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Understanding Global Poverty: How Youth Can Make a Difference!

BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth For Grades 6 – 12

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Lesson 1: Extreme Poverty, Africa, and Uganda

Lesson 2: Life on A Dollar a Day

Lesson 3: Meet the Members

Lesson 4: BeadforLife: A Model for Success

Lesson 5: Taking Action: How YOU Can Help Eradicate Poverty

www.BeadforLife.org

2nd Edition 9/2011


BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Introduction: Welcome to the BeadCircle! You and your students will now be part of a growing circle of people joining together to help eradicate poverty one bead at a time and one student at a time! At BeadforLife, we are constantly seeking ways to increase awareness about extreme poverty and inspire others to take action to help eradicate it. We believe that with knowledge comes power, hope, and the belief that any one individual truly can make a difference in the lives of others. Understanding Global Poverty: How Youth Can Make a Difference! exemplifies this message of hope and helps us achieve our mission of eradicating poverty through education and participation. The curriculum contains five lesson plans, designed to be taught in consecutive order. While we encourage instructors to implement the full curriculum, each lesson can stand alone and can be easily adapted to complement any subject. If you do not have time to implement all five lessons, we encourage you to include the following key elements in your lesson plans: 1. Definitions of poverty and extreme poverty (page 11) 2. One of the hands-on learning activities regarding Global Poverty (see pages 6 and 18) 3. The BeadforLife DVD and coinciding handouts (watch the Overview video and Beader Bios – see Meet the Members Lesson #3, pages 26-31; and watch the How to Roll a Bead video and handout – see BeadforLife Model for Success Lesson: #4, pages 43 & 44) 4. Take Action Lesson (see handout on page 49) We believe these elements will provide your students with an understanding of the harsh realities of extreme poverty, and offer concrete ways that they can address poverty in their communities and beyond. Our ultimate goal is for the next generation of youth to become informed global citizens who feel empowered to alleviate poverty wherever they encounter it; whether it be in their local community or in a remote village half-way across the world. Thank you for your commitment to educate and inspire your students about global poverty! We hope you enjoy the curriculum and welcome your feedback and comments anytime.

Acknowledgements:

Host a BeadParty: Raise Money for Uganda AND Your School or Community with BeadforLife’s “Fundraising with Curriculum” To learn more, contact education@ beadforlife.org

Just as it takes all of us working together to help eradicate poverty, it took a concerted effort and the contributions of many talented people to help us create this curriculum. Special thanks and recognition goes to the following: The BeadforLife Curriculum Team: Josie Chamla, Heather Ditillo, Devin Hibbard, Robin Kozic, Patty Manwaring, Staci Moore, Toni Pickett, Lauren Sato, Erin Schol, Megan Swanson and Torkin Wakefield – for their amazing collaborative effort to take this vision and make it a reality!; Facing the Future: for their generosity and willingness to share both their expertise and some of their simulations to help support our efforts; Charles Steinberg of Charles Steinberg Photography: for your ability to continually capture the heart of our work and for providing us with all the moving photos used throughout the curriculum; Dean McCready of Dean Allan Design: for your keen eye, creativity and beautiful graphic design of the curriculum; and To the many incredible teachers and students who reviewed and piloted the curriculum: for your time, expertise and valuable feedback that truly helped shape and refine this finished product! We are truly blessed to be surrounded by such generosity and talent!

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Table of Contents BeadforLife: Curriculum Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Lesson 1: Extreme Poverty, Africa & Uganda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15 Activity: “Let Them Eat Cake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 The BeadforLife Creation Story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 What is Poverty? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Map of Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 World Population Data Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Sharing the Cake divided by World Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Sharing the Cake divided by Per Capita GNI in PPP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Lesson 2: Life on a Dollar a Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-22 Activity: “Shop Till You Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Local Market Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Local Market Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Local Market Shillings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda . . . . . . . . . . . 23-34 Activity: “Life in the Slums of Kampala . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Profiles of Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Photos of Before (Slums of Kampala) House and After (Friendship Village) House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda: Items Found in Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Lesson 4: BeadforLife: A Model for Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35-44 Activity: Living the BeadforLife Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 BeadforLife Mission Statement and Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 BeadforLife Community Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Income Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Life Skill Cards Handout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 How to Roll a Bead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Lesson 5: Take Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45-56 Activity #1: Class BeadParty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Activity #2: Choose from Take Action Handout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Take Action Planning Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Take Action Handout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Step-by-Step Guide to Hosting a BeadParty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57-62

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

BeadforLife: Curriculum for Schools Overview This curriculum is intended to introduce students to conditions of extreme poverty in Africa, with the specific focus on BeadforLife and the work we do to help people rise out of poverty. Throughout the week, students will use simulations, discussions, and service learning to better understand global poverty and ways they can make a difference. BeadforLife believes that engaging citizens on issues of global poverty is critical and hopes to connect people across continents to understand our similarities and how we can work together in a mutually beneficial way. We partner with impoverished women in Uganda to make beaded jewelry out of recycled paper, providing a sustainable income, and reinvesting profits in community development. BeadforLife thanks Facing the Future, a global issues curriculum organization from which several of the simulations are taken. Visit Facing the Future’s website at www.facingthefuture.org to download FREE curriculum and resources for K-12 educators!

Objectives: Students Will ...

Key Issues/Concepts

Know The definition of extreme poverty, and what it means for people’s lives That each woman in BeadforLife represents the 1.4 billion other people in the world living in extreme poverty Specific actions they can take to overcome extreme poverty around the world Understand and appreciate the people in Uganda and their ability to lift their families out of poverty through their own hard work Extreme poverty disproportionately affects women and children world wide Feel Inspired to do something to make a difference about extreme poverty Empathy for BeadforLife members and those living in extreme poverty Confident extreme poverty can be overcome in their lifetimes

Sustainable Development Equity, poverty and scarcity Consequences of extreme poverty Consumption patterns Environmental resources Resource distribution Environmental and structural scarcity

Vocabulary We have included suggested daily vocabulary lists to enrich your students’ learning experience.

Subject Areas  ocial Studies (Geography, Economics, Global S Studies, Contemporary World Problems) Science (Environmental) Math Health/Nutrition

Art  at those living in extreme poverty have something Th to give to us, just as we have something to give to them National Standards Consistency NCSS: 1, 2, 3, 7, 9 More connected to their own communities and the needs around them through their increased awareness of global issues

Do

NSES: C, F

Grade Level: 6-12

Educate their families or friends about extreme poverty Commit to taking one or more actions from the curriculum to help end extreme poverty

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 1: Extreme Poverty, Africa & Uganda Overview

Key Issues/Concepts

Students will learn the definitions of “poverty” and “extreme poverty” and explore the implications of what it means to live in extreme poverty conditions. They will then complete an interactive activity, “Let Them Eat Cake,” in which pieces of cake (or pizza, or other item that can be divided) are cut and distributed to represent shares of natural resources that students must negotiate and allocate. It illustrates the inequitable distribution of resources around the world and the interconnectedness of human economic and social activities as well as resource scarcity. They will also be introduced to BeadforLife as a model of a nonprofit organization working to help people living in extreme poverty in Uganda, Africa, lift themselves out of poverty … one bead at a time.

Resource distribution Consumption patterns Environmental and Structural Scarcity

Subject Areas S ocial Studies (geography, economics, global studies, contemporary world problems) Science (environmental) Math

Vocabulary Slum

 urchasing Power P Parity (PPP)

Impoverished

Inquiry/Critical Thinking Questions

Tuberculosis

What are some consequences of unequal distribution of resources around the world?

Tenacious Brutality

Malaria

What feelings and behaviors result from such inequity?

 ross National G Income (GNI)

AIDS/HIV+

Structural Scarcity

What can we do to make resource distribution around the world more fair and just?

Objectives Students will: Experience an inequitable distribution of resources.

NORTH

WESTERN SAHARA

ALGERIA

MAURITANIA MALI

SENEGAL GAMBIA GUNEA BISSAU

EGYPT

ERITREA

NIGER

CHAD

SUDAN

BURKINA

GUNEA SIERRA LEONE

LIBYA

AFRICA

COTE DIVOIRE

LIBERIA

Time Required: 1 Hour

NIGERIA BENIN CAMEROON TOGO GHANA SAO TOME & PRINCIPE GABON CONGO REPUBLIC

ATLANTIC OCEAN

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

DJIBOU ETHIOPIA SO MA LIA

Gain a basic understanding of how BeadforLife is working to help eradicate extreme poverty in Uganda, Africa.

TUNISIA

MOROCCO

UGANDA

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

KENYA

TANZANIA

ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

NAMIBIA

BOTSWANA SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

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INDIAN OCEAN

MA DA GA SC AR

Consider, write about, and discuss the connections between resource distribution and hunger issues, and the underlying connections to human economic, environmental, and social activities.

MOZAMBIQUE LESOTHO


BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Extreme Poverty, Africa & Uganda

(continued)

Materials/Preparation

TEACHER TIP Some teachers have found

A cake, pie, pizza or other baked item that can be cut into wedges

using M&M’s or jelly beans

Plates, napkins and utensils, 1 per student

instead of cake or pizza works

Spatula or knife to cut and serve the cake

even better– plus it will

BeadforLife Creation Story handout pg. 9, 1 per student

develop math skills at the

What is Poverty? handout pg. 11

same time!

Maps of Africa & Uganda handout pg. 12 and map of world (your own copy) World Population Data Sheet handout pg. 13, 1 per student Overhead #1: Sharing the Cake divided by World Population pg. 14; Overhead #2: Sharing the Cake divided by Per Capita GNI in PPP Gross National Income adjusted for Purchasing Power Parity pg. 15 During the activity you will divide the class into groups according to the table below: For a class of 20 form groups of:

For a class of 30 form groups of:

Representing

% of Earth’s Population

3

4

Africa

14%

1

2

U.S. & Canada

5%

2

3

Latin America

9%

2

4

Europe

12%

12

17

Asia

60%

Introduction In this activity, you will divide your class into groups that represent the population division by continent worldwide. Then you will distribute a cake or other treat, based on actual distribution of resources worldwide, illustrating the unequal distribution of resources. Before dividing into groups, it is important to first have a brief discussion about poverty and extreme poverty. Steps 1. Write on the board or overhead the word “POVERTY” and ask students to think about what this word means. Refer to What is Poverty? handout. 2. Now write the word “EXTREME” above the word poverty. Ask students if they know the difference between “poverty” and “extreme poverty.” 3. Ask students to think about these questions: Who lives in extreme poverty? How does being poor affect quality of life? Why are people poor? What are some of the causes?

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You may want students to write or brainstorm these answers on paper, and after about 3 minutes, students can share their thoughts with the class; or you can lead a class discussion about these questions. 4. Tell students extreme poverty is defined by living on about $1 a day. Living on $1 a day means all your focus is on food and shelter, not clothing, not education, not healthcare, not even transportation. (Note: The World Bank, 2009, defines extreme poverty as living on $1.25 to $2.00 per day, we’ve estimated it about $1 day for simplicity sake) 5. Tell students that while using the curriculum they will learn about extreme poverty and specifically how it affects people in Uganda. A key component of the curriculum is that they will examine the cause of extreme poverty. 6. Display a map of the world and direct student attention toward Africa. Ask them to locate Uganda. 7. Distribute the World Population Data Sheet handout to students. Have students compare the regions’ statistics. Revisit these statistics later during the simulation.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Extreme Poverty, Africa & Uganda Activity: “Let Them Eat Cake”

continued)

agitated. Allow some stress to develop.)

Steps 1. Show the cake or pizza, pie, etc. to the class and explain you bought it for them to share. You might set the cake out in front of the class a while before you start the activity to pique the students’ interest. 2. Ask the class if you should invite the class next door to join you in eating the cake. If the students say no, ask them why not. Explain that this represents the concept of environmental scarcity, in which there is just not enough of a particular resource for everyone who wants or needs it. In this case, if the class next door came over, there would be less cake per person. 3. Tell them that instead of inviting the class next door, you will divide the cake for this class to share. Ask them to imagine that they represent all the people on the planet. Put up the Overhead: Sharing the Cake—Divided by World Population, showing how the cake would be cut if it were divided based on population. Physically separate the class into groups as indicated in the table on the previous page..

8. A  sk each region what they are going to do about the situation. Some may choose to migrate to US/ Canada and take their cake. You might see discrimination (only some people can have cake), or the “brain-drain” (only your “friends” — those with professional degrees or education — from another region can come over and share our piece of cake). Make sure there is enough time for everyone to experience the feeling of having very little or having more than everyone else. 9. E  xplain that this unequal distribution of cake is an example of “structural scarcity,” in that there may be enough of the resource to go around, but it is not distributed fairly. (continued on page 8.)

4. Ask each region how they feel about this distribution. (this distribution equally divides the cake among each region and represents the “fairest” distribution). 5. Tell the class that instead of dividing it by population, you will divide the cake to represent how resources are actually distributed in the world, based on per capita Gross National Income (GNI) adjusted for Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) (Ability to purchase goods, based on value of local versus international currencies). Put up the overhead, Sharing the Cake Divided by Per Capita GNI in PPP. 6. Cut the cake into 5 unequal pieces, as indicated on the overhead, and distribute the pieces to each “region”. Be sure to hold up each piece so the class can see how much each region will get. 7. Ask each region how they feel about their share of the cake. Ask Asia and Africa how they are going to divide the cake among their population. Will they try to divide their very small piece equally among the group or will 1 or 2 people decide to eat all of it? (Some students will likely begin eating the cake, while others may get “Adapted from Facing the Future’s lesson “Let Them Eat Cake” (www.facingthefuture.org).”

