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Spring/Summer 2019 How We Got Our Cover

By Paula Rosa and Alexandria Saad

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Looking back to move forward..

The Boy Next Door? By Caroline Miller

20-27

Kyle Rodgers

Cover boy, Kyle Rodgers, is not just the boy next door.

When Time Meets Opportunity By Nadia Egipiciaco

32-37

Kairoi is more than a motto, it is a movement.

Asian Sensation By Paula Rosa

38-45

Rapper and role model. Main feature, Awkwafina is nothing less than an industry trailblazer with a fantastic sense of humor.

The Future of Fashion with SCAD Students

Kyle Rodgers

Morgan Taylor Lewis

By Alexandria Saad

52-61

What is the future of fashion? We sent out questionnaire’s to art school students to find out.

Bold, Brass, and Bada$$ By Caroline Miller

64-69

Morgan Taylor Lewis, is a name you’ll want to remember.

Credits

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Stockists

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HOW WE GOT OUR COVER

The past Dazed issues have consistently featured influencers that are blazing a trail through their industry. The cover page is usually presented in a profile format and contains elements of styling particular to that personality. Looking through our features and the people who chose to feature, the personalities were widespread and bold, nearly popping off the page and coming to life before your eyes. Through careful processing and selection, the editors at Dazed chose our main feature, Kyle Rodgers, to place on the cover of our issue of the Spring 2019 Dazed.

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Kyle may seem like the boy next door but at the age of 21, he has already directed and produced music videos for some of the biggest names in the underground hip-hop scene even before his graduation at The Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia. Kyle and his close friend, Cooper Hammond, founded 2400 Kelvins, a start-up film production company a year ago and it has gained attention in just the first year. The team has been filming videos for almost 8 years together so they share a history and work incredibly well together. “Coop is one of the main reasons I picked up a camera in the first place,” Kyle shared.

The Boy Next Door?

Kyle explained that the goal is to turn 2400K into a label, something like 88 Rising, another collective that’s making huge waves right now. Rodgers explained that he wants to be able to sign and manage artists, as well as be a full-scale production studio and company. The name 2400 Kelvins is in reference to white balance, or how cold or warm a scene looks depending on how blue or orange the hue is on your image, which is measured in Kelvins. Kyle describes, “2400 Kelvins would be on the hotter side, a very warm color, kind of like the color gold. With that being said, 2400K, we’re like a brick of gold. I’m gonna’ get this tatted soon,” he says grinning.


“I learned early on the only way these artists make it is if the people listening, could see the music come to life.”

Kyle has worked with a plethora of music artists from less known to some pretty well-known musicians. “I’m still working my way up,” he explains. Some of the artists he has worked with include DonMonique, Sha Hef, Wifisfuneral, 458 Keez, Gizmo, DirectedbyMax, Velous, Divine Council, Smooky Margielaa, Reese Laflare, JDuce, STL GLD and Luhx. “Hopefully the list keeps growing!” he declared in excitement. Kyle picked up a camera early on as a skateboarder, filming his friends at the skatepark and in the streets and shared he couldn’t part from his camera wherever he went. His friends in high school were always older so when they parted ways to different universities Kyle tried to find a direction to focus on. As a hip-hop head, he gravitated towards the rap scene in Providence to see what he could get into which led to producing a few videos with some friends. “From there I started to fall in love with what I was doing,” he says in nostalgia. Looking back, at the start of his journey towards film, he recalls that towards the end of high school he wasn’t positive what he wanted to do but he did know that his relationship with his camera was a bond that couldn’t be broken. His uncle, a successful filmmaker, encouraged him growing up by advising him to immerse himself in watching films. Kyle remarks, “I had always loved movies but growing up you don’t really get to watch the cult classics with your family in the living room.” Soon enough Kyle wanted to produce his own films and says he decided he wanted to dabble in everything from documentary and narratives to music videos and the advertising industry. Upon graduating from University, Kyle has been focusing on music videos although he points out he eventually wants to produce more than just music videos in the future. From educating himself in film from an early age, Kyle draws inspiration from a variety of artists. “I’ve always had this unrelenting love for Kubrick of course,” he says smiling. Some of his other inspirations include Werner Herzog, Paul Thomas Anderson, Tarantino, Jim Jarmusch, Hayao Miyazaki, The Coen Brothers, Dennis Villanueve, Alejandro Iñárritu, and Scorcese. Kyle is also enlightened by modern day photographers and filmmakers, “Nabil Elderkin is a huge inspiration, dude is an absolute genius,” Kyle responded. Other influences include BRTHR, Hiro Murai, Luke Monaghan, and Eric K. Yue. The list goes on. He concludes, “I’m inspired by all art in general though, I would’ve loved to be an illustrator, would love to get into fashion and architecture as well.”


