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Paul H. Stanley Portfolio


contents Boathouse

spreading

pp.4-11

Desert: reclaimed derrick pp.12-15

Vessel for sitting pp.16-17

Charleston art school- pp.20-25 2


swarming

N.Y.C. Five Corners-Housing Tower-pp.26-29

N.Y.C. blockStacked Swathespp.30-35

Urban Aquafaripp.36-39

pre-existing power park

watercourses and aquafari infrastructure

pedestrian and vehicular ways

Shared Lanaispp.40-45

Housing and Memory- pp.44-49 Bay Break- pp.5057


B O A THOUSE INVESTIGATING-

SIZE-

Compound Buildings, Plenum The Space, Newnan’s Lake History, Sensitivity to site with large-scale buildings Palm Point Park on Newnan’s Lake (Gainesville, FL) ~20,000 sf

CRITIC(S)-

Stephen Bender, Mark McGlothlin

LOCATION-

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reflected world is the conquest of calm -Gaston Bachelard


A Boathouse for the U.F. crew team on Newnan’s Lake-- In 2001, 110 wood dugout canoes were unearthed from its Northwestern shore, the largest archaeological find of canoes anywhere. The boathouse occupies a sensitive peninsular park 2 miles South. Its towering pine and broad cypress will now support a structure fit to shelter the sculls, boat shells, and spirits of a sophisticated rowing team Diagrammatic sectional and planometric speculations suggested architectonic regarding ways to slide across the landscape towards the water FInding a system of primary spatial sequences and secondary surfaces is important to efficiently choreograph the rowing team’s movements between service areas, training areas, and intermittent social areas.


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Sliding and gathering involved in the atrium, split up along an axis emphasizing sight lines to the water.

South Stair for socializing cantilevered over the penninsula

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Direct, mechanical sliding in the doors of the boat storage area

Sliding up the interior ramp along points of social interaction


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Approaching the Boat House’s sliding openings

Storage Base for Boats


DESERT: reclaimed derrick INVESTIGATING-

SIZE-

Field/Ground Studies, Sheltering/ Exposing the building/ Working without a context, Program of a School/Compound Non-specific American Southwest Oil-boom Town ~10,000 sf

CRITIC(S)-

Nitin Jayaswal, Bradley Walters

LOCATION-

the boring of the earth for oill, natural gas, and minerals that architects would be remiss without, affects many of the equatorial deserts of our world in drastic ways. The architectural provenance and fate of 19th century oil-boom towns begat highly automated ways of excavating the desert with little to no involvement with humanity.

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recovery Vastly imperceptible to the public, researchers and artists travel through the desert fastly, but the desert is fastly approaching the city as well. Yet, the desert is equally sought after as a basin for new ideas. It’s important to elucidate the narrowing gap between the desert and the city in order to reap its potential solar, biological, and plenty other resources. Both the public’s visiting of the museum and the retention and refinement of the private researcher’s quarters are programatically paramount in constructing dunes that withstand the shifting sands


public appro

ach

e servic

exploring different sectional shelters bearing the traces of oil wells long dried up.

privat

e


atrium and visiting exhibition space

Eastern portal

a great city, a great desert

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-ancient Roman proverb


Vessel for sitting

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INVESTIGATING-

Working in the full-scale, Promoting Public Interaction/ Comfort,, Constructional Techniques in Wood, Tension, and Wire,

LOCATION-

Plaza of the Americas- - Gainesville, FL

SIZE-

15 sf

CRITIC(S)-

Martin Gundersen, Bradley Walters


Wood and wire were the two materials allowed. Such a restricted palette offers a surprisngly wide array of material possibilities. Cross programming and multivalent nodes of activity were key to creating a versatile bench that would actually be used amidst bustling student life in the Plaza of the Americas. A curved mantle of 1/2� pine, held taught at an angle with wire from the central mast both supported the bench and offered a place of repose on the ground. Once the project served its duty in the Plaza of the Americas as a small vessel for sitting, a simple mantra rang true amidst the graffiti that grew on the bench-- “We are the people who willl build our future.�


