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BouyerMagaña

Paulina P a

PAULINA BOUYER - MAGAÑA


PAULINA BOUYER - MAGAÑA


Table of Contents

1

Undergraduate - Schoolwork

2 3

Art - chitecture Installlation

Professional Work

4

Art and Sketches


Palm Springs Reseach Center CMOF Contemporary Museum of Florence University of Florence Library UM Homeless Transitional Housing Grand Avenue Itinerant Interchange ENV Library

2 3

Art-chitecture Installations

Professional Work

4 1 Undergraduate

Art and Sketches


CAL POLY - SPRING 2003 SCHOOLWORK

Agua Caliente Research Center In the arid climate of the Palm Springs Agua Caliente desert canyon lays a greenbelt along a narrow stream descending from the fertile peak of the mountain. During the hottest months of the year, the stream recedes and the greenbelt vanishes, its fauna migrates and flora desiccates as part of their perennial cycle. Survival in this climate demands adaptation and the effective use of resources. Notable in this regard are the local flora’s anatomic and biological adaptations; for example, desert succulents form waxy, hairy, or spiny, pustules on their outer surface to create microhabitats to control heat retention, channels air circulation, and reduce water loss. Many of these plants also surface layers to shade and protect from high temperatures and sun exposure. Taking these survival adaptations as guiding principle for the initial approach for the Research Center Project, the design creates a micro environment through a series of canopies and brisoles that shield from the sun, channel air flow, and provide shade for dual interior and exterior areas of the building providing flexible access and shelter to the researchers and their undertakings in this desert.

Palm Springs, Ca


Research Exterior Cooridor Cafe/Administration Exhibit Space Parking

N > MASTER SITE PLAN LEGEND 0 > Balcony 1 > Laboratoy 2 > Office 3 > Archives 4 > Viewing Lab 5 > Exhibition Area 6 > Restrooms 7 > Receptionist Area 8 > Administative Office 9 > Kitchenette/Cafe 10 > Media 11> Storage

2

1

2

3

0 LEVEL

4

8

7

6

6 5

1 LEVEL

11

> CONCEPT SKETCH/PHOTO

0

2 LEVEL

2

2

10

9

0


L AT 3 3 ° 5 0 ’ 9 3 ”

> EARLY MODELS

> ANNUAL SUN PATH

> DAILY SUN PATH

LON 116°36’16”

> SKETCH SITE FORCES + PROGRAM HABITAT -


Exterior Shades Exterior Brisole protects critical areas from harsh sun exposure while allowing to shade and cool

Slabs and Roofing Light weight concrete over metal decking

Walls Prefabricated wall panel system to reduce construction pollution

Glazing System Insullated Low-E glazing allows mazimized views and light while maintaining high R values

Structure System Moment frame system

Pilaster System Pilaster footings system to minimize site impact

> SYSTEMS AXON

> PROGRESS BASS WOOD MODEL


EXHIBIT PUBLIC

LEVEL 2 > DIAGRAM VIEWS

L AT 3 3 ° 5 0 ’ 9 3 ”

PRIVATE SEARCH

LEVEL1

LEVEL -0

> DIAGRAM PROGRAM Exhibit Space/Restroom/Cafe Laboratories/Archives/Media Library Offices

> SOUTH ELEVATION

> WEST ELEVATION

> NORTH ELEVATION

> EAST ELEVATION

LON 116° 36’ 16”

View to Valley / Desert/ Greenbelt View to Greenbelt View to rocky mountain hill View to mountain range


FLORENCE - FALL 2004 SCHOOLWORK

CMOF Contempora ry Museum of Florence The historic center of Florence is laid out on an orthogonal grid of, compounded layers reminiscent of earlier centuries. Throughout, grand nodes like piazzas, cathedrals and churches mark the city visibly structuring its hierarchy and prevalent importance. The city itself is a treasured museum due to its historic renaissance art, architecture, and cultural influence it has bestowed on the world. Architecture shaped the city into massive, compact clusters of buildings creating unusual streets, avenues, and spaces throughout the grid that fluctuate in size, degree, and effect. As one walks through this densely knit historic city, the experience of its narrow, partly shadowed streets lined with towering buildings is accentuated by the grandeur evoked by magnificent structures like the Domo. These narrow, tunneled streets suddenly open into grand plazas, surprising and affecting the pedestrian as he or she transitions from one space and scale to the other. This project takes this walking experience marked by transitions from narrow, intimate space (i.e., the streets) to open, communal space (i.e. the piazza) and reinterprets it to articulate and parallel the space for the museum, relative to its program and curatorial use.

Florence, It


Via Dante Alighieri

Via Del Presto

Via D e

l Proc onsolo Via Del Proconsolo

Via Del Pandolfin

Via Ghibellina

N

> MASTER SITE PLAN 9 6

LEGEND 0> 1> 2> 3> 4> 5> 6> 7>

Plaza 8> Cafe 9> Tickets 10 > Gift Shop 11> Kitchen 12 > Restrooms 13 > Office 14 > Mechanical Room

7 6

Storage Electrical Room Conference Room Multi-Media Gallery Gallery Sculpture Gallery Archiological Site

5

5

9 3

13

2

4 1

0

1 LEVEL

-0 LEVEL

6

5

11 12 11

2 LEVEL

13

3 LEVEL

4 LEVEL

10

5 LEVEL

6


DIAGRAM LEGEND

A

Piazza Della Signoria ~ 368’ x264’

C

Piazza Di Santa Croce ~ 436’x 202’

B

Piazza Del Domo ~ 872’ x 300’

D

ART BOX Piazza Della Republica ~ 252’ x 242’

> CITY DENSITY REFERENCE - Stacked Program - Open Spaces - Narrow Spaces - Open Plaza

