa   aqui   explicitar,   preferi   antes   ater-­‐me   a   um   ciclo   para   piano   escrito   em   1912,   intitulado   V   mhlách,   ou,   Nas   brumas.   Este   ciclo   representa   o   ponto   mais  alto  da  produção  para  piano  solo  do  compositor  moravo,  e  também  a  última  grande  obra   que  escreveu  para  esse  instrumento,  se  exceptuarmos  as  duas  peças  concertantes  dos  últimos   anos.  Escolhi  este  ciclo,  para  além  das  razões  pessoais  que  referi  não  querer  revelar,  também   pelo  facto  de  os  gestos  que  retirei  se  prestarem  a  ser  adaptados  à  formação  do  quarteto  com   piano.  Não  pretendi  sequer  esconder  a  origem  pianística  dos  três  fragmentos  seleccionados:   estes,   em   todos   os   casos,   são   ouvidos   somente   no   piano   em   várias   ocasiões,   ou   são   tocados   pelo  piano  num  contexto  em  que  as  cordas  fazem  outra  coisa  qualquer.     A  ideia  não  era  compor  “ao  estilo  de”,  nem  re-­‐compor  ou  imaginar  uma  nova  peça  tal   como  esta  seria  escrita  por  Janáček.  Pelo  contrário,  esta  música  nunca  poderia  ter  sido  escrita   em   1912,   nem   por   Janáček   nem   por   outro   compositor   qualquer.   O   que   pretendi,   tal   como   noutras  peças  semelhantemente  baseadas  em  música  de  outros  compositores,  música  que  uso   como  ponto  de  partida  (Mozart,  Schubert,  etc.),  foi,  de  certa  forma,  fundir   passado   e   presente,   unir   a   minha   linguagem   com   outra   linguagem,   criando   dessa   forma   um   objecto   novo   que   resulta  das  duas,  mas  que  o  faz  de  forma  inextrincável.  Trata-­‐se  de  algo  que  nada  tem  que  ver   nem   com   neo-­‐romantismos   ou   pós-­‐modernismos,   nem   com,   pior   ainda,   aquele   tipo   de   música   que   usa   as   citações   em   colagens   que   pretendem   criar   uma   dialéctica   de   confronto   entre   épocas  e  estilos,  mas  que  muitas  vezes  resulta  apenas  numa  caótica  acumulação  de  materiais   irreconciliáveis.     Se  me  viro  para  o  passado  em  busca  de  sentido  e  inspiração  para  o  presente  e  o  futuro,   terei  de  relembrar  Borges,  o  grande  escritor  argentino,  que  declarou  uma  vez  preferir  olhar   para   os   escritores   do   passado,   porque   os   seus   contemporâneos,   vivendo   na   mesma   época   que   ele,   tinham   grandes   probabilidades   de   escreverem   todos   como   ele,   ou   Borges   como   eles.   Olhando   para   uma   época   longínqua,   essa   possibilidade   atenua-­‐se.   Como   dizia   Madame   de   57  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Stäel, “Só  é  novo  o  que  está  esquecido”.  Não  indo  tão  longe,  e  embora  o  conto  Pierre   Ménard,   autor  do  Quixote,  do  mesmo  Borges,  a  esses  limites  nos  conduza,  lancei  o  meu  olhar  para  1912   e  para  esses  três  fragmentos,  todos  da  mesma  peça  do  ciclo  de  quatro:     Exemplo  1  -­‐  Janáček  “V  mhlách”  (A):  

  Exemplo  2  -­‐  Janáček  “V  mhlách”  (B):    

    Exemplo  3  -­‐  Janáček  “V  mhlách”  (C):  

   

Estes fragmentos   aparecem   por   esta   ordem   (a   mesma   por   que   aparecem   na   obra  

original), sendo   que   o   “C”   só   surge   no   quarteto   bastante   mais   tarde.   O   início   é   uma   mera   instrumentação   do   motivo   “A”,   a   que   se   segue   imediatamente   uma   versão   do   motivo   “B”   já   com  elementos  adicionais  que  o  transfiguram:    

58

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Exemplo 4  –  Azevedo  “V  mhlách…  1912”  (A):  

  Exemplo  5  –  Azevedo  “V  mhlách…  1912”  (B):    

 

59

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Exemplo 6  –  Azevedo  “V  mhlách…  1912”  (C):  

 

A obra   divide-­‐se   em   6   andamentos   tocados   “atacca”,   quase   todos   eles   lentos,   e   os   3  

fragmentos iniciais   dão   origem   a   diversos   contextos,   alguns   dos   quais   os   usam   em   novas   combinações,  como  no  exemplo  seguinte:     Exemplo  7  –  Azevedo  “V  mhlách…  1912”  (B  e  A):  

 

60  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Ou em  versões  que,  desses  motivos,  retiram  elementos  ainda  mais  básicos  (como  um   único  intervalo  melódico)  que  são  reiterados,  transformados,  etc.:     Exemplo  8  –  Azevedo  “V  mhlách…  1912”  (transformação  de  C):  

 

61

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Exemplo 9  –  Azevedo  “V  mhlách…  1912”  (outra  transformação  de  C):  

   

O grau   de   transformação   destes   fragmentos   vai   gradualmente   aumentando   até   que  

deles resta  somente  uma  memória  longínqua.  Apenas  no  fim  da  obra,  e  como  que  num  súbito   lampejo   dessa   memória   perdida   que,   num   instante,   se   desvanece   mais   uma   vez,   (desta   vez   para  sempre),  surge  novamente  o  motivo  “A”:    

62

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Exemplo 10  –  Azevedo  “V  mhlách…  1912”  (última  reiteração  do  motivo  A):  

63

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Exemplo 11  –  Azevedo  “V  mhlách…  1912”  (fim  da  obra):  

  A  utilização  dos  3  fragmentos  em  contextos  cuja  natureza  estilística  se  parece  com  a  de   Janáček  ou  a  da  sua  época,  a  transição  do  Romantismo  para  o  século  XX,  mas  não  é,  mercê  de   subtis   modificações   na   textura,   ritmo   ou   outros   parâmetros,   causa   um   efeito   de   estranheza   que   pode   ser   equiparado   ao   conceito   freudiano   de   “uncanny”   (“Das   Unheimliche”,   1919),   a   sensação  desconfortável  de  depararmos  com  algo  que  possui,  simultaneamente,  familiaridade   e  estranheza  devido  a  pequenos  pormenores  que  não  se  coadunam  com  o  original  que  nos  é   familiar.   Os   mecanismos   da   memória   contribuem   para   essa   sensação,   que   também   se   aproxima   do   “déjà-­‐vu”,   e   que   vários   artistas   utilizaram   de   forma   magistral   (Vertigo,   de   Hitchcock,   1958).   Kundera,   cuja   ligação   familiar   e   emocional   a   Janáček   é   conhecida,   usa   também   este   conceito   –   à   sua   maneira   –   em   vários   dos   seus   romances:   segundo   o   romancista,   o   nosso   desconforto   e   estranheza   não   surgem   quando   de   uma   nova   conquista,   com   uma   nova   mulher,  mas  com  aquela  mulher  que  já  foi,  outrora,  nossa  (o  mesmo  se  passando,  obviamente,   em  sentido  inverso  mulher-­‐homem).     V   mhlách…   1912   é   uma   obra   à   qual   esse   conceito   não   é   indiferente,   ao   explorar   materiais  que  nos  são  familiares,  mas  que  são  simultaneamente  apresentados  em  formas  que   os   tornam   inquietantes,   vagamente   estranhos,   porque   familiares   e   não-­‐familiares   ao   mesmo   tempo,   como   nesta   passagem   em   que   um   gesto   “tipicamente”   romântico   nunca   poderia   ter   64  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


sido escrito,   porém,   por   um   compositor   romântico,   mas   que   também   não   demonstra   à   evidência  porque  razão  nunca  o  poderia  ter  sido:     Exemplo  12  –  Azevedo  “V  mhlách…  1912”  (“Das  Unheimliche”):  

 

 

65

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Somente no   compasso   46   deste   exemplo,   os   “clusters”   no   piano   se   tornam  

efectivamente um   elemento   claramente   disruptivo,   embora   ainda   perfeitamente   integrados   no  “grand  geste”  abrangente  do  pianismo  ultra-­‐romântico  e  na  sua  virtuosidade  “maior  do  que   o  mundo”.  Não  chega  portanto  a  existir  um  verdadeiro  conflito  entre  o  piano  e  as  cordas,  que   continuam   a   sua   harmonia   tonal,   uma   vez   que   ambos   os   gestos,   não   obstante   a   diferença   harmónica,   se   integram,   como   gestos,   na   mesma   linguagem   romântica.   O   “cluster”   torna-­‐se   então   o   pequeno   elemento   de   estranheza,   aquilo   que   torna   o   momento   “uncanny”.   Neste   particular,  como  não  recordar  Mahler  e  Freud?  O  que  tornava  a  música  de  Mahler  “uncanny”   para   o   público   eram   aqueles   fragmentos   de   marchas   militares   e   de   música   popular   no   meio   das   sinfonias   e   ciclos   de   canções.   Não   porque   a   linguagem   de   um   ponto   de   vista   fosse   diferente   (toda   a   música   é   perfeitamente   tonal   e   estilisticamente   da   mesma   época),   mas   porque   aqueles   fragmentos   se   reportavam   a   contextos   sociais   e   estéticos   nos   antípodas   do   1st  International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   66   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


que era   suposto   ser   a   sala   de   concertos.   O   aparecimento   da   banalidade   na   grandeza,   disfarçada   com   as   mesmas   roupagens   tonais,   tornava   a   música   resultante   numa   fonte   de   estranheza  e  desconforto  estético.     Termino  lembrando  as  notas  de  programa  que  escrevi  para  V  mhlách…  1912:       Em   1912,   o   compositor   checo   Leoš   Janáček   escreveu   quatro   obras   para   piano   intituladas   V   mlhách   (“Nas   brumas”,   ou   “Por   entre   a   névoa”).   Do   século   XVIII   ao   XX   (inclusive)   e,   do   ponto   de   vista   da   mera   glosa,   desde   sempre,   tem   sido   hábito   dos   compositores  escreverem  variações  sobre  temas  alheios,  género  dos  mais  comuns  na   música   erudita   e   também   parte   integrante   do   mundo   do   jazz,   que   desde   há   muito   improvisa  sobre  os  “standards”  (temas  clássicos  de  jazz).  Porém,  o  que  me  interessou   nesta  obra  específica  não  foi  a  técnica  da  variação  sobre  um  tema,  mas  outro  processo   muito  mais  complexo.  O  que  me  fascina  é  a  metamorfose  poética  de  uma  ideia,  através   da  qual  entro  num  universo  que  já  não  existe,  qual  máquina  do  tempo  que  regressa  a   1912,   e   que   permite   modificar   à   minha   maneira   o   curso   da   História.   Três   curtos   fragmentos   iniciais   originam   as   metamorfoses   dos   dois   primeiros   andamentos,   e   ressoam,   embora   já   mais   longinquamente,   no   final   do   terceiro.   Neste   universo   paralelo,   Leoš   compõe   portanto   mais   peças   do   que   aquelas   que   efectivamente   nos   deixou,   e   numa   dessas   peças   impossíveis,   resolve   ampliar   algum   do   material   de   V   mlhách   para   um   quarteto   de   violino,   viola,   violoncelo   e   piano.   Sente,   inexplicavelmente,   que   está   em   comunhão   com   uma   época   muito   mais   tardia,   e   interroga-­‐se,   mas   leva   o   trabalho   até   ao   fim.   E   porque   não?   No   mundo   da   criação   artística  as  leis  da  física  não  se  aplicam,  e  os  paradoxos  de  Russell  são  possíveis  e  até   -­‐   novamente:  porque  não?  –  desejáveis.  

