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CLEVELAND STATE CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY

MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

ALUMNI BUILD INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ON CSU FOUNDATION P.11

FALL 2012 ISSUE

ARTS CAMPUS OPENS P.14 URBAN PRIMARY CARE INITIATIVE P. 26 RADIANCE SCHOLARSHIP P. 30 COLE: NBA CHAMPION P. 34

ATTENDING CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY IS A VALUED TRADITION FOR THE SINGH FAMILY


ďƒ’

ON THE COVER (L-R): Prabhjot Singh, Jagmit Singh, Taranjit Singh, Jagdip Singh, President Ronald M. Berkman, Monte Ahuja, Kabir Singh, and Preet Singh.


CONTENTS P3

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

P4

NEWS BRIEFS

THE SINGH FAMILY P11

P18

CONSTRUCTION ZONE

Alumni build international business

P 20

OUR COLLEGES CURTAIN RISES ON ARTS CAMPUS

P 27

RESEARCH

features

P30

ADVANCEMENT NEWS

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P

CSU partners with Cleveland Play House and PlayhouseSquare

depar tments

P32

ALUMNI NEWS

CSU + NEOMED P34

VIKING SPORTS

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P

Urban Primary Care Initiative is national model P35

CLASS NOTES

Stay connected with us www.twitter.com/engagecsu www.facebook.com/clevelandstateuniversity

www.linkedin.com/company/cleveland-state-university

E N G AG E C S U

A new web site for prospective undergraduate students and their parents, www.engagecsu.com makes it easy to apply for admission, schedule a visit, and request information about CSU. The redesigned site, also formatted

for tablets, allows visitors to explore campus and city life, find a major, learn about scholarships, take a five-minute video visit, engage in social media, and more. Check it out and let us know what you think by contacting Ben Sabol at b.sabol@csuohio.edu.

www.flickr.com/photos/csuohio/ www.youtube.com/CSUchannel

Read us on the web

www.pinterest.com/clevelandstate/

www.csuohio.edu/magazine

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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Cleveland State University Magazine Fall 2012 EDITOR/WRITER

Barbara Chudzik GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Patsy D. Kline PHOTOGRAPHY

Brian Hart Patsy D. Kline Tony Morrison William Rieter, ’88 Rob Wetzler PRESIDENT

Ronald M. Berkman ACTING PROVOST

George Walker VICE PRESIDENT OF UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CSU FOUNDATION

Berinthia R. LeVine ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING AND STUDENT RECRUITMENT

Rob A. Spademan DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS

Carolyn Champion-Sloan CONTACT US

216-687-2201 phone 216-687-9278 fax csuohio.edu/magazine 2121 Euclid Avenue KB 300 Cleveland, Ohio 44115-2214 POSTMASTER

Send address changes to CSU Division of University Advancement, 2121 Euclid Ave, KB 300, Cleveland, Ohio 44115-2214.

Copyright © 2012 by Cleveland State University. The Cleveland State University Magazine is for alumni and friends of CSU and is published twice yearly by the Division of University Advancement, located in the Keith Building, 1621 Euclid Ave., RM 300, Cleveland, Ohio 44115. Third-class postage is paid at Cleveland, Ohio. Cleveland State University is an AA/EO institution. 12-00162/98M.

PHOTO TO THE RIGHT

 CSU STUDENT CENTER


PRESIDENT’S

M E S S AG E

This spring, I took my first international trip as president to two countries that hold great potential for our University – India and China. In both, I witnessed a tremendous demand for American higher education, still considered the platinum standard. Approximately 1,200 international students are currently enrolled at Cleveland State, the vast majority of them from India and China. In fact, some 500 Indian students and 300 Chinese students have chosen to attend CSU, based primarily on our word-of-mouth reputation and the educational partnerships we already have in place. Unlike other schools, including Ohio State, Kent State and Bowling Green, Cleveland State does not have branch campuses or official recruiting offices in these countries. I felt it was extraordinarily important for me to assess firsthand CSU’s possibilities for new partnerships, student and faculty exchanges, joint degree programming, professional development courses, research collaborations, and more. After eight days in each nation and visits to nine universities, it was clear that CSU already has a good foothold in both nations and both are fertile for further development of new opportunities. Accompanied by alumnus Monte Ahuja and his wife, Usha, my trip began in India, with stops in New Delhi and Chandigarh. My visits included Delhi College

of Engineering, one of India’s top-rated engineering schools; Delhi Public School, a top private high school; Punjab College of Engineering, where Monte received his first engineering degree; and Rajiv Gandhi Technical Park, a mecca for information technology companies. I also had the pleasure of meeting the Ahujas’ friends, the Singh family, four of whom are CSU alumni. (See story on page 11.) Last year Monte and Usha donated $10 million to CSU for scholarships and an endowed faculty chair in business. They are two of our greatest ambassadors and I am deeply grateful for their assistance in arranging the Indian leg of my journey. From India it was on to China, with stops in Shanghai and Beijing. My visits there included East China Normal University, one of that nation’s top 10 universities; Capital University of Business and Economics, CSU’s official partner in our Confucius Institute; Southwest China University of Political Science and Law; Xiamen University; and the Hanban, China’s ministry for foreign educational partnerships

and all Confucius Institutes. Joining me were Sajit Zachariah, dean of our College of Education and Human Services; Jianping Zhu, senior vice provost and dean of our College of Graduate Studies; and Lih-Ching Chen Wang, director of our Confucius Institute. In all my conversations and meetings in both countries, the potential opportunities were obvious for student and faculty exchange programs; joint research; student work experiences; academic programs and more. At the very least, there’s the real expectation that even greater numbers of undergraduate and graduate international students will enroll here. Indeed, Cleveland State is positioned for growth. But first, much more exploration, thought and planning are needed. I will be working with my senior administrators and deans to further investigate the possibilities, devise a long-term plan, and develop strategies for opening the door to opportunities. RONALD M. BERKMAN PRESIDENT


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FRESHMEN ENROLLMENT SETS RECORD The 2012-13 academic year got off to a great start, with CSU welcoming 1,550 freshmen – the largest and most academically competitive freshman class in the University’s history. The first-time college students include six recent high

enrollment and retention efforts. Recruiters visit 500 to 600 high schools annually, and engage with students at some 120 Ohio college fairs. An award-winning advertising campaign keeps CSU awareness high throughout the recruiting season. And a Customer

school valedictorians – a clear indication that CSU

Relationship Management (CRM) system sends

is fast becoming the school of choice for outstanding

regularly scheduled, targeted communications by mail,

students seeking excellence in higher education as well

email and phone to all students from the time they first

as the “full” college experience.

show interest in CSU until they graduate.

This year’s freshman class surpasses last year’s record-

To help students start off on the path to success,

setting class by approximately 250 students, with high

10 orientation sessions were offered for this fall,

school grade point averages and ACT scores again

enabling freshmen to register for classes, meet their

surpassing the national average. Over the past two

academic advisor and learn about student services.

years, freshman enrollment has soared 26 percent while

The University welcomed the Class of 2016 with

retention and graduation rates also have increased.

a second day of orientation during which freshmen

CSU’s total fall enrollment exceeds 17,000, with

met President Ronald M. Berkman at New Student

increases in both out-of-state and international students.

Convocation, learned college survival skills, met their

Both Euclid Commons and Fenn Tower filled up so

academic dean and faculty, found their classrooms,

quickly, upperclassmen were offered incentives to move

and more. The day ended with a Hawaiian-themed

to apartments in the new Campus Village development

Tiki-Frosh party with fireworks, food, music, contests,

to make room in the residence halls for new students.

iPad giveaways, and other surprises from CSU and

With admissions and academic standards in place 4

for several years, CSU has substantially stepped up its

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

downtown Cleveland businesses.


 FOR INFORMATION ON THESE AND OTHER SCHOLARSHIPS, VISIT www.engagecsu.com

FRESHMAN

SCHOLARSHIPS CSU’s Freshman Scholars Program has been so successful, it’s been enhanced for the third time in just two years. The newest offering, called the University Scholars program, saves students 50 percent on tuition and provides them access to exclusive Honors Program benefits. The $4,500 University Scholars merit award is renewable up to $18,000 over four years. University Scholars also are eligible for a $2,000 Residence Hall scholarship. In total, University Scholars who live on campus receive $6,500 per year in scholarships, renewable to $26,000 over four years. In addition to financial savings, University Scholars have the opportunity to take honors-level general education courses during their freshman and sophomore years. CSU’s original Freshman Scholars program, started in 2010, provides qualified students with merit scholarships of $3,000, renewable up to $12,000 over four years. In 2011, the $2,000 per year Residence Hall scholarship was added. In total, Freshman Scholars who live on campus receive $5,000 per year in scholarships, renewable up to $20,000 over four years – a 30 percent savings on tuition, room and board. Over the past two years, nearly 400 students have received Freshman Scholars awards. To date, another 140 have taken advantage of the new University Scholars program. Incoming freshmen who are non-residents of Ohio are eligible for the CSU Voyager Scholarship to help reduce out-of-state tuition costs.

SCHOLARSHIP

LUNCHEON

(L-R) ANDREW GOTLIEB, RACHEL STRONGOLI, PRESIDENT RONALD M. BERKMAN, BRIAN ALLEN

Generous donors and appreciative students who hold scholarships funded by those donors had an opportunity to meet at CSU’s annual Scholarship Luncheon. Three students shared their personal stories of how scholarships impacted their lives and freed them from financial worries. Brian Allen, who graduated in May with a degree in biology, received the Carl D. Glickman Honors Program Scholarship for all of his four years at CSU. He will enter Northeast Ohio Medical University this fall and plans to be a primary care physician. Rachel Strongoli, a junior art major, holds the Gerald and Victoria Read Honors Scholarship. She is particularly happy that the award alleviated the financial burden of college on her family. Andrew Gotlieb graduated in May with a master’s degree in urban planning, design and development. He holds the Norman Krumholz Scholarship and the Catherine A. and David P. O’Neill Hope Scholarship. Now enrolled in Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Gotlieb hopes to someday be a scholarship donor himself so future students can benefit from the same opportunities he has had. President Ronald M. Berkman discussed the importance of private support. “We are responsible for giving students who work hard the opportunity for a quality education,” he said. “CSU is increasingly becoming the school of choice for students. Scholarships are critically important to helping them achieve their dreams.”

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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STUDENT

SUCCESSES

Women’s basketball player Brandee Kelly received the 2011 Cleveland Clinic Courage Award at the Greater Cleveland Sports Awards Banquet. The sophomore from St. Louis, Mo., was recognized for her battle against lymphoma, a blood cancer that affects cells of the immune system. Kelly was diagnosed with lymphoma in March of her freshman year. Over the next four months, she underwent several rounds of grueling chemotherapy at the Cleveland Clinic’s Taussig Cancer Institute. Throughout her ordeal, Kelly kept up with her classes and studies and remained involved in her team’s daily routine. Now healthy, the six-foot-tall guard is looking forward to the Vikings’ upcoming season.