EXTERIOR

PUBLIC SPACE A

M

N

C B D > Piazza Density

> Street Density

> City’s Density Respresented

Open Spaces Narrow Spaces

> VISITOR 1 PATH > CITY DENSITY

M

N C

B

N

M A

> Visitor 1 Visitor 2 > CITY EXPERIENCE

D

> VISITOR 2 PATH

L AT 4 3 ° 4 6 ’ 1 5 . 0 8 ” LO N 1 1 ° 1 5 ’ 2 8 . 0 3 ”

> DENSITY: NARROW N - Streets +/- 12’ - Alleys +/- 8’ > DENSITY: MEDIUM M - Main Street +/- 24’

> DENSITY: OPEN SPACE PIAZZA


A

B > PROGRAM MASSING Conference Room Art Sculpture Media Sculpture Plaza Utilities ART BOX

> PROGRAM Art Box Cafe Exterior Plaza Private Utilities

> PUBLIC VS PRIVATE Public Private Public

> SPACE TYPOLOGY A - Large Sculptural Art B - Smaller Plastic Art

EXTERIOR PUBLIC SPACE

> PRIMARY SECTION

> IMPOSED SECTIONS

> SECONDARY SECTIONS


> WEST ELEVATION > CHIPBOARD MODEL

> CONTEXT ELEVATION

L AT 4 3 ° 4 6 ’ 1 5 . 0 8 ” LO N 1 1 ° 1 5 ’ 2 8 . 0 3 ”

> NORTH ELEVATION


L AT 4 3 ° 4 6 ’ 1 5 . 0 8 ” LO N 1 1 ° 1 5 ’ 2 8 . 0 3 ”


TEAM - MARTIN, WANG, GARCIA

FLORENCE - FALL 2004 SCHOOLWORK

University of Florence Library A library is a hub for the acquisition of information and the production of knowledge, and as such, it could be defined as a beacon of knowledge that attracts all those who seek it. But what good is a library if those who stand to benefit from it are unaware of this institution’s presence and what transpires in its quarters? The University of Florence Library stands inconspicuously in front of a small paved plaza, among massive buildings that demark the entrance to the university itself. This epicenter of intellectual formation fades amid the facades of the surrounding buildings, unnoticed and quiet, acknowledged only by those who already know of its existence. Drawing on the iconic notion of libraries as beacons of knowledge, this project aims to revitalize and highlight the presence of the university’s library by partially exhibiting and displaying its inside, and through it its inner workings and activities. By shifting, bisecting, peeling, and stratifying of the building’s façade to uncover library life to the rest of the community, the project works to enhance the contemporary university’s mission and commitment to the betterment of the public through the production of knowledge.

Florence, It


Via

ell es ch i

lC ast

illa

14

ru n

De

cc io

16 19

Pia z

za

Fil ip po B

15

17

20

Via D

eg

li A lfa

ni

18

21

> MASTER SITE PLAN

N

> SHIFTING-BISECTING PLANES

8 10

LEGEND 0 > Lobby 1 > Exhibit 2 > Circulation Desk 3 > Computer Area 4 > Copy Area 5 > Service Counter 6 > Cafe 7 > Restroom 8 > Storage 9 > Office 10 > Reading Area

11> 12 > 13 > 14 > 15 > 16 > 17 > 18 > 19 > 20 > 21 >

Private Area Book Stacks Archive Underground Parking Enterance Amphitheatre Plaza Via Della Cosa’ Bike Racks Rotonda Della Cosa’ Univ. of Letters and Philosophy

7

6 2

3

5

10 1

0

1 LEVEL

10

10

11

7

7

11

9 8

0 LEVEL

13

9 10

10 12

2 LEVEL

12

3 LEVEL


> BUILDING SECTION : Light Well

> SHIFTING-BISECTING OF BUILDING

> CONTEXT ELEVATION

L AT 4 3 ° 4 6 ’ 1 5 . 0 8 ” LO N 1 1 ° 1 5 ’ 2 8 . 0 3 ”

> MAIN IDEA LIBRARY serve as beaconsof knowledge


> INTERIOR VIEW

> BOOK STACK SECTION STUDY

> BOOK STACK DIAGRAM PEEL the SKIN > REVEAL the BOOKS > REVEAL the COLOR > REVEAL the KNOWLEDGE

> INTERIOR SKETCH

> INTERIOR STUDY ROOM


> ELEVATION NORTH

> ELEVATION SOUTH

> ELEVATION SOUTH

L AT 4 3 ° 4 6 ’ 1 5 . 0 8 ” LO N 1 1 ° 1 5 ’ 2 8 . 0 3 ”

> ELEVATION EAST


CAL POLY - SPRING 2006 SCHOOLWORK

Urban Mission Homeless Shelter “If you give a man a fish, you will feed him for a day, but if you teach him how to fish, you will feed him for the rest of his life.� (Unknown Author) A shelter alone does not end homelessness, but like any institution, it provides options and opportunities where an individual receives valuable information to persevere. The person determines whether he or she is willing to take the opportunity and try to opt out of homelessness. However, there is the case of those less fortunate who due to their circumstances, are unable to get help. Society cannot let these unacknowledged, dispossessed people decay. Homelessness is a reality; the homeless are not going to disappear. If homelessness is a deeply entrenched social issue then what can architecture offer to remediate its corrosive effects? This project investigates the creation of a shelter for displaced homeless families. The main idea behind the Urban Mission is to: 1) Provide opportunities and options for homeless families to get off the street by bringing together viable programs, services, and functions into a single site for rehabilitation. 2) It encourages homeless families to attain self-sufficiency and re-integration into the community. 3) On a macro level, the Urban Mission extends its services to individuals who are in need of basic amenities but who are not ready to leave homelessness and often reject structured programs. This project is aimed at those most neglected and transparently deleterious member of society.

Long Beach, Ca


12.5% of U.S lives in poverty

L.A.

83,347 HOMELESS IN L.A. 83,347 HOMELESS IN l.A.

41% of the homeless population in L.A. are families withStreet children. 3rd.