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Extreme Poverty, Africa & Uganda 10. Conclude with the following reflection questions:

Assessment/Reflection Questions “Let Them Eat Cake” Questions: How did it feel when you saw how much other groups got? How did you divide the cake within your group? Did you do anything to get more cake, or give any away? How does this activity relate to the real world? (If students struggle answering this question, be sure to point out how conflicts can arise over resource scarcity; or how some may migrate to other areas where there are more resources/more “cake”, etc.) How would this have been different if you were really hungry and hadn’t eaten much, or anything, for a couple of days? Have the students brainstorm ways they could personally address the inequitable distribution of resources. Examples include: reduce, reuse, recycle; buy energy efficient and sustainable products; volunteer at a nonprofit organization working

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(continued from page 7)

towards social justice, like BeadforLife; and talk about the issue with friends and family. Poverty Questions: In which parts of the world are people most likely to live in extreme poverty?  ne aspect of extreme poverty is a lack of access O to basic needs (food, water, shelter). How would someone’s quality of life be affected by severe shortages of each necessity?  hy are people poor? How can you explain W poverty in terms of population and resource distribution?

Closing Activity: Give each student the BeadforLife Creation Story handout, and let students know that we’ll be continuing to learn about poverty, the issues surrounding it, and learning how BeadforLife is a model for success. “Adapted from Facing the Future’s lesson “Let Them Eat Cake” (www.facingthefuture.org).”

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

The BeadforLife Creation Story A Chance Encounter

their eyes remained clear and bright, their survival instincts palpable.

BeadforLife began with a chance encounter between women living in a slum in Kampala and three American women: Torkin Wakefield, her daughter Devin Hibbard and family friend Ginny Jordan. In April 2004 the three women were walking through a Ugandan slum and came across a woman rolling strips of paper into beautiful, colorful beads. Intrigued, they stopped to talk to her and learned that she and many others had learned to make beads out of recycled paper and string them into brightly colored necklaces, but had no markets in which to sell their jewelry. The three American women purchased a few necklaces which friends and strangers immediately started to notice and admire. Believing that there must be markets for the necklaces, the women purchased several hundred pieces of jewelry and brought them to the US. As suspected, everyone loved the beads and were captivated by the story of hard working Ugandan women struggling to find a way to lift their families from poverty.

Despite the relative safety of Kampala, life in the Acholi Quarter remained brutally hard. For most, their sole economic opportunity was sitting in the blistering hot sun crushing rocks by hand, earning about 80 cents a day. They lived without electricity or running water Bone breaking work pounding in their small mud homes rocks in the quarry. and malaria, tuberculosis and AIDS were widespread. When women finally put down their rock hammers to roll beads in the shade of a mango tree, hope replaced despair.

BeadforLife Takes Wing In December 2004 BeadforLife was mentioned in a national magazine which generated great interest around the world and created a global market for the paper beads. With this attention, BeadforLife put in place a two part mission: 1. H  elp Ugandan women lift themselves out of poverty; 2. H  elp citizens in the developed world understand extreme poverty and how they can take actions to end it.

An Organization Is Born In September 2004, BeadforLife was officially born as an all volunteer effort with the goal of supporting a small group of women in Uganda. The first group of bead makers included 90 women from the Acholi Quarter slum. These women had fled their homelands in northern Uganda where the Lord’s Resistance Army burned villages, abducted children to become soldiers or sex slaves and tortured or killed thousands of adults. Each woman told of terror and brutality almost too difficult to hear, yet

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

The BeadforLife Creation Story Empowering Women through Business, not Handouts: BeadforLife’s work in Uganda lies in helping women earn money, and start sustainable businesses or farms. We have two products – paper beads and cosmetics made from shea nuts. Our model allows women to earn money which they invest in sustainable long-term income streams:  e work with up to 400 women at any one time W to make beads out of recycled paper for a period of 18 months. During this time, women have the opportunity to sell us their beads, open a savings account, put money into a business fund, and receive business training and mentorship. As of 2011,  e have nearly 1,000 current or graduated members, w whose earnings support over 10,000 people.  e work with over 1,000 women in northern Uganda W to create markets for their shea nuts. We help them increase their agricultural capacity by swaping shea nuts for seeds, organic fertilizers and provide access to ox plows. We also make market connections for other agricultural products so women can sell directly maximizing the price they earn. All of the women we work with are also provided opportunities to get health education and supplies such as mosquito nets, deworming medicines, nutritional supplements for children, etc.

Other Programs Supported by BeadforLife:  chool fees for impoverished youth, we work with S very bright girls who would be unable to continue because their family is too poor to afford school fees.  ocational Training for youth from poor V backgrounds, providing training and support that creates a direct pathway to employment  rants to other organizations doing work that fits G with our mission and targets those living in extreme poverty.

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(continued)

Our Work Around the World: Outside of Uganda, BeadforLife works to educate and engage global citizens on issues of global poverty and creates effective and compelling ways to get involved. Targeting the 1.2 billion people who live on less than $1.25 a day is a big and complicated challenge but we believe there are effective and proven strategies to end extreme poverty in our lifetimes.

Our Work Around the World: We work to engage people around the world through: BeadParties – Women in every US state and in 27 countries around the world have hosted BeadParties in their home, office, school or place of worship. To date, over 10,000 women have hosted parties, reaching and educating over 300,000 people about extreme poverty, and inspiring people to get involved in a global movement.  urriculum - BeadforLife’s dynamic and C experiential curriculum: Understanding Global Poverty and How Youth Can Make a Difference, helps youth understand what it is like to live on a dollar a day, and how they can get involved. The curriculum is free, and has been downloaded by thousands.  ommunity Partners – BeadforLife is supported C by an incredible network of volunteers, including Community Partners who are volunteers across North America focused on educating their communities about extreme poverty.

BeadforLife Today Today (as of 9/2011) BeadforLife is a thriving NonGovernmental Organization (NGO) employing approximately 60 people in the US, Uganda and France. We are continually looking for new opportunities to provide Ugandan women a way out of poverty and spread our message: Eradicating extreme poverty IS possible in our lifetime.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Extreme Poverty, Africa & Uganda

(continued)

What is Poverty? Poverty is hunger. Poverty is lack of shelter. Poverty is being sick and not being able to see a doctor. Poverty is not having access to school and not knowing how to read. Poverty is not having a job, having fear for the future, and living one day at a time. Poverty is losing a child to illness brought about by unclean water. Poverty is powerlessness, lack of representation and freedom. Poverty has many faces, changing from place to place and across time, and has been described in many ways. Most often, poverty is a situation people want to escape. So poverty is a call to action —for the poor and the wealthy alike — a call to change the world so that many more may have enough to eat, adequate shelter, access to education and health, protection from violence, and a voice in what happens in their communities.

What is Extreme Poverty? Extreme poverty is defined as living on about $1 a day. ($1.25 according to The World Bank). Nearly 1.4 billion people around the world —that’s 1 out of every 4 people alive—struggle to survive on about $1 a day.

Poverty in Uganda, Africa: In Uganda there is a burden of three sorrows that afflict its people: the AIDS epidemic that has already killed over a million people and orphaned over a million children, a war in Northern Uganda that lasted over 20 years, and extreme poverty affecting more than half of its population.

POVERTY: Half of the 1.4 billion people living in extreme poverty throughout the world live in Africa. In Uganda, over 52% of the population survives on $1.25 a day. AIDS: AIDS has decimated sub-Saharan Africa. It is the leading cause of death. 60% of all the people in the world with AIDS are in sub-Saharan Africa even though it has but 10% of the world’s population. 25 million people live with HIV in Africa. Half of these people also have TB. Every family has been affected. Uganda has not escaped this fate with half a million people living with AIDS. WAR: War is also a devastating influence. In Africa 44% of all people live in countries that are at war; tribal wars, border raids, oppressive government, guerrilla movement, and military dictatorships. In Uganda, a brutal civil war raged in the North for over 20 years led by a charismatic figure named Joseph Kony. His army would sweep into a village, burn it, kill peasants, and kidnap the children to become soldiers and “sex slaves.” Although Kony and his forces are no longer in Uganda, he continues his destruction in neighboring countries. His is an army comprised of children that terrorizes the local population and then slips away before the army arrives. Today, a million and a half people have left their homes and are living in filthy camps or other parts of the country. A UN secretary for humanitarian affairs has called the war in Northern Uganda “The largest neglected humanitarian emergency in the world.”

Sources: The World Bank: http://wwr.worldbank.org/poverty UN AIDS, http://www.unaids.org/en/countryresponses/countries/uganda.asp Jan Egeland, United Nations Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator UNDP 2005 Unicef, http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/uganda_statistics.html

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Extreme Poverty, Africa & Uganda

(continued)

TUNISIA

MOROCCO

WESTERN SAHARA

ALGERIA

LIBYA

EGYPT

AFRICA ERITREA

NIGER

CHAD

SUDAN

BURKINA

GUNEA SIERRA LEONE

NIGERIA BENIN

COTE DIVOIRE

CAMEROON TOGO GHANA SAO TOME & PRINCIPE GABON

LIBERIA

CONGO REPUBLIC

ATLANTIC OCEAN

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

DJIBOU ETHIOPIA

SO MA LIA

MALI

SENEGAL GAMBIA GUNEA BISSAU

UGANDA

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

KENYA

TANZANIA

ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

NAMIBIA

BOTSWANA

SUDAN KAABONG

MOYO ARUA

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

KITGUM

ATIAK GULU

UGANDA

SOUTH AFRICA

MOZAMBIQUE LESOTHO

MOROTO

KAMPALA

IGANGA

MUBENDE MITYANA

NTUSI MASAKA LYANTONDE MBARARA NTUNGAMO

SWAZILAND

OTUKE LIRA

BUTIABA MASINDI SOROTI KAPCHORWA HOIMA MBALE NAMASAGALI TORORO MBULAMUTI RUSEMBATIA

KYENJOJO FORT PORTAL KASESE

KENYA

INDIAN OCEAN

MA DA GA SC AR

MAURITANIA

Otuke is the source of BeadforLife Shea Butter. Iganga and Kampala are where BeadforLife jewelry is made.

LAKE VICTORIA

KABALE

TANZANIA TANZANIA

RWANDA

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Extreme Poverty, Africa & Uganda

(continued)

World Population Data Sheet Asia

Latin America / Caribbean

Europe

U.S. / Canada

Africa

Uganda

Population in millions

4157

585

739

344

1030

33.8

0-14 years

26%

29%

16%

20%

41%

49%

65+ years

7%

7%

16%

13%

3%

3%

Deaths / 1,000

7

6

11

8

13

13

Infant Mortality [deaths of infants (before age one) per 1000 live births]

41

22

6

6

76

76

Life Expectancy

70 yrs

47 yrs

76 yrs

78 yrs

55 yrs

52 yrs

HIV (Males vs. Females)

0.3%/ 0.2%

0.7%/ 0.4%

0.7%/ 0.3%

0.9%/ 0.3%

3.2%/ 4.8%%

4.3%/ 6.6%

Source: World Population Data Sheet 2010: http://www.prb.org/pdf10/10wpds_eng.pdf

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Extreme Poverty, Africa & Uganda

(continued)

Sharing the Cake Divided by World Population (Data from 2005 World Population Data Sheet of the Population Reference Bureau)

Europe 10%

Africa 15% Asia 60% U.S. and Canada 5% Latin America 10%

“Adapted from Facing the Future’s lesson “Let Them Eat Cake” (www.facingthefuture.org).”

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Extreme Poverty, Africa & Uganda

(continued)

Sharing the Cake Divided by Per Capita GNI* in PPP (*Gross National Income) (Data from 2010 World Population Data Sheet of the Population Reference)

Europe 28% Asia 36%

Africa 4% U.S. and Canada 25%

Latin America 7%

*Gross National Income comprises the total value of goods and services produced within a country., together with its income received from other countries (notably interest and dividends), less similar payments made to other countries.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 2: Life on a Dollar a Day Key Issues/Concepts

Overview In this simulation, students gain empathy for members of BeadforLife and another 1.4 billion people who live on about $1 a day. They will explore how resources are distributed and used by different people based on access to wealth. Students will discuss and work toward personal and structural solutions to address the environmental impacts of resource consumption, and to help alleviate poverty.

Equity, poverty and scarcity Consumption patterns Environmental resources

Subject Areas S ocial Studies (geography, economics, global studies, contemporary world problems) Science (environmental, life)

Inquiry/Critical Thinking Questions What are the choices that people with relatively little access to wealth/income can make compared to people with relatively high access? What are the impacts of each of those choices and decisions?

Math Health/Nutrition

Vocabulary Deforestation

What personal choices can we make to help reduce some of these impacts, and what actions can we take to help alleviate poverty?

Desertification Soil Erosion Purification

OBJECTIVES

Posho

Students will: Gain a visceral understanding about having to make difficult choices because of poverty.

Matoke

Determine and explain purchasing/consumption choices. Compare different purchasing/consumption choices and their social and environmental effects. Describe how relative affluence and high consumption patterns relate to environmental degradation. Discuss and begin to implement personal choices they can make to reduce environmental impacts, as well as develop and implement an action plan to help alleviate poverty.