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INVESTIGATING-

Programming an arts school amidst fluid public visitation patterns, Reflecting materials and characteristics of the city, Building flows, Height regulations, Framing views to historic adjacencies, Studio ergonomics

LOCATION-

Parking Lot between Church and Queen Street Charleston, SC

SIZE-

25,000 sf

CRITIC(S)-

Ruth Ron, Nitin Jayaswal, Martin Gold

Charleston Institute for Fine Arts + Portraiture


HISTORY The history of Charleston is checkered with not just manufacturing industry but artistic in-

dustry. The program is a school focusing on the art of portraiture, and in it, reflecting and the sites surrounding in the visages of the students as well as the building itself.

PORTRAITURE The act of portraying someone or intimately involves not just direct viewing, but

peripheral sensing, and a certain un-focusing of one’s visual faculties to create a meaningful impression of a person, or a mirrored reflection of the city in the building

TECTONICS Formulating a structure that both re-

ceives the canvas in an ergonomical way that respects human proportions and serves as a framing system for the upper portions of the building.


The southern end of the Charleston Institute for Fine Arts and Portraiture (C.I.F.A.P.) houses flexible civic spaces including a library, cafe, and meeting rooms. The Gallery for C.I.F.A.P. occupies the northern end of the site. Composed of ramps that wind up towards the second floor, walls creep up in the interstices between that receive canvases and mixed media alike.

basement

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first floor


Similarly, public ramps will connect both ends of C.I.F.A.P’s length to the central stairway, fastened back to administration offices and specifically smaller spaces. The tectonic language of these circulation spaces is reflected in the ballasts that surround the reflecting pool in the public plaza and extend downward into the integrated easel/structure system in the below-ground galelries.

second floor

ramped galleries

ground floor


Planters with mirrors affixed to the curtain wals of the northern Gallery reflect historical adjacencies of the block-brick, vines, and sandstone. The integrated easel/structure system creeps down to the basement level, where studio spaces are left open to above to maximize natural light. Alternately, studio spaces are lifted above the southern basement level on the 2nd floor, presenting a public plaza to Charleston below on its Southern edge.

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public plaza on Southern edge


SQ PER C OO

Sociological Housing typologies, Contextual Space-making, Attracting Urban Density

LOCATIONSIZE-

Corner of Worth St. and Park Row, Chinatown N.Y.C. 80,000 sf

CRITIC(S)-

Alfonso Perez-Mendez

PARTNER-

Roland A. Faust

BO

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INVESTIGATING-

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N.Y.C. Housing Tower

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tectonics

A moment-resisting steel frame grips concrete modules that carry glass and internal wood desk diaphragms

modules

Residential tower units must be arranged in a very specific way in order to allow the most sun penetration, versatility, and appear as kinetically identifiable as the park.

Columbus Park Columbus Park is the only park in Chinatown. At the historical nexus of notorious little Five Points, it retains a less violent but equally diverse character. The character of the park must seep across the street into the gathering spaces throughout the tower. It seeks to turn its back on the blank faceless walls of the neighboring courthouses and open up to the park across the street

Diagrammatic sections evincing the interplay between public and private spaces


Shared lanai between residential and commercial units

Entrance on Worth Street

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Sections expressing the stacking operations of the modules as well as their notches and mortises


N.Y.C.

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Block-

INVESTIGATING-

Extra-large scale place-making, Propagating private spaces of repose, Reconsidering the Smithson’s “Cities in the Sky”, Peripheral public junctions, Accomadating for the transient environment of boarding schools and life-long living.

LOCATION-

block of 29th Street-30th Street between 10th and 11th avenue-- N.Y.C.

