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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

SPRING 2013

AREIAC Newsletter From the Chair... Joy Schmack

Contents

It might not have been many weeks since the last newsletter but what a lot has happened in the world of RE! I keep telling PGCE trainees that there has never been such an important time for Religious Education .With a potential average RE career of forty three years there will be time enough for them to appreciate the battles and energies the RE community have invested in the future of the subject.

From the Chair

1

Report from the APPG Conference 2013 Sponsored Walk Statement from John Keast Gove: the good, bad & ugly

2 4 5 6 6

Ofsted NATRE REQM Think RE RE Learn / Teach / Lead

8 8 8 9 9

Since the last newsletter we have learnt of Mr Gove’s plans for those subjects not in the Ebacc. Although potentially encouraging news we hope that more specific details will be available soon and allow informed discussions to take place regarding Implications for Religious Education and the future of GCSE. As the APPG report [which can be downloaded from the AREIAC website] shows moves are afoot in many schools and myths and misconceptions regarding the status of RE are constantly needed to be checked and countered.

Young Ambassadors RE and Academies Culham Conference 2013 Membership Matters RE: Route - RE & SEN

9 10 10 11 12

New RE:Online National Census RE make up of Cornwall Book reviews

13 14 16 21

This newsletter highlights many of the other activities that are happening in RE but particular acclaim must be given to the APPG Report which has been compiled and written by Barabara Wintersgill, who in her spare time (What spare time! I hear her shriek) is also secretary to AREIAC. The comprehensive and hard-hitting report is a result of considerable data collection which, at the time of writing, has attracted significant media interest. Like the snow we have experienced this year let’s hope this isn’t a flurry but a long-lasting avalanche of interest and indignation. The implications for the future of RE, portrayed so graphically in the report, must be told and retold. The timing of this year’s conference couldn’t be better. By July we will have the results of so many more RE activities to consider. The publication of the Ofsted Subject Report and Ofqual GCSE scrutiny; the activities of the RE Review Group and the good practice being witnessed through the REQM to name just a few. We are delighted that we will be able to gain first hand insight through the usual up-dates also workshops and research papers. The 48 hours of conference will be vital for not only up-dating our own practice but also enabling us to gain a comprehensive understanding of the many different RE projects, reviews, initiatives and research currently taking place. For further details of the work of AREIAC or details about the conference please contact Joy Schmack on chair@areiac.org.uk

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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

SPRING 2013

A cautionary tale: Please check that your car insurance is up to date and active as the national database monitors cars on camera. Police can swoop at any time, even if you are convinced you have insurance and the insurance company has failed to enter the correct details or take your direct debit out of the bank at the right time. The outcomes for non-insurance are: ■ ■ ■ ■

Your car is taken away to a compound You pay £150+ to get it back You pay a fine of £200 You gain 6 points on your licence

In recent months this has happened to a primary headteacher and an RE Adviser you all know!

AAPG report RE teachers lack training and support, concludes Parliamentary inquiry. All party report ‘RE: the truth unmasked’ highlights lack of support for and provision of qualified RE teachers A report by the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Religious Education (RE) has found that RE lessons are frequently taught by teachers with no qualifications in the subject. Furthermore the responsibility to educate young people on the different beliefs and values held in society is often given to teaching assistants, who receive little support, training or guidance. A three month long inquiry by the APPG into the supply of and support for RE teachers in schools, including a review of evidence from over 400 sources, found:

• • • • •

!

Over fifty per cent of those teaching RE in secondary schools have no qualification or relevant expertise in the subject In more than half of the 300 primary schools participating in the inquiry, some or all of the pupils were taught RE by someone other than their class teacher A quarter of all primary schools that responded said the lesson was given by a teaching assistant Primary and primary trainee teachers lack confidence and expertise in teaching RE, especially in diverse and multi-cultural classrooms Support for RE teachers at a local level has been dramatically reduced by local authority funding cuts and the academies programme

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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

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SPRING 2013

Bursaries for RE trainees have been removed and there has been a radical reduction in applicant numbers for 2013/14 Because of this lack of training and support many of those teaching RE are unable to meet the Department for Education’s Teaching Standards, selling young people short in their schools.

Commenting on the findings, chair of the APPG on RE, Stephen Lloyd MP said: “There are a large number of excellent RE teachers across the country who are doing a first class job preparing children for the challenges life throws at them, and helping them make sense of the wide range of beliefs and cultures around us. But a range of policies, most notably those relating to the EBacc, academies and GCSE short courses, have served to lower RE’s status on the curriculum. “As many children as possible should be encouraged to study GCSE Religious Studies – and it is essential that they are taught by experienced and trained professionals at primary and secondary level.” “It is illogical to think that we can dilute the professionalism and expertise needed to teach RE well and still have a generation of young people that understand and are sensitive to the growing levels of religious and non-religious diversity in our society.” The inquiry found that the situation has been compounded by insufficient professional development opportunities for subject leaders, specialist teachers and those who take on the responsibility for teaching RE. Evidence also revealed a wide variation in the amount and quality of initial teacher training for RE with many trainee teachers stating they had little effective preparation to teach the subject.

The report RE: the truth unmasked, which was delivered to the Secretary of State for Education, Michael Gove on March 18th, includes clear recommendations for primary and secondary schools, teacher training providers, local authorities, Ofsted, those providing professional development for teachers, and the Department for Education.