Chestnut Ave

Magnolia Ave

Daisy Ave

57,426 (69%)

24,671 (30%)

BLACK/AFRICAN AMERICAN 32,255 (39%) WHITE 23,921 (29%)

LATINO/HISPANIC 20,920 (25%)

MULTI-RACIAL\OTHER 6,251 (7%)

12.5% of U.S lives in poverty

Veterans

Brodway

L.A.

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPME RENOVATIO COMMERCE RESIDENCE

16,181

83,347 HOMELESS IN l.A.

Chronically Homeless

34,898

Mentally illness

28,431 SHELTERED 9,875 (12%)

DECREASE IN HOMLESS IN AREA

Veterans Chronically Homeless

9,711

PEOPLE IN FAMILIES 19,965 (24)

41% of the homeless population in L.A. are families with children.

57,426 (69%)

39,038

2,917

24,671 (30%)

CHRONICALLY HOMLESS INDIVIDUAL 34,898 (42%)

9,711

INDIVIDUAL 28,484 (34%)

N

> MASTER SITE PLAN

2,917

Domestic Violence

28,431

Substance Abuse

Domestic Violence

39,038

34,898

Mentally illness

People with AIDS/HIV

People with AIDS/HIV

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT RENOVATION COMMERCE RESIDENCE

16,181

Substance UNSHELTERED Abuse 73,472 (88%)

> STATISTIC DIAGRAMS

BLACK/AFRICAN AMERICAN 32,255 (39%) WHITE 23,921 (29%)

LATINO/HISPANIC 20,920 (25%)

MULTI-RACIAL\OTHER 6,251 (7%)

Elementary School

St. Mary’s Hospital 2.0 mi

UM

16,181

Chronically

LBPDHomeless

28,431

Substance Abuse with MainPeople Library AIDS/HIV

39,038

UM Violence

UM UM

> SITE ANALYSIS: MACRO CONNECTIVITY UM Urban Mission Shelter Homeless Prescence Community Connections

Transit Mall

2,917

9,711

Harbor/Shoreline/Park

CivicDomestic Center

UM

Axis

34,898

Mentally illness

Court House

Downtown Long Beach Center Commercial/ Mix-use

Residential

Veterans

Middle School

International High School 1.2 mi

Residential

Park/Recreation

LA River Bank

12.5% of U.S lives in poverty

L.A.

83,347 HOMELESS IN l.A.

SHELTERED 9,875 (12%)

DECREASE IN HOMLESS IN AREA

UNSHELTERED 73,472 (88%)

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT RENOVATION COMMERCE RESIDENCE

PEOPLE IN FAMILIES 19,965 (24)

CHRONICALLY HOMLESS INDIVIDUAL 34,898 (42%)

INDIVIDUAL 28,484 (34%)


Transitional Dorm Type A Social Service Programs Vocational and Educational Programs Daycare/Parental Education Recreational Programs Transitional Housing Type B

(Step 1) (Step 2) (Step 2) (Step 2) (Step 2) (Step 3)

> PROGRAMING MASSING Social Services Housing Recreational Daycare

Vocational Education Administration Courtyards Utilities

> GREEN SPACE

> PRIVATE PUBLIC

Public Private Residence (Members Only) Private (Admin Only) Semi-Private (Members Only)

Recreation Space

Children’s Playground Terrace Basketball half-court Recreational

PrivatePRIVATE Vs Public Vs > CIRCULATION vsPublic PUBLIC Private vertical circulation

Vertical Private

vertical circulation Private/ staff circulation Semi-Private Residence circulation Private/ staff circulation Public circulation

Semi-Private Residence circulation Semi-Private Public Publiccirculation

unit typologies

typologies > TRANSITIONAL ANDunit DORM UNIT TYPOLOGIES Transitional Dorm Transitional Housing Transitional Housing Transitional Housing

Type A (Step 1) Type B (Step 2) Type C (Step 3) Type D (Accessible)

L AT 3 3 ° 4 6 ’ 1 3 . 0 2 ” LO N 1 1 8 ° 1 1 ’ 47 . 9 3 ”

> STEP PROGRAM


2

WEST

Recreation

> NORTH ELEVATION

LEGEND 0 > SOUTH Lobby 16 > 1 > Info 17 > 2 > Public Restroom 18 > 3 > Job Training 19 > 4 > Dayroom 20 > 5 > Computer/Library 21> 6 > Medical 22 > 7 > Restroom 23 > 8 > Multi-purpose Room 24 > 9 > Caseworker Office 25 > 10 > Refferal Office 26 > 11> Storage 27 > 12 > Cafeteria 28 > 13 > Kitchen 29 > 14 > Daycare 15 > Laundry

5

4

Art Studio Trash Administration Classroom Conference Staff Room Rehab Meeting Hall Counseling Work Area Showers Lockers Gym Recreational Room

2

3

3

1 0 6

7 17 11

13

7 11

1 LEVEL

9 10

12

14

15

7

5

Day care

Play Kitchen

Dinning

> BUBBLE DIAGRAM

NORTH

EAST

> EAST ELEVATION

Utilities

Restrooms

CourTyard

Loading

Job Traning

3

Ho using

Social

Day Room

Medical

1

Courtyard

4


10’-6”

18’-10”

21”-6”

10’-6”

10’-6”

5’-0”

20’-0”

5’-0”

A

B

C

D

WEST

EAST

NORTH WEST

SOUTH EAST

> WEST ELEVATION

> SOUTH ELEVATION

NORTH

SOUTH

21

18

18

25

2 LEVEL

22

24

19 19

20

16

23

18

19 7

7

19

28 27

29

29

25

21

21

26 26

26 26

3 LEVEL

27

19

L AT 3 3 ° 4 6 ’ 1 3 . 0 2 ” LO N 1 1 8 ° 1 1 ’ 47 . 9 3 ”

