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Avon-Otakaro River, Madras St Bridge

Paula Hansen Landscape Architecture Portfolio BLA (Hons) Lincoln University 2011-2015


Curriculum Vitae Paula Hansen

Address:

4 Hanrahan St Upper Riccarton Christchurch

Tertiary References

Personal Skills

I starting a Degree in Landscape Architecture at Unitec in 1999 but we decided to go traveling so I completing enough papers for a Diploma in Garden Design. We lived in Chiba, Japan with my husband and children from 2000 to 2009. We’ve lived in Christchurch since 2010 after moving from Auckland with my family for my husband’s job and to study. With the support of my husband I restarted my degree at Lincoln University which I completed in 5 years without repeating any papers.

Andreas Wesener - Lecturer in Urban Design

Software Knowledge

I enjoy forming connections between different cultures & age groups. I enjoy learning about different ethnicities & community groups while maintaining an open mind. I’m also a very practical person with experience who enjoys researching or using the National Archives to discover the history & story of a place. My degree was chosen with a desire to protect and enhance our environment as well as creating a more functional and enjoyable living spaces for a sustainable future for future generations.

Phone:

03-3417-985 022-0211-931

Email:

PaulaHansen.BLA @gmail.com

D.O.B: 14/12/1972

Place of birth:

Auckland, New Zealand

1

Introduction

Curriculum Vitae

Tertiary Education

2011-2015 BLA (Hons) Bachelor of Landscape Architecture with a Minor in Māori Studies Academic Transcript available on request 1999/2000 Unitec 1999 - Certificate of Home Garden Design 2000 - Diploma in Landscape Design OTHER 2001-2003 Gyotoku Ekimae Japanese Language Class Level 1-3, Ichikawa, Chiba, Japan

Languages

English Conversational Japanese Basic Te Reo Māori

Andreas.Wesener@lincoln.ac.nz

Donald Royds - Senior Tutor in School of

Landscape Architecture Donald.Royds@lincoln.ac.nz

Neil Challenger - Former Head of School of

Landscape Architecture, Lincoln Uni Neil.Challenger@whenua.nz

Simon Lambert - Senior Lecturer in Dept. of Tourism, Sport & Society Simon.Lambert@lincoln.ac.nz

Conferences Attended 2015 Oct - WĀNANGA at Rehua Marae Making the Culturally Shared Landscape. Speakers: Danny Kamo, Neil Challenger, Phil Wihongi 2013 IFLA50 World Congress, Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand Shared Wisdom in an Age of Change 10th-12th April 2013 Sky City Convention Centre Field Tour: Hobsonville Point 2012 NZILA Christchurch Conference Lincoln University

Competitions & Workshops

Greening the Rubble & Beca 1 of 4 joint winners of Beca 2012 design competition for a temporary installation at a site in New Brighton for my katipo inspired tyre spider. Computer Software Upskilling Vectorworks, Photoshop, AutoCAD & GIS The Viva Project Community Discussion Group for a sustainable urban village

Proficient using: Window OS - XP, 7,8,8.1 & 10 Adobe Creative Suite 6 Indesign Photoshop Microsoft Office suite Word Excel Power Point Vectorworks 2010-2015 Online research tools National Archives Experienced using: AutoCAD Google SketchUp

Community Projects

Greening the Rubble - mapping sites Pita Kaik - Peterborough Village historical researcher of the history of Colombo St North Ilam School working bee - garden care

Other Skills

Retail Eftpos & checkout systems Banking Bookings Customer service Plant care & identification


Work Experience

Employment History

Outside Interests

Di Lucas - Lucas Associates

Storage King Riccarton

Genealogical research Sustainable living - vegetable gardening - keeping chickens - using public transportation Neighbourhood watch Taiko (Japanese drumming) when in Japan Amateur photography

2014/2015, 3 months mapping out for CAD and researching the history of sites along Colombo St North from Kilmore St to Salisbury St Nov/Dec 2015, 1 month compiling evidence of protected trees policy changes for presentation before a council hearing. Feb 2016, assisting Christchurch CBD’s ICON group compiling suportting imagery and maps. ‘Marokapara’ 351 Manchester Street Ōtautahi / Christchurch 8013 New Zealand Ph 03 365 0789 di@lucas-associates.co.nz

Perry Royal - Royal Associates Architects

2014, Trained during 2 week semester break using ArchiCAD to reconfigure the layout for Te Matatini Kapa Haka festival in Hagley Park in March 2015 62 Avonside Dr via Te Orewai Pl, Christchurch 03-379-9645

Greening the Rubble 2013, 2 months with Rhys Taylor Volunteer Researched potential sites for installations along the outskirts of the CBD Red Zone during my semester break using CCC GIS systems, photography and site analysis.