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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

SPRING 2013

AREIAC Conference 2013 New Vistas in RE: Progression, Rigour and Challenge 1-2 July 2013

JURY’S INN LIVERPOOL The AREIAC Conference will help us make sense of the changing landscape in RE. With contributions from Prof Julian Stern, Dr Mark Chater, Alan Brine and Prof David Smith, there will be plenty to inform our practice. We have also arranged workshops on the new REonline, the REC RE Review, Face to Faith, SMSC, RE and the new Teachers’ Standards and plenty more. In order to help delegates gain maximum value from the conference there will be visits to places of worship, interest and enjoyment on the Sunday afternoon! To book and download the programme go to: www.areiac.org.uk If you have any queries, contact marymyatt@aol.com

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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

SPRING 2013

REC sponsored walk at the AREIAC conference A great feature of AREIAC conferences in the past has been the option to visit places of local religious or spiritual interest in the area where the conference is being held. I have fond memories of many of these from past years. They not only included a good and unusual chance to see places and meet people, but also provided an opportunity to get to know the other AREIAC members taking part in the same visit. This year there's an additional incentive for conference attendees (and any others who could get to Liverpool on the afternoon of Sunday 30th June). The visits being planned for the afternoon before the conference starts will form a walk which is being publicised as one of the RE Council's 40th anniversary sponsored walk events. The REC's work in championing RE is needed as never before but it desperately needs to raise money if it is to be effective. Its achievements over the last year – the All Party Parliamentary Group on RE, the Young Ambassadors scheme, its support of the RE Quality Mark, its PR work to increase public understanding of the subject – all cost money. It runs on a shoestring and whilst it tries to avoid competing with its member organisations (such as AREIAC and NATRE) for cash generating activities such as putting on CPD events or producing RE resources, it cannot run on fresh air. Hence the sponsored walks. There will be around twenty walks of RE interest across England and Wales during May and June, many organised by AREIAC members – Sharon Artley is running one at the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire, Joyce Miller has initiated one across the sands to Lindisfarne at low tide, Graham Langtree has a walk planned in Exeter, Philip Lord and others will walk up the Dee Valley from Llangollen, Jonathan Marshall has another organised in Plymouth and there are quite a lot of others in the pipeline (go to www.virginmoneygiving.org , type 'religious education council' into the charities list, then select 'events' to see the full list). The aspirational target is for each walk to have fifty walkers, and for each of those to raise £100. The money will be divided equally between the REC and a second charity chosen by the local organising group. In the case of the Liverpool walk this will be Parkinson's UK. There isn't yet a complete programme for the Liverpool walk but the conference team is working on this. It will start from the conference hotel at 3 p.m. If you know you're going to be in Liverpool on the Sunday afternoon, please consider taking part in the visits as a sponsored walker. As well as provide a great opportunity to visit some interesting places in the company of your fellow AREIAC members (which you can of course do whether you're sponsored or not) it will raise much needed funding for two very good causes. Setting up a sponsorship page is easy – just go to the website above and follow instructions. If you feel you'd like help with doing this, simply contact Sophie Agrotis at the REC office on sophie@religiouseducationcouncil.org.uk and she will send you instructions or even talk you through the process on the phone. Then all you need to do is persuade a few friends and relations to sponsor you – or even come and walk with you as well – and you'll be there. Please do support this event if you possible can – your help is much needed and will be greatly appreciated. Sarah Smalley

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SPRING 2013

Statement from John Keast: Chair REC council We are delighted that the Government has decided to abandon plans to replace GCSEs with the English Baccalaureate Certificate (EBC). We have made it clear for a long time that to focus on five core subjects will restrict vital subjects such as RE. We also welcome the announcement that the EBacc as a school performance measure will be reviewed. We would like to see a more rounded reflection of school performance that takes into account students’ broader interests – and one that encourages schools to deliver a more enriched education for young people. Our goal is to ensure every young person in every school gets access to good quality RE –this announcement on the EBC is a positive step in the right direction.

MICHAEL GOVE AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION: THE GOOD, BAD AND THE UGLY

Comments on Michael Gove’s statement in the House of Commons and DfE publication of new arrangements for the national curriculum, GCSEs and school accountability on 7 February 2013 from the Chair of the RE Council

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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

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GOOD

• •

• •

No EBacc certificates but one qualification (reformed GCSE) for all subjects, so no first and second class qualifications A new broader performance measure for schools (Peformance8) that allows GCSE RS to count towards school performance alongside EBacc subjects; this is good news for schools with successful GCSE provision RE was reaffirmed in the new National Curriculum documentation – “all state schools … must teach RE to pupils at every key stage” Not mentioned on 7 February but RE now included in Specialist Leader in Education programme by National College of School Leadership

BAD

• • •

• •

The EBacc still exists and still excludes GCSE RS as a humanity option, despite the recent addition of Computer Science to the science suite The EBacc headline measure for school performance remains in place, implying second class academic status to GCSE RS (and other subjects) Position of GCSE RS is still precarious and depends on how Performance8 subjects will be determined; RS may lie only in an overcrowded option position, competing with provision for both EBacc and non-EBacc subjects The GCSE Short Course RS will not count towards school performance and its future is very uncertain – no indication of how statutory RE in Key Stage 4 can be accredited Not mentioned on 7 February but teacher training for RE remains in a dire state with the removal of bursaries for RE PGCE trainees (unlike nearly every other subject) being inequitable and unjustifiable

