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Summation & Production BA (HONS) Graphic Design EGRD 6002

Portfolio by Paula Mockute


2013

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Semester1.

{Research Development & Positioning}

Subject Research

Visual Research I started looking at different social awareness/charity campaigns to get a better insight into what range of issues have been raised; what issues are receiving more attention; what are the recent social campaign trends. In comparison to the number of other awareness campaigns, the blind and visually impaired people do not seem to be in the peak of attention. The most popular campaigns appear to be: breast cancer, smoking, child abuse, prostate cancer, alcohol abuse and helping poorer countries.

Primary Research I was exploring different surroundings to identify obstacles blind people face everyday and aids that assist them when moving about.

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Me

Interviews To gain the best insight in what is like to have no or minimal sight, I visited Swail House for the blind. I had pleasure talking to several people who were happy to share their experiences. They talked about how being blind affects their daily lives and their relationship with general public.

Katy

Craig

Katy is 37 years old. She has a guide dog which helps her to get around. Most of the time she is happy with the assistance she receives from the general public. Katy believes that people needs more knowledge about blind people but it could improve by interacting with one another.

Craig is 22 years old. He loves using a computer for interaction, education and hobbies. He wishes the general public was more aware of the abilities blind people have. He believes visually impaired people are seen as different from everybody else. Craig thinks that with more knowledge people would start treating him and other blind people with more respect and equality.

Questions: 1. What eye condition do you have? 2. How/what do you see? 3. Do you need assistance when you are out and about? 4. What are the issues you encounter in everyday life? 5. What do you think the public knows about visually impaired people? 6. In your opinion, what information should be given out to the general public?

Lauren Lauren is 26 years old. She believes people lack knowledge and understanding about blind people. When Lauren is out she feels treated like she is mentally disabled rather than as a blind person. She wishes people were more aware of visually impaired people as it would make her feel accepted and appreciated.

7. What would change if the public became better informed about people with sight loss?

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After the interviews, I started to come up with design ideas which would raise public awareness about blindness. My goal was to introduce different eye conditions and highlighted the issues a blind person faces when out and about.


Experimentation Clear film cards This product is aimed at introducing different eye conditions to the general public. To represent the main five eye conditions I drew according patterns. Later I printed them out on a clear film. Every card has an instruction to hold it in front of your one eye while closing the other. By doing this, a person is introduced to different types of visual impairment.

Camera filter I used my hand-made lens cover to recreate “Age-related Macular Degeneration”. I have used a piece of clear plastic and made a spot in the middle. Then I stuck it on my camera lens and took the photos to create a stop motion video. The images on the left are stills from a short video of me making tea. The video tries to simulate the eye condition through the blind person’s eyes.

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Textured poster I used the idea of braille to create an embossed poster. (Braille. Noun: A form of written language for the blind). I created lettering out of matches saying “ONLY 10% OF THE BLIND HAVE NO SIGHT”. Its purpose is to disprove a myth about all blind people ‘living in the dark’. In reality, only 10% of ‘blind’ people are completely blind. The other 90% still have some sight left. The technique of the poster nicely links to its content. Embossed letters connotes to blindness by reminding us of braille.

Goggles My other experiment was to alter regular goggles to create a representation of blindness. The way I painted them leaves you with Tunnel vision. My boyfriend volunteered to wear the googles while he was taking out rubbish. After the experiment he said that is was not too difficult as it was an area he was familiar with. However, he could not be as observant as usual because the goggles covered the sides and he lost peripheral vision. Also, he noticed his eyes were much more sensitive to bright light. 6


Semester2.

{Summation & Production}

Research

Me

Survey I found the following survey very helpful. Its results helped build my knowledge of peoples’ experiences, knowledge and curiosities that concern blind or visually impaired people. The final results made me realize that most of the public does not have contact with blind or visually impaired people in their daily lives. This outcome encouraged me to focus the project on educating/training staff in public businesses to assist visually impaired people.

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Yes

No Experience with blind people

Are you confident to approach a blind person?

Would you like to receive tips of how to approach a blind person?

What information would you like to know about blind people?

Is there enought information about blind people?

Is there a communication barrier between general public and the blind people?

100%

0%

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Experimentation

Me

Tanya, Sat 9th March, 2013 Q. Do you go out by yourself? A. Yes I do, every day. Only when I get to Epsom and reach big roads to Ashley Centre or Wilkinson I always ask general public to help me cross the roads. I also use a white stick to help me to get around. I have to push it around in front of me to find any obstacles.

Interviewing blind people Same as last semester I used interviews as a research method. I talked with four people with different eye conditions to tell me about their experiences when out and about. One person was more helpful then the others, but the overall information was great. I received a good amount of examples of how staff treat the visually impaired. It gave me a better insight in what is the current staff knowledge about assisting visually impaired people and what improvements are needed.