House & Garden 2010/2011 Summer Garden Centre Assistant Restocked seedling stock, keep centre tidy & assistant customers with plant choices and design ideas. www.housegarden.co.nz/

Aug 2013 - Jan 2015

Saturday manager completing accounting and customer transactions. Finished due to restructuring. www.storageking.co.nz/riccarton/

House & Garden 2010/2011 Summer

Garden centre assistant growlandscape@hotmail.com www.housegarden.co.nz

Shane English Schools Japan 2009 English Language Teacher

To teach Japanese students (adults & children) the basics of the British English language. www.saxoncourt.com/jobs-abroad/shane-english-schoolsjapan/

Employment References Storage King Riccarton

Area Manager – Geoff Adams (03) 343-1500 geoff.adams@storageking.co.nz

Suwada Orchid Nursery

Owner - Munekazu Ejiri Chiba, Japan Suwada Orchid Nursery Ichikawa, +81 (47) 371-7768 2001-2003 Nursery Assistant 5stars@suwada.com Kept plants weeded, re-potted & also assisted NZ exhibitors at the Tokyo Dome Orchid show each year. www.roy.hi-ho.ne.jp/suwada-orchid/eindex.htm

Maple School

2000-2001 English Language Teacher

Taught Japanese students (all ages) the English language.

Other employment

www.roy.hi-ho.ne.jp/suwada-orchid/etour.htm

Alan Dudunski

Former Pettit’s Garden Centre Assistant Manager 990-1992, closed in 1994 Highland Park, Auckland (09) 426-5066 naturally@naturestoreroom.co.nz Owner of NatureStoreroom in Orewa, North Auckland

Milne’s Plant Link (1999) The Plant People (1996)

Curriculum Vitae

2


Portfolio Skill Set Criteria Com Crtv Des Eco Env Eth Hist Impl Mri Plant Res RMA Sftw Sust TecD Thry TOD

3

Portfolio Skill Set

Definition

Community

Has involved a level of community engagment

Creativity & sketching

Freehand drawing or creative exspression

Design

Created a new plan based on considered influences and meets the client brief

Ecosystem enhancement

An improved ecosystem would result from the implimentation of this proposal

Environmental implications

Certain environmental factors have been taken into consideration or has been the main focus of the design study

Ethics

Moral and ethical issues have been considered

Historic considerations

The recent and/or long past history has been researched to create an informed and considered design

Implementation

The proposed design has been implemented

MÄ ori & multi-cultural

The consideration and/or consultation with MÄ ori and/or other ethnicities or subcultures

Planting plan

A planting scheme of appropriate species

Research

Considerable research was done

Resource Management Act

Resource Management Act was a focus or consideration

Software

Introduction of new software or has further developed skills

Sustainability

Sustainable practices has been a focus

Technical Drawings

Construction, levels & detail drawings

Theory

Research papers outlinings design theories have been studied

Transit Oriented Development The promotion of the use of public transportation, walkability & safe cycling


Castle Hill

Index NZILA Core Competencies *

History & Theory

* Landscape analysis & design * Landscape planning, assessment & management *

Māori / bi-cultural capability – Bi-cultural / Māori Values

* Technical skills detailed design, construction management & implementation * Natural & Cultural Systems * Communication & research *

Professional Ethics

*

Professional Practice

1 NZILA Core Competencies

5 2012

Projects

Curriculum Vitae

3 2011 Projects

9

13

2013 Projects

2014

17

21

2015 Projects

Projects

Design Study

25

27

Major Design

Photography

29 Index

4


2011

Projects Lasc 108 Introduction to Design Project 1: Sticks & Stones

An exercise in creativity using a rock, bamboo, twine and flax.

Kaitorete Spit, Te Waihora, Selwyn

Crtv

Des

Lasc 108: Introduction to Design Project 1: Sticks & Stones

Diverse projects take you through a variety of design approaches such as object design, design form and functional design as well as spatial design introducing 3-dimensional experimentation through modelling and drawing as a key design tool.