> HOUSING TYPOLOGIES


L AT 3 3 ° 4 6 ’ 1 3 . 0 2 ” LO N 1 1 8 ° 1 1 ’ 47 . 9 3 ”


TEAM - WANG, HARTWELL

CAL POLY - FALL 2005 SCHOOLWORK

Grand Intervention : Itinerant Interchange Park A landmark park for Los Angeles in the 21st century must embody the modern culture of the city rather than simply reflect traditional planning methods. This park must assert its position and connect to the city by binding the diverse functions surrounding it. Today’s city culture, one marked by speed and mobility, requires a place that offers convenience and choice, while also fostering familiarity and accessibility. A solution presents itself in the mobility icons of Los Angeles: freeways and automobiles. The freeway offers circulation and infrastructure’s evocative forms that are both familiar and accessible. The automobile’s attributes lend to the development of a program that is both convenient and interchangeable. Taking this mobility convergence as a point of departure for the park, this project uses a central spine and a network of off-ramps. The spine is laid along the long axis of the park, bridging streets, and acting as a permanent platform for a variety of event programs and circulation patterns. Parts of the park remain static; acting as buffers between existing buildings and its spinal “freeway” providing a foundation for the network of off-ramps. The plan of the park offers dual spaces; some temporary and some permanent. The temporary spaces provide a place for events such as markets, concerts, and rallies. The permanent spaces offer leasable plug-in retail space for specialty shops, restaurants, and cafes.

Los Angeles, Ca


Temple A venue

6 7

6 7

Hall of Administration

Hall of Records

Hall of Justice

2 4

5

2

9

4 9 3

N

Hill Street

County Court House

7 State Office

> MASTER SITE PLAN LEGEND 1> 2> 3> 4> 5> 6> 7> 8> 9>

Forum Open Park Area Bridge Retail Row Restaurant Row Paking Entrance Paking Exit Reflecting Pool Main Thoroughfare

> CROSS SECTIONS

1

2

6 7

City Hall

8

> CONCEPT SKETCH -Flow Interchanges

2

Spring Street

9 5

3

3

Broadway

Grand Avenue

5


08:00:00

M T W TH F S S

TH F S S Christmas New Year’s Eve

Proposed Activities 17:00:00

20:00:00 22:00:00

> DIAGRAMS HOURLY/WEEKLY ACTIVITY Tourist, Workers, Commuters, Local/Distant Residents Workers, Commuters, Local Residents Farmers Market, Street Fair, Concerts, Parades, Film Set/Shoot Cafe, Restaurants, Retail, Specialty Shops

DAILY SET-UP

FARMERS MARKET SET-UP

CONCERT SET-UP

FORUM SET-UP > DIAGRAMS EVENT SENARIOS

> DIAGRAMS MONTHLY ACTIVITY

L AT 3 4 ° 3 ’ 2 0 . 57 ” LO N 1 1 8 ° 1 4 ’ 4 5 . 2 7 ”

12:00:00


Hall of Administration

Hall of Records

County Court House

Hall of Justice

State Office

> DIAGRAMS PROGRAM Restaurant Row Retail Specialty Shops Parking Entrance/Exit Reflecting Pool

> PLUG-IN SYSTEM CAPSULES

Parking > SITE LAYERS

> ELEVATION SECTION

Main Streets

Green Space

Park Path

Buildings


> DIAGRAMS PARKING NEWTWORK

> DIAGRAMS PATH NETWORK

L AT 3 4 ° 3 ’ 2 0 . 57 ” LO N 1 1 8 ° 1 4 ’ 4 5 . 2 7 ”

> DIAGRAMS LANDSCAPE NETWORK


CAL POLY - FALL 2002 SCHOOLWORK

ENV UNIVERSITY LIBRARY The objective of this project was to design a specialized library for the ENV Environmental Design School of Architecture on the Cal Poly Pomona campus. The library was to be located on a lusciously vegetated, semi-sloped site next to the confines of a structured orthogonal arrangement of classroom buildings at the end of the campus. The duality of the site—hardscape and landscape—guided the design. Drawing dialogically from this context, the organic spectrum, the orthogonal distribution, and a series of datum points and lines were plotted to inform and formulate the relationship of the building and its milieu. One set of points defined by the existing buildings delineated access, opportunities, and geometry. While the other set of factors corresponded to prevalent natural occurrences of the site. The ENV library project actively engages the organic nature of its site while integrating and enhancing symbiotic relationships to the university.

Pomona, Ca


Bldg. 7A

Bldg. 1

y Drive

Bldg. 7B

Univers it

18

> CONCEPT SKETCH 17

7

4 2

3

0

9

N

5 14

1

8

6

7

1 LEVEL

> MASTER SITE PLAN

LEGEND 0> 1> 2> 3> 4> 5> 6> 7> 8> 9>

Lobby Circulation Desk Exhibit Area Reading Area Multi-Media Periodicals Copy Room Cafe Rest-Women Rest-Men

10

10 > 11 > 12 > 13 > 14 > 15 > 16 >

11

Study Area Book Stacks Office Mech/Elec Room Storage Balcony Conference

11 11

13

10

2 LEVEL

15

16 12

> CONCEPT SKETCH

3 LEVEL


Orthagonal Datums

> CHIPBOARD MODEL STUDY

Organic landscape Datums

> GRIDS EXISTING BUILDING DATUMS

> NORTH ELEVATION

> EAST ELEVATION

> GRIDS SUPERIMPOSED

L AT 3 4 ° 3 ’ 2 5 . 3 5 ” LO N 1 1 7 ° 4 9 ’ 3 6 . 62 ”

> CLAY MODELS STUDIES


> STRUCTURAL SKETCHES

> STRUCTURAL STUDIES

> CIRCULAR GEOMETRY STUDY


Reading 500 sf Conference 200 sf Multi-Media 100 sf Mech/Elec 100 sf Restroom 160 sf Admin 400 sf

Circulation 100 sf Cafe 200 sf Study 300 sf Exhibit 400 sf

L AT 3 4 ° 3 ’ 2 5 . 3 5 ” LO N 1 1 7 ° 4 9 ’ 3 6 . 62 ”

Bookstacks 1000 sf


Art-chitecture Art•chi•tec•ture - \ärt-ke-tek-cher\

Blurs the line between architecture and art, combining elements from each in ways that are symbiotically complementary and mutailly co-constitute. The result are hybrid projects that function, provoke and inspire, an endeavor I like to call “Art - chitecture.”