UGLY

• • •

Some probably irreversible damage to RE has already happened, with reduced time, staffing and fewer exam entries ‘Bridge too far’ metaphor obscures the minimal change in Gove’s plans; sleight of hand is evident and he will not lose political credibility over any of this Whilst mentioning nearly every other subject, he did not mention RE at all

CONCLUSION

RE is not out of the woods yet; or to put it another way, there are stormy times still to come for the good ship RE

Clarification from the DfE on new accountability measures Contrary to what was said in a recent issue of The Tablet, a Department of Education spokeswoman has confirmed to the RE Council that GCSE Religious Studies can count as one of the last group of three subjects in the new Performance Eight measure to be introduced by the government as part of its new school accountability arrangements. She also confirmed that GCSE RS has, nevertheless, not been added to the English Baccalaureate

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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

SPRING 2013

Ofsted report on Religious Education Ofsted plans to publish its next triennial report on RE (provisionally entitled RE: realising the potential) around May 2013. This builds on the previous report Transforming Religious Education published in May 2010. Although the familiar pattern of subject inspections stopped last September, Ofsted is currently exploring alternative models of subject work to ensure it retains the ability to report on trends in the subject. Ofsted continues to add to the good practice website, most recently publishing an example from Little Heath Special School which can be found at: http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/good-practice-resource-inclusive-approach-religious-educationspecial-school-little-heath-school

NATRE Survey

The National Association of Teachers of RE (NATRE) is asking primary teachers to complete a survey about the teaching of Religious Education in their school in order to obtain as accurate a picture as possible of the way the subject is being taught. The survey can be accessed here https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NATREPrimaryteachers2013 - and NATRE would like to encourage people to circulate it to contacts who teach in primary schools. All responses will be treated in complete confidence; no information that could identify a teacher or a school will be published.

REQuality Mark, SMSC and whole school improvement The RE Quality Mark has now completed the second pilot. As a consequence, documents and processes have been refined and are available on the website www.reqm.org. There are now 61 assessors and nearly 50 schools across the country who have achieved the award. Many RE subject leaders have valued celebrating their subject and discussing the evidence with the assessor. Headteachers are delighted to have RE recognised positively externally. There are other funds available for small schools to apply: please contact Jane Brooke, jane.brooke@reqm.org or Mary Myatt, mary.myatt@reqm.org if a school needs support. There will be an official launch of the RE Quality Mark on July 15th in the House of Lords. This is what one school leader had to say about the impact of the REQM: “The RE Mark has had a significant impact on RE in school. It provided us with clear stepping stones which, through following them, directly improved our understanding of the quality of RE provision in our school. This was most apparent in our approach to planning and assessment as the mark gave us a clear bench mark to aspire to. The RE mark itself also brought the whole staff together to work towards and further raised the status of RE in school. it will also provide guidance for us moving forward in the future.”

The cost of is £475 and there is some funding for schools who may find it hard to find the cost. See www.reqm.org.uk

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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

SPRING 2013

RE Think RE The REThinkRE website has been launched - www.rethinkre.org This is a campaigning site, so the more people that sign up the better. Good to get tweets going [if you know what to do or want to try!].

Learn / Teach / Lead RE A new form of CPD in RE is emerging as schools address teachers’ current identified training needs in the changing context for training provision. In the south-west peninsula, 12 teachers are being trained over three years as project lead teachers of RE. They will run learning hubs in six areas across Devon and Cornwall. These teachers, who are interested in specialist leader status, receive CPD through an annual conference and through two days of face to face expert training a year. They share this training in their local areas, including with HLTAs and NQTs teaching RE. A website is being developed to support the training and to advertise events – please see www.ltlre.org The project’s partnership, managed through its steering group, includes representatives of the funding agency (St Luke’s College Foundation), four local authorities, two Diocesan Boards of Education and two Universities. LTLRE is being directed by Linda Rudge, previously Director of the Centre for Spirituality and Religion in Education (CSRE) at the University of East Anglia in Norwich.

Young Ambassadors for RE This scheme was publicised to schools early in January. Teachers are able to select a team of Young Ambassadors from Y5 to Y13 students at their school; the young people will have the chance to receive training in speaking and communication skills, to take part in initiatives to support RE locally, regionally and nationally, including for some the chance to speak to MPs at the summer meeting of the All Party Parliamentary Group. For further information please contact sarah@religiouseducationcouncil.org

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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

SPRING 2013

Religious Education and a positive story about Academies In Cambridgeshire there is an interesting development in brokering a positive relationship between SACRE and the local secondary schools that have become academies. It is in its early days but a flexible approach has been offered to all secondary schools. Schools may buy into a range of support services. The services have been carefully selected by the Local Authority based upon important aspects they support in education. One of the services that is being offered is advice and support for religious education and collective worship, through SACRE and a named adviser. There are different tiers of support and schools can buy different tiers of the services, as well as all or just some of the services offered. A range of specific support has been identified e.g. access to the Agreed Syllabus with updates when appropriate, advice on the quality and provision of statutory religious education, advice through e-mails and telephone conversations, newsletters, termly briefing papers for Governors and updates about collective worship, in-school training and attending the local network meetings. Virtually every secondary school has become an academy in Cambridgeshire but nearly a third of the schools have bought into the service, thus ensuring links with the LA and the county maintained primary schools. It is important to broker positive relationships and encourage academies to work with SACRE in its development of the locally determined agreed syllabus. This has happened in the county, thus ensuring some continuity and progression in the curriculum by all phases and all schools in the county.