5

2011 Projects


Structures and Land Surfaces Slope Analysis & Cross-sections

Mast 106: Nga Tikanga (Cultural Studies)

Māori

Māori Language is the Key to the Heart of Māori Culture

Essay excerpt; Te Reo Māori This was still strong right up to the early 1900’s with over 90% of children fluent when they started school (1913 Census) but slowly decreased as the Māori population dispersed. As long as the Māori people remained largely in rural and isolated communities, the Māori language was very much in fluent everyday use (Te Reo Maori, 2000) but once they left and settled throughout the cities, they lost touch with whânau, marae and te reo. By 1975 only 18% of Māori spoke Te Reo and it was described as being ‘severely endangered’ (Hill, M, 2011) with the bulk of Te Reo speakers being elderly. The education system of the 19th and 20th century insisted on the suppression of Te Reo in school and that English was the key to success. Many children tell stories of being punished in school for speaking the Māori language and stopped speaking Te Reo Mäori completely for fear of further punishment; leading to generations of Māori whose parents did not want them to be punished at school for speaking Te Reo Māori as they once were (Te Ao Hou, 1973).

Hill, Marika (17 April 2011). Experts fear for future of te reo Maori. Sunday Star Times. Retrieved from http://www.stuff. co.nz/sunday-star-times/news/4897289/Experts-fear-forfuture-of-te-reo-Maori Te Ao Hou, The Maori Magazine No. 72 (1973) Retrieved from: http://teaohou.natlib.govt.nz/journals/teaohou/ issue/Mao72TeA/c10.html Te Reo Maori, Background Note, New Zealand parliament (14 March 2000), pg. 3, Retrieved from http://www. parliament.nz/NR/rdonlyres/7C98C7EE-4175-41F5-957687AB4ED03419/428/004TeReo3.pdf

Lasc 111: Computer

Applications in

Landscape Design

Edmond’s Band Rotunda

Along the banks of the Avon River, Thomas Edmonds erected a bandstand celebrate 50yrs of the Edmonds baking goods company. The purpose of this project is to redesign this area in a complimentory manner using the newly learned skills of Vectorworks. The bandstand had been converted into a restaurant but has recently being partially demolished for safety reasons.

Env

Plant

TecD

Engn 106: Structures & Land Surfaces Engineering design concepts applied to structures and land surfaces

Hist

Mri

Res

Mast 106: Nga Tikanga Māori (Cultural Studies) An introduction to Māori culture and society

Crtv

Des

Sftw

Lasc 111: Computer Applications in Landscape Design An introduction to the use of computer aided design, photo editing and page layout within the context of Landscape Architecture.including 2D and 3D Vectorworks, SketchUp, Photoshop and InDesign

2011

Projects

6


Tonal Excercises

Visual Texturing

Sketching in the Field

Magazine collage Crtv

Lasc 109: Visual & Landscape Communication Graphic design techniques. These include; how to draw and render in colour and black & white, draft master plans and construct other technical supporting drawings such as section-elevations and axonometric projection, carry out a site measure and complete a small landscape design for an urban park.

7

2011 Projects

Sketching in the Field


Project 3a

Urban Patterns A look at the visual queues the landscape provides while walking from one point to another.

20

19 7

17

10

3

Com

This was a walk through the eastern border of the CBD in August 2011, 7 months after the 2011 earthquake devastated Christchurch. Abandoned buildings, wire fences and road cones are the landscape to navigate through.

1

Des

Thry

Lasc 109: Visual & Landscape Communication Project 3a Urban Patterns Graphic design techniques.

2011

Projects

8


2012

Projects

Erst 202 Environmental Analysis with Geographic Information Systems Bank’s Peninsular - View-shed Analysis

Pūtaringamotu / Riccarton Bush

Akaroa Harbour

Com

Env

Res

Sftw

Erst 202 Environmental Analysis with GIS Bank’s Peninsular View-shed Analysis

9

2012 Projects


Lasc 217

Lasc 217

A bridge design was required that acknowledge locals and provided a much needed replacement for the bridge destroyed in the February 2011 earthquake.

This site inspired me to design a bicycle rack that takes on the Art Deco style of the building that was on this site before the Feb 2011 earthquake. It was originally the site of the Joyland Theatre built in 1916.