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CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

When the New York Times needed student photographers for a “stress survival guide” story, the newspaper called CSU. Student Ryan Upp, a senior majoring in art and photography, captured fellow students burning off stress before finals with the help of yoga, massage, an Angry Birds game, henna tattoos, inflatables and more. In January, the Times published the story in its Education Life section with two of Upp’s photos prominently featured. His work also can be seen on campus. The Recreation Center has filled its walls with action shots and campus photos commissioned from Upp, and CSU purchased a large, clay-fired sculpture from him that will be installed in the Student Center.

CSU students are engaged in the classroom, on the playing field, in community service and more. Here are just four examples of why CSU students are the best.

Freshman Timea Pap was selected by the Hungarian Embassy in Washington, D.C. to read a poem honoring Hungarian President Pa’l Schmitt when he visited Cleveland. Pap was one of 13 individuals granted Hungarian citizenship during a swearing-in ceremony conducted by Schmitt at the Cleveland Hungarian Heritage Museum in the Galleria. Although born in Hungary, Pap was raised in Transylvania, Romania. She moved to Atlanta five years ago, and then joined her mother in Cleveland a year ago. Both have been active in local Hungarian cultural and educational activities. After reading the poem and receiving her Hungarian citizenship, Pap was personally thanked by Schmitt and interviewed by a Hungarian television crew.

It seemed like a routine class assignment for sophomore Benji Diaz when his graphic design professor asked students to create holiday greeting cards for the University. But his design was selected by President Ronald M. Berkman and his wife, Patsy, for their own personal holiday card. Unknown to the class, Mrs. Berkman had created the assignment to develop a presidential card. The project included an engaged learning component when students toured the American Greetings facility in Brook Park and spoke with copywriters, artists, marketing analysts and product managers to gain a better understanding about consumer product development. As 500 greeting cards went into production, the class worked directly with Genie Repros Inc. to learn about working with a printer. The Berkmans plan to make the greeting card project an annual event.

Wishing for the ho you the best liday se ason and new year.

—Ronald

& Patsy

Berkman


 FOR INFORMATION ON JOINING THE VIKING PARENT ASSOCIATION, EMAIL vikingparents@csuohio.edu

PARENT ASSOCIATION CSU’s new Viking Parent Association is helping moms and dads stay involved in their child’s education.

The group’s first events — a lunch at Fenn Tower, a reception followed by the Vikings-Butler basketball game, and a barbeque — drew capacity crowds. Spearheaded by Patsy Berkman, wife of President

Ronald M. Berkman, the group taps into the important role that parents play in students’ success and in improving the University experience for students. “Parental involvement is essential to the success of any student’s academic career. This includes college preparation, adjusting to a university setting, and providing guidance throughout school and on to graduation,” she said. The Viking Parent Association keeps parents informed about University news, events, important dates and deadlines; allows parents to be actively involved in CSU’s growth and development; provides networking opportunities; and builds community among students, parents, faculty, staff and friends of the University.

MULTI-TERM

SCHEDULING CSU is the first state university in Ohio to offer multi-semester registration. Degree-seeking students can now register for fall, spring and summer semesters simultaneously. This increases the ability of students to plan ahead when charting the course to their degree. The billing schedule remains the same, and

students are not required to register for more than one semester at a time. The new option gives students better control of their schedule and allows them to lock in required courses. Multi-semester registration is part of an ongoing effort by CSU to enhance student success.

OPEN

HOUSE The CSU campus was bustling with energy when more than 2,200 visitors participated in the University’s second-annual spring open house. The huge crowd represented a 50 percent increase over last year’s attendance. Prospective students, admitted students, parents, grandparents, alumni and community members turned out for a day of exploration, information and education. Events included a fair highlighting University offices and departments, information sessions on a host of topics from finding a major to finding a job, special programs presented by each College, campus tours, and more. The Saturday open house was structured for maximum flexibility, with some guests staying all day and others taking part in only certain activities. “Spring open house was successful beyond our expectations. The positive energy was nothing short of phenomenal,” said Rob Spademan, assistant vice president for University marketing and student recruiting. Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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NEW

PERCY

NAMED INTERIM DEAN

FACES

Steve Percy has been named interim dean of the Monte Ahuja College of Business. The retired chairman and CEO of BP America is one of the nation’s most respected business leaders. He earned a JD from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in 1979.

Byron White has joined CSU in the newly created position of vice president for University engagement. He is a former vice chancellor for the Ohio Board of Regents and a former associate vice president for community engagement at Xavier University in Cincinnati. Dr. White is working to enhance and extend CSU’s many community partnerships and increase cooperative education and internship opportunities for students, and is participating in outreach activities that contribute to University and community objectives. He will play a key role in developing programs that align the University more closely with the needs of neighborhoods and the region.

Anette M. Karlsson has been named dean of the Fenn College of Engineering. Her appointment was effective in August. Dr. Karlsson spent the past 10 years at the University of Delaware and most recently was professor and chair of mechanical engineering. She also has held teaching and research appointments at Rutgers University and Princeton University. She serves as the principal investigator with various industry leaders, including the National Science Foundation and the DuPont Center for Collaborative Research & Education. In 2010, she was elected a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Brent Pieper has joined CSU as assistant vice president for advancement. Working with Vice President Berinthia R. LeVine to strengthen and enhance CSU’s advancement initiatives, he is responsible for the management and coordination of annual, capital and comprehensive campaigns, charitable gift planning, corporate and foundation relations, major gifts, special events, prospect research, donor relations and stewardship. Most recently, Pieper was executive director of development at Ohio University. He began his fundraising career at United Way of Atlanta, was the executive director of university advancement at Indiana University East, and was a senior major gifts director and special projects manager for the Indiana University Foundation.

Percy has been a member of the CSU Foundation Board of Directors since 1999 and most recently served as vice chair. He received CSU’s Distinguished Alumni Award in 1999, is a former member of the CSU Alumni Association Board of Directors, and just completed a term as chair of the C|M|LAW National Advisory Council.

MEARNS

NAMED PRESIDENT Geoffrey Mearns, CSU’s provost and senior vice president for academic affairs for the past two years, has been named president of Northern Kentucky University.

An attorney and former federal prosecutor, Mearns relinquished a Baker Hostetler partnership in 2005 to become dean of the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. He became provost in 2010, after serving as interim provost for six months. During his tenure as dean, bar passage rates for C|M|LAW graduates improved, the law building was renovated to include a one-ofa-kind mock trial courtroom, and financial support increased. As provost, he worked closely with deans and faculty and guided a number of academic initiatives, including the Student Success Initiative that seeks to improve retention and graduation rates. George Walker, CSU’s vice president for research and graduate studies, is now serving as acting provost.

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CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University


AWARDS &

RECOGNITIONS 1

PROSECUTING

PIRACY

C | M | LAW Associate Professor Milena Sterio and Case Western Reserve Law Professor Michael Scharf recently travelled half way around the world to the Seychelles Islands in the Indian Ocean. They weren’t there for sun and surf; they were lending their expertise in international law and human rights to help in the prosecution of Somali pirates. Sterio and Scharf are members of the High Level Piracy Working Group, an elite team of piracy and international criminal law experts assembled by the Public International Law and Policy Group, a Washington, D.C.-based global nonprofit organization. The Working Group, chaired by Scharf, also includes representatives from the U.S. departments of State, Justice and Defense, and other scholars and legal practitioners from around the world. According to Sterio, piracy has re-emerged as a major problem for world shipping, resulting in more than $12 billion in losses in the past year. Somali pirates, who operate throughout the Indian Ocean, have seized

more than 50 vessels, taking more than 1,000 crew members and passengers hostage. Captured pirates are routinely released, since Somalia won’t prosecute them. Recently, however, other countries that have been capturing Somali pirates (including the United States and United Kingdom) have been taking them to the Seychelles Islands, which has set up a regional piracy court and special prison with the assistance of the United Nations. During their visit, Sterio and Scharf met with the Seychelles attorney general, British prosecutors on loan to the islands, and the chief judge of the criminal division of the Seychelles Supreme Court. The Cleveland duo presented copies of 18 specially written legal memoranda, addressing such issues as the exercise of universal jurisdiction over pirates, and the trial of child-pirates. During spring semester, C | M | LAW students wrote additional research memoranda which Sterio sent to the Seychelles attorney general.

Sixteen CSU graduate programs were featured in U.S. News & World Report’s 2013 edition of America’s Best Grad Schools. The Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs was ranked second in the nation for the graduate specialty of city management and urban policy. Levin’s graduate specialization in the management of nonprofit organizations was ranked 12th in the nation and is the only ranked program in Ohio. The College’s Master of Public Administration degree is ranked in the top quarter of all graduate public affairs degrees. The Cleveland-Marshall College of Law maintained its national ranking, coming in 38th overall among law schools for part-time students. The Master of Occupational Therapy program, in the College of Sciences and Health Professions, was recognized as 58th in the nation. It is the only graduate-level occupational therapy program in Northeast Ohio. Other CSU master’s degree programs ranked by U.S. News include: Business Administration, Education, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Social Work, and Speech Language Pathology, as well as online bachelor’s programs.

MUST

2 CSU’s Department of

University Marketing and its creative partner, flourish inc., received 17 prestigious ADDY awards from the American Advertising Federation-Cleveland in recent competition. CSU and flourish garnered four silver awards for individual posters and a poster campaign touting the Farmers Market held on campus from May through September. Thirteen bronze awards honored CSU’s engage poster series, Alumni Center signage, Tiki Frosh poster, Wolstein Center brochure, Thanksgiving card, and Farmers Market materials. The ADDY Awards is the world’s largest advertising competition recognizing outstanding work at the local, regional and national levels.

3 CSU’s Master of Urban

Secondary Teaching Program (MUST) won the Distinguished Program in Teacher Education award from the Association of Teacher Educators. The award recognizes outstanding programs that exemplify collaboration between local educational agencies and institutions of higher education in program development and administration. A 14-month intensive graduate program, MUST focuses on urban teaching and social justice, culminating in a master of education degree and grade seven-12 Ohio teacher licensure in math, science, social studies, English/language arts, foreign language or art. For information, call 216-523-7576. Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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Special

EVENT

AHUJA EVENT

A WINNER CSU received the Connectors Choice Award for Corporate Event of the Year for the Monte Ahuja College of Business dedication ceremony.

he was humbled by both the President’s

dropped from illuminated signs on the

Medal and the naming of the College in

building, revealing the new name “Monte

his honor.

Ahuja College of Business.” As guests toasted the honorees with

“I have great respect for CSU and I am committed to its success. CSU and

champagne, President Ronald M.

Cleveland will always be our home,”

businessman and alumnus Monte Ahuja,

Berkman presented the University’s

he said.

MBA ’75, his wife, Usha, and their

highest honor, the President’s Medal, to

daughters for a $10 million gift in support

the couple.

The dedication event honored

of student scholarships and an endowed faculty chair at the College of Business. The outdoor event, held on a rainy evening, brought some 250 guests to a tented ballroom and reception area built along East 18th Street. As fireworks

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soared through the sky, black curtains

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

“CSU has not had any better friends

Presented by Cleveland Business Connects magazine, the awards annually honor the top local companies,

than the Ahujas,” he said. “Their

organizations, and individuals involved in

generosity, service and dedication to the

corporate event planning and networking.