Kyle states, “The biggest thing that kept me doing music videos was the urge to keep building a platform for artists to be seen, whether they already had some attention or they were just starting, when we made these videos, people wanted to hear more from them. I’ve always been a super empathetic person so when people would come to me that I hadn’t heard of before, I knew maybe I wouldn’t get much from it, but I treated every project like it had as much value as the next and once they saw that final edit, hopefully it would inspire them to say, ‘Well damn, we really look like we’re doing this shit for real.” Kyle discussed that there are so many artists trying to make it nowadays and the art of being noticed is a difficult one to master. “I learned early on the only way these artists make it is if the people listening, could see the music come to life.” Over the years, Kyle has evolved in his film style and aesthetic. Kyle clarifies, “I’d say my underlying aesthetic is on the gritty side, I always have been attracted to things that are out of the ordinary in the sense that they rub against the grain of what we’re used to, so I guess I have a darker style than some, but I’d rather say I try to capture things for what they are and when I do exaggerate a style it’s only to accentuate the mood of the subject.” He emphasizes that editing is a crucial element in his work. “Every cut I make has to be as near perfect as possible. Once I start moving towards more narrative and documentary films I’m going to be even more of a stickler than I am now. I have a love hate relationship with doing music videos at this point cause there’s only so much I can do style wise, but at the same time it’s been paying the bills and it’s been great helping artists establish themselves and be known for their talent.” For now, Kyle is building his dream and his portfolio in Boston and we can’t wait to see the release of some exciting projects he has in the works.


Kyle states, “The biggest thing that kept me doing music videos was the urge to keep building a platform for artists to be seen, whether they already had some attention or they were just starting when we made these videos, people wanted to hear more from them. I’ve always been a super empathetic person so when people would come to me that I hadn’t heard of before, I knew maybe I wouldn’t get much from it, but I treated every project like it had as much value as the next and once they saw that final edit, hopefully, it would inspire them to say, ‘Well damn, we really look like we’re doing this shit for real.” Kyle discussed that there are so many artists trying to make it nowadays and the art of being noticed is a difficult one to master. “I learned early on the only way these artists make it is if the people listening, could see the music come to life.” Over the years, Kyle has evolved in his film style and aesthetic. Kyle clarifies,

“I’d say my underlying aesthetic is on the gritty side, I always have been attracted to things that are out of the ordinary in the sense that they rub against the grain of what we’re used to, so I guess I have a darker style than some, but I’d rather say I try to capture things for what they are and when I do exaggerate a style it’s only to accentuate the mood of the subject.” He emphasizes that editing is a crucial element in his work. “Every cut I make has to be as near perfect as possible. Once I start moving towards more narrative and documentary films I’m going to be even more of a stickler than I am now. I have a love-hate relationship with doing music videos at this point cause there’s only so much I can do style wise, but at the same time it’s been paying the bills and it’s been great helping artists establish themselves and be known for their talent.” For now, Kyle is building his dream and his portfolio in Boston and we can’t wait to see the release of some exciting projects he has in the works.