Q. Tell me how often and how far do you tend to travel? A. The furthest I go on a bus is to Weybridge to where my mom and dad live. I get two busses to get there which take about 10 miles. Q. Tell me about places you feel well assisted in. A. There are few cafes I love to go to. There is one in the upper high street which is called café metro. Also, I go to pet shops for my guinea pigs, one pet shop in South Street here. They are very good in there. Then I go to Ewell sometimes. There is a café and a pet shop next door to each other and they a very helpful. The café is called Deli Delight. I also find staff in Waitrose and M&S and Wilkinsons very helpful. Q. What are places you tend to avoid? A. Oh I don’t like railway stations. I feel very nervous there. Although some of the staff is friendly if nobody is there, it’s hard finding your way to the platform, finding your way up and down the stairs or finding the lift. Then on the station it’s dangerous. You’ve only got the markers you can feel when you are right at the edge of the platform.

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Q. What are the factors that affect your choices about going out to places? A. I like to go out where there are a lot of people out; I don’t like walking in quiet lonely roads. I always like to go to places within an easy walking distance or a bus journey. I don’t like open spaces so I never walk in the park on my own or by a river because I get lost. There is nothing to follow and I feel unsafe.


then I get a surprise at the cashier. Q. What exact help do you receive when you are out? A. In the cafes after I walk in they help me to find a seat and to sit down. They read the menu out for me if I haven’t been there before. If I have a hot meal they cut it up for me. In some cafés staff is kind enough to offer to take me across the road or take me to a bus stop so I would get home safely. When I go out to Waitrose or M&S I ask someone at the customer services to help me and they find a staff member to help chose my shopping with me. Q. What knowledge staff needs to assist a visually impaired person? A. They should let a visual impaired person know about steps going up or down in a shop. The best way to guide a blind person is to let him or her stay a little behind holding on staff members arm.

Q. In your opinion what is the reason why some staff is more helpful then others? A. Maybe some people are just helpful and others receive training. Trained staff would be more confident when assisting a visually impaired or a blind person. Q. Would you say that if you knew the staff was well trained to assist a visually impaired person you would go out to more new places? A. I would. Then you wouldn’t feel like risking the experience without knowing how staff will react.

Daniel, Tue 12th March, 2013 Q. Do you do out by yourself? A. Well I have a PA (Personal Assistant) who takes me shopping once a week to Sainsbury’s. Joe, Thu 7th March, 2013 Q. Do you do out by yourself? A. Yes

Rosie, Tue 12th March, 2013 Q. Do you do out by yourself? A. Sometimes, but I usually go out with my friend who is partially sighted or with a PA (Personal Assistant). (Rosie is blind from birth). Q. Tell me about places you feel to be well and not that well supported? A. Some staff is helpful. In some restaurants staff reads us a menu. Once we went to Nando’s and the service was very poor. It took 20min for them to produce a braille menu while all places should. Then we were told to go to the bar to order food while we had no idea where it was. Staff in cloth shops is usually both good and bad. Some staff will be very helpful, telling about colors asking sizes. Other staff doesn’t really want to go any further with you and only wants to take the money. It happens that some people feel the right to pick clothes for me without asking my opinion. Q. What are the things you consider when you chose what places to go to? A. The distance is important, how helpful the staff is and also the service. Q. What assistance do you expect from staff? A. In the shop I need them to tell me what is available, the offers and the prices. Sometimes staff doesn’t bother saying how much the products cost and

Q. What assistance do you need when you go out shopping? A. Me and my mate go out shopping together and help each other out seeing what the prices are or seeing if there’s any deals on. I also do my shopping online and the food comes to your door!

Q. How far do you usually walk or travel? A. Weill I go all over the place. I go to London to see my mom, I travel to college by myself witch is in Reigate. I usually get a bus or train. Depend how I feel really. Q. Do you feel free to make decisions where to go? A. Yes Q. Tell me about places you like to go and ones you avoid? A. I like going out to cinemas, restaurants, shopping for clothes or to go round window shopping. I tend to avoid going out on Saturdays as it is very busy with people. Everyone hurries too much and doesn’t pay attention that you are visually impaired. Q. What do you think about staff in public service places? A. I usually don’t need assistance, but if I do staff tends to point instead of actually taking me to the place. They think they can treat you however they want. Q. what are the factor that affect your going out choices? A. There are none. Q. What tips can you give to staff to better support a visually impaired person. A. Don’t be afraid to ask if we look like we’re struggling. Most of the time I need help reading the prices. That’s about it.