Design Details Bridging the Avon

Sir Ian Redgrave was photographed at the Avon Rowing Club walking under an honour guard of oars and team-mates Eric Murray & Hamish Bond had recently won gold medals at the Olympics. It was these images that inspired my design.

Design Details Site Furniture Design

Des

Res

Sftw

Lasc 217: Design Details Bridging the Avon Des

Hist

Res

Sftw

Lasc 217: Design Details Site Furniture Design

2012

Projects

10


Lasc 215 Landscape Analysis, Planning & Design

Lasc 215 Landscape Analysis, Planning & Design

Site survey & analysis to determine the best placement for a new school hall & off-street parking.

Looking for inspriration to create a place for the new asian immigrant community to relax. Some ideas were Korean chess and kimchi or the Japanese board game of Go.

Weedons School

Com

Des

Sftw

Lasc 215: Landscape Analysis, Planning & Design Weedons School Com

Crtv

Res

Lasc 215: Landscape Analysis, Planning & Design Tranquil Spaces Eco

Mri

Res

Ecol 103: Ecology I - New Zealand Ecology & Conservation Research Essay

11

2012 Projects

Tranquil Spaces

Ecol 103 Ecology I - New Zealand Ecology and Conservation In the Light of the Moon: Life Stages of the Puriri Moth Excerpt 4. Tree phase The caterpillar set to work excavating a tunnel, the first part sloped upwards so that the tunnel wouldn’t get flooded when it rained. Then it chewed out a small tunnel going down and rested for a while, coming out to the entrance in the evenings to nibble back the callus tissue the tree produced as it tried to close repair the damage. The puriri grub did this for the next 2–5 (some say 7) years, feeding on the entrance sap wood and then heading back in to excavate the now 7-shaped shaft. A storm had ripped off a branch further up the tree many years earlier leaving a large deep hole in the tree. Long ago local Māori had placed the bones of their revered elders in the hole (NZ Geographic, 1992?) making it tapu (sacred).More recently a swarm of bees had built their hive in there (Stevenson, 1905) but they couldn’t force past the thick webbing covering the entrance and so it was ignored. The grub was lucky that the tree was tapu and so wouldn’t end up on the end of someone’s fishing line like grubs in other trees might, getting water squirted up into their holes to flush them out by eager fishermen needing bait to catch eels (Sharell, 1971) or eaten by the fishermen as a snack. NZGeographic. (1992, Jan-Mar). Puriri trees and puriri moths. Retrieved February 2012, from New Zealand Geographic: http:// www.nzgeographic.co.nz/resources-for-students/puriri-trees-puriri- moths Stevenson, W. (1905, 04 13). Auckland City Council - Heritage Images. Retrieved February 2012, from George Grey Collection, Auckland Weekly News 13 APRIL 1905 pg6: http://www.aucklandcity. govt.nz/dbtw-wpd/HeritageImages/index.htm, Record ID AWNS- 19050413-6-3 Sharell, R. (1971). New Zealand Insects and Their Story. Auckland: Collins.

Puriri Moth - Photographer Stefan Marks 29-9-2008


Lasc 210 History of Design & Culture

Lasc 216 Site Design - Design Exemplar

Timeline

A look at the pump houses fo Christchurch inspired me to look closer at what influenced the architects who created them as well as what other buildings they had designed in Christchurch.

Hist

Res

Sftw

Lasc 210: History of Design & Culture Architectural Timeline Res

Thry

Lasc 216: Site Design Design Exemplar

2012

Projects

12


2013

Projects 2013 IFLA50 World Congress International Student Charette with

Ngati Whatua o Orakie - International Team 1

Paula - New Zealand Fred - China Happy - Indonesia Genevieve - Australia David - England

MAST 321 Hoa Whenua Māori (Māori Landscape Design)

Unitec/Lincoln Charette with Ngati Whatua o Orakie - Team 4 Working together, Unitec & Lincoln students brain-stormed over 3 days to create new Master Plans inspired by our first charette. Lincoln University

Carolyn Ramsbottom Paula Hansen

Unitec In a one-day charette we banded together to create an international design for a new whare waka in Okahu Bay.