Time Required: 1 - 1.5 Hours

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 2: Life on a Dollar a Day (continued) Materials/Preparation o Handout: Local Market Items pg. 20, 1 sheet per student

TEACHER TIP

o Handout: Local Market Shillings pg. 22, 1 card per student (there are 6 cards per sheet)

Another option is to try telling

Make enough copies of the Local Market Shillings sheet so that there is 1 card for each student (Each sheet has three 50,000 shillings cards, two 200,000 shillings cards, and one 1,000,000 shillings card). To maintain balance make sure that half of your class receives the 50,000 shilling card.

the students they can buy whatever they want at the market, and later ask them to consider what would happen if they did not meet their

o (optional) Teacher Master: Local Market Impacts pg. 21, 1 copy as teacher reference

basic needs.

o Butcher Paper or Flip Chart Paper, 1 sheet per group o Markers, 2-3 per group

Activity: “Shop Till You Drop” Introduction: 1. Using a flip chart have the students brainstorm what kinds of things humans need (food, water, energy, clothing, health care, etc.). 2. Tell the students that today, as global citizens, they will have a chance to shop for these needs at the “Local Market”. The Local Market sells all of the resources that humans depend on to live during an average month as well as some “non-essential” items. Steps 1. Pass out the Local Market Items handout, which lists the items available. Tell students they can select items from the list to purchase with their Local Market Shillings, but that they must first meet their basic monthly needs by selecting items from the categories of food, water and fuel, and only then can they buy any of the other items. 2. Pass around a basket with the Local Market Shillings and instruct each student to take 1 card and not to show it to anyone. 3. Instruct students to write the items they purchase on the lines on their card (or on the back) along with the cost of each item (be sure they do this part of the activity individually). 4. While students are making their purchasing choices you should keep the pressure on to instill a sense of urgency. Ask “Who’s done shopping?” Say, “The market

is closing soon!” Students with 50,000 Local Market Shillings will likely finish much sooner. 5. W  hen students finish their shopping, have them break into 3 groups, putting students with the same shilling amounts (50,000; 200,000; and 1,000,000) together (there will be more students with 50,000 shillings; if necessary, subdivide groups so you have between 3 and 5 students per group). 6. I n their groups, have students share and compare what they chose to purchase, and why. Ask them to discuss anything they could not afford to purchase and how not having those items might affect their lives. 7. H  ave each group report to the class on the decisions they made and the impact that these decisions would have on their lives.

Assessment/Reflection Questions  ow did it feel to have more or less money and H options than other people in the class? How did it feel to see what you could and could not afford at the Local Market?  ow many of you could not afford education? H What would your lives be like if you could not go to school?  ow many of you have been very sick or gone to a H hospital or had friends and family who have? What would your life be like now if you had been unable to get medical care?

“Adapted from Facing the Future’s lesson “Shop Till You Drop” (www.facingthefuture.org).”

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 2: Life on a Dollar a Day (continued) Assessment/Reflection Questions (continued) What is the effect on people when a small group is consuming the majority of resources? What are the impacts caused by people with fewer Local Market Shillings, and what were the impacts caused by people with more Local Market Shillings? What are some specific examples of how to reduce the social or environmental harm of some choices? What are 3 things that every one of us could do in the next week to reduce our environmental impact? Do the class divisions represented here exist in our country? Which group do you think you are in?

You can choose to stop the lesson here and conclude with the reflection questions below, or continue with the following part of the activity.

4. Once the class discussion ends, read the following statement: Those of you who had 50,000 shillings represent the members of BeadforLife at the level they were before having the opportunity to earn an income. You also represent 1.4 billion other people—one out of every four people on the planet—who struggle every day to meet their basic needs. Those of you with 200,000 represent the middle class in Uganda. This is a small, but vibrant sector of the society, people with education who are working hard to improve their lives by starting businesses, working for government, or running non-profit agencies. The accomplishments of these people are often not covered by the media in the developed world, so we see mostly war, conflict and starvation. Those of you with 1,000,000 shillings represent the elite of Uganda. Those with inherited wealth or tribal status that sets them apart. Often these people obtain powerful positions in business or government because of their class. Most members of this class have few opportunities to come into contact with the poorest people of Uganda.

1. Give each group a large sheet of paper and some markers, and ask students to list 3-5 items that members of their group purchased. Have them create 2 columns titled “Social Impacts” (effects of the choices on people) and “Environmental Impacts”. For each item listed, have groups write all of the impacts they can think of, positive or negative, for each category. Give them the following example: “If your group chose ‘Firewood Gathering’, you might list such Social Impacts as women and children spending their time gathering wood rather than going to school, harvesting food, cooking or engaging in recreation activities. Environmental impacts might include deforestation, habitat destruction, and soil erosion. 2. Circulate among the groups and suggest the impacts they might not have considered. Use the handout Local Market Resource Impacts as a teacher reference. 3. Have each group present and discuss their findings with the class.

“Adapted from Facing the Future’s lesson “Shop Till You Drop” (www.facingthefuture.org).”

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Local Market Items

Food

Water

Tea for breakfast, and one meal a day of Beans and Posho (a thick cornmeal porridge like polenta). 20,000 Ugandan Shillings $8.40 US Dollars

Collecting untreated water from Lake Victoria and carrying it long distances by women and children. Free

Heat/Fuel

Education

Luxury Items

Three high-quality meals daily with variety of fruits, vegetables, rice, eggs, bread, potatoes. Meat 2-3 times/week. Occasionally eating out at a restaurant/fast food joint.

Three high quality meals daily, including meat, vegetables, fruit, dairy and imported foods. Regularly purchasing meals in restaurants and luxury items like chocolate and soda.

75,000 Ugandan Shillings $31.50 US Dollars

150,000 Ugandan Shillings $63 US Dollars

Treating lake water by boiling it over charcoal oven.

Using water purification tabs to treat well water.

25,000 Ugandan Shillings $10.50 US Dollars

50,000 Ugandan Shillings $21 US Dollars

Indoor plumbing with running water, showers and water purification equipment in kitchen.

Beans, vegetables, rice and Matoke (mashed plantain bananas), twice daily. Meat once a month. Occasional fruit and eggs. 35,000 Ugandan Shillings $14.70 US Dollars

150,000 Ugandan Shillings $63 US Dollars

Electricity installed for heating/ lighting. Natural Gas used for cooking.

Firewood cut from local forest, Small lumps of charcoal used for sometimes hours away. Mostly heat and cooking. collected by children. 20,000 Ugandan Shillings $8.40 US Dollars Free

Kerosene used for heating, lighting and cooking.

Public school through grade 12. Middle and high school require taking the bus an hour in each direction.

Private boarding school (elementary - high school).

University for a bachelor/ graduate degree.

100,000 Ugandan Shillings $42 US Dollars

400,000 Ugandan Shillings $168 US Dollars

Public hospital with good facilities and expertise available. Crowding may require lengthy wait for service.

High-Quality private hospital with specialists available.

Crowded public primary school to grade 6, an hours walk away. Schooling is free, but a school uniform, books and equipment are required in order to attend. 25,000 Ugandan Shillings $10.50 US Dollars

Health Care

Note: All figures are based on the average supplies needed per month for a family of five (as of 8/2011).

Traditional healer with no medical training or local clinic with only a nurse and 5 basic medicines. 10,000 Ugandan Shillings $4.20 US Dollars

50,000 Ugandan Shillings $21 US Dollars

Local clinic with a doctor and a good supply of basic medicines available. 20,000 Ugandan Shillings $8.40 US Dollars

80,000 Ugandan Shillings $33.60 US Dollars

50,000 Ugandan Shillings $21 US Dollars

150,000 Ugandan Shillings $63 US Dollars

200,000 Ugandan Shillings $84 US Dollars

Mattress to place on the floor.

Pay-as-you-go Cell Phone.

Satellite TV with 10 channels.

Safari Holiday for the family.

35,000 Ugandan Shillings $14.70 US Dollars

40,000 Ugandan Shillings $16.80 US Dollars

100,000 Ugandan Shillings $42 US Dollars

300,000 Ugandan Shillings $126 US Dollars

“Adapted from Facing the Future’s lesson “Shop Till You Drop” (www.facingthefuture.org).”

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Local Market Impacts

Food

Water

Heat/Fuel

Tea, Beans and Posho Environmental: Locally grown, no pesticides. Social: Lack of essential nutrients and vitamins leads to frequent illness, poor health, and malnutrition.

Health Care

Luxury Items

Social: Better range of nutrients and vitamins.

Water Treatments Untreated Water Environmental: Use of lake Environmental: Chemicals used to manufacture. Unsanitary degrades natural habitat. waters still used for clothes Social: Disease, possible washing, degrading natural death. Poverty (time spent habitat. away from school, work, etc.) Social: Less disease, convenient and available Firewood. Environmental: Deforestation, global -warming, desertification, open fire is dangerous. Social: Poverty (time away from work/school), smoke linked to health problems.

Education

Veggies, Rice, Matoke Environmental: Locally grown, but may have some pesticide use.

Charcoal. Environmental: air pollution, uses wood, deforestation, global warming, desertification, open fire is dangerous. Social: Smoke linked to health problems.

3 quality meals/day, regular meat Environmental: Meat production requires more water/feed use. Social: Very healthy diet.

Clean water, delivered Environmental: Delivery requires fuel, but bottles reuseable. Social: Convenient, readily available, safe.

Electricity/Oil. Environmental: Oil drilling, spills, pipeline/electric cabling impacts, pollution, global warming, loss of habitat.

Boarding School Environmental: Better able to protect the environment.

Public education. Environmental: Have some knowledge about protecting the environment.

Social: Illiteracy, few job skills, poverty.

Social: Allows access to some jobs, money, health care.

Social: Private education means higher chances of employment, access to health care and better quality of life.

Traditional Healer/ nurse. Environmental: High mortality linked to high birth rates, population growth.

Local Doctor. Environmental: Lower mortality linked to lower birth rates.

Public Hospital. Environmental: Low mortality linked to lower birth rates.

Mattress. Environmental: Energy, and resources to manufacture.

Cell Phone. Environmental: Energy and resources to manufacture.

Social: Slightly improved comfort, quality of life.

Importing uses fuel, global warming.

Social: Less illness, disease, but Social: Less disease, but may Social: Illness, death, poverty, only be able to treat a small range with higher financial cost. disease transmission. of ailments.

Indoor plumbing. Environmental: Energy use, metal and plastic for pipes. Social: Fast, easy safe, convenient.

Electricity, Natural Gas. Environmental: Oil drilling, spills, pipeline/electric cabling impacts, pollution, global warming, loss of habitat.

University Environmental: Knowledgeable about protecting the environment, consume more natural resources. Social: Good job opportunities and quality of life. Private Hospital. Environmental: May use many resources, medical equipment. Social: Wide range of treatments/ procedures available, good quality of life.

Satellite TV. Environmental: Energy and resources to manufacture and import, global warming, space pollution.

Safari Holiday. Environmental: Lengthy travel uses fuel, global warming, safari’s interrupt natural habitat and wildlife.

Social: Enjoyment, entertainment, access to information.

Social: Enjoyable, educational but expensive.

“Adapted from Facing the Future’s lesson “Shop Till You Drop” (www.facingthefuture.org).”

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Social: Convenient, but unhealthy. High fat related to multiple health problems.

Social: Convenient but creates Social: Convenient but creates dependency. Gas cooking more dependency. dangerous.

Elementary school only Environmental: Lack of education predicts family sizes/ population growth.

Social: Social networking, opens opportunities for employment, access to information.

High-quality food Environmental: Meat production, imports use more energy, chemicals, pollution.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Local Market Shillings

Equivalent to $21 US Dollars

Equivalent to $21 US Dollars

Item ___________________

Cost ___________________

Item ___________________

Cost ___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

Equivalent to $21 US Dollars

Equivalent to $84 US Dollars

Item ___________________

Cost ___________________

Item ___________________

Cost ___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

Equivalent to $420 US Dollars

Equivalent to $84 US Dollars

Item ___________________

Cost ___________________

Item ___________________

Cost ___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda Overview

TIME REQUIRED: 1 hour

In this simulation, students will experience what it is like to live in the Acholi Quarter, a slum in Kampala, the capital city of Uganda, Africa. Students will measure an area representing the approximate size of a home in the Acholi Quarter. They will also receive a list of items commonly found in the home of a Beader. Students will determine where they would put these items and where they would sleep. The class will discuss the meaning of a necessity and determine what possessions they could and couldn’t do without. Students will also discuss what practical items might improve the lives of the Members.

BeadforLife Related Reading:

Inquiry/Critical Thinking Questions

Beader Bios (pp.14-19)

Key Issues/Concepts Equity, poverty, and scarcity Housing, necessities

Subject Areas Social Studies Math

Vocabulary

What things do you have in your life that the Members don’t have?

Industrious

What items do we really need to survive?

Microfinance

How do our living situations differ from that of the Members?

Mortgage

What things do you think would most help the Members improve their lives?