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Q. How far do you usually walk or travel? A. I probably go out about two or three times a week. I go to Epsom, to shops, or get a bus to go and see my parents. Q. Do you feel free to make decisions where to go? A. Yes I do. Q. Tell me about places you feel to be well supported? A. Wilkinson’s staff is very helpful. Also, café Nero staff is great, they come to us right after me and my friends walk in, they take us to our seats and takes our order. Q. What other places do you go to without your PA? A. I go out to the bank by myself or get to the Cooperative for extra food for example. Q. What assistance do you expect from staff? A. I need assistance to read small print in the bank or in shops. Q. Do you have tips for staff to better assist you? A. If I needed guiding they could ask whether I’d like to hold on their arm. I usually find the help desk if I’m in a known place, if not it may be difficult for me to find a member of staff. Q. Would you say that if you knew the staff was well trained to assist a visually impaired person you would go out to more new places? A. I would and I think others would too. It would mean the staff is trained and understands the needs of visually impaired people.


Semester2. {Summation & Production}

Proposal After summing up the information from interviewing blind people and collecting information from the general public, I have made a decision to alter my proposal idea. Instead of concentrating on educating the general public about blindness, I will focus on public businesses. The research proved it is an area that needs more attention and the result will be successful and rewarding.v

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Brief: Create a design solution to be used for training various staff about assisting visually impaired people. Design should equip personnel with guidance skills and increase confidence in providing a high level of service. Social benefit, research background, commercial awareness and execution of design will be taken into account. Background: A barrier between general public and people with disabilities has always been an issue. Until today, great changes were made to meet needs of vulnerable adults. People with eyesight loss face difficulties in their everyday lives, it holds them back from being independent and they are not

being treated like able bodied people. Proposal: My aim is to create a visual communication piece to train staff working in various public areas about assisting visually impaired people. The main focus group is managers working in various public establishments who are responsible for the staff training in the workplaces. Firstly, the design must intrigue, interest and be straightforward to acknowledge. The final outcome aims to have provided basic knowledge and strategies for the staff in order to improve the quality of service in an interactive and fun way. To accomplish this, design concepts will embody the most effective Medias like printed and interactive. Firstly, I am working on the research and organizing relevant information to be used in the design. Also, I aim to approach my target audience to get useful tips and information. Till now, I have created a survey, interviewed visually impaired and blind people, also, was in contact with Action for the Blind organization and used my personal knowledge from working with visually impaired people. The final design is direct mail 11

which would reach the establishments’ directors. It will aim to convince them to encourage educating their staff. Also, I am looking at creating information graphics covering these topics: how to guide a blind person physically and verbally, safety, introducing eye conditions, what the equipment says about the person and extra advice for premises’ improvement. Finally, I am working on interactive design ideas to encourage a more enjoyable and fun learning for the staff, like a workshop.


Professional context Final project idea reflects the area of design I wish to work in the near future. I want to work for the social good and making a difference. Authors like Victor Papanek, Steven Heller and Rick Poynor has inspired me to focus my energy on benefit of the society. Like Ken Garland suggests, designers’ work should ‘… promote our trade, our education, our culture and our greater awareness of the world’ (Garland, 1964).

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Visual research Besides primary research I searched internet, looked at various books, magazines which published socially aware design projects. It was an important process in order to build knowledge on what work has been done already and to know where my work will be positioned. Also, visual research helped me to build knowledge about awareness posters layouts, colour schemes and trends.

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Content resources Correct facts and information is an essential part when creating a project to respond to a real life situation. Apart from interviewing visually impaired people I researched professional scholar texts and companies working on the subject. I was looking up to blind association websites. Those organizations have a long time existence and prove to be competent in their professional field. NHS, National Federation of the Blind, Action for the Blind and Royal National Institute of Blind People are a great source for a throughout information package.

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Visualising Concepts

As a respond to the primary and secondary research I drew sketches to visualise my first ideas which I developed into possible design concepts. I was coming up with various ideas that would work as an awareness piece of design. Its final destination is managers in various public businesses.

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Braille packaging This is an idea for direct mail to be sent out to various directors and managers. It aims to encourage staff training about assisting visually impaired people. A plain packaging design with braille writing puts the manager into a blind persons’ position when a plain box, bottle or a tube gives out no information about the content. The packaging will also have a sentence encouraging a staff training in order to make a shopping experience approachable to those who are blind.

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Maps These images were inspired by an idea that visual information empowers us to orientate ourselves in various places, while it is worthless for someone who is blind. The aim of these designs is not only to state a problem but to give a solution: ‘A Shopping Centre Map is No Use For a Blind Person. A Shop Assistant Is.’ It encourages shop managers to consider training their staff to be helpful in assisting blind people with their shopping.

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Website template A website is a great way to promote a business or a campaig. For this reason I attempted to create a website template. It is based on 6 main points about visually impaired people and ways of assisting them. It could be used by any business to train their staff with guidance skills and a better knowledge about visually impaired people.