University are exceptional.” Ahuja, who credits his success in business and in life to his CSU education, said

Local firms Event Source, GhostLight Productions and Everything Tented shared in the award with CSU.


CSU was the start of our educational experiences and truly helped shape our characters and our personalities.

ALUMNI BUILD INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS India ON CSU FOUNDATION - Preet Singh

New Delhi

A

ttending Cleveland State University is a valued tradition for the Singh family. But unlike other “legacy families” where several relatives attend the same school, the four Singh alumni travelled a bit further – from their homeland of India. It was an experience that helped shape the successful careers of Kabir Singh, MBA ’97; Jagmit Singh, BSME ’00; Preet Singh, BSIE ’00; and Prabhjot Singh, MBA ’00. Kabir and Preet are brothers; Jagmit and Prabhjot are their cousins. “We grew up together and were taught by our parents to stay together and share common experiences to create a better foundation for our families, businesses and personal lives,” says Preet

Singh. “When Kabir, the eldest, decided to pursue advanced management education, our father sent him to the United States, considered by our family to be the number one location in the world for advanced business education.” Helping bridge the 7,500-mile distance between Cleveland and New Delhi, India was Monte Ahuja, a long-time family friend who earned his MBA from CSU in 1975 and went on to become a prominent business leader and philanthropist. Last year, Ahuja and his wife, Usha, donated $10 million to CSU for scholarships and an endowed professorship in global business. It was the largest gift in the University’s history.

the

SINGHfamily Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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to help grow the family businesses, Sigma Group, a leading manufacturer and marketer of automotive components. “We were focused on choosing the right classes to help us gain and apply specific knowledge to advance our businesses back home. CSU offered a wide variety of course offerings that made our decisions easier. The faculty was top flight and we had the opportunity to complement our theory with significant field training that was weaved into our course work,” notes Singh. “Although we still consider the U.S. to be a home, we are a closely knit family and wanted to go back to India for professional and personal reasons.” Following graduation, Kabir joined his father in building up the business to manufacture automotive components for the worldwide market. Jagmit joined the family business and launched a branch company designing and manufacturing metal tools and stampings. Preet joined the family business and started a firm that provides engineering services to global companies seeking to procure parts in India. Prabhjot joined the family business and built closer ties between the automotive industry in the U.S. and Sigma companies in India. Today, Kabir is president of Sigma Vibracoustic Pvt. Ltd. and Sigma-Freudenberg-NOK Pvt. Ltd. in New Delhi; Jagmit is vice president of Sigma Corporation Ltd. in New Delhi; Preet is president of Sigma Molds & Stampings Ltd. in Gurgaon, India; and Prabhjot is director of marketing and sales at Sigma Global Inc. in Plymouth, Mich. All are married, have children, and visit this country frequently for business ventures. A family home in Northville, Michigan serves as their base of operations when here. Although work and family keep them busy, the Singhs stay current with all that’s happening at CSU through updates from the Ahujas. When CSU President Ronald M. Berkman and his wife, Patsy, recently visited India with the Ahujas,

CSU remains very close to us.

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- Preet Singh

“Monte is more than a close friend and confidant; he’s family,” says Singh. “He and my father, Jagdip (JD), are from the same city in Punjab in North India and have known each other for more than 30 years. My mother, Guddi, and Usha also have a close rapport. Our families meet frequently and interact closely on personal and professional matters. “So when Kabir wanted to pursue an MBA, my father looked to Monte for guidance. Monte was closely associated with CSU and knew the strength of its academic programs. He suggested that Kabir, and later the rest of us, come to Cleveland and attend Cleveland State. We all followed his advice and my father was comfortable, entrusting Monte with his children’s education in a foreign country thousands of miles away.” During the time that all four Singhs were students at CSU, they lived together in an apartment and commuted to campus. All were members of the International Students Organization, with Kabir and Jagmit both serving as treasurer. All excelled academically. “We found a friendly environment, both at the University and in the city, which was important to us,” says Singh. “CSU had a big international community which, through events and programs, helped us start well at the college and fit in easily. This made us comfortable and prepared us to better absorb the educational experience CSU had to offer. “The mechanical and industrial engineering programs and the MBA program that we studied had depth and set a foundation that we continue to use in our professional careers. Cleveland as a city gives a lot of importance to education and offered an enriching college life to students. On both the educational and personal fronts, those experiences helped shape our personalities and our careers,” he adds. All four Singhs came to CSU with a common goal – graduate, return to India, and use their knowledge and skills

(L-R) Jagdip Singh, President Ronald M. Berkman, alumnus Monte Ahuja


In addition, modern businesses need leaders to be well-read, global in their thoughts, aware of their surroundings and well-trained. My father believed the key to success lies not in hard work but in education and the preparation young people need before and during their careers,” says Singh. “My entire family has always felt that the younger generation with good education should not be satisfied with good jobs, but should strive to challenge themselves as entrepreneurs who can create modern industries and jobs for the growth of the economy of their respective nations,” he adds. “Universities must lay greater emphasis on entrepreneurship in their course work and training of students. Cleveland State is doing this and more to produce the next generation of business leaders. We are proud to be alumni.”

When Kabir, the eldest, decided to pursue advanced management education, our father sent him to the United States, considered by our family to be the number one location in the world for advanced business education. - Preet Singh

the

SINGHfamily

20 members of the Singh family hosted a welcome dinner at their home. The guests included the principals of New Delhi’s two top high schools and many other influential leaders. “It was a wonderful evening of food, culture and conversation that focused on the reason we were in India — to seek ways to expand CSU’s cohort of Indian students and explore possibilities for new partnerships, student and faculty exchanges, joint degree programming, student work experiences, research collaborations, and more,” says President Berkman. “Many interesting insights and ideas were shared. And getting to know the remarkable Singh family and meeting four alumni who used their CSU education to achieve great success in the business world was a highlight of our trip,” he adds. (See related story on page three.) For the Singhs, the evening brought back fond memories. “CSU was the start of our educational experiences and truly helped shape our characters and our personalities,” says Singh. “Furthermore, CSU helped train us and set us on the path to achieve success in our professional lives. For all these reasons, CSU remains very close to us.” Singh says he, his brother and cousins were raised to be respected individuals who would contribute to society. “My father realized that education was required to achieve these goals. He always felt that with education, people develop the aptitude of reasoning and when combined with an analytical mind, this aptitude can produce great results.

BUSINESS

Jagdip (JD) Singh and his younger brother, Taranjit, founded Sigma Corporation in 1964. As a manufacturer of vibration control products for the automotive aftermarket, the business grew rapidly in the local Indian market. By the 1990s, Sigma products were being sold in the United States and Europe and the company was one of the largest engineering goods exporters in India. In 1998, Sigma formed a partnership with a German company to expand into the original parts manufacturing business. In 2003 Sigma expanded again, collaborating with German and Japanese partners to produce an oil seals product line. Today Sigma Group comprises six companies that manufacture and market automotive components. One company is based in Plymouth, Mich.; the others are in New Delhi, India. Sigma employs over 2,500 people and has annual revenues of $200 million. The group supplies products throughout Europe and the Americas to such companies as Volkswagen, Audi, Porsche, MercedesBenz, Volvo, General Motors and Ford.

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

13


“The relocation under one roof brings together the strengths of America’s first regional theater, the nation’s second-largest performing arts complex, and Cleveland’s only metropolitan university.” PRESIDENT RONALD M. BERKMAN

14

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University


Curtain Rises on The

Arts Campus Michael Mauldin has performed on Broadway. But the Great White Way never made his heart skip a beat like it does when he walks down Euclid Avenue and sees Cleveland State University alongside Cleveland Play House on the Allen Theatre marquee in PlayhouseSquare.

“This partnership between the University, the Play House and PlayhouseSquare is unparalleled in the nation and will make Cleveland State the school of choice nationally for theater and dance students,” says Dr. Mauldin, chair of CSU’s Department of Theatre and Dance. Throw in the Middough Building, a key component of CSU’s new Arts Campus, and Jennifer Visocky O’Grady agrees. “Our students now have spectacular space in which to learn. I see nothing but potential for growth,” says the chair of CSU’s Department of Art. The Arts Campus opened in January when Theatre, Dance and Art, as well as Cleveland Play House, moved their administrative offices into the Middough Building on East 13th Street, nearly next door to the Allen. CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

THANK YOU, POWER OF THREE DONORS, FOR YOUR SUPPORT!

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

15


Occupying floors two and five, CSU has more than 120,000 square feet of classrooms, rehearsal spaces, art studios, offices, meeting rooms and production shops for sets and costumes. The light and airy renovated space features floor-toceiling windows offering city views to inspire artists of all genres. More importantly, both CSU students and Play House actors now perform on the Allen Theatre stages. The historic venue, once home to vaudeville and movies, has been transformed into three stateof-the-art performance venues – a traditional proscenium theater, a lab theater, and a black box theater. Working in partnership as the Power of Three, the University, Cleveland Play House and PlayhouseSquare have raised more than $29 million to date for the Allen conversion. Together, the Allen and Middough offer educational, rehearsal and performance facilities that provide one of the most unique undergraduate arts experiences in the nation and add new luster to the engaged learning that defines Cleveland State. With the Arts Campus, CSU is a full partner with Cleveland Play House, and the Department of Theatre and Dance is a resident company of PlayhouseSquare.

“It’s really unbelievable,” says Dr. Mauldin. “The national buzz surrounding our Arts Campus is elevating CSU’s overall profile. And the opportunities now available to our students are just fabulous.” Both Dr. Mauldin and VisockyO’Grady have been busy fielding calls from prospective students and leading tours of the new spaces with an eye to growing their departments. “CSU stands alone in having undergraduate theater students working side by side and training with professionals. The opportunities for educational and artistic collaboration are endless,” says Dr. Mauldin. “Both the Play House and PlayhouseSquare staffs have been incredibly welcoming and eager to work with our students – in the classroom, on stage, behind the scenes, and informally. You never know what great ideas may result from people having coffee together or chatting in the hallways.” The Arts Campus will provide the Play House and PlayhouseSquare with a steady stream of interns and apprentices for the performance, design, technical, marketing, ticketing and management sides of the house. In addition, staff and actors will have the opportunity to teach classes and workshops and

perform as guest artists in CSU productions. Retailers and restaurateurs have welcomed the influx of faculty and students that the Arts Campus has brought to PlayhouseSquare. With a year-round calendar of professional and University performances, the Allen is expected to draw more than 150,000 additional theater patrons to the area each year. “CSU is changing the demographic of downtown Cleveland,” notes Dr. Mauldin. Indeed, as the Arts Campus opened, the antiquated buildings which formerly housed theater and art were bulldozed to make way for Campus Village, a development that is bringing 300 housing units, retail and more to a three-block area north of Chester Avenue. The Arts Campus, says Dr. Mauldin, is “the right time, the right place and the right people coming together.” He credits former President Michael Schwartz as the impetus behind the project and President Ronald M. Berkman for expanding the vision to include art and dance. “The administration understands and appreciates that the arts are part of an overall education,” he says. “The arts help create wellrounded human beings.”