  Biografia   Sérgio   Azevedo   nasceu   em   Coimbra   em   1968.   Estudou   inicialmente   com   Fernando   Lopes-­‐ Graça   e   terminou   os   estudos   de   composição   na   Escola   Superior   de   Música   de   Lisboa,   com   Christopher  Bochmann  e  Constança  Capdeville,  tendo  obtido  a  classificação  máxima.  Ganhou   vários  prémios  em  Portugal  e  no  estrangeiro,  e  as  suas  obras  têm  sido  regularmente  tocadas  e   encomendadas  em  vários  países  por  prestigiadas  orquestras,  ensembles,  solistas  e  maestros,   estando  várias  delas  disponíveis  em  CD.  Em  2011  foi  distinguido  com  o  importante  "Prémio   Autores"   da   Sociedade   Portuguesa   de   Autores   na   categoria   de   "Melhor   Trabalho   de   Música   Erudita   de   2010"   com   o   Concerto   para   Piano   e   Orquestra.   Publicou   ainda   dois   livros   e   contribuiu   com   artigos   para   diversas   publicações,   colaborando   com   o   Museu   da   Música   Portuguesa   na   edição   das   obras   completas   de   Fernando   Lopes-­‐Graça.   É   desde   1993   professor   na   Escola   Superior   de   Música   de   Lisboa,   e   a   sua   música   é   publicada   pela   AVA   -­‐   Edições   Musicais  (www.editions-­‐ava.com).        

67

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Composition-­‐as-­‐research: Connecting  Flights  II  for  Clarinet   Quartet  –  a  research  dissemination  methodology  for  composers     Dr  Martin  Blain  (Manchester  Metropolitan  University,  England)   m.a.blain@mmu.ac.uk   Abstract.     This   article   will   consider   the   relationship   between   the   making   of   a   composition   and   the   dissemination  of  its  research  ‘insights’,  for  composers  developing  practice  within  academia.    It   will   provide   a   context   for   the   discussion   by   considering   the   position   of   the   UK   Higher   Education   Funding   Council   for   England   (HEFCE)   on   the   dissemination   of   practice-­‐based   research.   It   will   briefly   reflect   on   current   practice   within   the   wider   context   of   the   arts   in   Higher   Education,   before   going   on   to   discuss   the   ‘practice-­‐as-­‐research’   (PaR)   initiative   as   a   potential  model  for  composer-­‐researchers  to  develop  methodologies  for  the  dissemination  of   their  work.  From  this  position,  I  will  discuss  my  recent  composition,  Connecting   Flights   II   for   Clarinet  Quartet  in  an  attempt  to  draw  out  the  research  ‘insights’  exposed  through  the  making   of  the  work.       Keywords:     Research  dissemination,  practice-­‐as-­‐research,  process,  methodology,  embedded,  practitioner   knowledge,   contextual   framework,   critical   reflection,   post-­‐serial,   fragmentation,   chord   multiplication.     Introduction   The   Encontro   Internacional   de   Música   de   Câmara   initiative   provides   an   exciting   opportunity   for   composers   and   performers   to   meet,   within   an   academic   Forum,   to   disseminate  and  discuss  recent  activity  in  a  variety  of  compositional  practices.  However,  the   ‘how’   and   the   ‘what’   composers   are   to   disseminate   and   discuss   within   their   research   communities,   at   meetings   of   this   kind   (as   well   as   at   other   research   dissemination   opportunities)  has  become  an  issue  for  consideration.  For  some,  a  musical  composition  may   stand  alone  as  evidence  of  a  research  inquiry,  with  its  research  imperatives  clearly  articulated   through  the  practice,  through  the  production  of  a  notated  score  and/or  a  performance  of  the   work.  For  others,  as  suggested  by  Robin  Nelson,  ‘it  may  be  helpful,  particularly  in  an  academic   institutional   context   where   much   rides   on   judgement   made   about   research   worthiness,   for   other   evidence   to   be   adduced.’   (2006:112)   Here,   there   is   a   suggestion   that,   for   Nelson,   the   production   of   ‘new   knowledge’   and/or   ‘substantial   new   insights’   within   a   research   inquiry,   may   not   only   be   an   outcome   as   evidenced   within   the   product,   but   may   also   reside   in   the   processes  that  have  lead  to  the  making  of  the  work.     68  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


This article   will,   therefore,   consider   the   relationship   between   the   making   of   a   composition   and   the   dissemination   of   its   research   ‘insights’,   for   composers   developing   practice   within   academia.     It   will   provide   a   context   for   the   discussion   by   considering   the   position   of   the   UK   Higher   Education   Funding   Council   for   England   (HEFCE)   on   the   dissemination  of  practice-­‐based  research.  It  will  briefly  reflect  on  current  practice  within  the   wider   context   of   the   arts   in   Higher   Education,   before   going   on   to   discuss   the   ‘practice-­‐as-­‐ research’  initiative  as  a  potential  model  for  composer-­‐researchers  to  develop  methodologies   for   the   dissemination   of   their   work.   From   this   position,   I   will   then   discuss   my   recent   composition,  Connecting  Flights  II  for  Clarinet  Quartet  in  an  attempt  to  draw  out  the  research   ‘insights’  exposed  through  the  making  of  the  work.     1  –  Research  Context     As   the   UK   Higher   Education   research   communities   prepare   for   a   research   audit   in   Autumn  2013,  HEFCE  has  recently  published  criteria  for  its  Research  Excellence  Framework   (REF)   on   the   articulation   of   practice-­‐led   research.   It   reports   that,   research   outputs   (this   includes  music  composition)  ‘may  include  a  statement  of  up  to  300  words  in  cases  where  the   research   imperatives   and   research   process…might   further   be   made   evident   by   description   and  contextualising  information.’  (REF  2012:87)  Whilst  this  statement  is  welcomed  and  offers   some   guidance   to   composers   on   how   to   make   the   results   of   a   research   inquiry   explicit   for   the   purpose   of   the   REF   exercise,   it   only   partly   addresses   the   issue   of   how   composers   working   within  ‘an  academic  institutional  context’  can  best  disseminate  their  research  insights  for  the   benefit  of  their  respective  research  communities.  At  a  time  in  the  UK  when  HEFCE  has  made   the   decision   to   bring   together   the   research   communities   of   Music   and   the   research   communities  of  Drama,  Dance  and  the  Performing  Arts  for  the  REF  process,  I  would  suggest   that   it   is   pertinent   for   composers   working   within   academia,   to   consider   the   relationship   between  arts  practice-­‐as-­‐research  and  methodologies  for  research  dissemination.   Whilst   there   have   been   initiatives   within   the   music   academic   community   to   develop   methodologies  for  practice-­‐based  research,  much  has  centred  around  performance  practice1   and  the  community  has  not  dealt  specifically  with  the  development  of  ‘appropriate’  methods  

                                                                                                              1  In  2007,  the  University  of  London  ran  a  two-­‐year  project:  Practice-­‐as-­‐Research  in  Music  Online  (PARMO).  One   of   the   outcomes   of   the   project   was   to   provide   a   resource   for   ‘capturing   and   disseminating   what   was   once   an   ephemeral   event.’   It   also,   however,   made   the   assumption   that   ‘traditional   modes   of   dissemination,   for   musical   scores…was  well  developed.’   (www.Jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/reppres/sue/primo.aspx)  (accessed  29/1/12)  