SIZE-

800,000 sf

CRITIC(S)-

Alfonso Perez-Mendez, Yann Weymuth of HOK Tampa, Michael Chatham of

PARTNER-

Roland A. Faust

HHCP Orlando

Stacked Swathes

New York City’s Meat-Packing District is enjoying a Renaissance due, in part, to the popularity of the High Line. Residential spaces in the area, particularly those with private green spaces, are highly prized. An entire city block between 10th and 11th avenue South of Hudson Yards on 29th street is opened up to welcome an expanse of housing and a boarding school.


Street-scape greeting the City level iterations

Private/Inter-generational gardens level modifications

Private Towers level enunciations, Iindividualizations

base reaches into the infra-structural depths of the site

base creeps up from the ground level defining pockets of peace in the fabric for housing

base rises upward to define revamped cities in the sky focused on private quarters

Swathe- — (n) a broad strip or area of something, a bandage or wrapping, a strip left clear by the passage of a moving machine

Section along the High Line displaying the interplay between private green spaces and public destinations.


foundational fabric

+

institutional scale

apartment fabric

+

Approaching a suitable density for swathes of private occupation in the city carpet housing

permanent residents transitional students students visitors

+

living

system with variety

= 30

90% residents

housing

disruptions and irregularities in the swathes

learning

shopping

7%

3%

boarding

parking

school

dorms

attractors= 3

boarding school campus/ ground floor shopping and galleries/ inter-generational gardens

urban intensity max/min= 3/1 residential density = 68 dwellings/ acre

completed swathes


Northern Residential clusters/ Southern Dormitory groups

Towers for living-- to each entire floor a residence

1- Private Gardens 2- Housing Cluster 3- Dormitory Cluster 4- Shared Gardens

Upper podium inter-generational gardnes for both boarding students and permanent residents

Carpet Housing Skins.

Private Gardens/ Carpet Housing in context


Longitudinal Section from East to West

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Street View from 10th avenue showing Public Entrance to Boarding School


Urban Aquafari INVESTIGATING-

Programming an arts school amidst fluid public visitation patterns, Reflecting materials and characteristics of the city, Building flows, Height regulations, Framing views to historic adjacencies, Studio ergonomics

LOCATION-

John R. Kelly Power Plant Gainesville, FL

SIZE-

17 Acres

CRITIC(S)-

Anne Lacaton (visiting Professor), Nancy Clark pre-existing power park

watercourses and aquafari infrastructure

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pedestrian and vehicular ways


lazy rivers

extensive power grid

active aquafari

steel forests

Collective Rivers

water algae (fish food, nutrients) waste

Reaching the sky-

variegated canopy heights and functions

open-pond algal bioreactor tube Tying back to the ground-

lateral cable braceways

algal-feeding tilapia fishery and market Filtering back into the ground: via

urban pantry for high profit, high-demand herbs parsley and basil

hollow centrifugally spun concrete posts set into a 72’ x72’ grid to collect waters

derelict powerhouse

productive fisheries

Productive Rivers

septic tank

aerobic reactor

boiler tubes

Algal Bioreactors

Reactive and energetic Rivers


5 Criteria 1_to create no new walls 2_to retain all the existing pipes and building infrastructure/ convert pipes to water pipes 3_to exclusively re-use substation components in reconstructed canopy 4_to combine both hi-tech and low-tech industries ranging from robotics to algal biomass production/ tilapia-based aquaculture facilities 5_to create intermediary heights and connections with the smart roof canopy, creating solar energy, collecting water for both recreational and industrial uses

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_1_2_5

_2_3_4

_2_4

_1_2_3_4_5


Shared Lanais INVESTIGATING-

LOCATION-

Programming an visitors Center in an increasingly defunct site on Tamiami Trail. This siting is an opportunity to detract visitors from I-75 and allow them to experience some of the remaining oak hammocks and natural beauty on the site. An outgrowth that sits right on the Tamiami Trail is meant to act as an economic attractor, recognizing the need for visitors to first buy things before simply “being” in the Visitor’s Center. Tamiami Trail and 47th Street Sarasota, FL