A DARIUS


‘Feeling on these vegans despite the smell of armpits The skinny ones are artists, it's obvious they starving Your shit art don't pay bills it eats Ramen’

- NYC Bitche$


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Where has she been? Featured in new Gap Logo Remix Commercial Has a self created short web series "Tawk" Awkwafina was added to the cast of the third season of Girl Code She also was co-host of the weekly late-night talk show Girl Code Live She played a supporting role in Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising Starred in the indie comedy Dude She also appeared in the 2016 animated comedy Storks She is part of the principal cast in the all-female spinoff to the Ocean's Trilogy, Ocean's 8 She is part of the cast of Warner Bros. film Crazy Rich Asians She has a recurring role in the Hulu original series Future Man

Awkwafina

Asian - American Rapper - Actress

Chinese-Korean-American Nora Lum – also known by her stage name, Awkwafina. A born and bred New Yorker, tell-it-like-it-is chick with a witty persona that is breaking down barriers in the rap game and Hollywood. Awkwafina first came to light in 2012, after debuting her self-produced rap track titled “My Vag.” In 2016, she then won a Webby Award for “Tawk” – a no holds barred, late-night talk show she hosts on Verizon’s Go90 free streaming service. Raised by a single dad who doubted her aspirations and urged her to pick a safer route, there was no stopping on Awkwafina’s agenda. Awkwafina was supported by her grandmother, whose personality was more conservative but cheered her on otherwise. From 2006 to 2008, Awkwafina attended the Beijing Language and Culture University in Beijing, China. She then attended the State Univeristy of New York at Albany (SUNY) where she focused on journalism and women’s studies.


“I want to show young Asian-American girls that it’s ok to be ‘embarrassing, loud, rocket’! I’m just helping people come out of their shell that they are already born in to. Entertainment is not an option for a lot of Asians. You don’t see many of us, you don’t even think it’s an option. I think every Asian entertainer is a role model at some point; even if they’re terrible. There’s power in numbers.”


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THE FUTURE OF FASHION WITH SCAD STUDENTS


Recent seasons of fashion runway shows have presented viewers and consumers with an uncertainty in direction and have left them wondering and questioning what will be next for the fashion industry?

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF FASHION?

What better place to learn about opinions on

the fashion industry than a globally top-ranked fashion school? The Savannah College of Art & Design is home to more than just fashion majors, but fashion is obviously a big part of the college’s persona. In our survey, we sent out questionnaire’s to students and received back answers from advertising, fibers, photography, fine arts and fashion marketing majors.

Picking only eight to feature, at random, we

found that no two answers were alike. The personality of each student really came through with each question answered. Beginning with obvious favorites surrounding personal style, preference and hobbies. The questions then turned into a chat of current fashion news. Asking specifically what one dislikes about fashion, who the big names are in the industry at the moment and where will the road of the future take fashion. The responses were strong-willed, and exactly what you would expect from the next wave of witty, sincere, and talented college graduate millennials.

Cutting down to the chase. Where does the

future of fashion take us? You don’t have to be Anna Wintour or the President of Nordstrom to know the answer to that question. Like we learned from this questionnaire with SCAD students, it is all about your personal level of compassion towards society and the environment, and your willingness to keep up with the news of the world. Each answer was different, but all rooted from core values that

To find out what people’s thoughts are on the changing industry and the future of fashion, the editor’s at Dazed went to the student body of the Savannah College of Art & Design to learn their perception on the whole situation.

“ According to Kanye - holes on tights. According to me tech in fabrics. ” - @bengois

each individual has learned from their experience or interest in the industry and also just from an every day consumer’s standpoint. The conversation is an interesting one, there is so much uncertainty in what will be the next step, the next move, the next big development for fashion. But our best guesses are the only answers we have for now. Toying with the idea of tech integration with fabrics, has been a much talked about and very popular idea. While the actual technologies still are under development, the idea is not farfetched at all. With the recent rise of sustainable products and eco-friendly manufacturing practices, this response to the question was said more than once and has been a hot topic for recent fashion publications and designers.

Taking the time to learn more about these

students and their passions has reassured us that our next wave of industry professionals are compassionate towards the current issues we face today as well as are interested in the future of the billion-dollar industry. We are looking forward to watch these future trailblazers put their mark on the world.