TO LEARN MORE, VISIT www.csuohio.edu/class/theatredance OR www.csuohio.edu/class/art 16

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University


 A LOOK INSIDE

UPCOMING ARTS EVENTS: THE GALLERIES @ CSU OPENING Friday, Oct. 19 KEYBOARD CONVERSATIONS 25TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT Sunday, Nov. 11 A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM November 8-18 VISIT www.csuohio.edu/ class/artscalendar FOR A COMPLETE ARTS SCHEDULE

 ALLEN THEATRE • Main stage proscenium theater with 514 seats • Second stage theater with 260 moveable seats • Helen Rosenfeld Lewis Bialosky Theater with 150 moveable seats  MIDDOUGH BUILDING • Three rehearsal halls measuring the exact sizes of the three Allen stages • Two acting studios and two dance studios, all with sprung floors • Costume and wig rooms • Costume and prop storage rooms • Makeup room with 16 mirrored stations • Scene shop • Printmaking, drawing, painting, art and graphic design studios • Photography lab and studio • Classrooms, offices and meeting spaces

(L-R) MICHAEL BLOOM, CLEVELAND PLAY HOUSE; ART FALCO, PLAYHOUSESQUARE; PRESIDENT RONALD M. BERKMAN, CSU; MICHAEL MAULDIN, CSU

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

17


Constr uction

NEW PROJECTS ENHANCE CAMPUS: CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY, ALREADY THE LARGEST “FOOTPRINT” IN DOWNTOWN CLEVELAND IN TERMS OF ACREAGE, CONTINUES TO ENHANCE ITS SPACE AND CREATE A LEARNING/LIVING NEIGHBORHOOD IN THE HEART OF THE CITY. ZONE

CAMPUS

VILLAGE

The city’s largest residential development

and anyone who wants to live in the heart of

in 30 years, officially named The Langston, is

the city, The Langston is part of President

transforming the north campus along Chester

Ronald M. Berkman’s vision to create a vibrant

Avenue between East 21st and 24th streets.

campus neighborhood.

Phase one, with housing for 200 residents,

At a groundbreaking ceremony attended by

opened this August. Phase two, with housing

city officials, politicians and others, President

for 400 more, is expected to open in August

Berkman called The Langston a true public/

2013.

private partnership between CSU, Polaris

The $50 million, nine-building project includes 278 one-, two-, three- and fourbedroom, market-rate apartments, as well as

Real Estate Equities and the Buckingham Companies. “It takes a community to build a village.

shops, restaurants, green spaces and more.

Today, CSU has become in and of the

Designed to attract students, alumni, faculty,

community,” he said. “Today, the city truly is

staff, young professionals, empty-nesters

our campus.”

18

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

TOWER OF

LIGHT A 30-foot-tall, brushed stainless steel Tower of Light will soon mark the eastern perimeter of campus.

It’s the first of four towers that the University hopes to construct to help define the campus neighborhood. The $100,000 tower, paid for with capital funds, will be in the 2600 block of Euclid Avenue on the south side of the street. Two sides of the four-foot-wide square tower are painted CSU green. All four sides include a vertical cutout of the words Cleveland State University, lighted from within at night. The top of the tower is clear, allowing an interior spotlight to project a beam up to 2,000 feet into the sky for special events, such as commencement or homecoming. A Plain Dealer editorial called the Tower of Light a “great way to put out the welcome mat” and praised all of the University’s recent efforts to improve the area and create a downtown neighborhood. “The changes at CSU are hard to miss. The beacon will make them even more so,” said the editorial. CSU hopes to pay for the other three towers through donations. “Alumni should take on this worthwhile project,” the editorial urged.


MATHER

STILWELL

HALL

MANSION Once home to industrialist

at the Levin College. No

and marble fireplaces. The

Samuel Mather, this

parts of the mansion will be

third floor has a full-sized

landmark is slated to

torn down, although some

ballroom; the first floor

become a boutique hotel to

larger rooms may be divided.

dining room features a

“The historical significance

marble sculpture in an

house campus visitors. CSU is evaluating

of Mather Mansion will

proposals from two

not be compromised,”

developers to convert the

said Boyle. “The hotel will

the house until his death

43-room Tudor mansion,

be similar to a bed and

in 1931. The Cleveland

one of the few surviving

breakfast. It will have guest

Institute of Music leased the

Millionaires’ Row homes

rooms and conference

building until 1940, when

that once lined Euclid

rooms but no full-service

it was purchased by the

Avenue.

restaurant. CSU’s catering

Cleveland Automobile Club.

service will provide food for

In 1967 it was acquired by

selected will lease the three-

events. The developer will

CSU.

story mansion from CSU,

operate the hotel. In return,

spend about $10 million

CSU gets a 45,000-square-

first building in Cleveland to

to redevelop the property,

foot refurbished building

be placed on the National

and operate it as a boutique

that will be a beautiful

Register of Historic Places.

hotel.

campus amenity.”

CSU and the Junior League

The developer who is

alcove. Samuel Mather lived in

In 1973, it became the

The two proposals would

The mansion is located at

of Cleveland restored many

extend the mansion north

2605 Euclid Ave., adjacent

of the larger rooms in 1978.

to a campus parking garage

to the Recreation Center.

by building a three- to five-

Nearly all of its original

the mansion most recently

story connector wing with

interior and exterior features

housed the department of

a glass façade, said Jack

are intact, including opulent

University marketing. The

Boyle, special assistant to

woodwork, elaborate wood

boutique hotel could open

the president for capital

and stone carvings, leaded

as early as 2013 or 2014.

planning and senior fellow

windows, plaster ceilings,

Vacant since last August,

CSU will receive $12.7 million from the state to renovate 85-year-old Stilwell Hall and build new labs. The upgrades, combined with curricular changes, will deepen collaborations between the Fenn College of Engineering and the College of Sciences and Health Professions. Parker Hannifin Corporation, a long-time supporter of CSU, will collaborate on developing the new engineering curriculum and fund an endowed professorship in human motion and control. The resulting research and technology will assist individuals with disabilities and those confined to wheelchairs. The $12.7 million from the state was recommended by the Ohio Higher Education Capital Funding Collaborative, established by Gov. John Kasich to make suggestions on how $350 million in capital funds should be spent. Leaders of Ohio’s universities and community colleges worked together in an unprecedented effort to devise a list of projects for the state’s two-year capital budget. In the past, money was allocated based on a formula that included total amount of square footage, building age and student growth. While some $430 million was provided in 2009-10, no capital funds were available in the last two-year budget. The new funding is for the budget that began July 1.

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

19


OurCOLLEGES TO LEARN MORE, VISIT www.csuohio.edu/cehs

AN AN ALYS IS OF

NTIAL THE ECONOMIC POTE NS IN IO AT RM FO FOR SHALE

Y AND STAFF PREPARED BY FACULT UNIVERSITIES ING FROM THE FOLLOW

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

SEALS, NASA SEEK CSU EXPERTISE Conducting research that

tested under conditions that

heart rate and electrocardiographic

impacts the safety of top gun

simulated an altitude of 25,000

tracing.

fighter pilots, Navy SEALS and

feet. The data was turned over

And recently, the HPL collected

NASA astronauts is just some of

to local firm Orbital Research,

data for the Defense Department.

the work that takes place in the

which developed a sensor that

Subjects were monitored in the

College of Education and Human

connects to the face mask worn

lab’s lower body negative pressure

Services’ Human Performance

by fighter pilots and monitors their

chamber that simulates internal

Lab (HPL).

physiologic changes. CSU’s lab

bleeding. Orbital hopes to use the

will conduct further research on

data to develop a sensor glove that

Professor Ken Sparks, the HPL

the usefulness of the sensor in

can rapidly assess fallen soldiers

collaborates with external partners

predicting the onset, detecting the

on the battlefield.

to provide physiological testing

occurrence and issuing a warning

that’s used to devise products and

of hypoxia.

Under the direction of Associate

solutions for real-life problems.

In a similar project, CSU and

Each year, 100 to 150 exercise science students, mostly at the master’s level, participate

Orbital are working with the Navy

in projects in the HPL, either

potential to impact national

SEALS to monitor the health

as research assistants who are

security, is hypoxia (lack of

condition of submerged divers.

collecting and analyzing data, or as

oxygen) — high in the air and

Subjects were tested in the lab’s

test subjects. Faculty from across

deep beneath the sea. Recently,

underwater tank. The goal is

the University also participate, as

the Air Force grounded its entire

to develop sensors that can be

many projects are interdisciplinary.

fleet of F-22 Raptors when

integrated into scuba systems,

pilots experienced hypoxia-like

allowing the heart rate, breathing

College’s Partner of the Year

symptoms.

and body temperature of divers to

award. The HPL also works with

“Our lab is set up to measure

be monitored from the surface.

the Cleveland Clinic and other

physiological variables in human

The HPL is collaborating with

One such problem, with the

Last year, Orbital received the

local and national firms, and

Orbital in developing a harness

an Australian company recently

for astronauts to wear under their

contacted Dr. Sparks about

the physiology of volunteer

space suits. The harness has five

partnering with the lab.

subjects (often students) was

snap-in electrodes to monitor

performance,” says Dr. Sparks. For the Air Force hypoxic study,

20

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

David Ball


 MAXINE GOODMAN LEVIN COLLEGE OF URBAN AFFAIRS

ECONOMICS OF SHALE DRILLING As politicians and environmentalists

N OHIO

than 65,000 jobs and an almost $4.9 billion per year in valued added to the state

chemicals pumped down holes under high

drilling in Ohio, a study led by Levin

economy by 2014.

pressure to fracture shale rock, thereby

According to Levin College Dean Ned HIll,

College researchers shows the activity holds great economic promise for the

one of the co-authors of the study, this is

state.

equal to a one percent increase in the real

releasing oil and natural gas trapped in the otherwise impermeable shale. The study found that each drilling pad

value of Ohio’s gross state product – greater

location will need $1.1 million in road

Marietta College were asked by the

than the average annual growth rate in Ohio

and bridge upgrades in order to get heavy

Ohio Shale Coalition, led by the Ohio

for the past 13 years.

equipment into the area. In addition,

CSU, The Ohio State University and

To date, more than three million acres have

Chamber of Commerce, to investigate the

SPONSORED BY

Drillers use a watery solution of sand and

debate the pros and cons of shale gas

facilities to separate liquids from natural

economic impact of shale development

been leased for drilling, with gas and oil

gas streams will have to be built, along with

for the years 2011 to 2014. Andrew R.

companies paying an average of $2,500 per

a network of pipelines to move the material

Thomas, executive in residence in Levin’s

acre for new leases. Yet only 33 wells have

from well fields to existing or new pipelines.

Energy Policy Center, served as principal

been drilled, and just four are producing oil

investigator; Iryna Lendel, assistant director

and gas. Still, the study estimates that by

of Levin’s Center for Economic Development,

2014, gas producers will be drilling more

was the co-principal investigator.

The study concludes that the expected growth of the oil and gas drilling industry will stimulate nearly $10 billion per year in economic activity.

than 1,000 wells a year, using the practice

Following eight months of study, the team released a comprehensive report predicting

of hydraulic fracturing, better known as

that oil and gas drilling will support more

“fracking,” to complete those wells.