SIZE-

17 Acres

CRITIC(S)-

Guy W. Peterson, Lee Shaw The parcel on Tamiami Trail and 47th Street is one of many vacant, increasingly overgrown lots in Sarasota. The ambitious program of a Visitor’s Center is slated to occupy this land and revitalize the mostly derelict streetscape. This siting is an opportunity to detract visitors from I-75 and allow them to experience some of the remaining oak hammocks and natural beauty on the site. An outgrowth that sits right on the Tamiami Trail is meant to act as an economic attractor, recognizing the need for visitors to first buy things before simply “being” in the Visitor’s Center.

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Rather than create an individual building, this scheme aims to create a panoply of experiences for guests. Interior circulation is eliminated, allowing guests to meander through the outdoors. The site’s old-growth trees and oak hammocks are mostly maintained. A central cluster of oaks now inhabits an island of native grasses surrounded by an archipelago of clustered buildings and parking for 110 cars. These extra 10 parking spots are meant to service the economic attractor situated at the Western-most end of the property on the street edge.

A range of experience are afforded by this outdoor-oriented composition. Businessmen from the Chamber of Commerce and out-of-towners from the Economic Development Center/ Workforce Housing will allow for outdoor “walking-meetings”. Out of town visitors will be seduced by the luscious botanical gardens and transparent views from one pavillion to the next. In-town visitors and residents of Sarasota proper will enjoy weekly events on the public plaza and around the numerous boardwalks.


STG.

M.E.

M.E.

M.E.

BOOKSTORE MGMT

GALLERY: SRQ- HISTORY

Gallery-Future Visions for SRQ

STG. OUTDOOR EXHIBITION

OUTDOOR EXHIBITION BOOKSTORE/ GIFT SHOP

GALLERY OUTRO

PLAZA

KITCHEN BAR DIRECTORS OFFICE

LOBBY/ TIX M.E.P.

OFFICE MGMT

EVENTS KITCHEN

M.E.

M.E.

STG.

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CONFERENCE

M.E.P.

BOCCE COURT


Section through Lobby, Cafe and Gallery (right) Elevational Section of the East Facade (below)

Section through Lobby, RR, and Cafe (left) Elevational Section of the South Facade (below)


Exterior view of Lobby and Auditorium Entrance

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Interior view of Lobby

Aerial view of street corner meeting commercial edge along the Tamiami Trail

View of “Future Exhibits� Museum Gallery and boardwalks in the foreground


View of Lobby and Breezeways beyond


TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE IN URURAÍ: HOUSING AND MEMORY Strategies for defending the River Banks and the right to adequate Housing Between

INVESTIGATING-

A Housing Village for displaced residents and a Material Bank to support its development. An auxillary Headquarters for the Comissão Nacional da Verdade in the East of São Paulo, to archive and address memories of the Dictatorship from 1964-1985

LOCATION-

Jardim Helena, Sao Paulo, Brazil

SIZE-

~20 hectares

CRITIC(S)-

Martha Kohen, Nancy Clark, Milton Braga of MMBB Arquitectos and Alexandre Delijiacov

Unfolded Elevation along Rua Salvador de Medeiro

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Surround

Over

Under


Site 1 Choice- Near Itaim: Less historic buildings, resi-

Site 3 Choice- Sao Miguel: Site 2 Choice- Jardim Helena: Challenging boundaries, excellent historic structure and Long Distance to the River, vibrant street life Concrete Jungle