Unitec’s Te Noho Kotahitanga marae

Com

Crtv

Des

Mri

2013 IFLA50 World Congress International Student Charette

Com

Crtv

Des

Mri

MAST 321: Hoa Whenua Māori NZ Student Charette

13

2013 Projects

Daisy Zhe Tang James Haining Jonathan Cristal


MAST 321 Hoa Whenua Māori (Māori Landscape Design) Okahu Bay Landing - Making Stories

Once back at Lincoln University we chose a part of our group’s Master Plan to develop further.

Course aims and learning outcomes

Course at Lincoln University

Prescription Landscape architectural design and development in a Māori cultural context.

International Charette

Aims To allow students to develop an understanding of the principles, issues and the practice of landscape design and development that is culturally relevant to a Māori community.

Research – Issues, Opportunities, Considerations and Values Feb 25th – 26th March

Concept (Based at UNITEC) 7th, 8th and 9th April

Learning outcomes After successfully completing this course students will:

IFLA World Congress Evening of Tue 9th – Friday 12th April : Sky-City

Unitec & Lincoln Charette

Master Plan (Based at UNITEC) 7th, 8th and 9th April Site Design (1:500) (Based at Lincoln) 29th April to 20th May

Knowledge 1. Understand some of the key the Māori values, cultural practices and spiritual issues that relate to design, 2. Know how to read the Māori cultural landscape and develop design solutions that respond appropriately to this cultural setting. Skills 3. Be able to critically discuss the idea of design as an expression of culture, and develop the analytical skills necessary to work within culturally specific environments. 4. Be able to translate conceptual design ideas into well resolved and culturally appropriate design. Values 5. Recognise the valued nature of the landscape and the way it is developed. Contributions of this course to the graduate profile 6. This course puts landscape architecture into a Māori cultural context, allowing students to work on a project focused on meeting Māori cultural needs and so develop their understanding and knowledge of this area of growing importance.

Com

Crtv

Des

Mri

Mast 321: Hoa Whenua Māori Okahu Bay Landing Making Stories

Stone retaining walls support Pohutakawa roots due to original ground levels being reinstated.

2013

Projects

14


Ecol 202

Biological Diversity Insect Hotel Brief:

Design an insect hotel that:

--Will fit in a volume of 0.125m3 (that is about 50cm x 50cm x 50cm) --Can be built from readily available, recyclable materials --Looks good

What invertebrates / vertebrates you think your hotel will attract? Layer 1 = slaters, earwigs, solitary bees, weta & spiders Rolled cardboard in a bottle - This is probably the cheapest way of providing a temporary shelter for beneficial insects like ladybirds and lacewings during the cold winter months.

Why do you think your hotel will attract these invertebrates / vertebrates?

Layer 2 = compresses dry shelter, space for solitary bee eggs, hiding & hunting places

What benefits do you think these invertebrates / vertebrates will bring to your garden / open space? Winter hibernation and flower pollination by bees weta and spiders will hunt the unwanted invertebrate

Why you used the materials you did? • • • • • •

Wooden pallet beer crate flattened can shingles Plastic bottles Bamboo sticks Leaves, food scraps & soil

Construction Instructions 1. Place a beer crate on a base of recycled bricks to provide a dry

Des

Env

Impl

Res

Ecol 202: Biological Diversity Insect Hotel

Env

Eth

Hist

Mri

base 2. Place the crate on its side to nail on the shingles 3. Nail a piece on wood on one edge to provide height for the sloped roof 4. Cut a piece of corrugated iron so that there is a 10cm overhang as it sits on the crate 5. Along one edge of the iron screw on a length of bamboo so the edge will hook 6. Cut the top and bottom off a couple of 1.5ltr bottles so it lays on its side within the crate

Mast 319 Te Kaitiakitanga (Maori Environmental Management) Kauri: From Spar to Spore:

A tale of Māori, Pakeha & the mighty kauri tree

The story of the destruction of the Kauri forest is one of the saddest features in the history of this fair earth. There is nothing in this report to show that it is necessary or sound economically, or that it will not go down to history as a dark blot in the story of AngloSaxon colonisation (Hutchins D. , 1916, p. 395)