Objectives Students will: Measure and mark an area on the floor or ground. Determine a practical way to arrange their belongings in the hut. Compare the contents of their own houses to that of a Beader. Discuss the meaning of a necessity and what items in their lives they could do without. Discuss what practical items might improve the lives of the Members.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

Materials/Preparation o Masking tape (if working indoors) o Chalk (if working outdoors on asphalt) o Yardsticks/tape measures

TEACHER TIP

o Profiles of Members pgs. 26-31 (handouts provided, 1 page per group or visit http://www.beadforlife.org/women.html for additional bios) o BeadforLife DVD (overview 12 minutes)

props. This will help students

o Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda: Items Found in Homes pg. 34

2. Watch the BeadforLife video (overview 12 minutes). 3. Have the class divide into groups (1’s together, 2’s together, etc.) and handout the Beader Bios (one Bio to each group). If it is a larger class, you can split the 1’s into 2 or more groups, and so on., and just give a bio to each group. Select 1 member from each group and ask them to read out loud the 1st paragraph up until TODAY. 4. The next activity for this lesson needs more space than a classroom provides, so bring your class to an all-purpose room/cafeteria or outside on the playground to an area with asphalt. Allow students to stay in their same small groups and spread out. 5. Give each group a yardstick/tape measure and tape (if indoors) or chalk (if outdoors) and ask them to measure and mark a 10 ft. x 10 ft. area.

7. Explain to students that this is the approximate size of a home in the Acholi Quarter, a slum in Kampala and that a typical family usually has at least 5 members. Discuss the size restraints and show students a photo of the “Before House”. (page 32) 8. Tell students the items commonly found in a Beader’s home. (see list on page 34) 9. Gather the students and lead a discussion. Distribute Items Found in Homes handout. Have students complete the handout. 10. Additional questions to guide you:  ow do our living situations differ from that of H the Members?  hat things do you think would most help the W Members improve their lives? What did the Beader you chose teach you? 11. Now show the students the photo of the “After (Friendship Village) House”. Close by asking a volunteer from each group to read their Beader’s Bio now starting with TODAY, so that students get an understanding of how being a member of BeadforLife has changed their lives. (Message of Hope is key here).

6. Ask students to lie down in this area making sure everyone fits.

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visualize what will fit in a small space.

Activity: “Life in the Slums of Kampala”

Steps 1. Have the class count off by 4’s (1-2-3-4), ask all the number 4’s to stand up. Explain that those students would all be living in Extreme Poverty today—remember 1 out of every 4 people on the planet live in extreme poverty on about $1 a day. Pause for a bit and allow students to process that internally. Then ask the students to sit down.

common household items, such as chairs, etc. to use as

o Photos of Before (Slums of Kampala) House and After (Friendship Village) House pgs. 32 & 33

Introduction Yesterday we talked about people living in extreme poverty. Today we’re going to meet some people living in extreme poverty and what that’s like in terms of their daily living and housing.

If possible, try to gather some

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

Writing and/or Video Connection (optional) Have students write a journal entry from the perspective of a Beader. They can choose one of the Members from the profiles read or they can go to the website and view other bios. Ask them to include information that reflects what they learned in the activity and discussion they took part in. You can also encourage students to meet more BeadforLife members by watching video clips from our website at http://www.beadforlife.org/women.html.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

Acan Grace I am the mother of five children, including my twins, Ochen John and Sheila. Several years ago, I had to flee from Northern Uganda when rebels threatened my village. I moved my family into a small 5x10 foot home near Kampala. Soon after leaving Northern Uganda, I had to place my oldest son, Innocent, in a children’s home because I was not able to feed my family. I am divorced now, but my ex-husband does pay the school fees for two of my children. I joined BeadforLife 30 months ago, when my twins were less than a year old.

Today After joining BeadforLife, Grace quickly became one of the best Members in the whole group, rolling exquisite small beads in beautiful colors. Grace is always among the top sellers, and her income has made many changes in her life. Her son, Innocent is back at home and is enrolled in school. She has built a new home that is slightly larger than the last. And, a new baby came into her life. When a police officer heard weak cries coming from a dumpster, he dug around and found an infant wrapped in a dirty blanket. Although Grace lives on a modest salary, she immediately agreed to take the baby in and named him Gift from God. She calls the baby Gift. Gift is now growing into a toddler and is quick to smile at everyone.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

Odor Dennis I grew up in a poor family, with ten siblings. We lived in Apache, the area with the highest rates of malaria in Uganda. Unfortunately, seven of my siblings have died, most likely from malaria. My

Today

father’s, name is “Bera Bora,” which means “the

“When you get something you have really wanted,

sky is high.” He used to work as a tailor, but he was

you work hard,” says Dennis. “Mechanics has been a

paralyzed in an accident.

dream of mine since I was a really young one, and I would watch my neighbor work on his car. I would hang in over the motor admiring what a fine thing it was.” Dennis is now 24 years old, and is a second year student in BeadforLife’s Vocational Training Program. He will graduate soon and will be ready to work in an auto garage or industrial plant as a mechanic. He looks forward to supporting his parents and three sisters.

When I met the people at BeadforLife, my mother and I were barely making a living for our family by running a small vegetable stand by the roadside.

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Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

Naiga Mary I contracted AIDS from my

Today

husband several years ago.

Since joining BeadforLife, Mary has proven herself

He died several years ago,

to be one of the most industrious Members. She

leaving me, at age 25 to care

rolls beautiful beads, and has even started a small

for our four young children.

business selling bead supplies to others. Mary also

Luckily a local man agreed

wrote a song about how women lift themselves out

to let us live in a 4x7 foot mud hovel attached to the

of poverty by rolling beads. Because of her stable

back of his house.

income, Mary started taking the AIDS drugs last fall and her health has improved dramatically.

I supported my family by begging neighbors to let me wash their laundry, in exchange for small

Mary has always dreamed of owning a home, which

donations. On most days, I earned enough for only a

she could pass onto her children. Anticipating

single meal. I often had to skip meals so I could feed

the opportunity to build her own house, Mary was motivated to save money

my children.

in a savings account which

When I joined BeadforLife

BeadforLife helped each

27 months ago, the doctors

member open in a local

had recommended I start

microfinance bank. After a

taking life-saving AIDS

year and a half, Mary saved

drugs, which I could get for

enough for a down payment

free. But I had heard that

of one million shillings (about

the drugs would increase my

$600 USD) towards her house,

appetite, so I decided not to

which would lower her future

take them because I worried

monthly mortgage payments

I would not be able to afford

substantially.

regular meals to feed a family

Recently, Mary and her children

of five.

were finally able to move into their own home in Friendship Village.

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Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

Namutebi, Josephine I am sixty years old and I have been caring for my grandchildren for several years now. For this reason, the people in my village call me “Jajja” (grandmother). I have had a difficult life...Of my eight children, six died as adults from AIDS. I am now the primary caregiver for four of my grandchildren, three of whom contracted HIV from their parents. I am married, but my husband had cancer and his leg was

Today

amputated, so he cannot do much work.

Jajja Josephine supports her whole family by rolling beads. Although she is the oldest Beader

When I joined

in the Nsambia group, she is the life of the party.

BeadforLife 27

Whenever there is singing, she is out there dancing,

months ago, I supported myself

smiling, and sharing her love with all of us.

and six other people

Jajja no longer tills fields. Instead she gathers with

by working as a day laborer tilling people’s fields for planting.

her neighbors and daughter-in-law to roll colorful beads. She feeds her family three meals a day and sends all of her grandchildren to school. For a long time, Jajja dreamed of moving out of

My first beads weren’t very good, so the BeadforLife staff worked hard to help me improve them. Finally, they realized my eyesight was poor, so they found me some reading glasses. Now I can make much better quality beads!

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Kampala and building a house in the BeadforLife village, but she struggled to save money because she was supporting so many people. After a few years of hard work, Josephine was able to save enough money to achieve her dream.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

Akulu Grace Before rebels attacked my village of Alangi, my

Today

husband and I supported my family by baking

My family and I have

pastries, farming vegetables, and collecting shea

been reunited with

nuts to sell in the local market.

my lost son and he

When rebel activity threatened the security of my community in Alangi, my husband sent me and my children to live in Omoro. But my family was attacked en route, and in the confusion of flight, my twelve year old son was abducted. We sought protection and refuge at the Lira Cultural Center camp. We lived there for five years mourning the loss of my son and lived on very limited resources. We slept under trees for shelter and when we were finally able to return to our home, we took two orphaned children whose parents had died from HIV/Aids.

is now a productive member of our family and village. I am so happy to have my son back and my family complete again. Since I have worked as a shea nut gatherer for BeadForLife I have been able to pay for my children’s school fees and uniforms and afford household items such as food, soap, etc. I am very proud to say that my son is now a freshman in high school.

One evening my husband heard boys’ names being announced on the radio. They were rescued abductees looking for their families and my son was among them. He had run away and escaped from the rebels one day when sent on an excursion to find food. He sought amnesty and protection from government army barracks in Gulu and was placed in a rehabilitation program for three months.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

Amollo Saltina I am originally from the town of Oruda, in Gulu.

Today

I never attended school and instead got married

I now have a home

at the age of fifteen. I gave birth to nine children

near the center of

but six died from malaria. During the rebel years,

Orum where I live

my family was regularly robbed and we would

with my children

have to flee or face getting beaten. Since many

and husband. It has

people were displaced during this time, there were

been difficult to be so

many homeless orphans so I took one into my

unsettled and move so

home. At one point the raiding by rebels became

much, but I am very

so frequent that my family and I moved into the

optimistic about my

shelter of an Internally Displaced Peoples camp.

future because I now have a job with which to

We lived there for five years before we were able

support my family. With the income I make from

to resettle in Orum.

gathering and selling shea nuts to BeadforLife I am able to pay for my children’s school fees and uniforms. I hope that this will provide them with opportunities in life that I was never given.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

BEFORE Most Members used to live in mud and stick homes in the Acholi Quarter.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

AFTER: Friendship Village

A Beader tends the garden in her home in Friendship Village.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda (continued)

Life in the Slums of Kampala: Items found in homes. Items found in a Beader’s Home: Straw mats

What do you have in your home that the Members don’t have:

What items do you really need to survive?

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

A small amount of lentils, rice, salt

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

Jerry cans (Water jugs)

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

_ __________________________

2-3 cooking pots Partial bag of charcoal Broken furniture

1-2 pairs of shoes Small pile of clothes Fabric or dirty sheets

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 4: BeadforLife: A Model for Success Overview

Inquiry/Critical Thinking Questions

There are many organizations worldwide working with issues of extreme poverty. In Lesson 4, students will learn about the BeadforLife model for empowering people (especially women) to lift themselves out of extreme poverty. They will examine the philosophy behind this model, and evaluate its effectiveness. Students will gain an appreciation for the work of the BeadforLife Members.

Discuss the BeadforLife model (give BeadforLife 18 Month Program handout) and briefly explain how BeadforLife provides training and education to their members, so after 18 months, Members are able to stop rolling beads and graduate from our program with the skills and funds to start their own business(es). Using the “Give a man a fish...” handout briefly discuss the following questions:

Students will ‘sell’ their beads to the teacher (the Bank) to earn Goldfish (to use as currency, to feed their family, etc). Half the class will work using the BeadforLife sustainable model and Fair Trade prices, and half the class will not. They will learn how the BeadforLife model promotes sustainability in communities and why Fair Trade is important.

 hat is sustainability? What does it mean? Use the W Chinese proverb: “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” What does this mean to you? Why do you think sustainability is important?  hat is Fair Trade? Is it important? W Why or why not?

Why Work with Women? While some of our programs in Uganda do involve men and children, research shows that when women and girls earn income, they will reinvest 90% of it into their families, compared to just 30-40% for men. We believe by investing in women, the benefits will spread to their families, empowering younger generations to lift themselves out of poverty.*

Key Issues/Concepts Income generation as a key to ending poverty Sustainable solutions to alleviate extreme poverty Importance of Fair Trade

Subject Areas S ocial Studies (geography, economics, global studies, contemporary world problems) Science (environmental)

Vocabulary

Objectives Students will: Be able to articulate the BeadforLife model and why it’s successful. Understand key components of successful programs, using BeadforLife as a model.

Eradication Entrepreneurial Fair Trade Self-Sufficient

Understand why sustainability is important to communities, why the idea of “give a man a fish vs. teach a man to fish” is the most effective means of support. (see attached handout)

 GO (non-governN mental organization) Empowerment Collaboration

Sustainability

Understand why Fair Trade is critical to communities around the world.

Source: The Girl Effect Fact Sheet http://www.girleffect.org/uploads/documents/1/Girl_Effect_Fact_Sheet.pdf

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 4: BeadforLife: A Model for Success (continued) Materials

o Handout: How to Roll a Bead pg. 43 or use your own magazines o Glue sticks and pencils o Goldfish crackers (or some form of currency such as Swedish fish, pennies, m&ms)

o Handout: Give a Man a Fish proverb and definitions of sustainability and Fair Trade pg. 37 o Handout: BeadforLife Community Development pg. 39 o Handout: BeadforLife 18 month Program pg. 40 o Handout: Life Skill Cards pg. 41 & 42 (copy double-sided) o ‘How to Roll a Bead’ segment on the BeadforLife DVD

Activity: Living the BeadforLife Model Start with Inquiry/Critical Thinking quotations pg. 35. Set the scene: You are in Uganda, Africa, all living in extreme poverty. You are living on approximately $1 a day. Students will be put into groups of 4 or 5. Groups will “work” for an NGO (Non-Profit organization that operates independently from any government) by making beads. Half the groups will use the BeadforLife Fair Trade model (Model A); the others will not (Model B). (Don’t tell your students which group is which). The teacher is the Bank, who holds the currency/Goldfish. If time permits have each group give themselves a name. If desired, play African music in the background for effect. (http://www.beadforlife.org/curriculum-download.html). Watch the How to Roll a Bead video or use the How to Roll a Bead handout to explain the process. Have the groups start making beads. Suggest to the students to set up a system, i.e., have one student cut, two students roll, one student glues beads, etc. When they’ve made a certain amount (ex. 10 beads), have the students bring the beads to the Teacher /Bank to exchange for Goldfish. Teacher can also write the number of beads each group makes on the board (optional).