Annual CSGT RE Teacher Conference: Leaders for Changing RE This year’s annual Culham St Gabriel's RE teacher conference will focus on RE leadership. It will be held from 28 – 29 September at Wokefield Park, Reading. There is no cost for delegates; further details can be found on the Culham St Gabriel’s website http://www.cstg.org.uk/events/leadership-weekend-2013/

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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

SPRING 2013

Membership Matters There has been some discussion over the last few executive meetings regarding membership of AREIAC. The reasons for this are varied but the executive feel they would like the membership to be able to have the opportunity to discuss whether they wish to change the basis on which membership is allowable. One of the issues is that it has been brought to our attention that clause 3.2 which accords retired membership to those of pensionable age is discriminatory. We have checked this out and it would appear that this is indeed the case. Of course this will eventually sort itself out as the age at women may receive a state pension catches up with those of men. Meanwhile however, it might be wise to change the wording of the clause so that it reads: 3.2 Retired (life) membership at a single payment of twice the annual subscription rate will be open to former members of AREIAC who have reached the age of 65 or are of state pensionable age, whichever is the greater. The amended words are in bold. This amendment would mean that we would not have to alter the wording again when the state pensionable age increases. Those of you who attended the most recent regional meetings will know that we have been discussing other points regarding membership. London and the south east regions came up with this suggestion for you to consider. They talked about the fact that in the changing advisory landscape a lot of leading teachers, former ASTs and others were involved in advisory work and would thus be eligible for AREIAC membership according to our criteria. Many of them would already be members of NATRE and might feel their primary identification was as teachers, not advisers. We wondered whether we could set up a provision whereby anyone who was a NATRE member and engaged in advisory work could join AREIAC for a small extra fee (e.g. £20 pa). Advantages to them would be: access to other adviser colleagues, resources, meetings, conferences, for a reasonable sum which recognized the fact that they were still basically working as teachers. Advantages to us: they will bring in new ideas and help with succession planning for the next generation of advisers, boost AREIAC membership and bring in a certain amount of extra money. This is an interesting suggestion but we may need to check it out with NATRE and Prospect (see following paragraph). Dave Francis who is a long standing member of AREIAC also raised an important point in that, as a member of Prospect (formerly ASPECT) AREIAC’s constitution has to be agreed by them. Once we have come up with alternative wording I will write to them to see if the new forms of membership comply with them before taking the amendments to the AGM for voting on. Please take time to consider these issues and those of associate membership which were sent round earlier this term. You can feed back your thoughts either through your regional rep or directly to me, so that the executive can have a full range of opinions when they discuss the issues at their next meeting.

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ASSOCIATION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION INSPECTORS, ADVISERS AND CONSULTANTS !

SPRING 2013

RE:Route Resource for Pupils with Special Educational Needs When special needs teacher and resources manager, Tina Ward, told me some years ago that her special school had developed ‘Access Boxes’ of materials for History and Geography, I immediately wondered where the RE Access Box was. ‘Would you like to help me put one together?’ she replied. So began the project to fill a box with materials, interactive games, puzzles and cards that would allow a whole range of pupils, including those with special educational needs, to ‘access’ good learning in RE. The result, the ‘RE-Route’, is a scheme of around a dozen lessons, with assessment for P levels as well as can-do statements designed for KS3 pupils (though could be used for upper KS2 or KS4). It is packed with ideas for active learning around the big RE question ‘what do people believe?’ The focus is particularly on Christianity and Buddhism, helping pupils interact with key beliefs. The materials engage them through games, illusions and stories and use ‘Writing with Symbols’ to help those with reading difficulties. It's rather expensive if you would like a ready made box, with all the cards, games and pictures printed and laminated (£234) but the CD-ROM with all the materials available for schools to make themselves and including the interactive PowerPoints, is now available for just £20.

Dave Francis - Education Consultant - mayfly@blueyonder.co.uk

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SPRING 2013

New RE:Online Culham St Gabriel’s is excited to announce that over the last year a major redevelopment of RE:ONLINE has been completed. This has involved a rebranding and complete restructuring of the site: www.reonline.org.uk The site is divided up into five main sections:

1. Learning: Practical ideas, resources and

2. 3. 4. 5.

inspiration - the home of all our links and resources, all fully categorized and searchable. Leading: Everything for the subject leader. Knowing: Preparing to teach, continuing to learn - the heart of subject knowledge, pedagogy and CPD. Assessing: A teacher’s toolkit for pupils’ progress. Supporting: Access and contribute to expertise in the RE community with our RE Café, TV and Radio Listings, and our news service. Please join the RE conversation at the RE Café!

To support the new site a series of roadshows will be held across the country. The RE:ONLINE Roadshow will provide an opportunity for you to explore the site in the company of some of its lead consultants and contributors.