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Poster These poster experiments were inspired by assistance cards for blind people. The card contains a text asking anyone from a member of the public to assist the blind (usually deaf as well) person with crossing a busy road. I was told about it by a lady living in the Swail house for the blind. She had no sight from birth and a long time was using a card with words ‘YOUR HELP IS WELCOME’. I have added braille writing over each letter for a reference to the blind. I might incorporate these words in my work.

Scratch Off Technique I have tried a homemade scratch off lottery ticket technique. Following from my previous ideas for direct mail (to make managers organise staff trainings about visually impaired people) this one is engaging. The text ‘Independence should not be a winning prize’ could be printed on a scratch off surface. Then after rubbing it off the text ‘Train your staff to assist a blind person’ would appear.

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‘Blind Shopping’ These images are inspired by an idea that a blind person is only aware of the shape of things and is not capable identify details.

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Interactive Box The interactive box will have various things inside and the person (a member of staff) will be encouraged to reach for them and try to identify the objects. The final outcome of the process is to make staff understand the difficulties blind people face in their daily lives.

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Target Audience

Experience

Once my tutor said: ‘a good research equals a good design’. As my project is aimed at various businesses to improve blind people’s service I had to meet my target audience. I went out to talk to managers and staff in different establishments to see what are their views and suggestions on my design project. Jakob Nielsen, a usability consultant* said: ‘Elaborate usability tests are a waste of resources. The best results come from testing no more than 5 users and running as many small tests as you can afford.’ For my research I approached 4 people, three managers (Boots, Next, Cafe1) and a member of staff (EE). I talked to them on the same topics: Their existing trainings, which ones of them are most successful and why, what tools they see to be useful for my training and their opinion on my tool kit idea. The managers of Boots and Next shared their excitement and approval to my project idea.

Posters

The Next manager explained that most of their trainings are completed online and that they have never had disability awareness training. However, he expressed an interest in a possibility of blind awareness training. In his opinion a poster and hand-outs would be of a great use in order to educate the staff.

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Hand-outs

The manager of Boots said they are providing disability trainings to their staff. The training is based on experiencing the disability, like putting on blindfolds and trying to orientate oneself around the premises. He then suggested a poster being a good idea to keep the staff reminded of essential guiding tips.


Online

Meet with blind people

The least enthusiastic about the project and blind people appeared to be a small business’s owner. His preferred customer range is general, able bodied public. In his opinion, rather than educating staff on how to best support a blind person they should be escorted by assistants. Although, he expressed an interest in a braille menu idea he did not sound promising.

Braille menus,prices and labels

A member of staff in EE expressed his interest in the project and added that he would like to know how to better assist blind customers. He suggested experience training in cooperation with blind people to gain the best knowledge. Also, he finds printed material of a great use after any training.

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The overall research has helped me to weight my final design possibilities. I will mostly concentrate on printed media, will try to incorporate an experience and base it online.


The Brief

After overthinking the research and experimentation my project aims to educate staff in any business to assist blind customers. In order to do that I came up with an idea to create a company selling a toolkit to be adapted by any service. One part of the design is a direct mail package. It will contain a poster to be put up in a staff room, a brochure, a blindfold as a training tool and a business card linking to the company’s website. All pieces of design will be printed. I will not build a working website for this purpose as I lack technical skills it requires but I will put together a template of how the website is to look and work.

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Planning

Raising awareness campaigns are less popular and exciting to come across these days. For this reason I had to work hard to make my design attention-grabbing, engaging and straightforward. I wanted my final design to be functional through its content and form. It had to work well as a direct mail and an information piece.

General look Colour. I wanted the product to have a neat, uplifting feel. I looked at a bright colour scheme choosing most pleasant and warming tones. The ‘winner’ – vivid yellow- stands out and is appealing to look at. Yellow is a dominant colour that follows throughout all design pieces. Typefaces. To make my design legible and clean I used sans serif typefaces in black colour. Some parts are bold and larger for definition. I used three typefaces throughout the design: Gill Sans, Century Gothic and Raavi. Size. Size. Size was an important aspect creating the physi-

cal product. The box has to be a letter box size and also contain all the items. The poster must fold into adequate size while other items are generally small scale. Paper. I wanted to use a good quality paper throughout my designs. A lightweight large sheet of paper would have been easy to fold but wouldn’t remained it’s a quality look. I used a high quality Fabriano paper with a soft and slightly textured finish. The paper is thick enough to be resistant to creasing but has a lovely clean fold. The mailing box is made out of brown cardboard and is die cut. Illustrations. I did not want my design plain and boring so I drew illustration to give it more character. It gave design more life and worked well as references to the text. The illustrations are created by hand by drawing only one line to create human shapes. Unordinary drawing technique connotes a long curvy road or a maze. It nicely connects to the meaning of the project: making getting around easier for the blind people. The final outcome was three images: one shows a blind woman with a cane, other represents a woman guiding a blind man 26

and the last one is of a man in an open conversation pose.