Exchange rate: Model A: 1 bead = 7 Goldfish. Every few minutes during the class, tell the Model A Groups “Congrats! You are now a few months into your program, you’ve earned a Life Skill Card.” Make sure that students get all 6 Life Skill Cards before the discussion section.

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Model B: 5 beads = 2 Goldfish. No Life Skill Cards given. For Model B, the exchange rate is completely at teacher’s discretion. Have fun playing around with it. Teacher can give reasons for the exchange, eg. “Inflation is up, I can only give you 2 Goldfish for this.” Or “Those aren’t very good quality beads; I’ll only give you 3 Goldfish for those.” etc. Explain to them that you are the Bank, and you get to set the rules about how much they will be paid, and you are the only person who hands out Goldfish. Have the class continue to roll beads, have one person from each group periodically come up to exchange beads for Goldfish. Approximately every 2 minutes, give new Life Skill Cards to Model A groups. Approx. 15-20 minutes before class is over, tell the students: “ There is a civil war brewing in the country (or economic reasons), and many of the NGO’s have to leave. You need to stop making beads; I will no longer accept beads for Goldfish.” Have the students in Model A “cash out” the Life Skill Cards. Give the group 60 (10 for each Life Skill card) additional Goldfish. “Congratulations you now have a Savings Account and Business Fund and have also gained additional skills to support yourself after graduation.” “ Now, how are you going to support your family? I want you, as a group, to think of 2-3 ways you are going to support your family now. Think of other options besides rolling beads now that there is no longer an international market for them. If you have Life Skill Cards, turn them over and discuss how you can use the skills you’ve gained to earn money to support your family. Think of starting your own business, what sort of business would you create?

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 4: BeadforLife: A Model for Success (continued) Assessment/Reflection Questions Class comes together to discuss Fair Trade and the BeadforLife model. What sort of ideas did you come up with when you had Life Skill Cards? What sort of ideas came up for those who didn’t have Life Skill Cards? How are those ideas different? Life Skill Cards are the sustainable aspect of BeadforLife. Why is it important to give training and education to workers and not just a handout? (Use the “Give a man a fish” analogy again).

 hy is Fair Trade important? How did it feel to be W able to exchange beads for so few Goldfish? How did it feel to get a fair deal?  ow based on what you have learned here, if you N were to volunteer, donate or work for a non-profit organization what information would you want to know before committing your time or money?

Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime. – Chinese Proverb

What is Sustainability? Sustainable solutions are those that deal not only with present challenges, but that also take into account the wellbeing of future generations. Creating businesses and jobs through entrepreneurial development is a more sustainable approach to poverty eradication than providing aid. Rather than becoming dependent on handouts from abroad, members build their skills and long-term capacities through meaningful creative work.

What is Fair Trade? Fair Trade is a system of exchange that honors producers, communities, consumers, and the environment. It is a model for the global economy rooted in people-to-people connections, justice, and sustainability. Fair Trade Organizations seek to create sustainable and positive change in developing and developed countries.

Fair Trade Principals: Create Opportunities for Economically and Socially Marginalized Producers Develop Transparent and Accountable Relationships Build Capacity Promote Fair Trade Pay Promptly and Fairly Support Safe and Empowering Working Conditions Ensure the Rights of Children Cultivate Environmental Stewardship Respect Cultural Identity

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 4: BeadforLife: A Model for Success (continued) BeadforLife Mission Statement BeadforLife creates sustainable opportunities for women to lift their families out of extreme poverty by connecting people worldwide in a circle of exchange that enriches everyone.

BeadforLife Philosophy 1. Creating jobs through local partnerships is a more sustainable approach to poverty eradication than providing aid. Rather than become dependent on handouts from abroad, the Members build their skills and long-term capacities through meaningful creative work. 2. Concerned citizens in resource abundant countries care about the issues of extreme poverty and are willing to get involved. 3. Paying our Members fair trade prices* allows them to meet their daily economic needs. Investing 100% of our net profits in community development projects fighting extreme poverty allows for a long-term sustainable future. 4. Partnerships formed between world citizens and Ugandan Members enrich all of us.

*Fair Trade Prices are determined by the Fair Trade Federation, and are based on many factors, with an emphasis on the cost of living in each country. As a certified Fair Trade Organization, BeadforLife strives to create sustainable and equitable development in the communities where we work.

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Join the BeadCircle and help us to eradicate poverty! You can make a difference!


BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 4: BeadforLife: A Model for Success (continued) BeadforLife Community Development BeadforLife is a unique nonprofit organization in that nearly all of our operating budget is derived from the sale of products made by our members, meaning our operations are sustainable and our fundraising costs extremely low. We devote the majority of our resources to holistic program development in Uganda to allow women to leave extreme poverty behind by providing both direct income and community development initiatives such as entrepreneurial training. We also know that we cannot make the impacts on extreme poverty that we aim to alone, so we have an active Grants Committee that researches and finds other on-the-ground organizations that we can support through our own Grant-

giving program. We do solicit a few grants each year for specific new projects, but we’ve minimized the amount that we spend to raise these valuable additional funds. We also believe in the importance of an international effort to end extreme poverty, and invest in the education and engagement of people around the world to help them become powerful advocates to eradicate extreme poverty. Our general and administrative expenditures represent the funds spent to manage our programs and operations in all of our BeadforLife offices. We are very grateful for the thousands of volunteers who contribute so much of their time and effort to our programs and operations.

For all of the money received this past fiscal year from Donations and the sales of Bead and Shea Products, this is how those funds were spent or will be spent:

60% is disbursed in Uganda as indicated below:

• Fund Current Uganda Community Development Projects Paid to Members including Entrepreneurial Training, Health Projects, Agricultural Support, etc. (including Uganda program staff and other product costs) • Paid to members • Award Grants to other organizations in impoverished countries to fight extreme poverty in these key program areas • Designated by the Board of Directors to be distributed as Grants to other organizations

fighting extreme poverty or to be reinvested in future Community Development projects (usually within a year or 18 months of being earned)

19% is disbursed Worldwide as indicated below:

• Program expenditures to educate & engage people about extreme poverty, including development of a curriculum (including Worldwide program staff and related costs) • Program expenditures to create markets for the products produced by our BeadforLife members (including Worldwide program staff and related costs)

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• Award Grants to other organizations in the US to fight extreme poverty and educate people about extreme poverty

9% is disbursed in Uganda

and worldwide for nonprogram specific general and administrative expenses to manage our global operations

12% represents funds available

to sustain ongoing programs and non-program specific operations in Uganda and worldwide


BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 4: BeadforLife: A Model for Success (continued) Income Generation a house which we encourage. Members launch their small businesses after receiving the money in their business fund. Many of our members have as many as three small businesses providing a steady income stream. Popular businesses include restaurants, dry goods stores, livestock, poultry and egg production, beauty salons, refreshment stands, selling vegetables wholesale, and paper goods production. A few spectacular businesses are a lumber company started by four of our members, a night club, and a brick factory!

An 18-Month Program BeadforLife is a poverty eradication project with the fundamental goal to have its members become independent and self-sustaining. Our membership program lasts for 18 months. During this time members participate in our comprehensive program designed to prepare them with both the skills and resources needed to achieve selfsufficiency. Members are selected because they are living on less than a dollar a day and have an entrepreneurial spark. They are trained to roll beads and make jewelry and begin to earn a steady income. In the first month they open savings accounts. Money also goes into a business fund. They receive health care education, family planning, and mosquito nets. Members attend two entrepreneurial training courses and begin a business plan. They may also save money to build

By the time members graduate from BeadforLife they have started a small business and/or received vocational training and are ready to be on their own. New members are enrolled twice a year. Graduation is a poignant celebration, happy and sad as we say goodbye to women who have worked their way out of poverty.

The BeadforLife Membership Program: Our Unique Model 3 months prior to enrollment: recruitment of women living on $1 a day. Selection process including entrepreneurial and bead rolling training. Baseline data collecting.

Month 1-5: Entrepreneurial and numeracy training. Begin business fund savings. Month 1: Open savings accounts.

Month 15-18: Beaders stop rolling beads, focus on their business. Advice and support given to assure a sustainable business has been launched.

Month 1-3: Entrepreneurial training.

Month 1-15: Income generation sales twice a month provide Beaders with an opportunity to earn a regular and significant income. Health classes and services are offered.

Month 18: Graduation Month 24: Postmembership data collection and evaluation. Alumni support.

Month 7-15: Business funds are available by application. Beaders receive individual advice and support, on-going business training and launch their own business.

3 Months prior to enrollment Month 1

2

3

4

5

7

8

9

Month 6

10

11

13

14

15

Month 12

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16

17

19

Month 18

20

21

22

23

Month 24


BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Life Skill Cards 1

2

Life Skill Cards

Life Skill Cards

Start a Savings Account

Basic Skills Training

3

4

Life Skill Cards

Life Skill Cards

Advanced Skills Training

Mentoring & Financial Business Action Plan

5

6

Life Skill Cards

Life Skill Cards

Launch Your Business

Graduation from program!

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Life Skill Cards 2

Life Skill Cards

1

Basic Skills Training

Start a Savings Account

Skills Earned:

Skills Earned:

 ath and numeracy training M Literacy (learn to read and write) Build savings for future business Possible business ideas: Farming/ animal husbandry Trading (clothes, produce, etc) Food (restaurants, snacks, bar) Services (salon, rental houses, etc)

4

Life Skill Cards

Pay school fees Pay for housing Pay for health care Start a savings fund for future business

Life Skill Cards

3

Mentoring & Financial Business Action Plan

Life Skill Cards

Advanced Skills Training Skills Earned:

Skills Earned:

Business training

Entrepreneurial training

Customer relations

Brainstorm ideas for business

Marketing, advertising

Submit a business plan

Pricing

Financial planning advice

Keeping records of income/ expenses

Alumni support

Market research

6

Life Skill Cards

5

Graduation from program!

Life Skill Cards

Launch Your Business

Skills Earned:

Skills Earned:

 ork on business full time W Continued support from alumni Vocational training for steady employment Sustained income, own savings, ability to pay for: School fees Health care Housing

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 arn additional business grant from E BeadforLife Identify successes and setbacks in business, work on improvement Business ideas: Farming/ animal husbandry Trading (clothes, produce, etc) Food (restaurants, snacks, bar) Services (salon, rental houses, etc)

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The Art of Rolling a Bead Each bead in BeadforLife jewelry is individually cut and rolled resulting in totally unique pieces. Taking a recycled poster or magazine page and turning it into a beautiful, glossy piece of jewelry is a process that takes time, hard work, attention to detail and a great deal of skill. We followed Grace, one of our most experienced Beaders through the steps. 1. First, Grace chooses her paper, scrutinizing each page for colors and patterns that will make beautiful beads. She thinks about what shape and size bead she would like to make, then traces and cuts the pattern to create either short and round beads, or slim and long ones. She then cuts the paper into long thin triangles.

3. As she gets towards the pointed end of the paper, she is careful to keep it tightly rolled and symmetrical. When she finishes a bead, she puts a small dab of glue at the end to hold the bead together. 3.

1.

2. Grace begins rolling each piece, starting with the thick end of a triangle and rolling towards the point. She deftly rolls it tightly in her fingers. She is very attentive to the symmetry of the rolling so that each bead is perfectly curved. 2.

4. Finally Grace has finished one bead. Once she has several hundred beads, she applies a sealant to make them shiny and water resistant. Grace then strings the paper beads with small glass beads to make a necklace, bracelet, or pair of earrings. Although each bead takes only 30 seconds to roll, the whole process of making each item may take 2 weeks from start to finish. 4.

Although Grace makes creating attractive, quality beads look easy, it is harder than you think. Each piece of jewelry that BeadforLife presents is completed with care and love and is a small piece of art. The women have a great deal of practice and experience rolling beads, but they always love to see others try! On their behalf, we invite you to give bead rolling a shot. On the back of this sheet are templates for you to cut and roll to try your hand at bead making.

www.BeadforLife.org


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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 5: Take Action Overview

Key Issues/Concepts

Students will plan and execute actions that have an immediate effect on extreme poverty. This experiential learning will increase students’ senses of urgency and efficacy when it comes to eradicating extreme poverty in the world.

Social Justice Personal Efficacy

Subject Areas S ocial Studies (geography, economics, global studies, contemporary world problems) Science (environmental, life) Math Health/Nutrition

Vocabulary Review activity 4 vocabulary

Inquiry/Critical Thinking Questions 1. What was the most striking thing you learned about extreme poverty this past week? Why did that have such a strong impact on you? 2. What are two or three things that you could do to have a positive impact on those living in extreme poverty?

Objectives Students will: Take concrete actions to help in the fight to end global poverty. Know that there are things that they can do personally to help end poverty around the world and in their own communities; and will feel a personal commitment and sense of pride in working towards this goal. Consider how they can continue to work towards this goal in the months/years to come.