• • •

You will discover newly produced resources to support pupils’ learning. You will go away with a wealth of practical ideas to support your teaching in RE. You will discover how to participate in the RE conversation.

We hope you can join at one of the following twilight events (all running from approximately 4.00 or 4.30 to 6.00 pm – details to be provided on enquiry): 14 May 15 May 18/19 May 12 June 17 June 19 June 20 June 2 July 28/29 Sept. Oct/Nov

Kirklees: Junction 25 Conference centre, Brighouse. York: York St John University. Bolton: NATRE conference (Booking via NATRE). London: Tower Hamlets PDC. London: Al Khoei Islamic Centre, Chevening Road, Brent. North Shields. Durham. Liverpool: AREIAC conference (Members of AREIAC only). Wokefield Park (Culham St Gabriel’s RE Leadership Weekend Oxford: Ashmolean Museum.

TBA: Wales and the South West. Places at the RE:ONLINE Roadshow events may be limited. To enquire about or book a place please contact Shini Rajannan at Shini@cstg.org.uk stating which event you are interested in attending.

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National Cencus - 2011 2013 seems a long time past to be reporting on the census that took place in 2011 but it has taken that long to compile all the information. Some broad conclusions were published towards the end of 2012 but now we have all the detail. It is impossible to give a complete picture of what was in the census so I have concentrated on that part which is likely to be of most interest to AREIAC members: namely the shifts in religious adherence and to give them a context I have compared the 2011 statistics with those of 2001. The figures are only for England and Wales and I have rounded the pecentages.

Buddhism Christianity Hinduism Islam Judaism Sikhism Other No religion Religion not stated

2001 (52,041916) 144,453 37,338,486 552,421 1,546,626 259,927 329,358 150,720 7,709,267 4,010,658

2001 % 0.28% 71.75% 1.06% 2.97% 0.5% 0.63% 0.29% 14.81% 7.71%

2011 (56,075,912) 247,743 33,243,175 816,633 2,706,066 263,346 423,158 240,530 14,097,229 4,038,032

2011% 0.44% 59.28% 1.46% 4.83% 0.47% 0.75% 0.43% 25.14% 7.2%

From this the most startling thing to emerge is the drop in number of people who identify themselves as Christian. Whereas all other religions, apart from Judaism, have increased in numbers, Christianity has suffered a 12% drop in adherents. On the other hand those who are prepared to give themselves as having no religion have increased by almost the same percentage. One wonders if these are the same people, though I doubt there is a direct correlation. The numbers for ‘other’ religions are recorded and make interesting reading. For those who wonder if pagans should be allowed to sit on SACREs it is worth noting that 56,620 people identified themselves as pagans with a further 11,766 Wiccans and 1,276 who come under the heading of Witchcraft. This compares to 5,021 Baha’is, 20,288 Jains and 4,105 Zoroastrians. There are also 39,061 Spiritualists. Curiously, when it comes to the ‘No religion’ heading, there are more Jedi Knights (176,632) than atheists (29,267) or Humanists (15,067). Indeed

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there are almost 4 times as many pagans as humanists! Of course, numbers are only part of the story but the headline numbers are worth a closer look. The information is broken down by local authority so it is possible to look up the area in which you live and work to discover the demographic for that region which could be informative and may be relevant if you are assessing places on your SACRE. On those figures the press reported that Norwich was the most religious place in England! Again figures are only part of the story…

• On a different tack, it appears, perhaps surprisingly*, that ninety two per cent (49.8 million) of usual residents aged three years and over spoke English (English or Welsh in Wales) as their main language.

• Of the eight per cent (4.2 million) of usual residents aged three years and over with a main language other than English, 79 per cent (3.3 million) could speak English very well or well.

• In 2011, less than half a per cent (138,000) of all usual residents aged three years and over could not speak English.

• The second most reported main language was Polish (one per cent, 546,000), followed by Panjabi (half of one per cent, 273,000) and Urdu (half of one per cent, 269,000). * I said surprisingly, but that was before I checked the ethnic group tables (QS211EW). From these I discovered that over 81% of the population identified themselves as White: English, Welsh, Scottish, Northern Irish, British or Irish. Not so surprising after all! I certainly found this census fascinating and well worth a further look. The Religion table is QS210EW and to find it and for more information visit www.ons.gov.uk/census Christine Howard

Art in Heaven competition: 10th Anniversary Teachers are invited to enter pupils’ creative RE work in the 10th Anniversary Art in Heaven competition, part of NATRE’s ‘Spirited Arts’ strategy for more creative RE. This year’s themes include Prayer: How and Why?; Windows on the Soul; and Jerusalem by William Blake. There will be about 40 prizes of £20 to winners, and certificates for all whose work is received, as well as up to three big prizes (£100) for pupils aged 16 – 19. Entries can be sent in until 31st July – more details are available at www.natre.org.uk/spiritedarts