Website I created a website template to make the company ‘Service without obstacles’ accessible to clients. Browsing. The website has a very simple navigation system. All other windows can be

found among menu options. Every page is has a clear content title: About, Posters,Pocket Brochures, Blindfolds and Basket. The list if items offer a description, photos of the products, prices and dimensions. All of them can be ordered on the site.

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Design. The design of the website again follows the same typefaces and a clean look. A grey colour is introduced as a main background colour while yellow highlightens the menu bar.


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Direct mail box Direct mail design is an introduction to what is inside. I wanted it to be eye-catching and intriguing. The person who receives it should want to open it with excitement. The fact that it is a box is already more engaging than getting an envelope. To retain the anticipation, the package contains four items to read, unfold and interact with. Layout. I wanted the box to be quite hard in material but easy to open. I have purchased few types of cardboard and experimented with different sizes and layout templates. Make or buy. Experimentation proved to me that to make a good quality box is not easy. It was also difficult to find a right cardboard. Finally I have chosen to order a pack of boxes which were the right size and material. Illustrations. The box design is repeated from poster illustrations. The images are blown up in size and moved around to create a pattern. Band. I had to chose how the box should be sealed. Adding extra cardboard pieces did not work well and I did not want to use tape or stickers. I chose to use a band around the box. It keeps it closed and is not hard to take off. 33


Blindfold When I met my target audience all the managers and a staff assistant said they would find an experience training very useful in order to understand their blind customers. To fulfil that I chose to use blindfolds as a training tool. Usage. A single blindfold will be added to the direct mail box. It will contain a small card with a message attached to it. Then the manager who received it could either give it to his staff member to share or order a larger number on the website. Design. The blindfold has been purchased online. The card attached to it follows the same design style throughout the whole package.

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Poster The poster is the centre of the project. It is what the project is about. It presents essential information to educate staff and as a result improve their service quality assisting blind customers. In order to reach this goal more careful decisions has to be made. Layout. I went back to the visual research material to explore various poster layouts to find inspiration. The layout must be suitable to assist the main parts of the poster: title, guidance tips and illustrations. The final layout design has areas separated by the size of typefaces, alignment and spacing. It has a look of a step by step instruction manual because of the numbering and listing system. I find such layout successful for it’s purpose. That way it is straightforward and easy to comprehend.

layout variations. However, it had a plus side allowing me to create a brochure and a poster in one design. The folded poster can be flipped to see the following pages like a brochure. Also, it is designed to allow you to flip through first and second side of the poster in one motion. Side two was designed to work only when it is used as a brochure and you are flipping through both sides. It gives 9 facts about blindness. I used statistic information from such websites as Action for the Blind and National Federation for the Blind. Both organizations prove to be competent in their field.

Content. I revisited the large content research I have done and started editing until I was left with fewer tips to assist blind person. After the final editing I had a 12 point list and 2 categories: act and speak. The categories state two the most important things to have in mind followed when assisting a blind person and is followed by explanatory tips. Folding. The poster is double sided, folded into 7 parts. The zigzag fold restricted the 35


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FACTS

S E RV I C E W I TH O U T O BSTAC L ES

Steps to assist a blind customer

ACT Beaquatem enet que sunt, sinvelit et unt et odisquunt, cupitasi odias moloritiur? Axim sere latin nem volo venderibus arum fugita dolent. Aped utent faccum escilibus, optatu

1

Almost two million people in the UK are living with sight loss.

2

Nearly half of blind and partially sighted people feel ‘moderately’ or

3

1

When guiding, walk side by side with the blind person.

2

To locate things tap on the object, like a chair.

3

Beaquatem enet que sunt, sinvelit et unt et odisquunt, cupitasi odias moloritiur? Axim sere latin nem volo venderibus arum fugita dolent.

Give useful directions, use words like on your right.

Every day 100 people in the UK start losing their sight.

15 per cent of registered blind and partially sighted people say that they do not do any leisure activities outside of their home.

Blind people do not have a super sense of touch, smell or hearing.

6

Only about 15% of the visually impaired people have no vision or light perception

5

Keep the premises clear from mess to avoid creating hazards to the blind person.

7

6

Let him or her hold on to your bent arm.

8 9

FACTS Beaquatem enet que sunt, sinvelit et unt et odisquunt, cupitasi odias moloritiur? Axim sere latin nem volo venderibus arum fugita dolent.

1

ACT Beaquatem enet que sunt, sinvelit et unt et odisquunt, cupitasi

2

3

Almost two million peo-

Nearly half of blind

Every day 100 people in

ple in the UK are living

and partially sighted

the UK start losing their

with sight loss.

people feel ‘moderately’

sight.

eribus arum fugita dolent. Aped utent faccum escilibus, optatu

from people and things around them.

5

Respect the blind person’s guide dog and do not distract it at any time.