2A

Icups: Synthetic Landscapes Set in Motion:The Cloud Adaptation: The Cocoon

1 3

Preceptual Vision: Points of View The Spinal Vortex

Schoolwork

Professional Work

4

Art and Sketches


LOS ANGELES - 2010 ARTCHITECTUREINSTALLATIONS

TEAM - MAGAÑA, HERNANDEZ, MUÑOZ

Icup Synthetic Landscape

The Icup installation takes one of the most ordinary, disposable, and seemingly inconsequential objects—the paper cup— To invert the consumer-object relation and perception through the creation of an extraordinary –membrane like piece that embraces both the coffee-drinker and coffee shop. Given the typical paper cup has an average lifespan of 10-15 minutes, the user hardly ever considers the elaborate processes of its production, distribution, and its disposal. By bringing to light the throw away, mundane paper cup the installation counterbalances ordinary user-object relations to challenge assumptions regarding inconsequential consumption of the invisible waste. The 4,000 cups that make the installation reconfigure the user-object interaction by transforming the special experience of the coffee shop. To further study the user-object interaction; the I-cup installation was reconfigured and mechanically animated as part of the Phantom Galleries (an organization that transforms vacant storefront into temporary public art galleries) in Long Beach. The Icup installation, created a unique relationship between the community and the cups. As pedestrian walking by had a direct interaction with the installation as he or she was able to activate its movement, via sensor, by simply standing in front of the glass. Its harmonic motion creates a vast array of soft-scapes that are generated by a rotating crankshaft.

> PERSPECTIVE SKETCHES


3

1 2

> MOTION AT REST

01 PLAN CUPS

4

> MOTION ACTIVATED BY PEDESTRIAN WALKING BY

5

02 PLAN GRID + CONTROL POINTS

LEGEND 1> 2> 3> 4> 5>

Motion Sensor Cups Crankshaft Pully System Grid System


- 4,000 CUPS - 15,000 STAPLES - 500 FEET OF STRING - 4 STAPLERS 9 PULLEYS - 8 HUMANS - 256 FL OZ OF COFFEE

> CEILING SUSPENSION SYSTEM

> STUDIES FLEXABILITY + CONSTRUCTUBILITY OF CUPS IN UNITS

9 in 9 in

Displacement 0.0 in Displacement 0.0 in 0.0 sec 0.0 sec

30 sec 30 sec

60 sec 60 sec

Period Period

> HARMONIC MOTION

A B C D > MOTION CRANKSHAFT

> MOVEMENT DIAGRAM

E

F

> MOTION CRANKSHAFT

G

H

I


1.00’

2.00’

2.50’

3.50’

4.50’

5.50’

8.50’

10.00’

> TIME LAPSE SEGMENTS


LOS ANGELES - 2008 ARTCHITECTUREINSTALLATIONS

TEAM - MAGAÑA

Set in Motion : The Cloud

> STUDY MODEL

The cloud is a catalytic structure that changed the typical spectator’s experience of a gallery environment. The installation sought to solve the contradiction of creating a prominent installation while not overshadowing the work of 40 participating plastic artist on display. The articulation of the space was housed within the shape of the installation creating a dynamic fluidity between the art on display and the observer within the display itself. This art installation was exhibited in the Basswerks gallery, as part of the art show “set in motion.”


> SECTION SEGMENTS

> ELEVATION

4 5 1 3

01 LEVEL

LEGEND 3

5

1> 2> 3> 4>

Entry Sculptures Hanging Art Digital Media


LOS ANGELES - 2009 ARTCHITECTUREINSTALLATIONS

TEAM - MAGAÑA

Adaptation : The Cocoon

Downtown Los Angeles is in the process of reinventing itself as a thriving hybrid community. One key component of this goal is the adaptation of old, existing industrial buildings into mix residential and work/live lofts. It is this creative and genuine adaptation process that sprouted the concept of The Cocoon. When I moved into my loft, I analyzed and explored the existing conditions and elements presented by my then-newly repurposed place, and utilized these to create an adaptive dwelling I could reinterpret as home. The extension of the machine room of the freight elevator of this previously sweatshop-building happened to be an extension of my ceiling. This 11’x9’ void became the perfect opportunity to adapt a bedroom and incorporate several other elements in the design to enhance the loft, such as exterior views, ambient lighting through the use of translucent materials, incorporated lighting, material application, and spatial geometry.

> SITE - ADAPTATION - COCCON Before this building was renovated and converted into lofts. The Cornell Building was a sweat shop. This particular area ther e used to be fright elevator.


> SKETCH + VOIDS

3

2

4 6

7

1

01 LEVEL

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 1. 9. 2.