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The religious and non-religious make up of Cornwall: 2011 Introduction In 2011 the Government undertook a census that gave a snapshot of the population at that time which is intended to give government information with regard to funding allocations for public services. SACRE’s are expected to represent the religious make-up of their localities and data has been used since the 2001 census, the first to have a question about religion, to help Local Authorities ensure that SACREs are representative bodies, especially in relation to Committee A. On the basis of the data SACREs may also wish to co-opt members to SACRE who may not be eligible to sit on Committee A. This paper looks at the 2011 statistics for Cornwall LA and makes some comparison with the national picture. The data, though, is not always easy to understand. The question in the census looked at ‘identification’ not at formal belonging or practice. It did not differentiate within religious traditions, unless people themselves wanted to identify such a differentiation. Nor did have any mechanism for validating the identification that individuals made. Similarly, in terms of children it was parents who decided what religion or not they were. In fact a single person in a family could decide on the religion of the household. There is one question, though, that does need to be asked: how do we understand the changes between the 2001 and the 2011 census and are these changes significant? This question will be revisited at the end of this short paper. Local Authorities and SACREs, therefore, need to treat these statistics carefully. Religion in Cornwall In 2011 59.8% of people were identified as Christian, this is 0.6% lower than the national average (60.4%). Compared to the 2001 census this is a reduction in identification with Christianity of 14.5% (2001:74.3%). This reduction can be explained by looking at the rise of those who said they had no religion. In 2001 16.7% identified themselves as having no religion compared to 30.3% in 2011, a rise of 13.9%. The category of ‘no religion’ will be discussed in the next section of this report. Those who identified with non-Christian religions were as follows: Table 1: Non-Christian religions in Cornwall 2011

Religion Buddhism Islam Hinduism Judaism Sikhism Other religions

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Number

% 2011 census 1,726 885 556 389 105 3,609

% 2001 census 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.7

0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.5

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The census identifies other religions, making-up 0.7% of Cornwall’s population. They are presented in Table 2, below. Table 2: other religious traditions identified in the 2011 census for Cornwall UA

Religion Paganism Spiritualist Mixed religion Spiritual Wicca Taoism Druidism Baha’i Rastafarianism Pantheism Own belief system Believe in God Satanism Witchcraft Heathen Animism Shamanism Scientology Universalism Deist Theism New Age Shintoism Zoroastrianism Occult Eckankar Mysticism Traditional African Religion Ravidassia Church of All Religion Reconstructionist Thelemite Vodun

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Number

Percentage of Rank n348 population (nationally) 1,429 0.3 4 532 0.1 64 530 0.1 21 213 0.0 36 186 0.0 22 79 0.0 22 78 0.0 26 39 0.0 165 49 0.0 143 42 0.0 37 35 0.0 42 30 0.0 107 26 0.0 70 25 0.0 44 21 0.0 120 17 0.0 29 17 0.0 23 16 0.0 114 13 0.0 77 12 0.0 140 11 0.0 91 10 0.0 30 10 0.0 112 10 0.0 202 5 0.0 115 4 0.0 90 4 0.0 75 4 0.0 119 3 0.0 130 2 0.0 171 2 0.0 120 2 0.0 92 2 0.0 99

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Confucianism Jain Native American Church Unification Church Other religions

1 1 1 1 147

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

SPRING 2013 75 285 85 75 88

If you add Paganism to other groups traditionally associated with that term (Wicca, Druidism, Witchcraft, Heathen and Shamanism – although the latter is disputed) the total number under that designation ‘Pagan’ the number comes to 1,756, constituting 0.3% of the population, which is marginally larger than the number that self identified as Buddhist. What is of note is the variety of religious identification within the Census 2011. Whilst some numbers are very small it does not follow that for those who identify with a religious tradition that their tradition is not deeply significant for them. It also does not follow that someone who identifies positively with a religious tradition that they actively engage with that tradition. Hence, there is a reasonable question in terms of religious education: what does it mean to identify with a religious tradition? This question also applies to those who identify themselves with a no religious tradition. No religion in Cornwall The census asked respondents to identify if they had no religion. It is difficult to know exactly what constitutes ‘no religion’, as shall be explained below. Table 3 sets out the statistics for Cornwall UA. Table 3: those who identified themselves as having no religion in Cornwall UA

No religion No religion total No religion Agnostic Atheist Free Thinker Heavy Metal Humanist Jedi Knight Realist

Number Percentage Rank 161,320 30.3 158,104 29.7 439 0.1 309 0.1 4 0.0 63 0.0 224 0.0 2,169 0.4 8 0.0

55 56 50 85 168 103 50 47 52

It is not easy to interpret these statistics. What should we make of Jedi Knights? They number 51.7% larger than all other groups that define themselves as belonging to a specifically nonreligious designation. Professor Linda Woodhead of Lancaster University wrote: “When people tick "no religion" in the census, most of them don't mean secular. Only 9% are consistent atheists and more than a third believe in life after death. What they mean is that they're not religious, or Christian, in a traditional sense. But then nor are most of those who ticked the Christian box – it's not the Reformation style they believe in, it's something different.”