69

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


for the   practice   of   composition2.   In   England,   within   the   wider   context   of   arts   practice,   the   practice-­‐as-­‐research3  initiative  over  the  last  two  decades  has  begun  to  establish  new  practice-­‐ led  methods  for  research  practitioners  across  the  arts  communities.  More  recently,  an  AHRC   project:   Practice-­‐as-­‐Research   Consortium   North   West4  (Parc   NW)   has   invited   postgraduate   research   students,   project   partners   and   other   interested   parties   to   share   experiences   and   ‘exchange   knowledge’   and   to   explore   the   development   of   appropriate   methods   for   the   dissemination   of   research   where   practice   remains   a   substantial   element   of   the   research   inquiry.   This   has   resulted   in   arts   practitioners   from   across   a   wide   range   of   arts   disciplines   coming   together   to   share   their   research   ‘insights’   and   to   discuss   issues   in   research   dissemination.     One   method   I   have   found   particularly   useful   when   considering   my   own   approach   to   the  dissemination  of  compositional  research,  is  the  model  proposed  by  Nelson.  (2006)  When   considering  the  notion  of  a  practice-­‐as-­‐research  inquiry  he  suggests  that:   Poststructuralism   fosters   a   sceptical   and   radical   mode   of   thought   which   resonates  with  experimentation  in  arts  practices  insofar  as  play  is  a  method  of   inquiry,   aiming   not   to   establish   findings   by   way   of   data   to   support   a   demonstrable   and   finite   answer   to   a   research   question,   but   to   put   in   play   elements   in   a   bricolage   which   afford   insights   through   deliberate   and   careful   juxtaposition.  (2006:109)  [italics  are  mine,  except  bricolage]     Nelson’s   point   is   well   made   and   certainly   resonates   with   my   own   compositional   thinking.   From  this  position,  Nelson  offers  a  model  that  combines  three  specific  areas  for  consideration:   Practitioner   Knowledge;   Conceptual   Framework;   and   Critical   Reflection.   This   tripartite   structure   encourages   the   practitioner-­‐researcher   to   move   freely   between   these   positions   as   the   research   unfolds   and   suggests   that   the   model   may   encourage   the   production   of   ‘new   knowledge’   and/or   ‘substantial   new   insights’   through   the   interplay   of   encounters   exposed   throughout  the  research  inquiry,  what  Nelson,  refers  to  as  ‘Praxis  (theory  imbricated  within   practice).’   (2006:115)   Of   relevance   to   this   discussion,   I   am   particularly   drawn   to   Nelson’s   triangulation  model  when  considering  my  own  research  journey.  Through  my  experiences  as   a   composer,   I   continue   to   develop   a   variety   of   skills   (what   Nelson   might   refer   to   as   ‘practitioner   knowledge’).   These   may   include,   but   are   not   limited   by,   a   developed                                                                                                                   2  Composers  do  have  the  opportunity  to  present  their  work  at  national  and  international  conferences  although  I   am   unaware   of   any   attempt   to   develop   research   dissemination   methodologies   in   the   area   of   composition-­‐as-­‐ research.  If  the  reader  is  aware  of  any  developments  in  this  area,  I  would  be  grateful  to  receive  information.   3  In   2001,   the   University   of   Bristol   ran   a   five-­‐year   AHRB   project,   Practice   as   Research   in   Performance   (PARIP)   to   ‘investigate  creative-­‐academic  issues  raised  by  practice  as  research.’     (http://www.bris.ac.uk/parip/introduction.htm)  (accessed  20/1/12)   4  See  http://parcnorthwest.miriadonline.info/  (accessed  20/1/12)  

70  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


understanding of   proportion   within   the   musical   structures   I   generate;   of   how   melodic   and   harmonic  material  can  work  within  my  developing  musical  language;  of  how  musical  textures   can   be   manipulated   within   my   developing   soundscapes.   These   skills,   or   ‘knowledgies’   have   been   developed   and   refined   through   time   by   a   process   of   ‘play’   and   ‘encounters’   within   my   compositional  practice.  These  skills  have  become  ‘embedded’  into  my  practice  and  although  at   times   may   appear   to   be   working   at   an   instinctive/sub-­‐conscious   level   during   the   process   of   composition,   and   possibly   hidden   from   view   in   the   musical   score   or   at   the   point   of   performance,  could  be  made  visible  at  the  point  of  research  dissemination.      

As part   of   a   research   journey   it   is   important   for   a   practitioner-­‐researcher   to   be   able   to  

position their  practice  within  the  wider  context  of  a  research  community;  Nelson  defines  this   area  of  exploration  within  his  model  as  the  ‘conceptual  framework’,  and  suggests  that,  ‘[o]ne   way   in   which   creative   practice   becomes   innovative   is   by   being   informed   by   theoretical   perspectives,   either   new   in   themselves,   or   perhaps   newly   explored   in   a   given   medium.’   (2006:114)   Here,   both   the   researcher   (composer)   and   the   research   community   (other   composers),  I  would  suggest,  have  a  responsibility  to  each  other  to  disseminate  the  results  of   research,   allowing   the   community   to   fully   engage   with   current   thinking   in   compositional   practice.   Whilst   the   300-­‐word   statement   required   by   the   assessors   for   the   REF   exercise,   to   draw   out   the   ‘research   imperatives   and   research   process’,   may   provide   sufficient   information   for  the  panel  to  make  an  informed  judgement  regarding  the  quality  of  the  research,  I  would   suggest  that  this  particular  method  of  research  dissemination  may  not  be  of  significant  benefit   to  the  wider  compositional  research  community.  Here,  this  is  where  Nelson’s  model  may  be  of   value,  and  I  would  suggest  a  position  for  the  research  community  to  consider.   Critical   reflection   on   the   processes   at   ‘play’   remain   an   important   element   within   the   research   journey.   Here   attention   is   drawn   towards   the   processes   that   have   contributed   towards   the   making   of   the   work.   This   may   include   a   reflection   on   the   use   of   a   specific   conceptual   framework   and   may   draw   on   elements   contained   within   the   ‘practitioner   knowledge’   element   of   the   model.   However,   it   is   important   to   stress   that   in   Nelson’s   model,   the  triangulation  and  the  relationship  between  each  element  remain  fluid.  What  I  have  found   particularly   exciting   and   useful   about   Nelson’s   model   for   the   development   of   a   practice-­‐as-­‐ research   methodology,   is   that   it   is   not   suggesting   that   I   do   anything   very   much   different   from   what   I   have   been   attempting   to   do   as   a   composer.   As   a   composer,   I   have   continually   reflected   on   my   working   methods   and   at   times   have   gained   ‘insights’   into   developing   solutions   to   specific   compositional   problems;   I   work   with,   and   react   against   a   variety   of   compositional   practices   and   traditions   and   see   my   work   as   developing   within   a   ‘lineage   of   influences’;   and,   I   71  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


am hopeful   that   these   experiences   in   someway   have   become   ‘embedded’   within   my   compositional   practice.   However,   for   me,   Nelson   has   exposed   and   brought   into   focus   the   research   processes   at   ‘play’   in   my   practice   and   has   suggested   that   ‘new   knowledge’   and   ‘substantial   new   insights’   are   likely   to   occur,   and   be   made   evident,   not   only   within   the   final   product   (the   composition),   but   also   at   a   variety   of   points   along   a   research   journey.   This,   I   would  suggest,  can  only  benefit  the  composition  research  community.  So  how  is  this  working   in  relation  to  my  own  method  of  dissemination?  I  will  now  consider  my  own  research  journey   in   relation   to   Nelson’s   model   through   my   recent   work   Connecting   Flights   II   for   Clarinet   Quartet.     2  –  Connecting  Flights  II     Connecting  Flights  II  for  Clarinet  Quartet,  is  part  of  a  portfolio  of  compositions  concerned   with   the   development   of   rhythmic   and   harmonic   structures   within   a   post-­‐serial   framework.   The   portfolio   aims   to   develop   individual   works   that   are   a   practical   exploration   of   the   possibilities   and   tensions   for   the   contemporary   composer   in   a   postmodern   environment   working   in   what   is   essentially   a   modernist   tradition   –   here,   I   am   particularly   interested   in   the   work   of   Berio,   Boulez   and   Ligeti   and   see   my   work   as   continuing/developing   within   this   tradition.  Subsequently  each  work  examines  the  relationship  between  modernist  concerns  of   unity   in   relation   to   postmodernist   notions   of   fragmentation   and   its   impact   on   the   development   of   musical   structures.   At   the   local   level,   rhythmic   and   harmonic   structures   are   explored   through   a   variety   of   conceptual   and   analytical   frameworks   –   I’ll   discuss   these   in   more   detail   later.   To   date,   the   portfolio   of   work   includes:   Fiver   Pitch   (1999)   for   Large   Orchestra;  Connecting  Flights  (2001)  for  Wind  Quartet;  Therapy  for  Clarinet,  Violin,  Cello  and   Piano   (2002);   Percussion  Quartet  No  2  (2009);   and   Connecting  Flights  II  (2011);   two   further   compositions  are  planned:  one  for  Piano  and  Laptops;  one  for  Chamber  Orchestra.  However,   for  this  article,  my  focus  of  attention  will  be  on  my  recent  composition  Connecting  Flights  II.     Connecting  Flights  II  is  a  three-­‐movement  work  that  takes  about  15  minutes  to  complete   and  takes  its  name  from  an  observation  made  by  Robert  Lepage,  a  theatre  maker,  reflecting  on   his   own   creative   practice.   In   conversation   with   Rémy   Charest,   Lepage   described   his   own   process   of   making   theatre   as   something   that   ‘takes   shape   in   flight,   when   its   meaning   and   direction  escape  us,  when  it  becomes  a  rebellious  beast  that  we’re  unable  to  cage.’  (1995:159)   On  reflection,  the  process  Lepage  is  describing  here,  about  his  experience  of  making  theatre,   appeared   to   resonate   with   my   own   experience   of   generating   and   developing   materials   for   the  

72

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


portfolio, so   it   became   an   aide  memoire   for   my   thinking   through   my   process   of   making,   and   has  subsequently  remained  as  a  title  for  some  of  the  works  in  the  portfolio.     The   research   questions   Connecting   Flights   II   poses   are   concerned   with   the   technical   development   of   harmonic   and   rhythmic   procedures   in   the   development   of   the   work   and   their   subsequent   structural   implications   within   each   of   the   three   contrasting   movements.   Boulez,   when  discussing  musical  syntax  in  BOULEZ  ON  MUSIC  TODAY  suggests  that:  

[i]t would  surely  be  illusory  to  try  to  link  all  the  general  structures  of  a  work  to  one   and   the   same   global   generative   structure,   from   which   they   would   necessarily   derive  in  order  to  assure  the  cohesion  and  unity,  as  well  as  ubiquity  of  the  work.   This  cohesion  and  ubiquity  cannot,  in  my  opinion,  be  obtained  so  mechanically;  the   principle  of  allegiance  of  structures  to  a  central  authority  seems  rather  to  resort  to   Newtonian   ‘models’,   contradicting   the   development   of   present-­‐day   thought.   (Boulez  1971:99)  

I would   suggest   here   that   Boulez’s   insight   into   the   principles   at   ‘play’   regarding   the   development   of   musical   structures,   is   supported   by   his   own   practice   –   his   ‘practitioner   knowledge’.   Conceptually,   Boulez   withdrew   from   the   ‘mechanically-­‐driven’   world   of   ‘total   serialism’  he  had  created  for  himself  in  Polyphonie  X,  (now  withdrawn  as  a  composition),  and   Structures   Book   1a,   to   a   position   where   creative   ‘insight’   and   musical   experimentation   returned   to   his   working   method   and   played   a   more   significant   role   in   the   decision   making   process.   Here,   Boulez,   pre-­‐empts   Nelson’s   observation   of   the   poststructural   condition   in   relation  to  current  arts  practices,  and  in  principle,  is  close  in  its  conceptual  approach  to  the   way   Lepage   describes   his   own   practice.   Nelson,   Lepage   and   Boulez   are   connected   by   the   desire   to   allow   practice   to   develop   through   the   calculated,   but   experimental   and   playful   juxtaposition  of  materials.     3-­‐1  –  Development  of  harmonic  material    