HALLWAY BATHROOM KITCHEN DINNING LIBRARY STUDIO LIVING CLOSET HALLWAY BEDROOM BATHROOM

3. 4. 1. 5. 2. 6. 3. 1. 7. 4. 2. 8. 5. 3. 9. 6. 4. 7. 5. 8. 1. 6. 9. 2. 7. 3. 8. 4. 9. 5. 6. 1. 7. 2. 8. 3. 9. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

KITCHEN DINNING HALLWAY LIBRARY BATHROOM STUDIO KITCHEN HALLWAY LIVING DINNING BATHROOM CLOSET LIBRARY KITCHEN BEDROOM STUDIO DINNING LIVING LIBRARY CLOSET HALLWAY STUDIO BEDROOM BATHROOM LIVING KITCHEN CLOSET DINNING BEDROOM LIBRARY STUDIO HALLWAY LIVING BATHROOM CLOSET KITCHEN BEDROOM DINNING LIBRARY STUDIO LIVING CLOSET BEDROOM

B3

Context

B2

Context >B1 SKIN + VIEWS + TRANSPARENCY 0’

B3

2’

0’

4’

6’

2’

4’

6’

B2 B3 B13

B2

5

B1

A2 A

3

8 2 1

A2 A

3 8

02 LEVEL

2 4

7

B2 1 B A2 A 8

2

4 5

4 5

5

0’

2’

4’

6’

0’

2’

4’

6’

0’

2’

4’

6’

02 CEILING

B2 B

1

7

LEGEND

C C2

6

C C2

6

C C2

6

7

B2 B

1> 2> 3> 4> 5> 6> 7>

Entry Kitchen Dinning Studio/Office Bedroom Living Area Restroom


3’-0”

4’-11”

9’-6”

3’-0”

4’-11”

3’-0” 1’-4” 4’-11”

> SECTION DETAIL OF BEAM AT COLUMN

> SECTION DIAGRAM

9’-6”

9’-6”

10’-9” 8’-8”

3’-0”

3’-0”

4’-11”

4’-11”

9’-6”

9’-6”

3’-0”

4’-11”

1’-4”

9’-6”

SECTION B1

10’-9”

> SECTION DIAGRAM

> ELEVATION DIAGRAM

8’-8”

3’-0”

> SECTION DIAGRAM

4’-11”

3’-0” 1’-4” 4’-11”

9’-6”

9’-6”

10’-9” 8’-8”

SECTION B1

SECTION B3 3’-0”

4’-11”

9’-6”

SECTION B1

> SECTION FOOTING BASE PLATE

SECTION B3


toto entry ENTRY to ENTRY

East Moring Sun 6:51

to Living to Windows to Studio to Living to Windows to Studio to Living to Windows to Studio

to AC

to Kitchen

to street to street to baboo shoots

to dininig

> VIEWS DIAGRAM

> BASE PLATE + COLUMNS termination to different materials CONCTETE + OPAEL POLYCARBONATE


LONG BEACH - 2010 ARTCHITECTUREINSTALLATIONS

TEAM - MAGAÑA

Preceptual Vision : Points of View

> FLOOR DIAGRAM

A multi-perceptual experience of consciousness through a vacant storefront An individual’s perception of things is a critical aspect of the interaction between the spectator and the physical world. A perceptual ‘object’ can be defined as a spatiotemporal coincidence of its different attributes. For example, an object could be a large, red, moving square. If an object’s different attributes occur simultaneously in different places, can they still define the object? The installation emphasizes this “spatio-temporal coincidence” making the observer consider the conditions of our conscious recognition. The installation consisted of fragmentary shapes in different perspective planes that, when seen from specific positions, joined to create words that formed philosophical and artistic arguments on perception. The spectator would decipher each message as he or she looked for key perspective views. However, what lay before him were not letters or words, but rather shapes that, when seen from a specific point of view, aligned in a way the viewer could attach particular meaning to the collective ensemble. The installation sought to convey how art is judged as it is being observed, from the individual’s point of view.


MESSAGE

LETTER SEPARATION

PLANE PROJECTION

> WORD FRAGMENTATION

> SPACE LAYUOT

LEGEND

1 2 3

01 FLOOR PLAN

1> 2> 3> 4>

4 5

The world we see is not real, it’s our mind’s representation of our senses Question what you see Withdrawn in the mind Reality cannot be found except on a single source, because all things are inteconnected 5 > Art is truth existing only in the mind. There is no absolute truth


MESSAGE 1

MESSAGE 2

MESSAGE 3

MESSAGE 4

MESSAGE 5

MESSAGE 6

> WORD FRAGMENTATION


LOS ANGELES - 2009 ARTCHITECTUREINSTALLATIONS

SPINAL VORTEX

This installation carried on the challenge of transforming a neglected and marginal service patio behind a Hollywood club into a temporary exhibit space. The show sought to fuse elements of art and music creating a unique experience in an unexpected place. Not being able to physically alter the structural conditions of the patio, the Spinal Vortex facilitated its transformation as it covered the full extent of the space. The installation offer a free-flowing look allowing the existing conditions to bring a new layer of interest, Adding to the place without hiding or masking what was there, it created a well-rounded solution for the artists and musicians performing at the “The Live Festival” show.

> FLOOR DIAGRAM

> CONCEPT SKETCH > SOCIAL VORTEX - CATALYST


" /8

4’ 9 1/4"

7’

8’ 5 5/8"

8’ 9

" 5 9

3’ 5 5/8 "

6

LEGEND

5

4

01 FLOOR PLAN

2

1

3

1> 2> 3> 4> 5> 6>

THE CAT CLUB Retail WISKY GO-GO Retail Retail Parking

1/ 2"

7/ 5’ 8" 11 4

/8

3"

5/ 8"

3’

7

4’

"

/8

1/4"

8" 1 1/

5’ 5/8" "

5’

2

"

5’ 1

7’ 1 1/4"

3

5’ 3/4

3

7/ 8"

’4

4

3/ 8"

3

4

4’ 4’ 3 3/4"

4’

"

"

4’

6’ 7 7/8

4’ 1/4

"

’4

3

"

/8

4" 4 3/

"

3’ 10 7/8"4’ 5’2"

5’ 1 1/8"

/8

2’ 8 4 1/’3 4"

"

2’ 8 7’ 3 5/8" 1/4"

/8

2’ 9" "

3

1/ 2"

3

4

2

" 5/8 " 13/4

2’ 9 3/4"

2’ 7/8"

4’

5

1

8"

3/

8

2’

4’ 7 3/8"

’8

4" 3/

8" 3/

4’61/8"

5

8

4

4’53/4"