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(http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/dec/23/lost-faith-in-rituals-not-religion? INTCMP=SRCH)

Indeed the Religion and Society project (www.religionandsociety.org.uk), and other research, shows that moving away from identification with a religion is not the same as not having religious beliefs (Berger, Davie et al. 2008, Woodhead and Catto 2012). Indeed it is difficult to see what has changed over the ten years since the 2001 Census. There have been high-level campaigns led by the British Humanist Association and the National Secular Society in relation to filling in the Census and this may have had some effect. Yet during the same period attendance at Cathedral services has grown and religion has become more prominent in the public space (Op.Cit). As Woodhead (quoted above) indicates, this may be more to do with how people view ‘religion’ and their relationship to it rather than a loss of religious feeling, sentiment or conviction. What appears to be clear is that religion continues to be a contested concept that has the power to generate debate at a national level. What are the implications for religious education? There are a number of distinct issues that arise from the Census 2011 data that are pertinent to religious education in the classroom. The representation of religion and non-religion in the classroom There has long concern that religious education stereotypes religious and non-religious traditions (Jackson and Nesbitt 1992, Jackson 1997, Jackson 2004) and the danger is teachers do not enable pupils to have the right tools to explore the real issues of representation. Understanding that often religion and non-religion are more to do with identity than belief or practice. It is more than the teacher saying: ‘some Christians believe (with the caveat) but not all…’ Rather, it is an appreciation that the world is more complex than it first appears; and, that is the skill of a competent religious educator. Similarly, understanding the phenomena of non-religion is equally complex. Enabling pupils to be able to openly explore their own identity Generally RE has prided itself for offering pupils the opportunity to reflect on their own ideas, belief, practices and actions in light of their learning about religious education. A brief attainment target (AT2) sums this up: Learning form religion, although this was always a much richer concept than regularly understood (Grimmitt 1987). In order to be able to address these issues, in light of the evidence, teachers have to have the requisite understanding of pedagogies in religious education and the implications, merits and demerits of different approaches (Grimmitt 2000). This is supported by the Teachers’ Standards 2012 (DfE 2012) and may be a starting point for SACRE to have a conversation about RE in the curriculum with schools in the area covered by the Local Authority in relation to their specific training needs.

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Conclusion The 2011 Census is likely to be the last census of this kind, ending a tradition that goes back over a century. Given the results there are no particular implications for SACRE’s Committee A membership but there are implications for schools and how they teach and promote the value of religious education. The 2011 Census allows SACREs and schools to think about religion and non-religion in society and how those two ideas play-out in the lives of people within the local area, regionally and nationally. Both religion and non-religion are complex areas and good schools will encourage pupils to think of their worlds as complex, where people of differing beliefs and practices have to live together whilst preserving their own unique identities. In any revision of the Agreed Syllabus this data can prove a useful starting point in the exploration of religion and non-religion.

Bibliography Berger, P. L., et al. (2008). Religious America, secular Europe? : A theme and variations. Aldershot, Ashgate. Department for Education (DfE)(2012). Teachers' Standards 2012. London, TSO. Grimmitt, M. (1987). Religious education and human development: the relationship between studying religions and personal, social and moral education. Great Wakering, McCrimmons. Grimmitt, M. (2000). Pedagogies of religious education : case studies in the research and development of good pedagogic practice in RE. Great Wakering, McCrimmons. Jackson, R. (1997). Religious education : an interpretive approach. London, Hodder & Stoughton. Jackson, R. (2004). Rethinking religious education and plurality : issues in diversity and pedagogy. London, RoutledgeFalmer. Jackson, R. and E. M. Nesbitt (1992). Hindu children in Britain. London, Trentham. Woodhead, L. and R. Catto (2012). Religion and change in modern Britain. London, Routledge. David Hampshire

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Book Reviews Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel ISBN: 978-0007230204 RRP: £9.95 Wolf Hall is the first of a trilogy of books which centre around the figure of Thomas Cromwell. I picked it up because I was intrigued by the fact that the author, Hilary Mantel, had just received the prestigious Booker prize award for the second of the three: Bring out the bodies. She had already received the same prize for Wolf Hall, making her the first serial winner ever! I must confess that I am a fan of historical ‘faction’, particularly around this period of history. My previous recent fare has been the books of Philippa Gregory. Reformation church history was the period of Church history that I had read at University. The differing approaches of church historians and ‘ordinary’ historians over their understanding of Henry’s attitude to the Reformation and the Catholic church always interested me. My ‘Church’ history suggested Henry remained Catholic in his views and that the divorce from the Catholic church in Rome was driven by his desire to end his marriage to Queen Katherine. However, these issues are only hinted at in this volume. I suspect the following books will delve into it further. The book is no light weight, being 650 pages long but I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. I felt it gave an insight into the life of Thomas Cromwell from his origins as the abused, runaway son of Walter, the blacksmith, then his faithful service to Cardinal Wolsey even after the churchman’s fall from grace, to the point that he became trusted adviser to King Henry whilst also having the ear of the would be Queen, Anne Boleyn. The book shows the human side of Cromwell with his family (though both his wife and daughters die of the plague). He is also an industrious, hardworking and highly intelligent man. At this stage he doesn’t appear to be as self serving as others around him, though this may change in the subsequent novels. What I wasn’t prepared for was the description of Sir Thomas More. Brought up with the portrayal of him in ‘A Man for All Seasons’, I had always thought of him as a gentle, sincere man with firmly held convictions for which he was prepared to die. He was the sort of man who demanded respect and was thoroughly ‘nice’. Whilst the book describes how More was imprisoned and eventually executed because he was not prepared to swear to the act of supremacy, the picture of the man himself was not flattering. Most notably in the home at dinner he spoke Latin, a language in which his daughters could converse but his wife could not understand and so he made jokes at her expense. This cruelty just did not accord with my image of the man and is at odds with how I would have expected a man like him to behave. Mantel sums it up when describing one of More’s servants: a man who More sometimes refers to as his fool. “There’s something sly in More, he enjoys embarrassing people; it would be like him to have a fool who isn’t.” The book is well paced and the narrative drives forward. Mantel’s language is expressive and the whole has been well researched, not only in terms of the characters and historical facts but in the detail of everyday life, as her description of the Christmas festivities at Cromwell’s home show. I certainly would recommend the book, -contrary to the opinion of the critic in the ‘I’ newspaper who was quite dismissive of it – and I am waiting to obtain the second volume to continue the story. I did puzzle over its title: Wolf Hall because the place does not figure in the narrative more than a couple of times and is certainly never visited. That is until I arrived at the closing sentence. By this stage Anne is Queen and has produced the child Elizabeth but has then miscarried and no male heir is in sight. There are signs of her jealousy and the King’s ardour is beginning to wane. The royal court is going on progress and has a few days to spare before returning to Windsor in October. Cromwell is organizing the progress and is speaking to his charge, Rafe. “’And what I think is, Rafe, we shall visit the Seymours.’ He writes it down. Early September. Five days. Wolf Hall” Wolf Hall – the home of the Seymours where Jane lives…. And so the scene is set for “Bring out the Bodies’ and the rise of a new queen, Jane.