Excerpt

1840 – Removal by blade The ‘Māori Economy’ of the 1840s was that of Māori living in rural communities with infrequent contact with Europeans and any economic activities were contained within the individual iwi. There were some connected to the European economy through waged labour such as logging, flax production and domestic service but each iwi was mainly engaged in day to day living such as hunting, fishing or crop growing (Coleman, Dixon, & Maré, 2005, p. 4) A European visitor to the Kaipara noted in 1852 that the natives were busily engaged in the felling, drawing, dragging, rafting and loading of Kauri spars for two European establishments and were industrious, honest and well-behaved. He was of the opinion that the Kaipara natives were among the chief producers of colonial wealth and the best examples of morality having laid aside spear and musket for axe and plough. (Māori Messenger, 1852) Arriving settlers to the area were able to purchase land (not sure who from) in 1859 for a mere $0.15 to $0.30 per hectare, a large part of Puketi State Forest (2900ha) was sold for $840 (Thode, 1983, p. 205). Māori of the time rapidly adapted to the new technologies offered but were slow to adopt the same individual capitalist ethics and with the sudden influx of so many settlers Māori became badly affected by diseases introduced by European contact and population fell from 80,000 in 1840 to 44,500 in 1901 with life expectancy at birth less than age 22 gradually rising by 1901 to age 33. It is recorded that in 1891 only 10-11 million acres of land remained in Māori ownership. (Coleman, Dixon, & Maré, 2005, p. 8).

Mast 319: Te Kaitiakitanga (Maori Environmental Management) Kauri Essay

15

2013 Projects

Coleman, A., Dixon, S., & Maré, D. (2005). Māori economic development – Glimpses from statistical sources. Wellington: Motu Economic and Public Policy Research. Hutchins, D. (1916). A discussion of Australian forestry with special references to forestry in Western Australia. Perth: Government Printer. Māori Messenger. (1852, 1 31). Auckland. Lyttleton Times, p. 6. Thode, P. J. (1983). Northland’s Forest History And Present Resources. Tokoroa: N.Z. Forest Products Ltd.


2013 LASC 312 Landscape Ecology

Plants that attract birds for each Lincoln soil type (Katie Williams – DOC)

Designing for Wildlife – Urban Landscapes Report

Excerpt

A report on bird communities in production and natural habitats of New Zealand in 2005 showed higher than expected bird counts in production landscapes without any pest control management due to low numbers of rats and stoats and were flush with biodiversity. It is possible that with a dedicated pest management regime and appropriate restored habitat insipient populations of native species can be restored. Native species such as Tui and Bellbird have a tendancy to forage outside remnant forest patches along with Fantail and Grey Warbler which have a high association with farm sites. These farmland forest remnants support a diverse range of native species compared to larger forest tracts. (Blackwell, et al., 2005) These production lands make up roughly 58% of New Zealand’s landcover (MacLeod, Blackwell, Moller, Innes, & Powlesland, 2008) and yet are not really taken into consideration for habitat support and protection until recently. Blackwell, G., O’Neill, E., Buzzi, F., Clarke, D., Dearlove, T., Green, M., . . . Wright, J. (2005). Bird community composition and relative abundance in production and natural habitats of New Zealand. Dunedin: ARGOS. MacLeod, C., Blackwell, G., Moller, H., Innes, J., & Powlesland, R. (2008, August 27). The forgotten 60%: bird ecology and management in New Zealand’s agricultural landscape. New Zealand Journal of Ecology, 32(2), 240-255. Retrieved September 20, 2013, from http://www.nzes.org.nz/nzje/ free_issues/NZJEcol32_2_240.pdf

KEY: Exotic with native undergrowth Forest edge native planting Forest core native planting Narrow native shelterbelt Wetland area