3’

3’

3’

1

7"

4"

7’ 5 1/4"

1/8" 4’ 10/4"

4

5/8

4’ 1 "

4

/4" " 2 3 /8 5’ ’ 11 1 4

4’ 10 1/4"5/8"

7/8" 11 2’3’

4’ 4 1/8"

7’

3/4" 3/4" 5’ 5 5’ 5

"

2’ 10"

11 2’ 4 1/4" 5/ 8"

31 ’’ 22

2’

4’ 10 4’1/ 10 4"7/8" 6’ 6’ 5 3/ 5 8" 1/2" 1

"

1

7/8

7/8"2’ 8 1/2" " 2’ 4 1/8"

5’ 1 1/8"

/4 3’ 10 "5’

5’ 1 3/8"

6

8"

1

5’8’2 3/8"1/8"

3/4"

/ 5/8" 3 5’7 ’ 10 3/4" 7 10 2’

9

7’ 5 1/8"

2 1/ 8"

5’ 5

7/8"

14’ 0 3/4"

7/8

" 1/2"

1

5’

8 / 4

4’

4’ 4’ 5 8 3/4" 3/4"

3

4’

3’

"

7’ 7 3/8"

9

2

3’

8’ 3"

1/ 2"

4’ 11"

6

" /8 3

/2

5

1

3/8"

1

1

11

4’ 4 5/8"

1

5’

8 5’

"

8’

1/2"

10

5

10

/ 8

5’

5’ 1 1/4" 6’

3

5’ 1 91/4" 1

7 1/ 8"

3’ 4 1/4"


1R5,1R6,4,5

F,3R1,E,2R3

Group 01

1R1-1R2-1R3-1R4-1R5 1R6-1R7-1R8-4-5-6-7

Group 02

2R1-2R2-2R3-2R4-E-5

Group 03

A-B-C-D-F-3R1

Group 04

B-D-E-E-F-4R1-4R2

Group 05

A-C-E-F-5R1-5R2

Group 06

A-B-C-D-6R1-6R2-6R3

C,E

E,D,B,5R1,A,C

F,E,5R2

C,E

D,B,C,A

Group 07

B-D-E-7R1-7R2-7R3

Group 08

A-C-D-E-F D,B,C,A

9R2,9R1,F

Group 09

A-B-C-D-9R1-9R2

Group 10

A-A-B-B-C-D-E-F-F

> DEFRAGMENTED SEGMENTS


Professional Practice Ar•chi•tec•ture - \är-ke-tek-cher\

Through my professional practice, I have worked on projects that range from programmatic and functional analysis to complete building envelope systems, and gained experience in all levels of the applied practice -- from schematics to construction administration. This exposure has enabled me to understand the processes that shape architectural practice in ways that continue to fuel my drive to expand my design exploration.


3 1

Schoolwork

2

Art - chitecture Installations Learning Resource Center TMMC Torrance Hospital Taylor Yards High School

4

Art and Sketches


The vision for the LRC project was to create a vibrant campus center to attract and encourage interaction and knowledge sharing. The LRC gives new direction to an evolving progressive institution by creating an activity center that merges student reseach, study, and leisure spaces in a central multi-functional destination.

WALNUT, CA - 2007 PROFESSIONALWORK

TEAM -HMC ARCHITECTS

Mt S.A.C Resource Learning Center

Project Size: 200,000 S.F Program: Library, Research Lab, Student Center, Meeting Center, and Dinning Facilities Professional Work at HMC Architects Project Involvement/ Responsabilities: - Design - 3D model - Studies and Options - Presentations boards, modle, material research - Schematic Design

Solute (Users) Water (Knowledge) Partially Permeable Membrane (Translucent) Bridge connections Library Skin

Student Center Learning Resource Center

> OSMOSIS THEORY


01 FLOOR PLAN

02 FLOOR PLAN

03 FLOOR PLAN

04 FLOOR PLAN

05 FLOOR PLAN


Portal for pedestrians from the campuse main East -West thoroughfare

> MASSING GEOMETRY

Bridges with open study areas, link the campus Center with LRC; to stimulate interaction of knowledge, ideas & collaboration

Horizontal fins protect from south solar exposure & vertical fins proctect from east-west exposure Green Roofs help cool down the complex & provide gardens for public space

> 05 (+72.00)

Defines new entrance to the cental core of the campus Multi-functional plaza enhances sense of heart of the campus

> 04 (+57.00)

> PROJECT CONTEXT and SITE CIRCULATION

LEGEND > 03 (+42.00) Dining Bookstore Campus Center Reading Area Study Library Computer Lab > 02 (+22.00)

> 01 (0.00)

> MASSING PROGRAM


>SKIN IDENTITY

> SKIN IDENTITY

RESOURCE LEARNING CENTER

STUDENT CENTER


Torrance Memorial Medical Center Replacement Tower is a seven-story , 390,000square inpatient tower that will upgrade the hospital’s patient care and physical facility to meet the future demand’s of healthcare in the 21st century. Sculpted by the forces of the site, the curvilinear massing of the building softens the harshness of the medical environment and makes reference to the dynamics of the ocean waves in its vicinity. The void between the new tower and the existing facility is mediated by a belt of green spaces to provide relief from the intensive medical environment.