Time Required: Varied The time is dependent upon the chosen activity and how students go about planning and implementing the selected activity.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 5: Take Action

(continued)

Materials

Preparation

o Paper/Pencils for journal activity o Whiteboard/Chalkboard for class brainstorming o Take Action handout (one copy per student) pg. 49 o Step by Step Guide to Hosting a BeadParty (if teacher/ students decide to have a BeadParty) pg. 53 The teacher should also make enough copies of the Take Action handout for each student to have one.

The teacher should consider how involved he/she is willing to be in this Take Action plan, as many of the recommended events would require extra planning on his/ her part. Before class, the teacher should choose from the following two lesson plans included in this section: Class BeadParty (recommended) Chosen activity from Take Action handout

Option #1: Host a Fundraising with Curriculum BeadParty: Raise Money for Uganda AND Your School or Community Steps: 1. Distribute, or have students pull out journal materials. Have students respond to the following journal prompts. (3 min.) A. What was the most striking thing you learned about extreme poverty this past week? Why did that have such a strong impact on you? B. What are two to three things that you could do to have a positive impact on those living in extreme poverty? 2. Begin class discussion by asking for volunteers to share some of their answers to each question. (Be sure to complete a discussion on question #1 before beginning discussion of question #2, as this will lead directly into class plans.) (5 min.) 3. After students share their ideas on how to take action, distribute a Take Action handout (pp. 47-49) to each student and have them look over the handout for a minute or two. (2 min.) 4. At this point the teacher should lead with, “There are many different levels at which people work to eradicate poverty– from the local community level, such as a classroom, all the way up to a national or international level.” Ask students to: A Identify examples of local versus national/ international social projects from the Take Action handout. B. Explore the pros and cons of working at a local level versus a national or international level (number of people reached, effort to organize, etc.). Once the discussion of the above has taken place for a few minutes, the teacher can say, “With these ideas in mind, I think we should make a plan as a class to take action to help those living in poverty I would like for us to have a BeadParty here at school. We can raise money for the BeadforLife

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members and their families in Uganda, as well as for our school or another organization that we choose by selling BeadforLife jewelry. Based on our discussions today, think about which project, organization or cause would you like to support with our “Fundraising with Curriculum” dollars?” The teacher can then distribute the Step by Step Guide to Hosting a BeadParty to each student or simply use the handout as a discussion guide (20 minutes) 5. The teacher should then help students to begin to plan a BeadParty at school using the following guide: (30 min.) A. Who? Who will be involved in this plan? (Parents, friends, teachers, administrators, etc.) B. What? What exactly will we do to accomplish our plan? C. When? How much time will this event take? On what date should we hold our event? D. Which? Which organization or project would you like your “Fundraising with Curriculum” dollars to support? It can be for the school, a local organization, or an international organization. E. Where? Where will our event be located? (Class, school, etc.) F. Why? List three to five reasons to hold this event… Who will benefit? What will we learn? G. How? How will you advertise this event? Who will be responsible for this, and to whom will it be advertised? 6. Once you’ve completed the planning steps above, contact us at education@beadforlife.org to get all the details to register for your BeadParty. We’ll support you each step of the way and provide you with everything you need to host a successful event - hundreds of BeadforLife jewelry items, African recipes, a CD of African music, and much more! Make sure to register at least 3-4 weeks prior to your desired BeadParty date.

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 5: Take Action (activity #1 continued) Reflection: After your class accomplishes its Take Action plan, spend some time journaling/discussing how it impacted each student, your community, and the world. The following are a few journal/discussion prompts that you may use in this activity. Please feel free to share with us some of these reflections – we would love to celebrate your accomplishments with you. How did doing this activity make you feel? Do you think your event will affect the lives of the BeadforLife Members and their families? How? How do you think doing this activity together affected your class? What are some ways that you can share your experience and the BeadforLife story with your family, friends, community, etc.? Do you think you will do something like this again? Why?

Option #2: Choose an Activity from the Take Action Handout (p. 51) Steps: 1. Distribute, or have students pull out journal materials. Have students respond to the following journal prompts. (3 min.) A. What was the most striking thing you learned about extreme poverty this past week? Why did that have such a strong impact on you? B. What are two to three things that you could do to have a positive impact on those living in extreme poverty? 2. Begin class discussion by asking for volunteers to share some of their answers to each question. (Be sure to complete a discussion on question #1 before beginning discussion of question #2, as this will lead directly into class plans.) Answers to question #2 should be recorded on the white/chalkboard. (5 min.)

4. At this point the teacher should lead with, “There are many different levels at which people work to eradicate poverty– from the local community level, such as a classroom, all the way up to a national or international level.” Ask students to: A. Consider the benefits of joining an existing project versus creating a new project/organization to address a specific need. B. Explore the pros and cons of working at a local level versus a national or international level (number of people reached, effort to organize, etc.). Once the discussion of the above has taken place for a few minutes, the teacher can say, “With these ideas in mind, I think we should make a plan as a class to take action to help those living in poverty. Let’s look at the answers on the board, as well as those on this handout and see what we can come up with. Let’s start by choosing three Take Actions steps, and then we will vote on what we would like to do as a class. Does anyone have a recommendation?” Three of these student recommendations should then be recorded on the board. (5 min.) 5. The teacher should then lead a discussion on what would be required to execute each plan, and what the benefits of each plan would be. (10 min.) 6. The class should then vote, by raise of hands on a Take Action plan. (1 min.) 7. Once a plan is chosen, the class should answer the following questions (30 min.): A. Who? Who will be involved in this plan? (Parents, friends, teachers, administrators, a non-profit organization, etc.) B. What? What exactly will we do to accomplish our plan? (eg. Buy non-perishable food, bring it to class, and take a field trip to a food pantry to distribute it.) C. When? How much time will this event take? On what date should we hold our event? D. Where? Where will our event be located? (Class, school, home, homeless shelter, etc.)

3. After students share their ideas on how to Take Action, distribute a Take Action handout (pp. 47-49) to each student and have them look over the handout for a minute or two. (2 min.)

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Lesson 5: Take Action

(activity #2 continued)

E. Why? List three to five reasons to hold this event… Who will benefit? What will we learn? F. How? How will you advertise this event? Who will be responsible for this, and to whom will it be advertised? Reflection: After your class accomplishes its Take Action plan, spend some time journaling/discussing how it impacted each student, your community, and the world. The following are a few journal/discussion prompts that you may use in this activity. Please feel free to share with us some of these reflections – we would love to celebrate your accomplishments with you. How did doing this activity make you feel? Do you think your event will affect people living in extreme poverty? How?

We want to hear from you! Tell us how you’ve Taken Action: Facebook: Friend us then post your story and photos www.facebook.com/beadforlife VoiceThread: leave us a voice message or webcam video (Dean - link to follow) Email: Drop us note at education@beadforlife.org

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Take Action: How YOU Can Help Eradicate Poverty Locally and Globally Through the BeadforLife Curriculum you’ve learned about extreme poverty in Africa. It is important to also become aware of how poverty exists in your own community. Below are some ideas on ways you or your class can take action to eradicate poverty locally and globally.

Find Out the Facts: Poverty in Your Community

Take the time to find out the facts about poverty in your own community. Contact local organizations such as United Way, the chamber of commerce, the city or county Health and Human Services, or your local homeless shelter, food pantry and/or soup kitchens. Research poverty statistics in your own community; it may surprise you how many people live in poverty in your own backyard. Discuss what you find out about your own community and share your feelings and reactions with your class.

Volunteer in Your Community

 all your local homeless shelter and see how you C can volunteer. There are often many ways to do this. One option might be for your students to organize collecting items such as socks, blankets, toiletries or other necessities. Not sure where to start? Contact the Salvation Army at http://www.salvationarmyusa.org  ontact your local food bank or soup kitchen and ask C how students can volunteer. Arrange to collect or serve food, or clean up the kitchen and talk to recipients.  et your hands dirty with Habitat for Humanity G and help build a house for/with a family in need. www.habitat.org

Listen: Everyone has a Story

Interview someone at the homeless shelter or soup kitchen and listen carefully to learn how that person’s journey in life led them into poverty. Can you imagine what it might be like for you or your family if your parent had an illness or lost their job and you were homeless? Share their story with your class. How did this person’s story affect you? Did you have any preconceived notions about the homeless or the poor that have changed now since talking with this person?

Educate Others

You could create a poster to share with your school or family that could be hung in your school to teach others the lessons you learned about extreme poverty and poverty in your own community. Be sure to share the stories of the people you learned about and met in your own community.

Support Fair Trade

Buying fair trade items is a direct way to support poor artisans around the world who depend on the international market for their livelihood. You could plan a class trip to a local fair trade store, or collect money to purchase fair trade items for your classroom online. Check out the following websites for more information or to locate a store: http://www.fairtradefederation.org http://www.tenthousandvillages.com

Write Letters

Write letters to your Senators and Representatives expressing your concern about global poverty and suggesting ways that the United States or your country could make a difference. Visit the following websites to find contact information for your local congressional representatives in the United States: http://www.congress.org/congressorg/home  ere is a resource to find out what issues Congress is H currently addressing in regards to extreme poverty: http://one.org/us/issues You can also write letters of support and encouragement to the BeadforLife Members. Send your letters to BeadforLife; 2336 Canyon Blvd, Suite #202; Boulder, CO 80302.

Bake, Run or Dance for “Change”

Making change happen takes organization and creativity. Plan your bake sale, dance, fun run, or other activity and bring attention to poverty issues and support your school or project of choice. The more creative the better, admission to your dance could be a canned food item for your local food pantry. You could even sell BeadforLife beads and other items at the event and raise $ for the Members and for your school or organization of your choice. See Host a BeadParty for details. Here’s a good online guide to getting started with an event like this: http:// www.ehow.com/how_135566_organize-charity-walk.html

Host a Fundraising with Curriculum BeadParty: Raise $ for Uganda AND Your School or Community Hosting a BeadParty is fun, easy and a great way to raise awareness and money for Uganda AND for the school or organization of your choice. You will receive a box of BeadforLife beads and other items, along with African recipes, an African music CD and much more! To find out more about BeadParties check out: http://www.beadforlife.org/beadparty/ index.html To learn how to make your BeadParty a “Fundraising with Curriculum” party, and have a portion of your funds returned to you to donate to your school or organization of your choice, contact education@beadforlife.org.

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Take Action Planning Sheet What? What exactly will we do to accomplish our plan? (eg. Buy nonperishable food, bring it to class, take a field trip to a food pantry to distribute it.) Who? Who will be involved with this plan? (Parents, friends, teachers, administrators, a non-profit organization, etc.)

When? How much time will this event take? On what date should we hold our event?

Where? Where will our event be located? (Class, school, home, homeless shelter, etc.)

Why? List three to five reasons to hold this event. Who will benefit? What will we learn?

How? How will you advertise this event? Who will be responsible for this, and to whom will you advertise?

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1. Host a BeadParty to share our beads and stories with your friends. Go to the Host A BeadParty link at www.BeadforLife.org and we will send everything you need. 2. Give gifts that give twice – once to the recipient and once to women who are lifting their families from poverty. Shop at www.BeadforLifeStore.org. 3. Make a donation to BeadforLife to help support the Beaders and our Community Development Programs. Visit www.BeadforLife.org and click on How To Help. 4. Educate others about global poverty issues using BeadforLife’s interactive service learning curriculum in your classroom or organization. Students will use hands-on activities, simulations, and discussions to better understand global poverty and ways they can take concrete actions to help. www.beadforlife.org/5curriculum.html

1. Host a BeadParty to share our beads and stories with your friends. Go to the Host A BeadParty link at www.BeadforLife.org and we will send everything you need.

2. Give gifts that give twice – once to the recipient and once to women who are lifting their families from poverty. Shop at www.BeadforLifeStore.org.

3. Make a donation to BeadforLife to help support the Beaders and our Community Development Programs. Visit www.BeadforLife.org and click on How To Help.

4. Educate others about global poverty issues using BeadforLife’s interactive service learning curriculum in your classroom or organization. Students will use hands-on activities, simulations, and discussions to better understand global poverty and ways they can take concrete actions to help. www.beadforlife.org/5curriculum.html

2336 Canyon Blvd., Ste. 202, Boulder CO 80302 Phone (303) 554-5901

www.BeadforLife.org

2336 Canyon Blvd., Ste. 202, Boulder CO 80302 Phone (303) 554-5901

www.BeadforLife.org

BeadforLife

BeadforLife creates sustainable opportunities for women to lift their families out of extreme poverty by connecting people worldwide in a circle of exchange that enriches everyone.

BeadforLife creates sustainable opportunities for women to lift their families out of extreme poverty by connecting people worldwide in a circle of exchange that enriches everyone.

BeadforLife

Take Action with BeadforLife to Eradicate Extreme Poverty

Take Action with BeadforLife to Eradicate Extreme Poverty

www.BeadforLife.org

BeadforLife

2336 Canyon Blvd., Ste. 202, Boulder CO 80302 Phone (303) 554-5901

4. Educate others about global poverty issues using BeadforLife’s interactive service learning curriculum in your classroom or organization. Students will use hands-on activities, simulations, and discussions to better understand global poverty and ways they can take concrete actions to help. www.beadforlife.org/5curriculum.html

3. Make a donation to BeadforLife to help support the Beaders and our Community Development Programs. Visit www.BeadforLife.org and click on How To Help.

2. Give gifts that give twice – once to the recipient and once to women who are lifting their families from poverty. Shop at www.BeadforLifeStore.org.