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Mr Rosenblum’s List by Natasha Solomons or friendly advice for the aspiring Englishman ISBN: 978-0340995662 RRP: £7.99 My New Year’s Resolution was to get back into the ‘reading habit’ each night instead of compiling the endless lists of things to do the next day. A resolution that had a terrific kick start by being introduced to 'Mr Rosenblum’s List' by a new English novelist Natasha Solomons. The story line, based on Nataha’s own family experiences, charts the arrival of Jack Rosenblum and his family to England as refugees from Germany. Dedicated to becoming an 'accepted Englishman' he constructs a list of attitudes and practices that he perceives will make him appear quintantesinally English-including building his own golf-course! The list covers 112 items and includes shopping practices e.g. ‘An Englishman buys his marmalade from Fortnum and Mason’ to specific characteristics ‘An Englishman keeps his head in a crisis.’ (List Item 112). The book is described by fellow author Paul Torday as ‘Utterly charming and very funny.’ But for the teacher of Religious Education it is so much more. It exemplifies the difficult choices many have to make, even today, regarding assimilation and integration. It explores the themes of identity and tradition. Was the action of his daughter to change her name from Rosenblum to Rose one of pragmatism or a pragmatic action or shame? Resulting in a consideration of the relationship between names and identity as we read ‘she was tired of being the Jew. She did not look like a Jew-only the name betrayed her and without it she was free.’ The account of Mr and Mrs Rosenblum's journey into English life gives insight to the many different ways Jewish refugees reacted to their new life style . Some bringing with them their ‘home’ environment ,some completely abandoning it but for many the feeling of guilt at times becoming overwhelming. It also unashamedly explores anti-semitism in England. Not the anti-semitism of the Shoah but that described by Julius in his recent ‘Trials of the Diaspora’ as an anti-semitism ‘...of rebuff and of insult, not of expulsion and murder. Its votaries confer in golf clubs; they do not conspire in cellars.' And it was indeed Mr Rosenblums desire to build his own golf-course in a bid to be acccepted that led to his financial downfall . The read was bitter-sweet. Sometimes charming, sometimes funny and sometimes heart-rendering but always thought-provoking. Roll on next year when I will make the same New Years Resolution to get into the 'reading habit'-as for now it's back to the lists! Joy Schmack

If you are interested in submitted a book review, or have a book that you would like to be reviewed, or another form of resource (DVD, Video, Website etc...) then please details to web@areiac.org.uk and it will be considered for the newsletter.

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BACK PAGE & DATES FOR YOUR DIARY And Finally ... • Read the APPG report which can be downloaded from the AREIAC website • THere is still time to comment on the National Curriculum Consultation and other DfE Consultations - make your voice felt • Write to your MP over the changes to teacher education in England - damage is being done to the future of RE.

Contributors Joy SCHMACK Sarah SMALLEY Dilwyn HUNT David HAMPSHIRE Christine HOWARD Jane CHIPPERTON

WEBSITE Are you keeping an eye on the website? The website is updated and changed most weeks so you should be visiting at least once a week. You could contribute a butterfly or a link to your agreed syllabus or an example of good practice. The more you contribute the better the site is for everyone and adds value for your membership fee. As a new experiment a digest of website items will be sent you about once a term.

PLANNING AHEAD THE EFTRE CONFERENCE is in August 2013 and will be in Malmo in Sweden (just across from Copenhagen, Denmark). The conference theme is on “Religion and Relationships: Dealing with Difference”. A wonderful change to meet with colleagues from new places and to expand your horizons. To find out more and to book a place visit www.eftre.net

PRODUCTION All articles and information in this newsletter are copyright to AREIAC unless otherwise stated. Copies may be made for personal use by members of AREIAC. If you would like to submit an article for the next edition of the newsletter please contact Jane Chipperton <jchipperton@stalbans.anglican.org> Typesetting and newsletter design by Paul Hopkins <www.mmiweb.org.uk>

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AREIAC newsletter Spring 2013