Soil Types

Temp Barr Temp

Waka

Flax/ Temp

Waka Barr

Temp

Flax

Barr = Eyre = Flax = Temp = Temu = Waka =

Barrhill Eyre Flaxton Templeton Temuka Wakanui

Env

Res

Sftw

Sust

2013 Lasc 312: Landscape Ecology Designing for Wildlife Urban Landscapes Report

Waka

2013

Projects

16


Cathedral Square Gabion

2014

Crtv

Des

Projects

Hist

Res

Lasc 316 Innovative Design (A) P2: Art of Place

17

2014 Projects

LASC 316 Innovative Design (A) P2: Art of Place


MAST 104 Te Tiriti o Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi

Declaration of Independence Essay

He Whakaputanga a Te Rangitiratanga o Nu Tireni

Excerpt On the 28th of October, 1935, 34 (Bourassa & Strong, 2002) Ngapuhi chiefs (although many text note 35 (Keiha & Moon, 2008), (Taonui, 2012)), gathered at Waitangi to sign He Wakaputanga o Te Rangitiratanga o Nu Tirene. This was considered to have been prepared as well as signed (and still is) by Ngapuhi (Cavanagh , 2010) a declaration of national sovereignty and the establishment of diplomatic ties (Ngapuhi Speaks, 2012, p. 22 & 46) and declared New Zealand to be a free & independent state. (Keiha & Moon, 2008) In this document Ngapuhi use the word mana to signify ‘sovereignty’, this is still considered to be the closest translation (Moon & Fenton, 2002) (Mutu, 2011). The Colonial Office proceeded to acknowledge the Declaration of Independence and promised the King’s protection as long as it was “consistent with due regard to the just right of others and to the interest of His Majesty’s subjects” (Orange, 2011, p. 30). This acknowledgement was important as it validation the use of the word mana and promised protection in the face of possible invasion (Keiha & Moon, 2008), (Glenelg, 1836). Busby was privately triumphant in his prowess at the signing; declaring to be “the Magna Carta of New Zealand”. This was affirmed when Governor Bourke and his council commended Busby on his initiative (Orange, 2011, p. 31). Traveller John Bright notes the new flag flying on an outcrop at Waitangi in 1836(ish)(Orange, 2011, p. 30). Bourassa, S. C., & Strong, A. L. (2002, Summer). Restitution of Land to New

Zealand Māori : The Role of Social Structure. Pacific Affairs, 75(2), 227-260. doi:10.2307/4127184 Cavanagh , E. (2010, August 03). Joshua Hitchcock sets the record straight regarding ngapuhi, sovereignty, and legal pluralism in New Zealand. Retrieved from Settler Colonial Studies Blog: http://settlercolonialstudies. org/2010/08/03/joshua-hitchcock-sets-the-record-straight-regardingngapuhi-sovereignty-and-legal-pluralism-in-new-zealand/ Glenelg, L. (1836, August 20). Letter to R. Bourke . Historical Records of Australia. Independent Report, Ngapuhi Nui Tonu Claim. (2012). Ngāpuhi speaks : He Wakaputanga o te rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni and Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Kaitaia, New Zealand, Northland: Te Kawariki & Network Waitangi Whangarei, 2012. Retrieved April 2014 Keiha, P., & Moon, P. (2008). The Emergence and Evolution of Urban Māori Authorities: A Response to Māori Urbanisation. Te Kaharoa, 1(1), 1-17. Retrieved from http://tekaharoa.com/index.php/tekaharoa/article/view/10 Moon, P., & Fenton, S. (2002, March). Bound Into A Fateful Union: Henry Williams’ Translation Of The Treaty Of Waitangi Into. (J. Huntsman, Ed.) The Journal of the Polynesian Society, 111(1), 51-64. Mutu, M. (2011). The State of Māori rights. Wellington, New Zealand: Huia Publishers. Orange, C. (2011). The Treaty of Waitangi. (G. Sullivan, & P. Rainer, Eds.) Wellington: Bridget Williams Books Ltd. Taonui, R. (2012, Nov 15). Ngapuhi - Early European contact. Retrieved April 2014, from Te Ara: http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/he-whakaputangadeclaration-of-independence

LASC 322 Sustainable Design and Planning

LASC 322 Sustainable Design and Planning

Steps need to be taken now to prepare for future sea level rise (SLR) and the effects that it will have on Christchurch’s coastal communities with a stronger focus on the natural processes of hydrology of beaches and estuaries. By dong this the communities surrounding the estuary and along the beach can be a reinvigorated area still thriving in 100 years due to adapting to the effects of SLR and changing edges.

The effects of sea level rise will reduce the New Brighton spit to a sliver of land where only those properties in the green zones will remain above the high tide mark for the next 100 years. The land in yellow will need remediation work both along the shore edge and on the properties themselves to prevent water damage from flood events. Roads coloured grey will need elevation and the dotted sections are where new roads will be needed to maintain connectivity along the spit. Rawhiti Domain is the most practical place to begin rebuilding the New Brighton township along with new homes.

Project 1: Bluescapes

Project 3a: 100yr Plan

LASC 322 Sustainable Design and Planning Project 3b: *new* New Brighton

Existing Contours

0.5m Sea Level Rise - 50yrs

The current flood plain for the Avon-Heathcote Estuary take sea water upstream as far as the Avon Loop. This is causing marine invertebrate to move upstream as increase salinity changes their environment.