One analytical   framework   I   have   found   useful   for   the   development   of   harmonic  

material within   a   post-­‐serial   framework   within   my   work,   is   the   Boulezian   concept   of   chord   multiplication5.   Put   simply,   this   is   a   process   where   one   set   of   pitch-­‐classes   is   transposed   onto   another  set  of  pitch-­‐classes  resulting  in  a  complex  array  of  clusters  that  can  be  manipulated   within   a   variety   of   textural   settings.   Whilst   composing   the   work,   I   was   particularly   interested   in  developing  non-­‐functional  harmonic  structures  as  a  way  of  moving  away  from  traditional   practices  and  a  procedure  based  on  the  Boulezian  concept  of  chord  multiplication  (or  nested   transposition)  provided  a  useful  starting  point.  Of  course,  through  the  process  of  developing                                                                                                                   5  For  a  full  explanation  of  the  concept,  see  Boulez.  (1975:39-­‐40)  

73

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


harmonic materials  for  the  work,  other  processes  were  developed  and  have  contributed  to  the   work.    Whilst  a  full  analysis  of  the  harmonic  material  used  in  Connecting   Flights   II    is  beyond   the   scope   of   this   article   (if   in   fact   a   full   analysis   of   any   material   is   possible),   I   will   offer   a   brief   analysis  of  two  types  of  harmonic  material  used  in  the  work.   I   established   a   sequence   of   24-­‐pitches   (See   fig.   1(i)).   The   first   8-­‐pitches   were   established   at   the   piano   as   two   4-­‐note   chords   through   a   process   of   improvisation,   and   the   remaining   4-­‐pitches   in   the   first   twelve-­‐note   collection,   to   my   ear,   appeared   to   work   well   together,   so   were   added   to   the   collection.   However,   I   did   not   want   to   work   within   strict   serial   procedures   so   decided   to   extend   the   pitch   sequence   to   allow   a   wider   network   of   pitch   relationships   to   develop,   and   this   was   established   through   a   process   of   experimentation   –   I   was  guided  by  my  ‘practitioner  knowledge’,  developed  through  the  process  of  working  with   non-­‐tonal   structures   in   previous   works,   both   within   the   portfolio   as   well   as   other   projects.   From   this   collection   of   pitches   I   developed   two   forms   of   harmonic   material:   one   based   on   the   serial  procedure  of  pitch  rotation;  the  other  developed  from  the  Boulezian  concept  of  chord   multiplication.     3.2  –  Harmonic  material  –  type  1   Pitch  rotation  of  the  original  24-­‐note  pitch  sequence  produces  twenty-­‐four  forms  of  the   original  pitch  sequence  and  fig.  1(i)  shows  the  collection  of  4-­‐note  groupings  from  which  the   first  six  4-­‐note  chords  are  produced.  Fig.  1(ii)  shows  the  pitches  as  harmonic  material.  During   the  process  of  developing  this  type  of  harmonic  material,  I  was  aware  that  my  positioning  of   pitches   within   each   chord   was   being   directed   by   my   experience   of   working   with   traditional   voice-­‐leading  techniques  in  past  projects  –  the  outer  voices  conform  to  established  practices   of  contrary  and  similar  motion  and  the  inner  voices  move,  where  possible,  by  step  or  to  the   next   available   pitch.   I   find   this   method   of   developing   non-­‐tonal   harmonic   progressions   works   well  in  my  compositional  practice.      

74

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


(i)            (ii)               (iii)     Fig.   1:   Connecting  Flights  II,   pitch   and   harmonic   material   –   type   1:   i)   24-­‐note   pitch   sequence;   ii)   4-­‐note   chords     constructed   from  the  24-­‐note  pitch  sequence;  iii)  example  of  elongation  of  chord  type  a.        

  3.3     –  Harmonic  material  –  type  2    

My adaption   of   the   chord   multiplication   technique   allowed   me   to   develop   a   different  

pathway through  the  initial  material.  Here,  I  divided  the  original  form  of  the  pitch  sequence     into  3-­‐note  groupings  (see  fig.  2(i)).  Groups  a  and  b  are  then  combined  to  produce  a  6-­‐note   chord  and  my  voicing  of  the  pitches  is  guided  by  my  ear.  The  resulting  6-­‐note  chord  pattern  is   then  transposed  onto  each  of  its  five  other  pitches  (see  fig  2(ii)).  This  procedure  is  repeated   for  the  combination  of  groupings  from  a-­‐d  and  e-­‐h  to  produce  a  chord  matrix  (see  fig.  2(iii)).   This   process   created   seventy-­‐two   6-­‐note   chords.   The   challenge   now   is   to   use   the   material   creatively   and   expressively   through   a   process   of   experimentation.   For   Connecting  Flights  II,   my   chosen   pathway   through   the   material   was   to   move   through   the   matrix   diagonally,   from   top-­‐left  to  bottom-­‐right  for  the  groupings  a-­‐d,  and  then  from  bottom-­‐left  to  top-­‐right  for  the   groupings  e-­‐h;  of  course,  many  pathways  are  possible  and  would  be  likely  to  produce  a  rich   variety  of  harmonic  material  for  further  exploration  and  this  could  be  explored  further  in  later   works   from   a   position   of   experience   from   working   within   this   particular   harmonic   system.   The  generation  of  seventy-­‐two,  6-­‐notes  chords  and  its  many  potential  harmonic  pathways  is   far   too   many   for   the   work   under   discussion.   For   Connecting   Flights   II,   this   process   created   twelve   6-­‐note   chords   which   after   considering   and   re-­‐voicing   some   of   the   chord   structures,    

75

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


(i)        (ii)             (iii)    

Fig.  2:  Connecting  Flights  II,  harmonic  material  –  type  2:  i)  24-­‐note  pitch  sequence;  ii)  example  of  6-­‐note  chord   construction  from  the  24-­‐note  pitch  sequence;  iii)  matrix  of  6-­‐note  chords.          

in response  to  the  ‘insights’  exposed  during  the  development  of  type  1  harmonic  material,  are   presented  in  fig.  3;  I  would  expect  this  type  of  harmonic  construction  to  work  well  in  my  piece.   The   creation   of   a   24-­‐pitch   sequence   together   with   two   initial   harmonic   pathways   through   the   material   has   created   a   rich   variety   of   pitch-­‐based   material   for   me   to   explore   and   consider   through   the   process   of   ‘play’.   In   order   to   discuss   how   my   harmonic   material   unfolds   in   Connecting  Flights  II,  I  will  give  some  consideration  to  how  the  rhythmic  material  in  the  work   has  been  conceived  and  developed.     76  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Fig. 3  :  Connecting  Flights  II,  twelve  chords  developed  from  one  possible  pathway.        

4.1 –  Development  of  rhythmic  material   Whilst  the  rhythmic  material  developed  in  Connecting   Flights   II   is  closely  aligned  to  the   harmonic  relationships  unfolding  within  the  work,  and  at  times  it  is  difficult  to  tease  out  the   complexities   of   construction   of   both   the   rhythmic   and   harmonic   devices   at   play,   for   the   purposes   of   this   article,   through   analysis   and   critical   reflection,   I   will   attempt   to   draw   out   some   of   the   devices   used   as   part   of   my   working   methodology   in   relation   to   the   rhythmic   content  of  the  work.  Connecting  Flights  II,  is  a  work  in  three  contrasting  movements.  The  first   movement   is   built   on   five   short   rhythmic   (motivic)   gestures   that   expand   and   contract   throughout   the   duration   of   the   movement   (see   fig.   4   for   a   visual   representation   of   each   gesture).  Gestures  1  and  2  are  conceived  as  musical  shapes  for  future  harmonic  exploitation;   gestures   3   and   5   will   provide   irregular   rhythmic   activity;   and   gesture   4   is   introduced   to   explore  texture  through  timbre  variation.  In  movement  one,  the  gestures  are  woven  together   into   a   fragmented   musical   fabric   controlled,   at   the   global   level,   by   a   combination   of   palindromic  structuring,  interrupted  by  the  deliberate  and  careful  juxtaposition  of  materials   derived  from  one  or  more  of  the  five  rhythmic  gestures  at  any  one  time,  at  the  local  level  of   operation.    

Fig.  4:  Connecting  Flights  II,  five  rhythmic  gestures  used  in  the  1st  movement.    

One conceptual  framework  that  I  have  found  useful  in  the  development  of  this  approach   is   to   consider   the   relationship   between   the   rhythmic   gestures   notated   as   visual   images   and   the   work   of   Paul   Klee.   Klee’s   PEDAGOGICAL   SKETCHBOOK   has   been   a   resource   for   many   composers6.  Sibyl  Moholy-­‐Nagy’s  insightful  introduction  to  the  work  explains  that,  Klee’s:                                                                                                                   6  See   Hall,   Michael.   (1984)   Harrison   Birtwistle.   London:   Robson   Books.   p26,   for   further   information   on   Birtwistle’s  obsession  with  the  work.  