TO LEARN MORE, VISIT http://urban.csuohio.edu

COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS

PROFESSOR EXPERIENCES AIR FORCE LIFE advising nearly 100 undergraduate

degrees and the rank of Second

camouflage and shiny shoes instead of

His students were wearing dress blues,

chemistry majors at CSU by email

Lieutenant. The majority of faculty

jeans and sneakers. David Ball was still

and phone — all while getting an

members are military officers. As a

teaching chemistry but not at CSU.

education himself.

civilian and professional educator,

Dr. Ball, professor of chemistry,

“The military environment is a culture

Dr. Ball offered his cadets a fresh

served as a Distinguished Visiting

shock. Everyone is Sir or Ma’am and

Professor at the U.S. Air Force

rank influences how people interact,”

Academy in Colorado Springs during

he notes. “The Air Force Academy

Pikes Peak and the Rocky Mountains

the past academic year. He taught two

is consistently recognized as one

was a “fantastic family adventure” for

core chemistry courses per semester,

of the nation’s top schools and its

Dr. Ball, his wife and two sons, he’s

plus mentored a cadet in his lab. They

Distinguished Visiting Faculty

happy to be back at CSU, his professional

presented their research on high energy

program is one of the most active of

home for 22 years.

incendiary materials at the American

all the U.S. service academies. It was

Chemical Society conference in

a privilege to be there representing

and seven books, he is one of only

San Diego.

CSU.”

four faculty members to receive two

Dr. Ball also kept busy revising a

Academy students, called cadets,

perspective in the classroom and lab. While living on base in the shadow of

The author of more than 190 articles

Distinguished Awards from the University

textbook, writing a new book, supervising

are generally 18 to 22 years old, and

— for teaching in 2002 and for service

the research of a CSU graduate student

about one-third are female. They

in 2010.

and two undergraduates via email, and

graduate with bachelor of science

TO LEARN MORE, VISIT www.csuohio.edu/sciences

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

21


OurCOLLEGES

FENN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CSU WIND TOWER AT PROGRESSIVE FIELD The wind power at Progressive

each seven feet in diameter,

of Energy in 2008 to design and

Field is no longer coming just

which automatically rotate to

install two wind towers based on

from batters’ swings. A 21-foot-

face into the prevailing wind. The

Dr. Rashidi’s patented system of

tall, corkscrew-shaped wind

translucent white helical structure

a wind-deflecting structure with

tower, designed by CSU Professor

is lighted from within by LED lights

small-scale turbines that can

Majid Rashidi, has been up

with controllable colors.

generate power at low wind speeds.

and running since the Indians’ season opener.

Grants from the U.S. Department

In 2009, CSU hoisted a 10-ton

of Energy and the State of

wind tower to the roof of its Plant

Ohio covered construction and

Services Building. Four turbines,

league ballpark and has been

installation costs of the Progressive

seven feet in diameter, are affixed

featured in USA Today.

Field wind tower system.

to the side of what looks like an

It’s the first wind tower in a major

The roof-top wind tower system,

The tower is the latest

old water tower. The four turbines

in Progressive Field’s southeast

advancement in wind amplification

sit on a base that automatically

corner near Carnegie Avenue and

research by Dr. Rashidi, the Betty

rotates around the cylinder to face

East Ninth Street, is rated at

L. Gordon Distinguished Professor

the wind. The system’s design

25,000 kilowatt hours per year,

and chair of the Engineering

channels the wind toward the

equal to the amount of energy

Technology Department at Fenn

four turbines and increases their

it takes to power two average

College.

capacity compared to a similar

American households for a year.

CSU received a $1.1 million

stand-alone reference turbine

The tower has four turbines,

grant from the U.S. Department

installed on the same rooftop.

TO LEARN MORE, VISIT www.csuohio.edu/engineering

22

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

Jianping Zhu


 SCHOOL OF NURSING

MANIKIN PATIENTS HELP HONE SKILLS Code blue. Those words, signaling a

potential for causing harm to real patients.

way that lectures cannot.

medical emergency, could be particularly

During simulation lab sessions, students

harrowing to novice nurses still fine-tuning

are given a patient assignment, an end-of-

put course content in context, assist them in

their skills on the job.

shift hand-off communication report, and

developing hands-on skills, and increase their

laboratory and pharmacologic data pertinent

self-confidence and critical thinking skills.

But students in CSU’s School of Nursing come to the work force prepared for real-life situations, thanks to a strong

to the patient they are caring for that day. As students perform healthcare procedures,

Students report that the simulations help

“When students graduate, they are expected to quickly transition to the role of

foundation in handling simulated patient

an instructor controlling the manikins from

professional nurses. While it is not possible

care situations.

behind a one-way mirror causes the patients

to prepare them for every possible scenario

to take a turn for the worse. Students are

they may face on the job, simulations are a

learn to make decisions and respond

then challenged to deliver care based on

highly effective teaching/learning tool that

to changes in a patient’s condition in a

their interpretation of the changing situation.

the CSU School of Nursing enthusiastically

protected environment which provides a

Afterward, instructors review the case with

embraces,” says Dean Vida Lock.

realistic learning experience without the

students, reinforcing engaged learning in a

Using technology and manikins, students

TO LEARN MORE, VISIT www.csuohio.edu/nursing

COLLEGE OF GRADUATE STUDIES

CSU IS REGION’S GRADUATE SCHOOL With approximately 6,500 students, or

for students.”

“Sometimes academia is separate from

one-third of CSU’s student body, enrolled

Dr. Zhu, who also serves as senior

real life but not at CSU. Engaged learning is

in 80-plus master’s, doctoral, professional

vice provost, envisions collaborative,

real. The study and research that take place

or certificate offerings, CSU’s graduate

interdisciplinary graduate programs centered

here are important to the community and to

program is the largest in Northeast Ohio.

around specific themes, such as health care.

people’s lives. CSU is the engine that drives

Dean Jianping Zhu, who joined CSU in

A prolific researcher himself, he’s eager to

change, especially in downtown Cleveland,”

January, is impressed by what’s already

build upon CSU’s strong base of graduate

he says. “I look forward to bringing engaged

been achieved. He’s also committed to

programs and student accomplishments.

learning through CSU’s graduate program to

further enhancing the College’s quality and

He cites such points of pride as: joint

the next level.”

developing interdisciplinary programs of

Ph.D. programs in biology, chemistry and

Dr. Zhu came to CSU from the University

national prominence that will elevate the

engineering with the Cleveland Clinic that

of Texas at Arlington, where he chaired the

University’s reputation.

enable science and engineering students to

mathematics department since 2005. He

work on cutting-edge research; a team of

was a faculty member and mathematics

creating distinct niche programs within

engineering and business students placing

department chair at The University of

and among Colleges to serve the needs of

as a semi-finalist in the national Clean

Akron from 2001-05. He earned his Ph.D.

the community,” he says. “These will be

Energy Challenge; outstanding licensing

in applied mathematics from the State

hallmark programs that will help make our

exam passage rates for students in nursing,

University of New York at Stony Brook.

College of Graduate Studies a destination

business and law; and much more.

“My goal is to build on CSU’s strengths,

TO LEARN MORE, VISIT www.csuohio.edu/gradcollege

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

23


OurCOLLEGES TO LEARN MORE, VISIT www.law.csuohio.edu

Piotr Wilczek (center)

CLEVELAND-MARSHALL COLLEGE OF LAW

EXTERNSHIPS, LAW FOR NON-LAWYERS OFFERED The Great Lakes Sports and

opportunity to participate in highly

The MLS degree will be awarded

Entertainment Law Academy, a

selective, nine-week externships

upon completion of 30 semester

summer program sponsored by

with such organizations as the

credit hours. Students will be

C | M | LAW and Case Western

Cleveland Browns, Lake County

eligible to enroll in all first-year and

Reserve University School of

Captains, Greater Cleveland Film

upper-level courses at the College.

Law, provided law students

Commission, and others.

They also will be permitted to earn

with a unique interdisciplinary

“This was a wonderful opportunity

up to eight credit hours by taking

classroom and experiential learning

for students to learn about

appropriate CSU graduate-level

opportunity featuring externships

sports and entertainment law

courses in a related field.

at high-profile sports and

in Cleveland, home to three

entertainment organizations.

professional sports franchises and

schedules allow students to juggle

world-class arts organizations,”

work and family responsibilities

says Mark Sundahl, associate dean

while they pursue the MLS. Part-

for administration.

time students have a maximum of

During three weeks of classes at C | M | LAW, students learned about representing the professional athlete and musical artist;

And for non-lawyers who want

Flexible day and evening class

four years to complete the degree.

“Individuals who want to

negotiation strategies in sports

to gain a better understanding of

management; and entertainment

the law and the American legal

enhance their professional value,

law.

system, C | M | LAW is introducing

redirect their career, or are

a Master of Legal Studies degree

interested in the law can benefit

program in fall 2013.

from the MLS,” adds Sundahl.

Following the coursework, up to 15 students had the

24

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University


 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT WITH POLISH SCHOLAR Piotr Wilczek, Professor Ordinarius at

program, says Dean Gregory Sadlek.

the Collegium Artes Liberales, University

“He was a wonderful addition to

support and provide key leadership in this campaign,” notes Dean Sadlek.

of Warsaw, Poland, spent one month at

our College, sharing his impressive

CSU as the College’s first Visiting Polish

knowledge of Polish history and

migration to the Cleveland area,

Scholar.

culture as well as his personal insights

community leaders have long noted the

with students, faculty, staff, and the

need to preserve the Polish cultural

community,” says Dr. Sadlek.

legacy and to foster a more sophisticated

Dr. Wilczek taught one course on Polish Culture through Film, as well as one

Given the rich heritage of Polish

non-credit class on contemporary Polish

The Visiting Polish Scholar Program, in

culture. He also presented three public

partnership with the University of Warsaw,

understanding of contemporary language, history, and culture among

lectures, which were well received by

hopes to bring a scholar to CSU for one

second- and third-generation Polish-

Cleveland’s Polish-American community.

semester every two years to teach courses

Americans. The College of Liberal Arts

on Polish and Eastern European history,

and Social Sciences is committed to local

University of Silesia in Poland, the

culture, and the arts. Funds are being

engagement and global education. The

University of Chicago, the University of

raised for an endowment to support the

Visiting Scholar Program is an excellent

Illinois at Chicago, and Rice University,

program permanently.

way to serve both purposes while linking

A former faculty member at the

Dr. Wilczek was an excellent choice to inaugurate the Visiting Polish Scholar

“We are asking the local Polish-American community to help us raise financial

the College to an important ethnic community in Greater Cleveland.

TO LEARN MORE, VISIT www.csuohio.edu/class

MONTE AHUJA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

NATION’S FIRST MOBILE MBA LAUNCHES Earning a master of business

to study on their own schedule from

Global Accelerated MBA program.

administration degree is now as

anywhere. Students complete all

The mobile MBA uses McGraw-Hill

convenient as turning on an iPad.

course work and take tests online.