Within our lifetimes the Avon River will spill over its edges expanding the saline wetland and flooding into areas that currently experience only occasional flooding.

Eth

great-grandchildren are born most of South New Brighton will be regularly inundated with only a few islands of dry land left. Flooding from the estuary and sea level rise will cause the dunes to shift inland.

Mri

MAST 104: Te Tiriti o Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi

Com

1.0m Sea Level Rise -100yrs By the time our

Hist

Eco

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Lasc 322: Sustainable Design and Planning Effects of Sea Level Rise

2014

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2014

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LASC 316 Innovative Design (A) P3: Southern Frame

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LASC 316 Innovative Design (A) P3: Southern Frame 12

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LASC 316 Innovative Design (A) P3: Southern Frame

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Lasc 316: Innovative Design (A) P3: Southern Frame

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2015

Projects LASC 318 Landscape Assessment and Planning

Project 2: Assessment of Environmental Effects A specific focus on ‘landscape and visual effects’.

Excerpt VISUAL ASSESSMENT 9.0 The Sumner SLSC location is a gateway to the township further on, the proposed building design that reinstates the old clock (10) offers a point of reference as well as being a necessity for seaside visitors. It is my opinion that the visual impact of the proposed building and its sloped roof will sit in harmony with its surroundings to a higher standard than its predecessor, it purpose-built and uses modern building methods. The engineering considers its geological location (11) as well as fulfilling the requirements of CCC Plan sub-clause 3.2.2. The proposed setback from the road will serve to give a greater feeling of separation and safety from the road. 10.0 Revegetation areas above the high tide mark have been roped off giving a visual queue indicating pathways (12).

Bloodbank carpark, Lester Lane, Chch

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Lasc 318 Landscape Assessment and Planning Assessment of Environmental Effects

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10 As per Appendix A: Part 4.2, Paragraph 1 11 As per Appendix A: Part 2.1, Paragraph 2 12 Graphic Supplement, Photo #2 APPENDICES A

Application for Land Use Consent: Sumner Life Saving Club, Replacement Building. Abridged version supplied by Lincoln University for LASC 318 2015. Not attached

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LASC 406 Complex Design Middleton Shunting Yards 12

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LASC 406 Complex Design

Middleton Shunting Yards


Work Experience

Colombo St North 2011

Di Lucas - Lucas Associates

Over the summer of 2014/2015 I dug through archives, searching online in Papers Past etc looking into the history and characters of pre-quake Colombo St North, Christchurch CBD. There was measuring of footpaths and power poles etc as preparation for street redesigning & beautification by the Peterborough Community Group also known as Pita Kaik guided by resident and esteemed Landscape Architect Di Lucas.

Colombo St North 1941

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Work Experience

1879 Christchurch Suburban Directory

Overlayed with 2014 cadastrals

2015

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Lasc 409 Major Design - Mini Major Diamond Harbour

An opportunity to reinvigorate a village centre that has lost it’s primary focal point.

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Lasc 409: Major Design Mini Major Diamond Harbour

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Lasc 409 Major Design - Mini Major Diamond Harbour

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Lasc 409: Major Design Mini Major Diamond Harbour

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Lasc 406 Complex Design

Addington Sale Yards - Design Study

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Lasc 406: Complex Design Design Study Addington Sale Yards

25

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Lasc 406 Complex Design

Addington Sale Yards - Design Study

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Lasc 406: Complex Design Design Study Addington Sale Yards

2015

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Lasc 409 Major Design

Addington Sale Yards

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Lasc 409: Major Design Addington Sale Yards

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Lasc 409 Major Design

Addington Sale Yards

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Lasc 409: Major Design Addington Sale Yards

2014

Projects

28


185 Empty White Chairs - Cnr Cashel & Madras St

Photography

Christchurch Photography

29

Personal Projects

A personal record of the creativity that sprang up around the city of Christchurch in the years following the Feb 2011 earthquake that flattened the city.

My tyre spider installation


Some of my favourite photographs taken on field trips from around the Christchurch, the South Island and Auckland

Lincoln University Feild Trip Photography

Personal Projects

30


pwf6ekiwi@gmail.com


Cv portfolio 2016 23 7mb a3