1. Host a BeadParty to share our beads and stories with your friends. Go to the Host A BeadParty link at www.BeadforLife.org and we will send everything you need.

BeadforLife creates sustainable opportunities for women to lift their families out of extreme poverty by connecting people worldwide in a circle of exchange that enriches everyone.

Take Action with BeadforLife to Eradicate Extreme Poverty


2. Volunteer for organizations helping hardworking, but impoverished, people around the world. Search for opportunities at www.volunteermatch.org. 3. Support the UN’s Millennium Development Goals to fight extreme poverty. Creating awareness and advocating for funding are critical to reducing poverty worldwide. Visit www.un.org/millenniumgoals. 4. Educate women! Girls who go to school marry later and tend to have fewer and healthier children that are more likely to be educated — creating benefits for the entire national economy. Visit www.thegirleffect.org. 5. Give alternative gifts that not only provide sustainable livelihood to people worldwide, but allow the recipient to experience the joys of receiving and giving. Visit www.alternativegifts.org.

2. Volunteer for organizations helping hardworking, but impoverished, people around the world. Search for opportunities at www.volunteermatch.org.

3. Support the UN’s Millennium Development Goals to fight extreme poverty. Creating awareness and advocating for funding are critical to reducing poverty worldwide. Visit www.un.org/millenniumgoals.

4. Educate women! Girls who go to school marry later and tend to have fewer and healthier children that are more likely to be educated — creating benefits for the entire national economy. Visit www.thegirleffect.org.

5. Give alternative gifts that not only provide sustainable livelihood to people worldwide, but allow the recipient to experience the joys of receiving and giving. Visit www.alternativegifts.org.

www.BeadforLife.org

1. Buy Fair Trade Products that help producers earn sustainable wages and also help the environment. Visit www.fairtradefederation.org to learn more about the Fair Trade model and see where you can purchase Fair Trade Products.

1. Buy Fair Trade Products that help producers earn sustainable wages and also help the environment. Visit www.fairtradefederation.org to learn more about the Fair Trade model and see where you can purchase Fair Trade Products.

www.BeadforLife.org

EVERY person deserves the opportunity to live with pride and dignity. Join us in proven and effective ways to combat extreme poverty.

EVERY person deserves the opportunity to live with pride and dignity. Join us in proven and effective ways to combat extreme poverty.

You can make a difference!

Over 1 billion people live on less than a dollar a day – 1 out of every 4 people on the planet.

Over 1 billion people live on less than a dollar a day – 1 out of every 4 people on the planet.

You can make a difference!

More Ways to Help Eradicate Extreme Poverty

More Ways to Help Eradicate Extreme Poverty

www.BeadforLife.org

You can make a difference!

5. Give alternative gifts that not only provide sustainable livelihood to people worldwide, but allow the recipient to experience the joys of receiving and giving. Visit www.alternativegifts.org.

4. Educate women! Girls who go to school marry later and tend to have fewer and healthier children that are more likely to be educated — creating benefits for the entire national economy. Visit www.thegirleffect.org.

3. Support the UN’s Millennium Development Goals to fight extreme poverty. Creating awareness and advocating for funding are critical to reducing poverty worldwide. Visit www.un.org/millenniumgoals.

2. Volunteer for organizations helping hardworking, but impoverished, people around the world. Search for opportunities at www.volunteermatch.org.

1. Buy Fair Trade Products that help producers earn sustainable wages and also help the environment. Visit www.fairtradefederation.org to learn more about the Fair Trade model and see where you can purchase Fair Trade Products.

EVERY person deserves the opportunity to live with pride and dignity. Join us in proven and effective ways to combat extreme poverty.

Over 1 billion people live on less than a dollar a day – 1 out of every 4 people on the planet.

More Ways to Help Eradicate Extreme Poverty


BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

How to Host a Great BeadParty! Dear BeadParty Host: Thank you for hosting a BeadParty! You are part of a worldwide circle of people who are helping impoverished, resilient Ugandans work their way out of poverty. Within this package we have included everything you need to host a successful BeadParty. For more help with your BeadParty, please visit our Resource Page: http://www.beadforlife.org/beadparty-resources.html and check out ‘Tips for Hosting a Successful BeadParty.’ If you have further questions, please email us at beadparty@beadforlife.org. We hope you have a fun and meaningful experience!

Fundraising with Curriculum? Remember to email: education@beadforlife.org prior to registration.

S et up your computer and bring up the BeadforLife homepage so your guests can browse our website.  esignate a place to collect the money and have your D money box ready with change and a calculator.  ave the credit/debit card webpage open and ready for H the first transaction. We suggest asking a friend or two to staff the sales table.

Before your BeadParty: I nvite family, friends, coworkers and neighbors. Consider using one of the BeadParty Invitation options on our website, or create your own! Follow up with reminders a few days before the party.  ead the important information on the Inventory R Summary Sheet. Count the inventory in your BeadParty Package, make note of any discrepancies, and set Summary Sheet aside for use after the party. Decide which Sales Tracking Tools from our Resource Page will help you during your event.

S et up the BeadforLife DVD on your TV or computer and test it to be sure it works.  ut on the BeadforLife CD or other African music to P create the atmosphere.  ffer writing materials so guests can write letters to the O members.

 se CREDIT CARDS or CHECKS as payment. You U should have received the link for credit card payments, along with detailed instructions - it’s as easy as ordering something online.

Watch the updated BeadforLife DVD to learn more about the project.

The Day of your BeadParty:  ake a creative bead display! Display the jewelry at M different heights by draping small boxes or overturned bowls with cloth. Baskets or other objects from your house will add interest to the table. I f you notice the jewelry is not lying flat, gently massage the beads back into place by pulling lightly along the entire length of the necklace until the kink is worked out. During the shipping process our BeadforLife Necklaces may become slightly bent or stiff. Have a mirror (or two) handy.  rominently display printed materials, including P biographies of the members, the Guest List, Creation Story, Price List, etc. Include anything you may have downloaded from our website.

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How to Host a Great BeadParty! During the Party:

(continued)

After your BeadParty:

There are many ways to host a great BeadParty. Below are a few options!

 ank your guests. There is a sample letter on the Th Resource Page.

 elcome your guests and invite them to look at the W beads and the materials until everyone has arrived.

 ill out the Inventory Summary Sheet according F to the instructions. The ‘# of items sold’ will equal the ‘items shipped’ minus the ‘# of items to be returned’. Please mark any donations separately on the Summary Sheet.

Thank everyone for coming and share why you were inspired to host a BeadParty, play the BeadforLife DVD. I nitiate a short conversation about extreme poverty and the importance of ordinary citizens getting involved. You can ask guests to read the biographies of the members aloud, or roll a bead.  sk guests to sign up to receive our e-newsletter, A ‘The Bead’ to get information about hosting their own party. Be sure to add names/addresses of people who were not at your party, but would be interested in receiving this information. The more BeadParties hosted the greater the number of people we are able to reach in Uganda. I nvite people to write to the members. We also welcome photos, which we often share. Have fun trying on the beads and helping each other select the perfect piece of jewelry!

Payment:  our guests may pay with cash, checks made Y out to ‘BeadforLife’, or credit or debit card (Visa, MasterCard, American Express or Discover). We highly encourage guests to use the convenient option of credit/debit cards.  rack credit/debit card sales on a separate piece of T paper. (You will need this information later when you are reconciling your BeadParty return.)

 eposit the cash into your own account, and D send back one check for that amount payable to BeadforLife. Include all funds raised in the provided envelope labeled ‘Funds Raised’.  repare your package for return to BeadforLife. P Along with the unsold items (please remove any tags you’ve added to the jewelry), be sure to include the completed Inventory Summary Sheet, checks (in the ‘Funds Raised’ envelope) and all the informational material originally included in your box (we re-use our materials to reduce our environmental impact). Letters to the members are welcome and appreciated.  ut the pre-paid UPS return label included in P your folder on the package and take it to a UPS location. Find the nearest location at www.UPS. com. (The pre-paid label does not cover pick-up at your home.)  lease ship everything back to us no later than P the Return Date on your Inventory Summary Sheet. If you would like to keep the box longer, please email beadparty@beadforlife.org and put “Extension” in the subject line. (The longest we allow BeadParties to be kept out is 3 months.)  e will send you a confirmation email when we W receive and process your BeadParty return!

 ive each person an enclosed gift tag for every item G they purchase.  harge the prices indicated on the Price List. (You C do not need to collect sales tax.)  onations are gratefully accepted. If you or a guest D would like to make a separate, tax-deductible donation, please provide the following information for each donation so we may send a receipt: Name, Address, and Donation Amount. (Please Note: BeadforLife Jewelry purchases are not tax deductible.)

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Thank you for taking action and helping BeadforLife Eradicate Poverty One bead at a Time®!

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African Recipes African Yam and Peanut Stew, with Ginger and Pineapple

Sugar Peanuts In many countries in Western and Central Africa, any town large enough to have bars, cafes, and restaurants will also likely have vendors selling roasted nuts and sugared peanuts. Often the vendor is a girl or woman, balancing her wares in a tray on her head. The peanuts are sometimes sold in recycled liquor bottles that have been collected, cleaned, and packed with sugar peanuts.

A real gourmet treat that just delights the taste buds. Serves 8 and can also be prepared ahead of time. What You Need: 8 cups vegetable stock 1 large yellow onion, diced 6 Tbs. minced ginger

What You Need: 1 cup water 2 cups sugar 4 cups raw peanuts, shells removed; skins can be removed or left on as desired

2 Tbs. vegetable oil 2 tsp. salt 4 large garlic cloves, minced 1 red bell pepper, diced 4 medium yams, peeled and roughly chopped 3 ripe tomatoes, chopped 1 bunch cilantro, chopped

What You Do: 2. Combine water and sugar in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, and stir until sugar is dissolved, to make syrup.

Juice of 2 limes, more to taste 1-14 oz. can water packed pineapple, juice reserved 5 Tbs. creamy peanut butter Hot sauce, to taste What You Do: 1. Heat stock and keep warm while you assemble the soup. In a heavy-bottomed soup pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and a pinch of salt; sautĂŠ for a few minutes, stirring occasionally. Next, add garlic, ginger, and spices and sautĂŠ until soft and golden. Stir in red pepper, yams, and salt and continue cooking until they start to stick to the bottom of the pot. Add vegetable stock to cover, bring to a boil, and reduce to a simmer. Cover partially and simmer until the yams are tender.

3. Add peanuts. Continue to cook over medium heat, stirring regularly, until peanuts are evenly coated, and no syrup is left in pan. 4. Spread nuts out on baking sheets. Bake at 300 degrees F for about thirty minutes to one hour or until sugar is completely dried. Gently stir the peanuts a few times while baking. Remove from oven and place on paper towels, let cool, and store in airtight containers.

ENJOY!

2. Add pineapple with juice, tomatoes, peanut butter and remaining stock and simmer 30 minutes. Puree the soup until smooth, either directly in the pot with a hand blender, or in batches using a food processor. Return soup to the pot and simmer for a final 10 minutes. Season to taste with more salt, pineapple juice, and/or hot sauce. Just before serving, add chopped cilantro and fresh lime juice.

ENJOY!

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African Recipes

(continued)

Groundnut Bread

Kashata Na Nazi

(West Africa) Yield: 12 1 1/2- to 2-inch pieces

Ugandan Coconut Candy; to make Groundnut Kashatas substitute roasted unsalted peanuts for coconut or use half peanuts and half coconuts to make Groundnut and Coconut Kashatas

What you need: pkg of roll mix

What you need: 2 cups raw sugar

1 cup of peanut butter 2 Tbs of melted butter

2 cups coconut cream

4 Tbs chopped peanuts

1 tsp cinnamon ½ tsp salt

What you do: Prepare 1 package roll mix (follow package instructions).

What you do: 1. In a medium-sized skillet, melt sugar stirring constantly

Roll out on a floured board to 1/2-inch thickness. Spread 1 cup peanut butter uniformly over the surface.

2. Before sugar begins to caramelize, add coconut cream, cinnamon, and salt

Roll up tightly.

3. Beat for approx. 30 seconds

Holding index finger at one end of roll, swing the roll around to form a round loaf.

4. Pour into a 9x12 pan lined with wax paper

Lift the round loaf onto a greased cookie sheet pan with a spatula.

6. Cool and serve.

Allow to rise as directed on the package.

5. Cut into 1 ½ inch squares while still hot

ENJOY!

Brush 2 Tbs. melted butter over loaf. Sprinkle 4 Tbs. chopped peanuts over top, pressing them into loaf. Score across the top of loaf with a knife, with lines 1 inch apart for criss-cross effect. Bake as directed on package for a full loaf. Break or cut into 1 1/2- to 2-inch pieces when serving.

ENJOY!