77

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


creative life…derived  almost  equal  inspiration  from  painting  and  from  music.  Man   painted   and   danced   long   before   he   learnt   to   write   and   construct.   The   senses   of   form   and   tone   are   his   primordial   heritage.   Paul   Klee   fused   both   of   these   creative   impulses  into  a  new  entity.  (1953:7)     PEDAGOGICAL   SKETCHBOOK   is   rich   in   musical   metaphor   and   it   is   of   little   wonder   that   composers  have  found  the  work  of  value  when  attempting  to  locate  contextual  frameworks  to   aid   the   development   of   musical   material.   From   Klee’s   opening   suggestion   on   taking,   ‘[a]n   active  line  on  a  walk,  moving  freely,  without  goal.  A  walk  for  a  walk’s  sake’  (1953:16),  to  the   final   section   where   Klee   suggests   how   the   visual   arts   student   (or   a   student   from   another   discipline,   for   that   matter)   might   address   issues   of   balance   and   control   in   their   practice,   (1953:51-­‐61)  there  is  much  to  explore.  So  how  does  this  work  in  Connecting  Flights  II?       4.2  –  First  movement     In   fig.   5,   at   the   beginning   of   the   first   movement,   we   see   four   of   the   gestural   fragments   working   within   a   post-­‐serial   harmonic   framework.   Gesture   1   unfolds   in   bar   1   within   each   voice  of  the  quartet  with  its  pitch  content   taken   from   the   first   section   of   the   pitch   sequence   in   fig.  1(i),  and  this  is  juxtaposed  with  rhythmic  material  taken  from  gesture  2  in  the  following   bar  –  here,  harmonically  the  quasi-­‐serial  procedure  explored  in  bar  1  is  replaced  by  a  fixed-­‐ pitch   harmonic   field,   and   this   is   replaced   by   something   different   at   bar   3,   to   maintain   the   fragmentary  nature  of  the  structure.  Notice  how  the  gestural  fragments,  when  they  reappear,   are   changed   in   some   way   –   this   is   what   I   call   ‘repetition   within   variation’.   Gesture   2   in   the   second   bar   maintains   its   shape   when   repeated   at   bar   6   and   is   voiced   within   a   fixed-­‐pitch   harmonic  field  but  has  changed  its  surface  detail:  an  example  of  Klee’s  instruction  to  consider,   ‘[a]n  active  line,  limited  in  its  movement  by  fixed  points.’  (1953:18)        

78

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


° 5 ≈ œj &4 q

b

œ #œ

#œ bw

f

b

b

w

œ

sfp

> ‰ œ #œ ˙.

j #œ. ‰

5 &4 Œ 5 &4 Œ

sfp

b

j ‰ b œ.

Œ

‰ œ. œ. ˙

j ‰ œ.

Œ

Œ

sfp

3 œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ #œ #œ

œœœ œ

sfp

˙.

sfp

3

˙.

. ˙. #˙

3 #œ œ œ 4 & 4 œ ‰ ≈ r‰ ‰ œ œ #œ

° 4 #œ œ & 4 #œ

. œ. œ ˙

œœ

œ

bœ œ

fi œœ

#œ ff œfij

œb œR 4 ‰. & 4 œ œ # œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ

<Ÿ>~~~~~~~~~~~~ 4 ≈ ¢& 4 œ . œ œ #œ œ ff

œ œ Æœ j ‰ J œ .

3 3 3 45 ‰ ‰ bœJ ‰ ‰ j ‰# œ ˙ #œ

44

45

44

ff

Ó

b3œ ‰ J‰Œ

44 Ó

Ó

œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ 5

3

44

˙ ˙ œ œ œ œ#œ bœ #œ œ f

ff

4 &4

f

3 3 3 45 ‰ ‰ j ‰ ‰ œj ‰ œ ˙ œ

f

˙

sfp

j œ œ # œ œ. ‰ ÆJ 3

sfp

44

38 ‰. œ bœ œ f

œ œ Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ œ 5 œ #œ #œ bœ 44 œ 4 œ # œ œ œ ˙.

œ

œ

sfp

4 Œ ¢& 4

œ

sfp

bœ b ˙. œ ‰. bœ b˙.

4 & 4 œ ‰ #œ ≈ œR ‰ œr ‰

44 38 bœ œ œ œ f œ œ

˙

f

° 4 #œ r œ‰ & 4 ‰ bœ ≈ œ ‰

f

f

5

f

5Œ ¢& 4

#œ œ œ bœ œ œ 4 4

4 38 œ œ bœ œ œ #œ 4

˙.

3

f

#œ 3 8 œ œ

‰ Œ

pp

œ bœ œ œ # œ ˙ . œœ œ sfp 3 bœ ‰‰ JŒ

Œ

#3œ ‰ J ‰ 58

44 œ ‰ ‰ 3 j ‰ Œ #œ #œ

‰ j Œ nœ

3 ‰ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ 58 J #œ œ

44

‰ bœj Œ

pp

Œ

Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

‰ ‰ j‰ Œ œ œ 3

pp

44 Ó

3

‰ j‰ Œ œ pp

‰ ‰ jŒ œ 3

3 ‰ ‰ j ‰ 58 œ œœœ #œ

Œ

3 ‰ j ‰ 58 œ

Fig. 5:  Connecting  Flights  II,  movement  1,  bars  1-­‐8.  

79

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


° 7 5 4 & 8 œ œbœ œ. œnœ œ œbœ œ. œnœ œ œ 4 bœ œ œ nœ œ œbœ œ œnœ œ œ ‰ ‰ 4 Œ . . . . . . . ‰

œ‰

44 j ‰ œ

j ‰ œ

œ‰

44 j ‰ bœ

j ‰ œ

44 j ‰ œ

j ‰ œ

° 7 œ œ œ bœ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ 4 bœ 4 &8 bœ

7 & 8 œj ‰

j œ ‰

7 &8 j ‰ bœ

j ‰ œ

7 ‰ ¢& 8 j œ

j ‰ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ

œ œ

3 bœ b ‰ œ ˙.

˙.

sfp

Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Œ 45 ˙ œœ o

œŒ

45 w

w

Œ

45 Ó

œ

78 78

Ó

7 œ œ 8

sfp

5

#œ œ. . ˙

sfp

78

œ œ bœ œ. œ. nœ œ œ bœ œ œ. nœ. œ. œ bœ œ

f

44 & 78 œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ w > f & 78

œ

f

œ œ

44 æ æ #œ nœ œ œ œ b œ bœ nœ œ œ b œ ˙.

44 7 ¢ & 8 œ œ b œ bœ œ n œ b œ b œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ f

Πo

œ ‰

#œ ‰ œ ≈ R

≈ œr ‰ ≈ r‰ œ

œ

œ œ

œ

≈ œR

bœ ≈ œ

r ≈ œ

≈ œ #œ

‰.

r bœ

Fig. 6:  Connecting  Flights  II,  movement  1,  bars  15-­‐20.  

One   of   the   controlling   devices   I   have   explored   when   attempting   to   fuse   together   disparate  and  fragmentary  elements  in  a  score,  is  to  allow  the  start  and  end  points  of  similar   fragments  to  be  controlled  by  the  principles  of  traditional  voice-­‐leading  techniques.  This  also   works   particularly   well   when   the   fragments   to   be   joined   are   not   adjacent   in   the   musical   structure.   In   fig.   6,   at   bar   15-­‐16,   clarinets   2,   3   and   4   develop   gesture   3.   The   gestural   fragment   returns  at  bar  20  having  been  interrupted  by  the  re-­‐voicing  of  gestures  1  and  2  at  bars  17  and   18  respectively  and  they  are  connected  not  only  by  the  similarity  of  their  rhythmic  design  but   also  by  their  voice-­‐leadings.         Throughout  this  movement  my  concern  was  to  developed  disparate  layers  of  material   connected  through  implied  voice  leadings7  and  this  can  be  seen  working  in  fig.  7a,  in  relation   to  the  development  of  harmonic  material  type  1  in  its  inverted  form  –  see  fig  7b,  as  this  will                                                                                                                  

7 For   a   further   discussion   on   this   approach   to   developing   fragmented   musical   structures,   see   Cone,   Edward.   T.  

(1968) ‘Stravinsky:  The  Progress  of  a  Method’  in  Boretz,  Benjamin.  and  Cone,  Edward.  T.  (1968)  Perspectives  on   Schoenberg  and  Stravinsky.  PUP:  Princeton.  

80  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


help to   identify   the   distribution   of   the   pitch   material   in   the   example.   Here   the   6-­‐note   chord   structures  provide  a  template  for  the  gestural  fragments  as  they  unfold  in  time,  as  not  all  the   selected  pitches  are  used  in  the  final  solution.  Notice  how  the  first  clarinet  melodic  line  uses   the  pitches  over  a  four-­‐bar  time  frame  to  expand  and  develop  the  visual  shape  of  gesture  1;   eagle-­‐eyed  viewers  will  notice  an  E  natural  in  bar  39  in  the  4th  clarinet  part  –  this  pitch  change   was   necessary   to   fit   within   the   range   of   the   instrument   as   well   as   the   musical   demands   of   the   phrase.  

° 7 &8

œ 3 œ. J 8

q

˙. f

7 & 8 #˙.. f

7 &8

#˙..

˙.

f

7 ¢& 8

fi œœ f

38 œ. 3 j 8 œ. œ

j3 œœœœœœœœœœœœœ 8

# œ.

˙..

78 ˙..

44 #˙.

#œ œ œ œ

78 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 44 ˙.

œ

78 #˙.

j 4 œ 4 œœœœœœœœœœœœœ

78

4 j 4 œ b ˙.

fij œ

˙.

Fig. 7a:  Connecting  Flights  II,  movement  1,  bars  39-­‐42    

Fig.  7b:  Connecting  Flights  II,  harmonic  material  developed  from  the  inverted  form  of  the  pitch  sequence  –  type  1.    

4.3 –  Second  movement     Movement  two  offers  a  temporary  harmonic  resolution  to  the  apparent  chaotic  rhythmic  and   harmonic   construction   of   the   first   movement   and   because   of   its   relatively   short   duration,   it   takes  c.2’  20’’  to  complete,  it  can  be  experienced  as  a  structural  upbeat  to  the  virtuosic  third   movement.   One   of   the   research   questions   that   materialised   for   me,   as   a   consequence   of   elongating  chord  type  a,  in  fig.  1(ii),  was  to  consider  how  the  unfolding  of  a  repeating  melodic   81  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


line could  interact  with  a  non-­‐repeating  harmonic  structure.    The  rhythmic  material  used  in   this   section   is   simple   in   design   and   provides   a   platform   for   the   harmonic   progressions   to   unfold   at   a   much   slower   pace   than   in   the   first   movement.   In   fig.   8,   we   see   the   melodic   line   developed   from   the   chord   sequence   first   established   in   fig.   1,   but   now   the   melodic   line   includes   the   additional   pitches   from   the   elongated   chord   experiment.   The   elongation   of   chord   a,  was  developed  to  enhance  the  melodic  line  for  this  section  and  was  developed  in  response   to  Klee’s  direction  concerning  ‘[t]he  same  line,  circumscribing  itself.’  (1953:17)  The  melodic   line,   first   heard   between   bars   181-­‐8   is   repeated   between   bars   190-­‐5   with   some   rhythmic      

° &

Œ

# ˙.

Œ œ œ ˙.