Higher Education’s business curricula

The nation’s first fully accredited,

The unique mobile program is

mobile, accelerated one-year MBA

accredited by the Association to

which include collaboration through

program is available to students

Advance Collegiate Schools of

social networking capabilities like

through the Monte Ahuja College of

Business. It is aimed at working

chatting, discussion boards and direct

Business.

professionals, those with an

messages.

and educational technology tools,

undergraduate degree in business,

The program costs $32,500, which

during spring semester, the College

and students who can’t get to CSU

includes the iPad and wireless service

formally launched the Mobile

because of work or transportation

from Verizon. For information

Accelerated MBA in August. Students

issues.

and to apply, go to www.

Following a successful pilot program

receive an Apple New iPad 4G loaded

The new program took several years

with e-textbooks, course modules,

to develop with faculty creating

apps, interactive learning systems

online versions of the courses they

and other materials that allow them

teach for the College’s one-year

mobileamba.com.

TO LEARN MORE, VISIT www.csuohio.edu/business

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

25


FOR DETAILS, VISIT www.csuohio.edu/sciences/preprof/premed/neomed.html

CSU+NEOMED URBAN PRIMARY CARE INITIATIVE TO BE NATIONAL MODEL + The CSU/NEOMED

partnership offers two programs that provide early assurance to medical school as long as requirements are met.

+ The post-baccalaureate/M.D.

program targets individuals who already have a bachelor’s degree and are willing to make a commitment to primary care and other needed specialties in urban settings.

+ The baccalaureate/M.D.

program targets incoming CSU freshmen from minority and disadvantaged backgrounds who want to study health professions.

Cleveland State and Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) celebrated the official launch of their Urban Primary Care Initiative with support from a national organization. “This initiative is one of the Sullivan Alliance’s national priority programs,” said Louis W. Sullivan, former U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services. “By combining NEOMED and CSU’s strengths in urban health, primary care medicine and interprofessional education, I believe the resulting unique primary care education programs will become models for the nation.” The Sullivan Alliance to Transform America’s Health Professions supports diversity initiatives that enhance the health professions pipeline. The CSU/NEOMED collaboration will provide trained physicians for populations that are economically disadvantaged or medically underserved.

26

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

The initiative will facilitate strong, lasting connections with the medically underserved communities in Cleveland and nearby suburbs by establishing a Neighborhood Clinic Model. Through this new educational model, students will be paired with a single site throughout their four-year medical school experience. This is distinct from other neighborhood-based programs because students will engage with specific community members, allowing them to get to know the people of a particular neighborhood well and increasing the likelihood the student will return post-residency to practice within that area and to serve those residents. The CSU/NEOMED initiative plans to offer an Education for Service component to help attract students who might not otherwise have the financial resources to achieve a medical education.


THANK YOU FOR YOUR

 SUPPORT FOR THE URBAN

PRIMARY CARE INITIATIVE

+ THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION + THE MARTHA HOLDEN

Engaged

Scholarship SITY

LAND STATE UNIVER

RESEARCH AT CLEVE

JENNINGS FOUNDATION

ENGAGED RESEARCH

+ KAISER PERMANENTE + THE MT. SINAI HEALTH CARE FOUNDATION

+ REINBERGER FOUNDATION + SAINT LUKE’S FOUNDATION + ST. VINCENT CHARITY

MEDICAL CENTER

FACULTY AT FOREFRONT OF NEW KNOWLEDGE OFFERING NEW HOPE FOR A RAVAGING DISEASE cover story - pg.

There also will be a mentoring program of educators, clinicians and community champions to help assure the success of students being trained as primary care physicians. “Given the critical need for health care in our community and the support of health care institutions in Cleveland, this collaborative program between CSU and NEOMED promises to create a model for the rest of the country, while serving the unique medical needs of our urban community,” said President Ronald M. Berkman.

4

IATE? TO DIE OR DIFFERENT pg. 25 THAT IS THE QUESTION THE MENTAL CHALLENGINGOLOG Y pg. 23 HEALTH MYTH

Offering hope to persons afflicted with cancer, heart disease, muscular dystrophy and sleeping sickness . . . finding alternative energies and promoting fuel efficiencies . . . building safer roads, bridges and cities . . . looking to outer space for solutions to earth’s challenges. All this and more is being done by CSU faculty researchers who every day are breaking new ground, discovering new knowledge, and transforming the world. CSU’s research program has been recognized and funded by such prestigious organizations as the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Energy, NASA and many others. Since 2010, sponsored research has increased by 28 percent. “As our research programs grow, we are attracting more top faculty who are drawn to the many opportunities the University provides to improve healthcare, diagnose and cure disease, increase school success, harness energy, create jobs and improve our lives,” says George Walker, acting provost. Research is an integral component of CSU’s engaged learning experience, as undergraduate and graduate students often work alongside faculty members in the lab. “Research at Cleveland State will continue to expand and play a critical role as the University moves forward

with its mission to transform our community, the lives of our students, and our world,” adds Dr. Walker. A new publication, Engaged Scholarship, highlights current research by 30 faculty members. Read it online at www.csuohio.edu/research Some of the exciting initiatives underway include: • Assistant Professor Roman Kondratov is studying the effects of circadian rhythms (an internal clock) on aging under certain dietary restrictions. The project is exploring ways to manipulate the internal timekeeping system to delay the aging process and significantly extend lifespan. Dr. Kondratov’s research received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. • Professor Elliott Ingersoll is examining physiological, psychological, cultural-familial and social-environmental issues surrounding mental health to better treat and educate patients and their families. • Assistant Professor Ronnie Dunn’s research on racial profiling is helping communities address inequities in policing and the criminal justice system. • Associate Professor Nolan Holland is developing nanoparticles of proteinbased polymers, which could be used to carry drugs to targeted areas within the body. His work is funded by the National Science Foundation.

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

27


AroundCAMPUS 

ROCK ON!

The Class of 2012 partied

The party featured

like rock stars at the CSU

music, food, a rock star

graduation party held at

photo booth, a red carpet

the Rock and Roll Hall of

and paparazzi line, and

Fame and Museum.

networking opportunities.

Sponsored by President

Door prizes included a

Ronald M. Berkman

complete academic regalia

and the CSU Alumni

set for commencement,

Association, the sold-

four credits of free graduate

out event celebrated

school tuition, an iPad and

December 2011 and May

iPhone, a Viking for Life

2012 graduates, as well

treasure chest, and more.

as incoming freshmen,

This was the first time the

current students, alumni

graduation party, now in its

and friends. More than 650

fourth year, was held at the

people attended.

Rock Hall.

CORPORATE PARTNERSHIPS

ROCK

With numerous partnerships already in place, President Ronald M. Berkman is working to create a new standard for how the University engages with the corporate community. “Corporate partnerships are an investment in Cleveland’s future,” he says. “By helping students connect academics and career, we are providing the engaged and educated citizens who will help businesses meet their work force needs while helping the Cleveland area prosper.” A new collaboration between Cleveland State and Progressive Insurance got underway spring semester with Progressive Day at CSU, a combination career fair/education expo that drew more than 400 students. Group information sessions taught by Progressive and CSU presenters focused on such topics as diversity in the workplace, life in corporate America, and launching a career. In one-on-one sessions, recruiters reviewed resumes, 28

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

conducted mock interviews and provided career coaching to students. Headquartered in Mayfield Village, Progressive has 25,000 employees in more than 450 offices throughout the country, including 6,000 in Northeast Ohio. Nearly 200 CSU alumni work for the company. “Both CSU and Progressive play a critical role in the economic well-being of this region. Joint efforts to make sure graduates are prepared to meet employer needs now and in the future make sense,” says Rob Spademan, CSU assistant vice president for marketing and student recruiting. “Progressive Day was an excellent way to show students the career opportunities available at a major corporation while showing Progressive the talent and skills that CSU graduates bring to the work force,” he adds. “Events such as this are a way to keep talented graduates at home — building successful lives, careers and futures.”


CSU & NASA Honor John Glenn 

The first American to orbit the earth . . . the oldest person to fly in space . . . a military hero who served for 25 distinguished years as a U.S. Senator from Ohio . . . few would quibble that John Glenn is a national treasure.

That certainly was the sentiment among the 3,000-plus people who turned out for Celebrating John Glenn’s Legacy: 50 Years of Americans in Orbit, a spectacular tribute hosted by NASA and CSU at the Wolstein Center. The one-hour event, featuring videos, heartfelt speeches and musical tributes, evoked tears, cheers, patriotic pride and standing ovations from fellow astronauts, NASA and public officials, invited guests, students from throughout Northeast Ohio, and members of the public chosen through an online lottery. Before the program, President Ronald M. Berkman bestowed

honorary degrees on Sen. Glenn and his wife, Annie, for their extraordinary public service and contributions to science, technology and the humanities. “As a native Ohioan, a Marine, an astronaut and a U.S. Senator, John Glenn has become an indelible symbol of courage and strength. By exploring the unknown, he shaped America’s future,” said Dr. Berkman as he presented Glenn with a Doctor of Science. “He is unquestionably a great American hero.” Annie Glenn, who received a Doctor of Humane Letters, was lauded for “a life of exemplary community service based on her enduring interest in programs for children, the elderly and the physically challenged.” At 90 years old, both Glenns inspired the crowd with their humility and graciousness. Saying that the nation was founded on curiosity, Glenn called NASA

“an invaluable leader in education, research and curiosity about how to do things differently and better. “The past is a prologue,” he added. An event like the 50-year commemoration “provides insight into what we may do in the future. It’s not about honoring me. It’s an opportunity to encourage young people to serve their country.” On February 20, 1962, Glenn circled the globe three times as commander of the Friendship 7 spacecraft. That maiden flight led NASA to later successes that included astronauts landing on the moon, the space shuttle and the International Space Station. In 1998, at age 77, Glenn became the oldest person to fly in space. In 1999, the NASA Center in Cleveland was renamed the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center in recognition of this space pioneer.

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

29


AdvancementNEWS

RADIANCE

CSU REALIZING THE PROMISE

EVENT RAISES $504,300 FOR SCHOLARSHIPS

H

undreds of students will receive scholarships to help them

Fenn College of Engineering in 1972. Eight of his relatives are CSU

stay in school and progress toward their degrees, thanks

alumni and his daughter is now a student.

to Radiance, CSU Realizing the Promise. The second-annual Radiance, CSU’s signature fundraising event, was a tremendous success, raising $504,300 and bringing nearly 400 people to the

Radiance scholar Stephen Carpmail, a senior biology major, spoke

Student Center for a reception and short program celebrating the

for all scholarship recipients when he said, “There is no way of

transformative power of CSU on student lives.

expressing our appreciation for the generous donations you have

“We are deeply grateful to the individual, corporate and foundation

provided. Thanks to you, students like me can realize our potential

sponsors who are helping our students achieve their dream of a

and greatness, often beyond what our own minds are able to fathom.

college degree by generously supporting Radiance scholarships,”

We also realize the compassion, generosity, and greatness of the

said President Ronald M. Berkman.

community around us.