Steps to assist a blind customer

odias moloritiur? Axim sere latin nem volo vend-

4

4

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SERVICE WITHOUT OBSTACLES

1

2

3

4

5

6

When guiding, walk

To locate things tap

Give useful directions,

15 per cent of registered

Blind people do not have a

Only about 15% of the

side by side with the

on the object, like a

use words like on

blind and partially sighted

super sense of touch, smell

visually impaired people

blind person.

chair.

your right.

people say that they do not

or hearing.

have no vision or light

do any leisure activities

4 identifying food and medicine labels.”

It is predicted that by 2050 the number of people with sight loss in the UK will double to nearly four million.

perception

outside of their home.

5

6

Respect the blind

Keep the premises

Let him or her hold

person’s guide dog

clear from mess to

on to your bent arm.

and do not distract it

avoid creating hazards

at any time.

to the blind person.

All blind people cannot read braille.

7

8

partially sighted people

9

It is predicted that by 2050

All blind people cannot

the number of people

read braille.

-

with sight loss in the UK

tifying food and medicine

will double to nearly four

labels.”

million.

SPEAK

SPEAK Beaquatem enet que sunt, sinvelit et unt et odisquunt, cupitasi odias moloritiur? Axim sere latin nem volo venderibus arum fugita dolent.

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7

8

8

9

Speak in a normal tone when addressing a blind person. Do not speak loud.

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Look directly at the blind person when you speak.

10 11 12

Speak in a normal tone when address-

blind person when

and say when you are

ing a blind person.

you speak.

leaving the person.

Do not speak loud.

10

the person.

Speak in a normal tone when addressing a blind person. Do not speak loud.

11

S E RVICE W ITHO UT O B S TACL E S

S E RV I C E W I T HOU T OB ST ACLES

12

Steps To Assist A Blind Customer

SER VI CE W I T HOU T OB ST AC LES

12

Steps To Assist A Blind Customer

ACT

blind person when

and say when you are

a blind person. Do

you speak.

leaving the person.

not speak loud.

SE RVICE WIT HO U T O BST ACLE S

12

Steps To Assist A Blind Customer

12

Steps To Assist A Blind Customer

ACT

ACT

Right customer treatment is an important part of a successful business. Blind people require a little extra assistance which results

require a little extra assistance which results

require a little extra assistance which results

in a customer’s pleasant experience inside

in a customer’s pleasant experience inside

in a customer’s pleasant experience inside

your business.

S E RV IC E W ITHO U T O B ST AC LE S

part of a successful business. Blind people

part of a successful business. Blind people

in a customer’s pleasant experience inside

S E RV I C E W I T H O U T O B S TAC L E S

Right customer treatment is an important

Right customer treatment is an important

part of a successful business. Blind people require a little extra assistance which results

Look directly at the

tone when addressing

ACT

Right customer treatment is an important

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Speak in a normal

Identify yourself

Look directly at the blind person when you speak.

Look directly at the

Identify yourself

your business.

your business.

your business.

guiding, walk side by side with the 1 When blind person.

When guiding, walk side by side with the 1 blind person.

guiding, walk side by side with the 1 When blind person.

guiding, walk side by side with the 1 When blind person.

useful directions, use words like 2 Give ‘on your right’.

2

useful directions, use words like 2 Give ‘on your right’.

Give useful directions, use words like 2 ‘on your right’.

3 Let him or her hold on to your bent arm.

3 Let him or her hold on to your bent arm.

3 Let him or her hold on to your bent arm.

3 Let him or her hold on to your bent arm.

4

To locate objects, such as a chair, tap on their surface.

4

To locate objects, s, such su uch as as a chair, chair, tap on their surface. rfa face e.

4

objects, such as a chair, 4 Totaplocate on their surface.

Respect the blind person’s guide dog

5 and do not distract stract it at a any time.

Respect the blind person’s guide dog bli pers p rss

5 and do not distract it at any time.

5 and do not distract it at any time. 6

Keep the premises clear from mess to avoid creating hazards to the blind person.

6

SPEAK

Give useful directions, use words like ‘on your right’.

isse ses es cle lea earr ffrom mess too Keep the premises clear azza a zard dss to o th he h e bblind lin nd per nd pperson. pe rsson on n. n avoid creating hazards the

6

respected and to trust your business.

5 and do not distract it at any time.

Keep the premises clear from mess to avoid creating hazards to the blind person.

6 avoid creating hazards to the blind person.

standing and trust. Communication strategies

standing and trust. Communication strategies

enable your blind customer to feel understood,

enable your blind customer to feel understood,

respected and to trust your business.

respected and to trust your business.

Identify yourself before offering help and 7 say when you are leaving the person.

Identify yourself before offering help and 7 say when you are leaving the person.