& Ó

mp

œ ˙.

mp

œ ˙.

p

#œ ˙

œ œ

œ

mp

#˙. ˙. # ˙.

˙.

#˙.

Œ Ó o

Œ

œ Œ Ó o

Ó

#œ ˙ #œ œ #œ Œ Ó o

Ó

‰ œ.

‰ bœj ˙

Œ Ó

Ó

Œ

mp

& Ó

¢&

˙.

œ œ

œ ˙

œ ˙ #œ œ #œ

o

œ bœ

mp

‰ bœ .

Œ

œ #œ bœ

mp

mp

œ.

mp

o

Ó

œ bœ Ó o

#œ #œ œ ˙ p

Ó ‰ j œ œ œ #œ œ o

a(1)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐(2)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐(3)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐(4)                                                                                          b                        c                                          d  

° &

#œ ˙ ∑ Ó Œ mp Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ œ ˙ œ. œ#œ ˙ & Œ ˙.

˙

œ #˙.

˙. 45

œœœœ 4 ˙ 4

˙

œ ˙.

45 Œ ˙

œ œ œ œ 44 #˙

˙

43 œ œ œ

& œ ˙.

˙

œ ˙.

45 Œ b˙

œ œ œ œ 44 ˙

˙

43 œ bœ œ

˙

œ ˙.

45 Œ # ˙

44 œ œ œ œ #˙

˙

p

¢&  

mp

#˙.

œ

mp

Ó

œ œ mp

˙

˙

43

43

b œ bœ œ

œ œ œ

                 a(2)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐(3)                              c                                      d                                                                c                    a(4)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐(1)  

Fig. 8:  Connecting  Flights  II,  movement  2,  bars  181-­‐95.  

82

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


variation. The  seven  chords  that  were  generated  as  part  of  the  harmonic  development  process   in  fig.  1,  are  now  used  to  re-­‐harmonize  the  repeated  version  of  the  melodic  line.  The  intervallic   relationship   within   each   chord   type   is   maintained   and   through   a   process   of   play   and   experimentation,   the   chord   shapes   are   transposed   onto   different   pitches   within   the   melodic   line.   For   example,   chord   a(4),   in   fig.   9(ii),   has   its   highest   pitch   as   G4   (where   middle   C   is   identified  as  C3);  the  intervallic  structure  of  this  chord  type  is  re-­‐positioned  as  the  sixth  chord   in   fig.   9(iii),   with   its   highest   pitch   as   F   sharp.   The   final   decision   on   what   chord   structures   would   be   used   to   re-­‐harmonise   the   repeated   melodic   line   was   made   through   a   process   of   experimentation  and  personal  judgement.    

(i)     (ii)             (iii)  

Fig.  9:  Connecting  Flights  II,  movement  2,  bars  181-­‐95:  (i)  original  chords  established  in  fig.  1;  (ii)  chords  shapes   from  (i)  maintained  and  transposed  to  new  position  in  the  sequence.  

  4.4  –  Third  movement      

The final  movement  attempts  to  re-­‐work  the  rhythmic  and  harmonic  material  from  the  

first movement.   The   structure   is   built   on   the   juxtaposition   of   three   contrasting   musical   textures,   with   the   addition   of   a   coda   that   references   sections   from   the   first   movement.   The   three  textures  are  dynamic  and  develop  in  different  ways.  For  this  article,  I  will  focus  on  one   texture   within   the   movement   that   explores   the   notion   of   complex   layering.   Here,   I   am   particularly   interested   in   developing   a   framework   for   this   section   that   incorporates   the   pitch,   rhythmic  and  harmonic  materials  generated  for  the  work.     83  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


(i)  

° &

œ

#œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ

œœœ

œœœœ

  (ii)      

&

œ œœœœ œœœ œœœœœ œœœ œœœœœœœœœ œœ

¢&

œ œœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœ

  (iii)      

& #n˙˙˙ ? #n˙˙ b˙

#˙ ˙ ˙ ##˙˙ n˙

n˙˙ b˙ b ˙˙ #˙

n˙˙ n˙ b˙˙ n˙

#˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ # ##˙˙ #˙˙˙ n˙ ˙

Fig. 10:  Connecting  Flights  II  movement  3,  layering  of  (i)  pitch;  (ii)  rhythmic  activity;  (iii)  harmonic  content.    

In fig.  10,  we  see  the  three  layers  of  activity  used  to  further  develop  each  repetition  of  

this particular   texture.   At   bar   223   we   hear   an   unfolding   of   the   24-­‐pitch   sequence   that   is   controlled   by   a   motor   rhythm   that   is   generated   through   the   repetition   of   small   irregular   rhythmic   cells.   After   developing   the   rhythmic   patterning   of   the   pitches   as   seen   in   fig.   10(i),  

° &

#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > œ> œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > œ> œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > mf

&

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ >œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ >œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > > mf

&

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ > > > >œ œ œ > > mf

¢&

œ œ œ œ œ #>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ >œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ >mf >

 

Fig. 11:  Connecting  Flights  II,  movement  3,  bars  223-­‐5;  development  of  pitch  material.  

through a   process   of   experimentation,   I   used   the   resulting   semi-­‐quaver   number   pattern   to   generate  the  rhythmic  activity  for  each  repetition  of  this  section.  I  worked  with  the  number   pattern  3-­‐2-­‐3-­‐2-­‐4-­‐2-­‐3-­‐4  and  allowed  the  sequence  to  repeat  with  variation  by  re-­‐sequencing   the  number  pattern  for  as  long  as  necessary;  this  gave  a  consistency  to  the  rhythmic  language   84  

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


and we  can  see  this  in  operation  in  fig.  11.  In  addition,  the  accented  first  note  in  each  sequence   of   numbers   provides   a   spatial   dimension   in   performance   as   the   ‘accents’   create   the   illusion   of   moving   the   sound   around   the   performance   space.   Harmonically,   the   individual   lines   weave   their  way  through  the  path  established  by  the  original  24-­‐pitch  sequence.    

° & œ > f

œ

> #œ > & œ œ#œ nœ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ >œ œ œ œ œ

f

& œ > f

¢&

œ

> ≈ #œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b>œ œ

f

#>œ œ œ œ

œ bœnœ œ

¢& œ œ œ œ

œ#œnœnœ #œ œ œ ‰ œ œœ ‰

œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ œ œ #>œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ œ ≈ Œ

œ œ >

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ >

œ#œ#œ

≈ œr œ œ œ >

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ

‰. œ œœ

bœ œ œ œ œ

≈ Œ

Ó

> œ œ bœ œ œ #œ#œ œbœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Œ

> œ œ œ

Œ

œ œ b œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ

& œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > #œ & œ œ œ #œ >

œ

#>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

r œ œ œ ‰.

Œ

° & Œ

œ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ Ó

œœœ

nœnœ œ

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > R œ œ œ œœ

œ œbœbœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ > > #œ >

Fig. 12:  Connecting  Flights  II,  movement  3,  bars  259-­‐62;  development  of  rhythmic  material.    

At bar   259   –   see   fig   12,   an   additional   layer   of   rhythmic   activity   is   introduced   into   the   texture.   The   rhythmic   pattern   identified   in   fig.   10(ii),   is   gradually   introduced   into   the   score   through   a   process   of   transformation.   In   addition,   the   layered   rhythmic   activity   is   explored   further  through  the  introduction  of  pitches  taken  from  the  24-­‐pitch  sequence  developed  in  fig.   1(i).  

85

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


° 7 #œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 œ œ œ# œ œ œ œ 5 # œ œ b œ n œ 8 & 16 œ 4 #œ

#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œb œ œ 24 7 #œ œ 16 #œ

7 >œ œ#œ#œn>œnœ œ œ œ 24 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 58 œ œ & 16

7 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 24 œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ 16

f

7 & 16

#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

7 ¢& 16 b œ

° 2 &4

œ

#œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

24 24

#œ œ œ œ

58 bœ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ #œ

œ

#>œ

bœ 2 & 4 œ œ œ œ #œ > #œ

œ

2 &4

œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ

2 ¢& 4 # œ b œ œ œ

#œ #œ nœ nœ œ œ

7 œ œ œ œ œ#>œ œ œ 24 58 œ 16 b œ œœœ œ#œ#œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

œ 5 8

œ

bœ nœ œ œ

œ 5 œ bœ œ 8 œ

#œ 58 #œ œ œ œ

58 #œ

œ œœœœ œ œ œ

bœ œ

7 16

bœ#œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ bœ œ nœ œ

œ

24

œ 7 8

œ

œ

œ

bœ œ œ #œ #œ nœ 78 >

œ

œ

œ

œ œ

œ

7 œ 8

œ

œ

œ

œ œ

œ

œ

78

Fig. 13:  Connecting  Flights  II,  movement  3,  bars  270-­‐75;  development  of  harmonic  material.    