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Additional Resources Books AIDS Orphans Rising: What You Should Know and What You Can Do To Help Them Succeed Author: Sister Mary Elizabeth Lloyd ISBN# 978-1932690477 Subject: children and AIDS crisis Beyond Humanitarianism: What You Need to Know About Africa and Why it Matters Author: Princeton N. Lyman and Patricia Dorff ISBN# 978-0876093719 Subject: issues and conflicts of Africa, politics, trade, terrorism, international relations Creating a World Without Poverty: Social Business and the Future of Capitalism Author: Muhammad Yunus ISBN# 978-1586486679 Subject: economics, social business, poverty East Africa: An Introductory History Author: Robert M. Maxon ISBN# 978-1933202464 Subject: in depth history Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide Authors: Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn ISBN#: 978-0307387097 Subject: stories of women in poverty around the world, and the opportunities that helped them out of poverty. How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas Author: David Borenstein ISBN#: 978-0195334760 Subject: Social entrepreneurs and how ideas can change the world Tips on Ugandan Culture. A Visitor’s Guide Author: Shirley Cathy Byakutaaga ISBN# 978-9970637034 Subject: social and cultural practices in Uganda

Uganda in Pictures (Visual Geography. Second Series) Author: Eric Braun ISBN# 978-0822523970 Subject: pictures and images of Uganda

Books for Youth Africa (Cultural Atlas for Young People) Author: Jocelyn Murray and Brian A. Stewart ISBN# 978-0816068265 Subject: history of Africa, slave trade, present-day Africa by region Africa (Facts at Your Fingertips) Author: Derek Hall ISBN# 978-1933834085 Subject: basic general book –children Africa (True Books) Author: Mel Friedman ISBN# 978-0531168639 Subject: general book about Africa –children African Nations and Leaders (History of Africa) Author: by Diagram Group ISBN# 978-0816050666 Subject: general history -youth Eyewitness: Africa (Eyewitness Books) Author: Yvonne Ayo ISBN# 978-0789460301 Subject: general, pictures and maps History of East Africa (History of Africa) Author: by Diagram Group ISBN# 978-0816050635 Subject: general history – youth Stories from Uganda Author: James Appe ISBN# 978-9966467270 Subject: ten stories of African Lore from Uganda

The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time Author: Jeffrey D. Sachs ISBN# 978-0143036586 Subject: one man’s plan to eradicate poverty by 2025

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Additional Resources

(continued)

Videos A Dollar a Day — The Strongest Link Subject: A documentary on poverty and what it means to live below the poverty line. Website: https://www.createspace.com/248149 5 Heroes of AIDS in Africa Subject: A documentary following five people who have dedicated their life to fighting AIDS in Africa. Website: http://www.aidsinafrica.net Invisible Children: Discover the Unseen Subject: A film that exposes the tragic realities of northern Uganda’s night commuters and child soldiers. Website: http://store.invisiblechildren.com/films/ invisible-children-rough-cut.html A Powerful Noise Subject: A POWERFUL NOISE takes you inside the lives of three women — a girls’ education crusader from Mali, an HIV-positive widow from Vietnam, and a peacemaking survivor of the war in Bosnia — who each overcome seemingly insurmountable odds to bring lasting solutions to their communities. Website: http://www.apowerfulnoise.org/ Uganda Rising Subject: A documentary highlighting the largely ignored twenty year war in Northern Uganda. Website: www.ugandarisingmovie.com War Dance Subject: A documentary that chronicles the efforts of a Ugandan refugee camp school in their quest to win the National Music Competition. Website: http://www.wardancethemovie.com/ Wonders of the African World (PBS) Subject: Join Henry Louis Gates, Jr. as he takes you on a journey to discover a wealth of African history and culture in Wonders of the African World. Website: http://www.pbs.org/wonders/

Bead for Life: http://www.beadforlife.org World Bank: http://wwwr.worldbank.org/poverty UN AIDS: http://www.unaids.org/en/countryresponses/countries/ uganda.asp UNICEF: http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/uganda_statistics.html Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org Facing the Future: http://www.facingthefuture.org The Girl Effect: http://www.thegirleffect.org Volunteer Match: http://www.volunteermatch.org Salvation Army: http://www.salvationarmyusa.org Habitat for Humanity: http://www.habitat.org United States Congress: http://www.congress.org/congressorg/home United States Congress issues: http://one.org/us/issues Organize a Charity Walk: http://www.ehow/how_135566_organize-charity-walk.html Alternative Gifts: http://www.alternativegifts.org UN Millennium Development Goals: http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals Fair Trade Federation: http://www.fairtradefederation.org ONE Foundation: http://one.org Half the Sky: http://www.halftheskymovement.org

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BeadforLife Curriculum Instructor Survey Online Version: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ BeadforLifeCurriculum

5. Did teaching the lessons take more or less time than indicated?

Thank you for using BeadforLife’s Curriculum! We appreciate your feedback.

o Much less time

o Allotted time indicated

1. Your Name:

o Much more time than indicated

_ ___________________________________________

Comments:

o A little less time o A little more time

_ ___________________________________________ 2. How many students did you reach using the BeadforLife Curriculum?

o 1-20

o 21-30

o 101-150

o 31-50

o 151-200

_ ___________________________________________

o 51-100 6. Which lesson(s) did you teach? Instructor “Please rate the following aspects of the lessons you taught:”

o 200+

Comments: _ ___________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________ 3. Overall how easy was the curriculum to use?

o Easy

o Somewhat challenging o Difficult

Please say more... _ ___________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________ 4. Did preparing for the lesson take more or less time than expected?

o Much less time

o A little more time

o A little less time o Much more time

Poor Fair

Average Good Excellent

Lesson 1: Extreme Poverty,

o

o

o

o

o

o

Lesson 2: Life on a Dollar a

o

o

o

o

o

o

Lesson 3: Meet the Members: Life in the Slums of Kampala

o

o

o

o

o

o

Lesson 4: BeadforLife: A Model for success

o

o

o

o

o

o

Lesson 5: Taking Action: How YOU can Help Eradicate Poverty

o

o

o

o

o

o

OneDay version

o

o

o

o

o

o

Comments:

Comments:

_ ___________________________________________

_ ___________________________________________

_ ___________________________________________

_ ___________________________________________

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N/A

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BeadforLife Curriculum Instructor Survey 7. What impact did the curriculum have on your students? Please rate below (1) being the greatest impact (opened their eyes, helped them truly understand global poverty and what they can do to make a difference; (5) being the least impact (no impact at all, don’t believe students gained a better understanding of poverty and are not likely to take any actions) Deeply Impacted What impact did the curriculum have on your students?

Strong Impact

Some Impact

A No Little N/A Impact Impact

9. We’d love to hear your students’ reactions and how the curriculum impacted (or didn’t impact) them. In your opinion, what would be the best way to gather their feedback and reactions? Check all that apply.

o Survey (electronic)

o

o

o

o

o

o Survey (hard copy from instructor)

o Voice Thread

o YouTube

Other (please specify):

o

_ ___________________________________________ 10. Is there any other feedback you’d like to provide? We so value your opinions and are always seeking new and innovative ways to continue to enhance our curriculum.

_ ___________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________

_ ___________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________

8. Did you and your students take any actions (Lesson 5) upon completion of the curriculum? o Yes

o Facebook

_ ___________________________________________

Please give us some examples?

(continued)

o NO

If so, what action(s) did you take? If no, why not?? _ ___________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________

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BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Critical thinking. Global perspective. Informed action.

www.facingthefuture.org About Facing the Future Facing the Future is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to engage students in learning by making academics relevant to their lives. We empower students to think critically, develop a global perspective, and participate in positive solutions for a sustainable future.

“Facing the Future has provided a strong, positive framework which helps students get a grasp of very complex issues. Students become engaged in the activities. Problems and solutions become tangible for them and they feel less overwhelmed and confused by the many serious questions facing all of us. It is the most successful, student-centered curriculum I have ever found to teach about global issues.” ~ Middle School Teacher

Curriculum Resources That Work for You and Engage Your Students Designed by teachers for teachers, Facing the Future curriculum resources are aligned with national standards, adaptable to diverse settings, easy to use, rigorous, and engaging. Many materials available FREE online.

Teacher Lesson Plan Books – Over 30 Lessons Available Free Online Proof-positive that not only can teaching students about global issues be fun and engaging, it can be life changing for your students. Each step-by-step lesson plan includes: standards alignment, materials needed, detailed instructions, timing, reflection questions, action project ideas, print and web resources for further information, and reproducible handouts.

Engaging Students Through Global Issues: Activity-Based Lessons & Action Projects

Real World Math: Engaging Students Through Global Issues Grades: 6-9 Subjects: Algebra, Geometry

Grades: 5-12 Subjects: Interdisciplinary

Through 15 lessons, students investigate real issues and solve problems similar to those they will encounter as active, engaged citizens. Topics and skills include:

A collection of 40 lessons designed to help students understand complex global issues and guide them toward sustainable solutions. Topics include:

• Systems thinking • Carrying capacity • Refugees, migration & asylum • Ecological footprint • Biodiversity & ecosystems • Media literacy

• Taxes & budget policy • Renewable resources • Women & development • Microcredit & poverty • Conflict & mediation • Worldview & culture

• Number patterns: Waste & recycling • Modeling integers: Population growth • Solving algebraic equations: Food choices

• S olving inequalities: Carbon emissions •A  rea & transformations: Wildlife habitats • S urface area & volume: Sustainable design

Teaching Global Sustainability In The Primary Grades: A K-4 Curriculum Guide

Making Connections: Engaging Students In Language, Literacy, & Global Issues

Grades: K-4 Subjects: Science, Social Studies

Grades: 6-12 Subjects: ELL, Language Arts

Encourage children to see global issues not as insurmountable problems, but as opportunities to create a better world. All lessons are linked to children’s literature and music. Topics include:

An innovative teacher’s guide and student textbook that empowers students to excel academically and contribute positively to their communities. Language learning is purposeful with skills directly applied to current, relevant topics. Topics and skills include:

• Mapping identity & culture • Connections between self, food, & environment

• Population: Making predictions • Community: Context clues • Environment: Cause & effect • Consumption: Sequencing

• Systems, problems, & fixes • Biodiversity in a forest-stream habitat

• Peace & conflict: Theme •Q  uality of life: Drawing conclusions

“Before I didn’t realize the problems in the world apart from those in North America, but now I realize the whole world is connected.”

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BeadforLife, 2336 Canyon Blvd, Suite 202 Boulder, CO 80302 303-554-5901 www.BeadforLife.org


BeadforLife: Curriculum for Youth

Critical thinking. Global perspective. Informed action.

www.facingthefuture.org Student Textbooks – Preview Chapters Available Free Online Our textbooks let students dig into the issues and see how they are personally connected to their communities. Each textbook provides substantive content knowledge, discussion of interconnections, and examples of sustainable solutions. It’s All Connected: A Global Issues And Sustainable Comprehensive Guide To Global Solutions: Population, Poverty, Issues & Sustainable Solutions Consumption, Conflict, & Environment Grades: 9-12 & Undergraduate Grades 6-8 Subjects: Interdisciplinary

Subjects: Interdisciplinary

The ultimate resource for a global issues course or as a supplemental text for other subjects across the curriculum. Chapters cover the following topics: • Population & carrying capacity • Human needs & rights • Food, water, & energy • Health &education

• Economic development • Peace & conflict • Governance • Sustainable solutions

This is a textbook that not only informs, but inspires and motivates students to explore the issues facing us all. Chapters cover the following topics: • Population through history • Carrying capacity • Food & water • Quality of life

• Economic inequity • Environment & sustainability • Sustainability in the USA • Sustainable solutions

Curriculum Units – Select Units Available Free Online

If you have only 1-2 weeks, these engaging units are aligned with national standards and include everything you need from start to finish: fully planned hands-on lessons, student readings, assessment rubrics, and action project ideas.

Climate Change: Connections & Solutions

Understanding Sustainability: (For Science Or Social Studies)

Grades 6-8 & 9-12 Subjects: Science, Social Studies

Grades 6-8 & 9-12 Subjects: Science, Social Studies

Teach about climate change using a systems framework, examining the interconnections among issues. Students think critically and collaborate in creating solutions. Topics include: • Greenhouse gases • Carbon dioxide trends • Energy source evaluation • Carbon footprint calculation

• Impacts around the world • National energy policies • Cap & trade vs. taxation • Consumption choices

In science (6-8), students audit major school systems and do a week-long project to examine their ecological footprints. In social studies (9-12), they make connections between history, economics, democracy, and sustainability. Topics include: • Tragedy of the commons • Open & closed systems • Ecological footprint • Resource use

Engaging Students In Conservation: Protecting The Endangered Snow Leopard

Buy, Use, Toss: A Closer Look At The Things We Buy Grades: 9-12 Subjects: Science, Social Studies

Grades: 4-8 Subjects: Interdisciplinary Explore the balancing act between the needs of humans and wildlife using the real world example of snow leopards in Asia. Topics include:

• Animals & their ecosystems • Human-wildlife conflicts

• Community-based conservation • Service learning

• Civilizations & sustainability • Equity & consumption • Community mapping • Media awareness

Explore the unseen side of everyday things. Students analyze these systems to find ways consumption can benefit people, economies, and environments. Topics include: • Carbon & ecological footprints • Resource extraction • Sustainable design • Systems analysis

• Social responsibility • Waste disposal • Media literacy • Quality of life

Professional Development – Workshops and Consulting Services Facing the Future staff and Peer Educators lead workshops at education conferences throughout the U.S. and provide customized workshops, in-service trainings, and consulting on a fee-for-service basis. Learn more about our Professional Development offerings and how Facing the Future can help you at our website: www.facingthefuture.org

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BeadforLife, 2336 Canyon Blvd, Suite 202 Boulder, CO 80302 303-554-5901 www.BeadforLife.org


2336 Canyon Blvd., Suite 202 Boulder CO 80302 Phone: 303-554-5901

www.BeadforLife.org

Printed on 100% recycled paper


BeadforLife Global Poverty Curriculum for Youth