Identify yourself before offering help and 7 say when you are leaving the person.

in a normal tone when addressing 8 Speak a blind person. Do not speak loud.

in a normal tone when addressing 8 Speak a blind person. Do not speak loud.

in a normal tone when addressing 8 Speak a blind person. Do not speak loud.

directly at the blind person when 9 Look you speak.

Look directly at the blind person when 9 you speak.

directly at the blind person when 9 Look you speak.

10

Always talk to the blind person instead of the person who’s with them.

Always talk to the blind person instead of 10 the person who’s with them.

Always talk to the blind person instead of 10 the person who’s with them.

11

Use descriptive language, talk about colours, patterns.

11

11

12 Offer to read out prices, labels or menus.

36

descriptive language, talk about Use desc colours, patterns. pa

12 Offerr to read out prices, labels or menus.

Keep the premises clear from mess to

SPEAK A successful dialogue is a key to an under-

A successful dialogue is a key to an under-

A successful dialogue is a key to an under-

enable your blind customer to feel understood,

Respect the blind person’s guide dog

Respect the blind person’s guide dog

SPEAK

SPEAK

A successful dialogue is a key to an understanding and trust. Communication strategies

To locate objects, such as a chair, tap on their surface.

Use descriptive language, talk about colours, patterns.

12 Offer to read out prices, labels or menus.

standing and trust. Communication strategies enable your blind customer to feel understood, respected and to trust your business.

7

Identify yourself before offering help and say when you are leaving the person.

in a normal tone when addressing 8 aSpeak blind person. Do not speak loud. directly at the blind person when 9 Look you speak. talk to the blind person instead of 10 Always the person who’s with them.

11

Use descriptive language, talk about colours, patterns.

12 Offer to read out prices, labels or menus.


Pocket size brochure The miniature poster works as another handy tool to train staff. Design. It is the same design and has same information as the large scale poster. Size. Its size 9x5 cm makes it easy to carry around in a pocket or wallet.

Business card I wanted to create a business card as link to a company providing these products. Size. The card is slightly smaller compared with an ordinary business card size. Design. The business card contains a link to the company’s website and has a single line illustration showing a person guiding a blind man. The type of the link is the same used for the title so it would work as a one package.

37


Production

Screen printing In the start I wanted to use screen printing for every piece of design. I was excited about the techniques I could use. As a project about blind people I wanted to bring out senses in my work. One of them was smell. I was fascinated by the idea to add essence oil in the ink for screen printing. Another sense was touch. It was possible to achieve a textured surface of the print by using PVA glue and any fine textures material like sand or spices. I have done a home trial using glue and adding spices to the covered surface. It was a great experiment. However, in the end I declined both of the techniques for the purpose of functionality and time. Smells are not neutral enough not to create misleading references to the client. Also, the textured printing would have been too messy in the form or a direct mail. Direct mail box. The packaging was the only product I decided to screen print. I did not want to have it plain brown so this technique seemed to be perfect. I have tried out few different designs combining illustration and the company’s title. 38


Digital printing Digital printing is the main technique I used to produce my design work: posters, miniature brochures, business cards and box bands. Technical side. Putting together InDesign and illustrator files is an easy job. However, the printing process required extra editing and many trials until I had the final piece. Paper. I have mentioned before I used a Fabriano paper with a beautiful fabric-like finish. It gave the print a natural and pleasant look and feel.

SERV I C E WI THO U T O BS T ACL ES

12

Steps To Assist A Blind Customer

ACT

Right customer treatment is an important part of a successful business. Blind people require a little extra assistance which results in a customer’s pleasant experience inside your business.

guiding, walk side by side with the 1 When blind person. useful directions, use words like 2 Give ‘on your right’.

3 Let him or her hold on to your bent arm. objects, such as a chair, 4 Totaplocate on their surface. Respect the blind person’s guide dog

5 and do not distract it at any time.

Keep the premises clear from mess to

6 avoid creating hazards to the blind person.

SPEAK A successful dialogue is a key to an understanding and trust. Communication strategies enable your blind customer to feel understood, respected and to trust your business.

yourself before offering help and 7 Identify say when you are leaving the person. in a normal tone when addressing 8 Speak a blind person. Do not speak loud. directly at the blind person when 9 Look you speak. talk to the blind person instead of 10 Always the person who’s with them.

11

Use descriptive language, talk about colours, patterns.

12 Offer to read out prices, labels or menus.

39


Final touches After I had every piece of my design printed there was some more work to do. The boxes did not require much effort as the score lines were in place. On the other hand, the rest of prints needed measuring, scoring, folding and gluing. After few mistakes and adjustment I had my final finished product.