Morgan Taylor Lewis, also known as Midnight Milk, is a wildly energetic creative known for his engaging personality and eccentric style. Raised in Urbana, Illinois Lewis moved to Savannah to attend the Savannah College of Art and Design where he started his music career and established a custom jewelry company, “Morgan Taylor Jewelry.” Inspired by “Rap Rock” and “Contemporary R&B” Midnight Milk creates an upbeat emotional roller coaster in his sounds using melodic undertones with dramatic imagery and wordplay.

M O R G A N TAY L O R L E W I S BOLD, BRASS AND BADA$$

“I lived with my grandparents for a few years when I was 3 and they had a plethora of instruments and would always be playing great music on vinyl records. So, I definitely was impacted greatly at a young age with how great music is.” Drawing inspiration from John Mayer, James Taylor, The Beatles, James Brown, and Bonnie Raitt just to name a few, Taylors style varies and when asked what genre he categorized his music as he couldn’t quite decide.


“I honestly don’t know”He shrugged, “but that’s kinda cool because I love not being confined by labels. It’s just good music to me.” Lewis explained that he got into custom jewelry when he wanted to buy a grill a few years ago. Instead of paying someone to do it he taught himself the process by watching videos online and referencing photos from Instagram and of course taking advantage of the resources offered in the jewelry making department at the Savannah College of Art and Design. “Making grills is pretty complicated to be explained but it’s fun I feel like a dentist sometimes,” he laughs. “I start by taking a mold of the mouth and then building wax on the mold. I use lost wax casting methods for almost everything that I make.”

In the process of making his first grill, he then felt inspired to pursue the other avenues custom jewelry had to offer. Lewis explained,“Like my personality and aesthetic, my jewelry is very raw and authentic to who I am which is what I think gives it that Morgan-like feel.” Inside and out, Lewis is a character you wouldn’t forget; he has a way of being incredibly impressionable on people. When asked about how he defines his identity he explained, “I really believe that the reason I am so memorable is that I try to be the same person all the time. I’m driven to be as genuine and authentic as possible and more importantly, I want everyone who comes into contact with me to leave feeling loved and cherish who they are.


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He also mentioned that his tattoos are deeply important to his identity. His favorite tattoo is his shin tattoo which depicts a totem pole illustrated entirely by his father and represents all the members of his family. Lewis expresses on his website that he wants to spread the feeling that it’s okay to be comfortable in your own skin and proud of who you are. We asked what his advice was for people who aren’t comfortable in their own skin and he reflected on his own way of doing this. “Growing up with a father being in a wheelchair my whole life, our family has always been different. So from a young age, I have always thought that being different is cool because I think my dad is cool, ya know? Acceptance is the key in my opinion. If you can accept your ‘shortcomings’ you can turn them into something amazing! Everyone has issues of some kind. So I feel that since I have an understanding of this, I have to share my love for myself to other people. And I love my self a lot,” he concluded with a smile. “Oh, and where did you get the name Midnight Milk?” we asked. Lewis explains it was a complete accident from a time he was hanging out with friends five years ago.“Just playing around I said ‘Guys!... if I ever get famous what should my name be?’ From there we just started talking shit back and forth spitting out random names. And at some point, I looked at the time and saw it was midnight. I saw my friend was drinking milk, and I was like, ‘BRUH why are you drinking milk at midnight?’ And that’s when a lightning bolt struck the center of the table and “Midnight Milk” was born. It’s funny to me because I’m very mixed “light skin” if you will. Milk is white. Midnight is dark, and if you mix the two together like they were people, it would create a little Morgan Lewis,” he says laughing.


cmcdonne@scad.edu ASSISTANT EDITOR-IIN-CHIEF Alexandria Saad alsaad20@student.scad.edu CREATIVE DIRECTOR Paula Rosa parosa20@student.scad.edu

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cmille38@student.scad.edu WRITERS-AT-LARGE Caroline Miller Paula Rosa Nadia Egipiciaco Alexandria Saad

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