Parker Hannifin Corporation was the lead sponsor for Radiance. Donald Washkewicz, Parker’s chairman, CEO and president, received the President’s Medal in recognition of his personal and Parker’s corporate engagement with CSU, including scholarships, internships, laboratories, and a recent $1.5 million endowed chair. Alumnus Washkewicz received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from CSU’s

30

“Radiance is all about helping students get the best education to accomplish anything they want,” he said.

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

“I hope to one day make enough money to give back to CSU so other students can benefit from an opportunity like mine,” he added as the crowd gave him a standing ovation. The 2012 event surpassed last year’s inaugural Radiance, which raised $377,000 and provided scholarships to 129 students. Next year’s Radiance will be May 10, 2013.


SCAN THE CODE WITH YOUR SMARTPHONE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT GIVING TO CSU OR VISIT www.csuohio.edu/advancement/ annual/

 M E M O R A B L E M O M E N T S F RO M RADIANCE

FOR INFORMATION ON BECOMING A 2013 RADIANCE SPONSOR, CALL 216-875-9855.

THANK YOU 2012 SPONSORS

TITLE

Parker Hannifin Corporation PLATINUM

Usha & Monte Ahuja Cleveland Clinic MetroHealth PNC University Hospitals

GOLD

The Stephen & Joanne Kirk Foundation Brewer-Garrett Cohen & Company Collection Auto Group Forest City Enterprises Huntington Bank KeyBank Lubrizol

TITANIUM

Pam & Don Washkecicz The Adler Family Foundation Guy Brown Express

SILVER

Richard A. Barone Joanne & Craig Black

Richard L. Bowen & Associates Judy & Mort Levin Polly & Steve Percy Judy & Bob Rawson Terri & Ron Weinberg American Greetings Baker Hostetler Cleveland Indians Fifth Third Bank Invacare Jones Day Nebraska Book Company Progressive RPM

Squire Sanders US Bank BRONZE

Anthony S. Bakale Patsy & Ronald Berkman Rita & Peter Carfagna Richard Fleischman Lucile & Robert H. Gries Charity Fund Berinthia & Mark LeVine Cheryl & Joe Levanduski Dolly & Steve Minter Marge & Dan Moore

David & Inez Myers Foundation Benensh Calfee Cleveland Thermal Ernst & Young Fairmount Minerals The Fededli Group Nordson Sisters of Charity Health System Superlative Taft Thompson Hine

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

31


AlumniNEWS

{ 1

DISTINGUISHED

ALUMNI AWARDS

FRIDAY, OCT. 12 WOLSTEIN CENTER 2000 PROSPECT AVE.

Nine outstanding graduates will be honored at the 22nd-annual event, sponsored by the University and its Alumni Association. The evening includes a reception at 5:45 p.m., followed by dinner and the awards presentation at 6:45 p.m. Tickets are $100 and include valet parking. Proceeds benefit student scholarships. For reservations, call 216-687-2078.

COME HOME

TO CSU HIGHLIGHTS

INCLUDE: COME HOME TO CLEVELAND STATE FOR

HOMECOMING 2012! THIS YEAR’S EVENT, THURSDAY THROUGH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11-14, INCLUDES

THIS YEAR’S HONOREES ARE: MONTE AHUJA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS WILLIAM J. CENTA, MBA ’77 President, Mayfran Holdings, Inc. Mayfran International

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES DR. DANIEL J. KEENAN, JR., Ph.D. ’05 Superintendent, Westlake Schools

FENN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING GEORGE J. PALKO, BSCE ’88 and MBA ’93 President and CEO, Great Lakes Construction Co.

CLEVELAND-MARSHALL COLLEGE OF LAW LARRY H. JAMES, JD ’77 Partner, Crabbe, Brown & James, LLP

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES DR. RUTH D. PETERSON, BA ’69 and MA ’73 Professor emeritus, The Ohio State University

ACTIVITIES FOR ALUMNI, FAMILIES, STUDENTS, DONORS, FRIENDS AND THE COMMUNITY.

Have lunch with President and Mrs. Ronald M. Berkman, celebrate nine distinguished alumni, sing along at a concert, run in a 5K or 10K race, see a parade, meet the men’s and women’s basketball teams at Viking Madness, tour the campus, attend special College events, and more.

COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS THOMAS E. HOPKINS, MA ’82 Corporate officer and senior vice president, human resources, The Sherwin-Williams Company MAXINE GOODMAN LEVIN COLLEGE OF URBAN AFFAIRS ERIN HUBER, BS ’09 and MSUS ’11 Founder and executive director, Drink Local. Drink Tap.

CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY WANTS TO WELCOME YOU HOME! JOIN US FOR HOMECOMING 2012!

Call the Alumni Office at 216-687-2078 for more information or visit www.csuohio.edu/ homecoming2012 for the complete schedule.

32

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

SCHOOL OF NURSING SHEILA A. NILES, BSN ’84 Healthcare consultant and educator

THE GEORGE B. DAVIS AWARD TIMOTHY F. HAGAN, BA ’75 Former Cuyahoga County Commissioner


FOR DETAILS, VISIT www.csuohio.edu/homecoming2012. See you there!

 M E M O R A B L E M O M E N T S F RO M 2 0 1 1 ’ S H O M E C O M IN G A N D D IS T IN G U IS H E D A L U M N I AWA R D S

2 • •

LUNCHEON

SATURDAY, OCT. 13 STUDENT CENTER BALLROOM HOSTED BY PRESIDENT & MRS. RONALD M. BERKMAN

All alumni invited; pre-registration required at www.csuohio.edu/ homecoming2012. The Classes of 1962 (50th anniversary), 1987 (25th anniversary), 2002 (10th anniversary) and 2007 (fifth anniversary) will be honored. Special recognition to former homecoming kings/queens, alumni couples, alumni legacy families (more than one generation of CSU graduates), and fraternity/sorority members.

3 •

PRESIDENTIAL

FAREWELL

BRUNCH

SUNDAY, OCT. 14

Alumni will gather for a farewell get-together before returning home.

ALUMNUS

HONORED The office space that houses Alumni Affairs has been named in honor of alumnus David Lee Balint.

degrees in business and also included CSU in his estate plan. Balint passed away on June 8, 2010.

Balint earned a bachelor’s degree

The David L. Balint alumni office

in business administration in 1969.

space was dedicated last October

Throughout his life, he was active

during homecoming weekend. Alumni

with his fraternity, Sigma Phi Epsilon,

and friends may remember Balint by

and with the Alumni Association,

contributing to the Balint Scholarship

serving as treasurer and chair of the

at www.csuohio.edu/giving.

development committee. A philanthropist who cared deeply

Alumni Affairs is located in room 104 of the Parker Hannifin

about his University, he established

Administration Center, 2300 Euclid

the David Lee Balint Endowed

Ave. Alumni are invited to stop in

Scholarship Fund for students seeking

weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

33


Viking UPDATE 

IT’S TIME TO START THINKING ABOUT SEASON BASKETBALL TICKETS! CALL 216-687-4848 OR VISIT www.csuvikings.com FOR INFORMATION.

COLE: NBA CHAMPION Congratulations, Norris Cole! The former Viking is the first Horizon League alumnus to win an NBA championship ring. Cole helped the Miami Heat capture its second NBA title, beating the Oklahoma City

ACADEMIC HONORS A total of 135 student-athletes, representing all 16 intercollegiate sports at CSU, were recognized for their academic accomplishments at the 22nd annual John Konstantinos Athletic Academic Honors Luncheon, sponsored by Huntington

Thunder in five games. Cole

Bank, Medical Mutual and Cleveland Clinic

played in all four Miami wins

Sports Health.

during the finals, averaging 3.3 points per game in some 11 minutes of court time per game. A Viking standout from 2008-11 and 2011 Horizon

The honorees were recognized for maintaining a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 or better through the end of the fall 2011 semester. The “Best of the Best” Team Award, given to the sport having the highest team grade point average (3.55), went to women’s cross country for

League Player of the Year, Cole

the second straight year. The cross country squad

joins Franklin Edwards (1983

also received the Horizon League Sportsmanship

Philadelphia 76ers) as NBA

Award.

champions from CSU.

HALL OF FAME A power-hitting baseball player, a standout swimmer and a top basketball player comprise the 37th class of inductees into the Cleveland State Athletics Hall of Fame. Congratulations to (l-r) Jeff Haase (baseball, 1997-2000), Andrew Hancock (swimming, 2000-03) and Gale Drummer (basketball, 1973-75). In addition, long-time equipment manager and current cross country coach Joe Jaketic received an honorary achievement award for his 40 years of service to CSU athletics, and the 1982 and 1983 softball teams were honored for advancing to the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women national tournament.

The softball team won the Horizon League Community Service award. The squad logged more than 500 hours of community service this year at such organizations as the Cleveland Food Bank, the Girl Scouts and the Salvation Army. Women’s swimming standout Carys Behn of South Africa received the John McLendon Award, given to the student-athlete who best represents the ideals and personal philosophy of McLendon, a former CSU men’s basketball coach and Basketball Hall of Fame inductee. Behn placed in the top three in three individual events at the 2012 Horizon League Championships to help the swimming and diving team place second — ­ the best mark in program history.

McCAFFERTY TROPHY RUNNER-UP

Volleyball middle hitter Megan Barhorst received the President’s Award as the graduating senior

On the strength of five runner-up finishes during the 2011-12 season, CSU finished second in the James J. McCafferty Trophy standings which determine the Horizon League all-sport champion.

student-athlete with the highest grade point

The Vikings, with runner-up finishes in volleyball, men's and women's swimming and diving, and men's and women's tennis, totaled 39 points to finish behind Milwaukee, which won the McCafferty Cup with 45.5 points.

in art and a 3.95 GPA.

It is CSU's best finish since winning the McCafferty Cup in 2007-08.

recognition for being on the Dean’s List during

average. Barhorst graduated in May with a degree Forty-three student-athletes received additional every term they have attended CSU.

34

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University


ClassNOTES

 1950s ■ CHARLES SIMONIAN, BA ’51, retired after 17 years as a faculty member and coach at The Ohio State University. He began his career as a fencing coach and physical education teacher at Fenn College.

1960s RONALD LEDIN, BSME ’68

TONY BAKALE, BBA ’82

■ LLOYD POWELL, BBA ’62, is retired and lives in Boynton Beach, Fla. The lifetime member of the CSU Alumni Association recently visited England and Belgium. ■ RONALD LEDIN, BSME ’68, received the 2012 Engineering Dean’s Alumni Award for his service and support of the Fenn College of Engineering. A generous benefactor, he is a former member of the College’s Visiting Committee and played a key role in the creation of Fenn Academy, a program that promotes engineering to high school students. Ledin is the chairman, president and chief executive officer of Middough, Inc. As part of CSU’s new arts campus, the Middough Building is now home to the theatre, dance and art departments.