40


Evaluation

From the start of the project, I felt very determined about the area I was working on – social benefit. Raising awareness about blind people is an important subject to me. I have worked among and with visually impaired people for a few years now at The Willows Seeability Care Home in Leatherhead. The personal experience and knowledge gained in the training room has built my knowledge and enthusiasm about the subject. It was a great way to take this interest further by making it my Final Major Project. The start of the first semester was a time of clarity. I knew what area of design I wanted to be in and it was working for the social good, making a difference. Authors like Victor Papanek, Steven Heller and Rick Poynor inspired me to focus my energy on benefits to society. Like Ken Garland suggests, designers’ work should ‘…promote our trade, our education, our culture and our greater awareness of the world’ (Garland, 1964). Semester One was also a time of hard research and experimentation. My project required me to build a good understanding of where the

blind society stands in today’s world, what are the main issues it faces and what causes are attracting most attention. I have worked on both primary and secondary research. Internet, books, personal experience and interviews have helped me to push my project further. At the same time in order to fulfil my project’s idea, I was testing a range of ideas and methods. My main focus was on representing the different eye conditions that blind people have. I wanted to use this to expand the general public’s knowledge about blind people. I have created printed material and short videos. However, I still was not sure what the exact outcome would be. I started the second semester by going back to research. The plan I had at the end of first semester was missing something. It needed a new and clearer direction. For this reason I went back to Swail House For The Blind in Epsom, to arrange more interviews. Also, I created a survey to query the general public on their views about blind people. That was exactly what my project needed. It became clear that the issue doesn’t affect people that much. The only people in 55

contact with visually impaired were those working with them or having them among family members. The new direction of my project was to concentrate on public businesses. The final design solution aims to educate and train staff in various public business to better assist visually impaired and blind people. Inspired by the new direction, I started visualising design concepts. Designing a direct mail package seemed to be the best solution to approach managers. I came up with a number of ideas to promote staff training but the final product was unclear. Then I decided I needed to meet my target audience – businesses’ managers. I approached them with questions about their existing trainings and their opinions about blind awareness training and its form. Once again it helped me come to the final decision for the product. Finally, I started designing a company ‘Service Without Obstacles’ which offers a training toolkit to educate staff about assisting blind customers. The process of planning and producing was long but fruitful. I was pleased to get the necessary staff support with technical parts, which


made my design look professional. I took the designing process very seriously, thinking over every detail and enjoyed the process of making it. I think the final outcome has an inviting look, provides clear information and has an attractive aesthetic finish. Creating a time plan for my project was not an easy task. I guessed the concept building and production weeks, but it was hard to be more specific. My project involved a lot of research which kept altering its direction. This meant I had more ideas and better understanding, but shorter time scale plans to work towards my final design. I found it very exciting being taken ahead by the process but not a strict plan. Now I am sitting at my desk and I see the final design next to me, it makes me remember what an exciting journey I had coming to this point and I feel happy. I hope this project would be adapted by one of the blind associations. In the near future, I will proudly use this project in my portfolio.

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Bibliography

E. Stephan. 2009. Oberhuber Posters Posters Posters: Catalog Raisonne. New York: Springer Wien M. Sala, 2010. Poster Design. Barcelona: Index Book SL The Grid System. 2012. http://www.thegridsystem.org/. [Accessed 18.03.2013] N. Leonard, G. Ambrose. 2012. Design Research. Switzerland: AVA Publishing G. Ambrose, P. Harris. 2009. The Fundamentals of Graphic Design. Switzerland: AVA Publishing J. Foster. 2005. Maximum Page Design: Pushing the Boundaries of Page Design under the Real World Limitations. UK: How Books R. J. Moore. 2004. Design Secrets: Layout. USA: Rockport Publishers C. Knight, J. Glaser. 2003. Layout: Making It Fit. USA: Rockport Publishers T. Samara. 2002. Making and Breaking the Grid. USA: Rockport Publishers R. Walton (ed.). 2000. Page Layout. New York: HarperCollins Publishers M. Taute. 2008. Design Matters: Brochures. USA: Rockport Publishers L. Siebert, M. Cropper. 1993. Working with Words and Pictures. Ohio: North Light Books. Action for the Blind. 2013. http://www.actionforblindpeople.org.uk/about-us/media-centre/factsand-figures-about-issues-around-sight-loss/. [Accessed 11.02.2013] thersa.org. 2012. [Online]. Available at: http://www.thersa.org/sda. [03.02.2013] Barard, M. 2005. Graphic Design as Communication. Routledge Papanek, V. 1998. Design For The Real World: Human Ecology And Social Change. Thames & Hudson Kolster, T. 2012. Goodvertising: Creative Advertising That Cares. Thames & Hudson Banks, M. 2001. Visual Methods in Social Research. Athenaeum Press Limited Laurel, H. 2001. Provocative Graphics: The Power of the Unexpected in Graphic Design. Rockport Publishers Inc. McQuiston, L. 2004. Graphic Design Agitation2: Social and Political Graphics In The Digital Age. Phaidon Press Lt 57


'Service without Obstacles' Portfolio