TORRANCE, CA - 2007-08 PROFESSIONALWORK

TEAM -HMC ARCHITECTS

Torrance Memorial Medical Center

Professional Work at HMC Architects Project Involvement and Responsabilities: - Design Team - Exterior Envolope - 3D model - Studies and Options - Presentations boards, model, material research - Schematic Design thru Construction Documents

PRECAST CONCRETE

GLASS CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM

NORTHERN LIGHT

ARRIVAL PLAZA TR

AN

SP AR

EN

> SITE FORCES

CY

> FACADE HARMONIC MOTION


> EAST ELEVATION

> NORTH ELEVATION

> WEST ELEVATION

> SOUTH ELEVATION


METAL PANEL CANOPY

SPANDREL

SPANDREL

VISION GLASS

METAL PANEL

> PARTIAL ELEVATION

EAST

> FIRST FLOOR PLAN

> PARTIAL SECTION


> ELEVATION AND THIRD FLOOR PLAN

> WALL SECTION


LOS ANGELES, CA - 2007 PROFESSIONALWORK

TEAM -HMC ARCHITECTS

TAYLOR YARD HIGH SCHOOL

LAUSD Central Region High School #13 serves a community that developed around the historic Pacific Electric Railway and an environmentally protected area of the Los Angeles Riverbed. Symbolic of the context, the hardscape’s circulation and gathering areas are ordered linearly, like the railway. The landscaped edges are organic and meandering, like the riverbed. The District and community required a facility to give the students the best possible educational experience, with and a sustainable hub for community activity. Environmental restrictions originate from the nearby railway switching station’s particulate emissions. These conditions influenced the organization of the campus into four distinct zones. The shared facility buildings, linked by a broad ribbon canopy, were grouped together to form a protective barrier against particulate emissions. The classroom buildings fan out and open up as air quality improves, culminating at the play fields, the location where active outdoor recreation can occur. The resulting campus is comprised of nearly 214,000 square feet, serving a population of 2,295 students in 85 classrooms.

Professional Work at HMC Architects Project Involvement/ Responsabilities: - Presentation Boards, Diagrams, Graphics - CAD Coordination - Design Development thru Construction Documents - Construction Administration

> SITE DIAGRAM > SITE FORCES


> SECTION TYPICAL (SLC) SMALL LEARNING COMMUNITY

> SECTION MULTI-PURPOSE AND (SLC) SMALL LEARNING COMMUNITY

MASTER FLOOR PLANS

> SLC SMALL LEARNING COMMUNITY


Art Art•e - \ärt


4A 1 3

Schoolwork

2

Art - chitecture Installation

Professional Work

Metamorphosis of the Popped El Nacimiento: The Birth The Breast Bust The Wormhole Selected Sketches


LONG BEACH, CA - 2001

Metamorphosis of the Popped

ART+SKETCHES

This project aimed to create a new form based on an object found in nature--Popcorn. The selected object was manipulated and distorted into a new abstract form using clay as a medium. In my perspective, a kernel undergoes a process of metamorphosis simply due to human manipulation and/or heat. So, heating constituted my first manipulation. Then, as an extended manipulation of this form, I transformed it into two disparate pieces that came from each other. Location: Long Beach City College Medium: Clay, Paint color, shoe polish, turpentine Dimensions: 7” x 18” x 9 ”

> RAW THE POPPED before color > SKETCH CONCEPT : POP CORN


> DETAIL OF FINISHED PIECE > FINISHED PROJECT


LOS ANGELES, CA - 2008

El Nacimiento : The Birth

ART+SKETCHES

Metal Sculpture has always compelled me ; So, a few years back,I decided to take a few welding classes at a local community college and began experimenting with this art form. This is an art piece that I conceived as the representation of an emotion of becoming and evolving; of freedom and of the birth of ideas. Nacimiento is to become, to evolve, to burst out, to come out, to break out, to emerge. The project brings together two materials from different spectrums-- metal and textile. Location: Los Angele Community College Materials: 1/8” Steel Plates 3/16” Steel Round Bar Sheer Black Textile Method: Forged Metal, Metal Welding: Tig Dimensions: 24” x 24” x 27”

> SKETCH CONCEPTS > SKETCH CONCEPT CONSTRUCTION Two very different material meet and coexist... Metal and Textile...Gotta love its contradiction hard, durable, permanent and soft, delicate, temporary...Oh but waitmetal is soft, and flexible….once heat is added to the equation.


> SKETCH OF PROPOSED PROCESS > CONSTRUCTION PROCESS


LOS ANGELES, CA - 2009 ART+SKETCHES

Wormhole Pendent Light

The Wormhole is a lamp fixture made for an in-house project at HMC architects called “Lighten Up!” The Recession Competition. The objective was to create cost-effective fixtures with minimal materials. The concept behind my pendent lamp fixture is a worm’s trajectory as it eats its way through a fruit, consuming it to reveal holes throughout the sphere. The light fixture consists of three spheres: the light source, and two spheres of increasing sizes on the middle and outer perimeter. The material used was P.V.C. piping of varying sizes Medium: P.V.C Piping 3/4”, 1”, 1.5” P.V.C Fittings Epoxy Dimensions: 1st Sphere - 16 in O.D. 2nd Sphere - 7 in O.D. Light Bulb - 3in O.D. - 11 Watt 530 Lumens

> SKETCH CONCEPTS > MATERIAL P.V.C.


> SKETCH OF PROPOSED PROCESS > CONSTRUCTION PROCESS


LONG BEACH, CA - 2000

The Breast Bust

ART+SKETCHES

This project aimed to create volume out of concrete. I used the bust of Venus of Willendorf as an example of volume, which I then reinterpreted as a voluptuous bust armor. This project is an example of an early exploration of material and their possibilities for expression. First I produced a “waste mold” out of clay. Then, one side of the mold was covered with a soap residue and a thick layer of plaster. The process was repeated on the other side. Once the plaster had hardened, it was separated from the clay mold, to produce two negative halves, which were joined and sealed together for the pouring of concrete. Once the concrete had dried, the plaster was chipped away to reveal the sculpture. Location: Long Beach City College Medium: Clay Plaster Concrete Shoe Polish Colour Dimensions: 11 1/2” x 7 3/4” x 6”

> RAW CONCRETE SCULPTURE > SKETCH OF BUST VENUS OF WILLENDORF


> DETAILS OF FINISHED PIECE > FINISHED PROJECT


ART+SKETCHES

1998 -2010

Selected Sketches


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l

i

n

BouyerMaga単

Paulina P a


Portfolio