A   final   layer   of   activity   is   added   to   the   texture   at   bar   270   -­‐   see   fig   13.   Here,   the   harmonic  structure  of  the  texture  is  transformed  to  combine  both  sets  of  harmonic  material   devised   for   this   work   (type   1   and   type   2).   The   layers   now   include   the   original   24-­‐pitch   sequence   generated   through   a   non-­‐repeating   motor   rhythmic   pattern;   a   second   layer   of   rhythmic   activity   that   is   controlled   through   the   unfolding   of   the   original   24-­‐pitch   sequence   although  at  a  faster  rate  than  the  first  layer;  and  now  a  final  layer  of  rhythmic  and  harmonic   activity  voicing  the  chords  from  fig,  3,  developed  through  the  chord  multiplication  technique   explored   in   fig.   2.     The   musical   texture   created   through   this   interplay   of   encounters   of   disparate  elements  is  one  of  controlled  chaos.         Conclusion   The   recent   emergence   of   practice-­‐as-­‐research   within   the   academy,   particularly   within   the   performing   arts   tradition,   has,   for   arts   practitioners,   working   within   an   ‘academic   1st  International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   86   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


institutional context’,   brought   into   question   the   relationship   between   the   making   of   a   work   and  the  means  by  which  its  resulting  production  of  ‘new  knowledge’  and  ‘new  insights’  can  be   disseminated   within   and   beyond   the   academy.   Nelson’s   observation   that   ‘play’   has   become   part   of   a   legitimised   research   methodology   that   is   now   better   understood   within   the   wider   research   community,   has   seen   a   shift   in   emphasis   in   practice-­‐led   arts   research   from   one   of   ‘scientific’   rigour   to   ‘artistic’   rigour.   Boulez’s   understanding   of   how   musical   structures   may   work  and  the  way  Lepage  experiences  the  process  of  making  theatre,  would  suggest  that  ‘play’   and  experiment  are  important  elements  in  the  act  of  creating  work.   At  the  beginning  of  this  article  I  suggested  that  composers  may  want  to  consider  that  the   ‘how’  and  the  ‘what’  need  to  be  disseminated  and  discussed  when  invited  to  talk  about  their   work  within  an  academic  context.  I  have  found  the  PaR  methodology  and  its  related  methods   as   explored   within   the   wider   context   of   arts   practices,   and   particularly   within   the   Drama,   Dance   and   Performing   Arts   communities   within   academia,   particularly   useful.   They   have   provided   a   framework   for   me   when   considering   ‘how’   to   disseminate   research   in   musical   composition.   For   arts   practitioners   developing   work   within   ‘an   academic   institutional   context’,   the   notion   that   ‘new   knowledge’   and/or   ‘substantial   new   insights’   can   occur   through   practice   is   not   disputed.   However,   where   and   when   the   ‘insights’   occur   and   what   we   might   mean  by  ‘new  knowledge’  as  a  consequence  of  conducting  research  as  a  composer  remain  one   of   contention.   By   considering   my   working   processes   and   positioning   my   compositional   practice   within   Nelson’s   classifications   for   Practitioner   Knowledge,   Critical   Reflection,   and   Conceptual  Framework,  I  have  been  able  to  give  consideration  to  ‘what’  can  be  disseminated   and   discussed   at   events   of   this   kind.   However,   what   I   have   found   most   useful,   whilst   attempting  to  position  my  work  within  the  broader  context  of  a  practice-­‐as-­‐research  inquiry,   is  that  through  the  process  of  research  dissemination,  I  am  beginning  to  better  understand  my   own  working  processes.     References   Biggs,   Michael.   and   Karlesson,   Henrik.   (2011)   ed.,   The  Routledge  Companion  to  Research  in  the   Arts.  London:  Routledge   Boulez,   Pierre.   (1971)   Boulez   on   Music   Today.   (translated   by   Susan   Bradshaw   and   Richard   Rodney  Bennett).  Faber  and  Faber:  London   Charest,   Remy.   (1995)   Connecting   Flights.   (translated   by   Wanda   Romer   Taylor).   London:   Methuen  

87

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Cone, Edward. T. (1968) ‘Stravinsky: The Progress of a Method’ in Boretz, Benjamin. and Cone, Edward. T. (1968) Perspectives on Schoenberg and Stravinsky. PUP: Princeton Hall, Michael.  (1984)  Harrison  Birtwistle.  London:  Robson  Books Klee, Paul. (1953) Pedagogical Sketchbook. (translated by Sibyl Moholy-Nagy). Faber and Faber: London JISC.   (no   date)   Practice-­‐as-­‐Research   in   Music   Online   (PRIMO)   [online]   [Accessed   on   29th   January  2012]     http://www.Jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/reppres/sue/primo.aspx   Nelson, Robin. (2006) Practice-as-research and the Problem of Knowledge, in Performance Research, 11:4, 105-116 PARC   North   West.   (no   date)   Practice  as  Research  Consortium  North  West   [Online]   [Accessed   on  24th  December  2011]  http://parcnorthwest.miriadonline.info/   PARIP.   (no   date)   Practice   as   Research   in   Performance   [Online]   [Accessed   on   24th   December   2011  http://www.bris.ac.uk/parip/introduction.htm   REF.   (2012)   Panel   criteria   and   working   methods.   [Online]   [Accessed   on   30th   January   2012]       http://www.hefce.ac.uk/research/ref/pubs/2012/01_12/01_12_2D.pdf    

Short  biography  about  the  author     Martin   Blain   is   a   Senior   Research   Fellow   at   Manchester   Metropolitan   University.   Martin’s   works  have  been  performed  in  Europe,  China,  and  the  USA  by  a  variety  of  leading  soloists  and   ensembles.   His   Percussion   Quartet   was   recently   featured   at   the   Cutting   Edge   Festival   in   London  by  BackBeat  Percussion  Ensemble  and  this  work  has  received  performances  in  China   and   the   USA   (BackBeat   awarded   1st   Prize   at   the   Concert   Artists   Guild   International   Competition).   Martin’s   works   have   also   received   performances   by   such   leading   new   music   ensembles  as  Equivox,  Vamos,  Black  Hair,  The  Composers’  Ensemble  and  his  orchestral  work   Fever   Pitch   was   performed   by   The   English   National   Philharmonic.   Martin   is   also   a   founder   member   of   the   laptop   ensemble   MMUle   where   he   continues   to   develop   works   that   combine   acoustic  instruments  with  laptop  performers.  He  is  currently  working  with  the  experimental   theatre  company  Proto-­‐type  Theatre  on  the  development  of  a  laptop  opera.        

88

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Wayang Kulit  Empat  (Shadow  Puppet  No.4)     Ainolnaim  (Malaysia/  UK)   Email: anllume@gmail.com

Abstract. Wayang  Kulit  Empat  (shadow  puppet  No.4)  is  one  of  the  series  in  The  Wayang  Kulit   piece   and   for   this   particular   series,   it   was   composed   specifically   for   a   Trio;   using   a   clarinet,   bassoon  and  piano.  The  piece  is  of  a  conceptual  form  of  music  where,  it  was  composed  based   on   the   materials   in   a   Malay   traditional   theater;   wayang   kulit   (shadow   puppet   play).   These   ideas  are  transformed  and  combined  with  the  materials  of  classical  western  music,  resulting   into   a   new   aesthetical   form.   It   is   a   combination   of   both   visual   and   sound   performance   disciplinary.   From   the   piece   played   by   the   trio,   it   creates   a   setting   of   spirituality,   mystery   and   etherealness  into  the  environment.   Keywords.  Wayang  Kulit,  Shadow  Puppet  Play,  Malay  Traditional  Theater.     Introduction   Shadow   play   is   one   of   the   oldest   forms   of   theaters   in   Asia.   In   Malaysia   it   is   generally   known   as   wayang  kulit.   Wayang  kulit  has   more   than   one   specific   name   and   has   a   variety   of   styles   throughout   South-­‐East   Asia.   This   theater   usually   derives   from   local   folk   stories,   legendary  myths,  religious  customs  and  everyday  occurrence.      The      stories      are      told      by    the     puppet      master    (tok      dalang)      who    manipulates  the  puppets’  (called  patung)  movements,   which  are    projected  on  screen  by  the  puppets’  shadows.   The  puppets  come  in  a  variety  of  shapes  and  colors,  which  define  the  characters  in  the   stories.     In   this   very   old   form   of   theater,   a   small   ensemble   of   musicians   plays   various   traditional  instruments  to  accompany  the  movement  of  the  puppets  and  to  add  suspense  or   drama  to  the  events  in  the  stories.    

89

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


With those  materials,  the  piece  was  composed  as  follow:   No.  

Original

Synthesis

1.

Puppet’s shadows.  

Performer’s shadows.  

2.

Puppet master.  

Music (score).  

3.

Music accompanying   movements   Playing   movements/   gestures   and   and  events  in  the  stories.   music  resulting  the  stories.  

4.

Scales: Heptatonic,   Pentatonic.  

5.

Colotomic structure.  

Non Colotomic  –  free  meter.  

6.

Non harmonious    (non  chordal).  

Harmonious (dyads  ,  triads  etc.).  

Hexatonic, Scales:  Bitonal  (Hexatonic  C  and  E)   -­‐  C  E  F#  G#  A  B  +  E  F#  G  A#  B  C  

  Conclusion   Wayang   Kulit   Empat   sets   a   ritual   like   performance   through   its   sonority   (audio)   and   playing  movements  (visual).  The  main  goal  for  the  piece  is  to  bring  up  the  sense  of  spirituality   to  the  audience  throughout  the  performance.  However,  the  visual  aspect  of  the  performance  is   to  accompany  the  music,  where  the  playing  movements/gestures  are  the  result  of  the  player’s   interpretation   on   the   music.     Those   movements   support   the   music,   emphasizes   on   it   and   results  to  the  whole  story  of  the  piece.       Acknowledgements   Thanks   to   International   Chamber   Music   Meeting   committees,   University   of   Evora,   UNIMEM,   Trio   “Spiritus   Musicum”   and   fellow   friends   for   contributing   to   the   work   and   performance.         References   Mutusky,   Patricia.   Tan,   Sooi   Beng.   (1997)   Muzik   Malaysia:   Tradisi   Klasik,   Rakyat   dan   Sinkretik,  Siri  Kebudayaan  Asia  Tenggara.  Penang:  The  Asia  Centre.   Matusky,   Patricia.   (1993)   Malaysian   shadow   play   and   music:   continuity   of   an   oral   tradition   South-­‐East  Asian  social  science  monograph.  US:  OUP.  

90

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Sweeney, Amin.   (1972)   Malay   shadow   puppets:   the   Wayang   Siam   of   Kelantan.   UK:   British   Museum.   Osnes,   Beht.   (2010)   The   Shadow   Puppet   Theatre   of   Malaysia:   A   Study   of   Wayang   Kulit   with   Performance  Scripts  and  Puppet  Designs.  US:  McFarland.   Read,   Gardner.   (1976)   Contemporary   Instrumental   Techniques.   New   York:   Schirmer   Books,   A   Division  of  Macmilan  Publishing  Co.,  Inc.   Kennnan,  Kent  Wheeler.  (1970)  The  Technique  of  Orchestration,  2nd  Edition.  Englewood  Cliffs   (New  Jersey):  Prentice-­‐Hall,  Inc.   Cope,   David.   (1997)   Techniques   of   The   Contemporary   Composer.   US:   Schirmer,   Thomson   Learning,  Inc.  

91

1st International  Meeting  for  Chamber  Music   University  of  Évora,  16-­‐18  January  2012.  