Atop a riparian landfill between the Rio Tietê and neighborhood São miguel,in Jardim Helena a tabula rosa condition aspires to become a zone that enhance the area’s ecological and economic standing. The new site aspires first to meet the area’s housing demands and achieve 100-units/ hectare and 45% permeable surfaces to prevent flood conditions. This sprawl will be designed along a long, rising wall of stepped housing, and a neighborhood of stilted housing pods that connect across a stream in the Tietê to the neighborhood below. The new site also aspires to meet a more abstract/ political demand; that is, the archiving and cataloguing of memories during the Brazilian military dictatorship from 1964-1985. This archive will also be home to the Comissão Nacional da Verdade, who has for its same mission the preservation of lessons from darkness during Brazil’s flirtation with the interminably meddlesome era of the Cold War. The project aims to match the diversity of the tropical, colorful streetscape along Rua Salvador de Medeiro, the main road that connects Sao Paulo’s first Jesuit outpost-church and public square with the Sao Miguel train station. Residents in the stepped wall of housing will be encouraged to dress and adorn their modular units with varied recycled materials and maintain a minimum of 1-2 small gardens. The stilted housing pods feature perforated aluminum panels with advertisements, contradicting the municipal code of no advertising with a special exception. The proceeds will be used to directly infuse money back into the housing unit’s amenities and to grow the Comissão Nacional da Verdade’s archives once the C.I.A.’s files on their involvement with the coup are released.

Estação São Miguel Paulista

e

rd

o ad

alv a S iro u R de Me


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Comiss達o Nacional da Verdade

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Housing Units with advertising/ artwork screens, Hidroanel Canal rejuvenation pond


Banco de Materiais de UruraĂ­, using the ancient Indian name for the township. Market stalls on ground floor.


BAY BREAK:

Botanical Arcades for the ongoing “St.Pete Pier” Competition

INVESTIGATING-

To investigate and create a new proposal for the St.Pete Pier Competition. Sadly, the “Lens” proposal was halted by a contingent in town who didnt’t aspire to see a non-“building”-focused design that frames the tropical outdoor tropical splendor of the site. “Bay Break” is inspired by this vision.

LOCATION-

Downtown St. Petersburg FL jetty, Space Beach and “Pier Uplands”

SIZE-

~30 hectares

CRITIC(S)-

Stephen Belton, Jason Jensen, Joy Watters, Martin Gold and John Maze Like mangrove leaves floating down a fast-flowing near-shoretrough at the morning tide, the foremost aim of Bay-Break is to create a flush between the North and Central Yacht Basins to encourage cleaner waters. The zone of Bay-Break proposes, secondarily, to house each of these Tampa-Bay-specific coastal ecosystems in an architecture archipelago of water, glass, limestone, concrete, and, most importantly, the botany of the bay. The Ground floor is composed of a forest of thin, concrete arches. Some of these arches span across roads to make way for traffic/ conditional parallel parking. Long, thick, limestone stem walls operate within the arches to provide lateral stability and create pockets of refuge. The two-way structural system supports a shimmering aluminum plate above where Office-workers and Restaurant-goers alike might take a stroll and enjoy the Botanical Gardens. Intermingled on top of this Botanical Garden are circular cutouts that encourage a stack-effect and allow fresh breezes. Book-ending this raised Botanical Garden, floating above public ground-floor event spaces are two “wings”. Each of these wings reads as

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a stereotomic, reflective glass bar sitting a top a forest of curving concrete and glass. Within the North-facing glass bar is the Colombia Restaurant, with floor-to-ceiling windows throughout and an expansive balcony sitting atop a mangrove forest and kayak tunnel. In the South-facing glass bar is a flagship Corporate Office Headquarters. Below, in the concrete-arched arcade is a public pool that is nestled within St.Pete’s historic octagonal brick bathroom. The face of the project to downtown exudes long, water views, playful forests of concrete, shallow pools, limestone stem-walls that reach to infinity, and a magical overgrowth of native pines, mangroves, ferns, and wildflowers, treated like splotches of unmixed color on a palette. viewed through a forest of concrete arches, curving glass, and wildflowers.


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U.F. SoA and GSoA Architecture Portfolio 2008-2013