Wayang Kulit Empat  (Shadow Play No.4)   

Performance Notes  Setup 

Light

   

Clarinet Bassoon 

Piano

 

Screen

Audience • •

The screen can be made from thin white cloth (as long as the light can go  through the screen and create clear dark shadows.)  More light source may needed to project clear dark shadow on the screen  and only the shadow of the player can be seen by the audience. 

Notation   Box Gesture indicates particular musical figure(s)  to be repeated along the thick black line and the  length is determined by the player (cue). Small    note value in the Box Gesture indicates the total       note value present in the box. 

        Breath point indicates inhaling sound;     soft (small inhale),   

stress (slightly big inhale). 

        Key open (all)   Key close (noted key)  Key close (all)      Indicates to vibrate the sound at free speed unless indicated.    Indicates to sustain the sound / let it ring (vibrate).      “Scratch Strings” indicates to scratch the string with fingernails outward (up  arrow) and inward (down arrow),  The softest dynamic sign (except silence) must be audible to the far audience and  balance with other parts. – Amplification may apply. 


Wayang Kulit Empat (Shadow Play No.4)



Clarinet

Mystic and Expressive (very slow) e = 38 Rubato

 

Free In

p





Cl.

Bsn.

Pno.

        

mp

L.H.

Silenty press all keys from A0 to A1 followed by middle pedal

   

    

mp

  

p 3

SOST.



sfp

  

   

f

 

 

 



gradually faster



sfp

      mp

mf vib.

SOST.

 



Mystic and Expressive (very slow) e = 38 Rubato

   6

mp

Piano

Air Blow-Crook, slow breathing-like





4th Breath

Rubato Bassoon

 



Air Blow-Reed, hollow sound

Ainolnaim

3rd altissimo

f

  muted strings

5:4x

vib.



sfp

f

  5:4x

ppp



gradually faster


2

 Cl. 

  

continue soft with airy sound (mp)

9

Bsn.

 vib.

 

sfp

mf

 

DAMP.

              

       3

mf

  



mp

   

mp

 

 

f

5:4x

gradually faster

   

Pno.

 mf

   

3      

  

3

   

11   Cl.  

Bsn.

Pno.

 

 

  

    

     

3

 

p



        

pp



pp



pp

   

3

   

 mp DAMP.

3

p

pp

3

  


3

 Cl.  12

 

            

 

Bsn.

Pno.



3:2q

p

mf

   

   



p

f

f

mf

  

L.H

flz.

         

f

R.H



f

mf

 

3:2e

   pp

   

  

 Air Blow-Reed, hollow sound  flz.               Cl.   3  p f p f

13

Bsn.

 

mp

   





 

Pno.

flz.

 

SOST.

  f

p

pp

pp

 

 

 

mp

  



3rd altissimo





Fade Away .....

 

mp

  mf

 

Fade Away .....

R.H.

 

p L.H.

    3

pp

Scratch strings inward, outward All Chromatics A§ to C#


ATTACHMENT   About  RMA  


RMA ROYAL MUSICAL ASSOCIATION

The Royal Musical Association is the oldest learned society devoted to music in the world. It was founded as the Musical Association ‘for the investigation and discussion of subjects connected with the art, science and history of music’ in 1874, and became by Royal Command the Royal Musical Association in 1944. The activities of the RMA are twofold : it holds meetings at which papers are read and discussed, including its Annual Conference, an annual Research Students’ Conference, and an annual Study Day featuring a lecture by the recipient of the previous year’s Dent Medal ; and it is an active publisher. Its publications comprise a Newsletter issued twice yearly, the Journal of the Royal Musical Association published twice yearly, the annual Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, and the irregular (approximately annual) series of Royal Musical Association Monographs. The RMA web site (http://www.rma. ac.uk/) is continually updated to provide members with full and accurate information. Benefits of membership Members receive free of charge the Association’s Journal, Newsletter, and monthly e-mail Bulletin. They are entitled to discounts on RMA Research Chronicle and books in the Monographs series, as well as to reductions on volumes of the musical series Musica Britannica. Other discount offers are publicized in the e-mail Bulletin and in the members’ area of the RMA web site. On-line access to the Journal of the Royal Musical Association, to Oxford Music Online (including Grove Music Online), and to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography is provided free to members through the RMA web site. Further on-line services are being planned for the near future. Some meetings of the Association are free to members, and members receive a reduction in the fees for RMA-organized and RMA-sponsored conferences. There are a limited number of bursaries available to assist Student members to attend the RMA Research Students’ Conference and other RMAorganized and RMA-sponsored conferences, and the RMA makes a few small grants (up to £150) each year to Student members for research. The RMA maintains a continually updated on-line Directory of Members on its web site, accessible by members only ; a printed Directory is issued every year. Members may specify whether any of their information is published in either Directory independently of the other. The RMA will never give membership data to any commercial organization, but only (with members’ individual permission) to similar learned societies or research bodies. For further information Visit the RMA web site, http://www.rma.ac.uk/, or contact the Executive Officer of the RMA, Dr Jeffrey Dean, 4 Chandos Road, Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester m21 0st, United Kingdom ; <jeffrey.dean@ stingrayoffice.com>. Categories of membership and current subscription rates are shown on the payment options form following. To apply for membership Complete the Application form and Payment Options form following, and send them with appropriate payment to Dr Dean at  the address above.


Application for membership in the Royal Musical Association Title :     First Name :

 Surname :

At least one postal address is required ; all other information is optional. An e-mail address is required for access to the members' section of the RMA web site, and if you wish to receive the monthly e-mail Bulletin ; if you provide an e-mail address but wish not to receive the Bulletin, please tick this box ❑. All members' names are included in both Directories of Members, on-line (accessible by members only) and printed ; please indicate what other information you wish to have published in each Directory by ticking the appropriate boxes. If you have provided more than one address, you may elect to receive the Journal of the RMA at a different address than the Newsletter and other written communications ; please select only one address for either. If you do not wish us to share your data with similar non-commercial organizations such as the American Musicological Society, please tick this box ❑.

Address 1 (required) Directory : ❑ on-line ❑ printed delivery : ❑ Journal ❑ Newsletter etc.

Address 2 Directory : ❑ on-line ❑ printed delivery : ❑ Journal ❑ Newsletter etc.

Town :

Town :

County :

County :

Postcode :

Postcode :

Country :

Country :

All telephone numbers (including fax and mobile) must include the internationall dialling code if outside the UK, as well as the STD or area code.

Telephone 1 Directory : ❑ on-line ❑ printed

Institutional Affiliation (required for Students) on-line Directory only

+    (    )

Mobile/Cellphone Directory : ❑ on-line ❑ printed

Telephone 2 Directory : ❑ on-line ❑ printed

+    (    )

+    (    )

Fax 1 Directory : ❑ on-line ❑ printed

Fax 2 Directory : ❑ on-line ❑ printed

+    (    )

+    (    )

E-mail 1 Directory : ❑ on-line ❑ printed

E-mail 2 Directory : ❑ on-line ❑ printed

Web site on-line Directory only

Research Interests (can be expanded later on line) on-line Directory only

http://

Be sure to complete the Payment Options form following, indicating both your membership category and your preferred method of payment, and send the forms with appropriate payment to :

Dr Jeffrey J. Dean Executive Officer, RMA 4 Chandos Road Chorlton-cum-Hardy Manchester m21 0st, United Kingdom


Payment Options (choose one) ❑ Cheque enclosed (in sterling, euros, or US dollars only, payable to Informa UK Ltd, drawn on a bank in the home country of the currency) ❑ Credit/Debit Card ❑ Visa ❑ MasterCard ❑ American Express  ❑ Diners Club (all these will be debited in sterling) ❑ Switch/Delta/Maestro* Card Number

     Expiry Date (mm/yy) / Security Code  *Start Date (mm/yy) / *Issue Number 

Membership Category (one year) ❑ Ordinary £ 54.00 € 84.00 $ 100.00 ❑ Student £ 27.00 € 42.00 $ 50.00 £ 27.00 € 42.00 $ 50.00 ❑ Retired £ 81.00 € 126.00 $ 150.00 ❑ Joint Notes : Student applicants must supply evidence of student status, such as a photocopy of a current student ID. The Retired rate is available to those who will be retired from full-time work at any time during the membership year. The Joint rate is available to any two persons using a single private address ; only one copy of the Newsletter and Journal is provided. Joint applicants should complete two copies of the Application form (but only one copy of Payment Options).

Card holder’s name and address (if different from Address 1 above)

 Signature :

❑ Direct Debit (Please complete the form below) What is a Direct Debit ? Direct Debit is a simple, safe, and speedy way for a payer to pay regular bills, donations, and subscriptions automatically. The payer agrees with the company the amount to be collected and the date of payment. From then on the amount will be deducted from the payer’s bank account on a regular basis. The company can only take out the agreed amount. If the amount or the collection dates change, the payer must be notified first.

  Instruction to your Bank or Building Society to pay by Direct Debit  1. Name and full postal address of your bank / building society To the manager :

Bank / Building Society

Address :

5. Originator’s identification number

6 8 0 1 2 7   6. Reference (to be filled in by us upon return of the form)

Postcode

2. Name(s) of account holder(s)

3. Bank / building society account number

 4. Branch sort code (top right corner of cheque)

 - -

 7. Instruction to your Bank or Building Society : Please pay Informa UK Limited Direct Debits from the account detailed on this instruction subject to the safeguards assured by the Direct Debit scheme. I understand that this instruction may remain with Informa UK Limited and, if so, details will be passed electronically to my Bank / Building Society. Signature(s)

Date

This guarantee may be detached and retained by the payer The Direct Debit Guarantee •

This Guarantee is offered by all Banks and Building Societies that take part in the Direct Debit Scheme. The efficiency and security of the Scheme is monitored and protected by your own Bank or Building Society.

If the amounts to be paid or the payment dates change, Informa UK Limited will notify you 10 (ten) working days in advance of your account being debited or as otherwise agreed.

If an error is made by Informa UK Limited or your Bank or Building Society, you are guaranteed a full and immediate refund from your branch of the amount paid.

You can cancel a Direct Debit at any time by writing to your Bank or Building Society. Please also send a copy of your letter to us.

International Meeting for Chamber Music (3rd edition, June 2012)  

(Proceedings) 16-18 January 2012, Department of Music, University of Évora. UnIMeM & RMA (event associated to the Royal Music Association)....

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you