1970s CHRIS PESTAK, BSEE ’82

and MSIE ’97

JAMES KANDRAC, BBA ’83

 KEEP IN TOUCH Office of Alumni Affairs

216-687-2078 2121 Euclid Avenue AC 104 Cleveland, Ohio 44115-2214

csuohio.edu/alumni

University Advancement

216-687-3557 Annual Giving 2121 Euclid Avenue KB 300 Cleveland, Ohio 44115-2214

csuohio.edu/advancement

■ PATRICIA MURPHY, BA ’70, retired after 20 years as library director of Ohio University Eastern campus in St. Clairsville, Ohio. ■ MICHAEL STEIRER, MEd ’72, received a 25-year service pin from Lorain County Community College. When he’s not teaching English composition, the Medina resident enjoys traveling. He and his wife have visited 50 countries. ■ MAGDA SZABO, BA ’73, JD ’77 and MAFIS ’84, joined Perelson Weiner LLP as director of tax services. ■ MARTIN JAFFE, BS ’73 and MEd ’89, retired after 21 years as manager of the adult career counseling program at the Cuyahoga County Public Library. He now does career counseling at Jewish Family Services in Beachwood. ■ RICHARD MAHONEY, BA ’74, is the vice president for healthcare information solutions at Quest Diagnostics, as well as president of MedPlus, a Quest subsidiary. ■ ERIC SCHULTZ, BBA ’74, sold his business and retired. The Richfield resident keeps busy by leading hikes in the Cuyahoga Valley for the Why Not Adventure Club. ■ JOSE FELICIANO, JD ’75 and MBA ’84, was inducted into the Cleveland International Hall of Fame. The attorney with Baker Hostetler is the founder and chairman of the Hispanic Roundtable, a nonprofit group that seeks to employ Cleveland’s Latino community. ■ JANA SINDELAR-MARTIN, BS ’76, has been a teacher for 34 years at Kimpton Middle

School in the Stow-Munroe Falls City Schools. With a colleague, she created Explodemics, a program that combines physical challenges, academic achievement and fun. The program was featured in the Ohio Education Association magazine Ohio Schools, and in the Future Focus journal of the Ohio Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. ■ DELORES McCOLLUM, MA ’77, works in CSU’s College of Education and Human Services, supervising interns in the Office of Field Services. The Cleveland resident taught social studies in the Cleveland schools for 32 years. ■ JOAN MILLER, MS ’78 and Ph.D. ’83, is the senior vice president for oncology and neurology services at Quest Diagnostics.

1980s ■ KAREN WEAVER, MMusic ’81, is in her eighth season as artistic director of Windsong, a feminist chorus. She also conducts the Chancel Choir at Lakewood Presbyterian Church and is the founding director of Good Company, a vocal ensemble. ■ TONY BAKALE, BBA ’82, received a signed basketball during halftime activities at a Vikings basketball game in Wolstein Center. A long-time season ticket holder and Big Green member, he was recognized for his support of CSU Athletics and his engagement with the Alumni Association and CSU Foundation. He is a member of the CSU Foundation board of directors, former president of the CSU Alumni Association, and a partner and CPA at Cohen & Company. ■ CRAIG RHODES, BA ’82, joined Corbus, LLC in Dayton as senior vice president, global head of human resources. ■ CHRIS PESTAK, BSEE ’82 and MSIE ’97, is the manager of NASA programs for Battelle Memorial Institute, a charitable trust headquartered in Columbus, Ohio. He had the opportunity to congratulate John Glenn on the 50th anniversary of Glenn’s historic Friendship 7 flight. ■ PAUL BRICKNER, LL.M. ’83, published a book review of Louis D. Brandeis: A Life in the Albany Government Law Review. ■ GRETCHEN FARO, MA ’83, is the president and CEO of Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Cleveland. ■ JAMES KANDRAC, BBA ’83, is the president and founder of UCG – United Computer Group, Inc. in Independence. The firm celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. ■ CHRISTINE KRIHA KASTNER, BA ’83, has written Soldiering On – Finding My Homes, a book about growing up as an “Army brat.”

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

35


ClassNOTES 1980s ■ SCOTT A. RAAB, BA ’83, is a writer for Esquire magazine and the author of The Whore of Akron, a book about LeBron James. ■ GUNTHER EVANINA, BSCE ’83 and MSCE ’85, has joined Butzel Long as a shareholder in the firm’s Lansing office. He is an intellectual property attorney. ■ ROSA M. DelVECCHIO, MA ’84, wrote the foreword and edited Eeti vs. Ansh, a novel by Prabhat Kumar Deo. She is the administrative secretary to the associate deans of the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. ■ Images of Slovenia by CONCETTA “TONI” RASH, MA ’84, so impressed the Slovenian Consul that he arranged to have them go on tour. The watercolors and acrylics were shown at a Catholic Slovenian Home in Illinois and at the Slovenian Embassy in Washington, D.C. and may be displayed in a museum in Slovenia as well. ■ JUDY BODENHAMER, MBA ’85, is a management consultant with Revenue Resources LLC. In April, she was a speaker at the American Bar Association’s dispute resolution conference in Washington, D.C. ■ DOUG BECKMAN, BA ’86, was inducted into the Alpha Delta Chi Hall of Fame. ■ DAVID NORGARD, JD ’86, is the vice president of human resources at Quest Diagnostics. ■ ANN SALIGA BECKMAN, BS ’87, was inducted into the Alpha Delta Chi Little Sisters Hall of Fame. ■ WILLIAM E. GOODILL, MA ’88, is the chief administrative and chief financial officer at Western Reserve Partners LLC, an investment banking firm in Cleveland. ■ ROBERT HARTWELL, BA ’89, received an MBA degree from Bay Path College. The senior pastor of Village Lutheran Church and the Chapel School in Bronxville, NY and adjunct professor at Concordia College finished the November 2011 New York City

Marathon with a time of 4:30:12. ■ JOANNE MAJEWSKI, BA ’89, was inducted into the Cleveland Clinic Stanley Shalom Zielony Institute for Nursing Excellence Hall of Fame. She lives in Parma. ■ VINCENT MENTI, BBA ’89, is the owner/operator of GitterPicker String Factory, a music school/ store in Twinsburg. ■ RITA NOLAN, BEd ’89, is one of only eight educators throughout the nation selected for the Alain Locke Initiative’s Ryan Fellowship. As a fellow, she is preparing to be a principal and studying best practices in charter school leadership and student achievement in urban schools. Nolan is the executive director of the Montessori Network in the Chicago area.

1990s ■ STEVE VARGO, JD ’90, placed fourth in his age group in the overall 2011 Colavita-Zipp Time Trial Series. He placed third in the cycling race. Vargo is retired and lives in Columbus. ■ FRANK VILLAFANA, DrEng ’90, continues to research and write about Cuban history. His latest book is Expansionism: Its Effects on Cuba’s Independence. ■ MARLA BUTLER, BA ’91, is a partner and New York assistant regional managing partner with Robins, Kaplan, Miller and Ciresi LLP. She is listed in Profiles in Diversity Journal’s “Women Worth Watching.” ■ FRED HUNT, BS ’92, published his first ebook, American Suicide. ■ LOU TISLER, BBA ’92 and MBA ’94, met President Barack Obama when he visited Cleveland in January. Tisler is the executive director of Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Cleveland. ■ LIZA GROSSMAN, BA ’93, is the founder/ director/conductor of the award-winning Contemporary Youth Orchestra. She lives in Cleveland Heights. ■ GARY M. KELLY, BA ’93, is the head of sales at Interscope Geffen

A&M in Los Angeles. ■ NANCY V. LESIC, BA ’93, is the chief executive officer of Lesic & Camper Communications. ■ KURT SANDER, BMusic ’93, lives in Cincinnati and is the chair of music at Northern Kentucky University. His CD, As Far as the East is From the West, features contemporary Orthodox liturgical music. ■ KAREN KAMINSKI, BA ’93 and JD ’00, was named vice president of human resources at Cleveland’s new Horseshoe Casino. ■ RASSENDRA (ROSS) SHAH, BIE ’94, is an industrial engineer at Lozier Corporation in Scottsboro, Ala. ■ SCOTT FERRIS, MA ’95, is co-chairing Partners for Ohio’s Families, an initiative to reform how the state provides technical assistance and support to Ohio’s 88 county child protection agencies. He has been the executive director of Public Children Services Agencies since 1996, with the last six years at the Allen County Children Services Board. ■ KEN RENFRO, BBA ’96, joined Stratos Wealth Partners as a wealth advisor. He lives in Chardon. ■ IAN FRIEDMAN, JD ’97, received the first annual Lawyer of the Year award from the Ohio Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. The founder of Ian Friedman & Associates, L.L.C. was a 2011 recipient of CSU’s Distinguished Alumni Award. ■ SONYA PRYOR-JONES, MEd ’97, launched her own business, Sychronicity Consulting LLC. ■ THOMAS DOEHNE, BS ’98, received NASA’s Silver Snoopy award for his contributions to the safety and success of human spaceflight. The Avon resident led the system engineering team for the Ares 1-X Upper Stage Simulator project. ■ MATT HLAVIN, BA ’98, is the president of Thogus Products and was interviewed for the national public radio show Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal.

IN MEMORIAM CSU DEATHS ■ JOAN TUCKER, BS ’96, in June 2011. She was an administrative assistant for 16 years, serving in the sociology department, the bursar’s office and the economics department. ■ SIDNEY PAUL in July 2011. The associate professor emeritus taught accounting for 39 years. ■ RANDALL GEE in August 2011. The associate professor emeritus taught biology for 27 years. ■ THOMAS HAYNES in August 2011. An Associate of the University, he retired in 1987 after 19 years as director and vice president of planning. ■ FRANCIS NEIL MYER in August 2011. The associate professor taught finance for 22 years. ■ STANLEY SCHULTZ in August 2011. The associate professor emeritus taught business for 25 years. ■ EDRIC WELD in September 2011. The assistant professor emeritus taught urban studies for 23 years. ■ KAREN STECKOL in November 2011. Dr. Steckol served as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of speech and hearing from 1996 to 2002. ■ THOMAS TAYLOR in November 2011. The associate professor taught physics for 26 years. ■ DANIEL MAYNARD in December 2011. He was a data administrator in the College of Law library for 15 years. ■ THEODORE WOOD in December 2011. The associate professor taught physics for 42 years. ■ CHARLES RINI in February 2012. The associate professor emeritus taught finance for 29 years. ■ HERBERT SCHLOSSER in February 2012. The professor emeritus of physics retired in 1994 after 26 years at CSU. ■ AUDREY WATTS in March 2012. She was a former member of the CSU Foundation board of directors. ■ B. NEIL DAVIS in April 2012. A lecturer of music for 17 years, he retired in 2002. ■ E. MANDELL DE WINDT in April 2012. He was a former member of both the CSU board of trustees and CSU Foundation board of directors. ■ RITA KLINGER in April 2012. The professor of music was a member of the CSU faculty since 1997. ■ PEGGY FISHER BRODER in June 2012. A faculty member from 1969 to 1997, Dr. Broder taught

literature and composition.

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 2000s MICHAEL CANTOR, JD ’00, was named

managing director of Allegro Realty Advisors. He lives in Solon. ■ GARRETT MATYAS, MBA ’00 and MLRHR ’02, was named director of human resources for National Airlines. ■ TIM McCOY, BA ’01, is a long-time chef who serves as the education director of the International Culinary Arts & Sciences Institute. He lives in Cleveland Heights. ■ THOMAS EVAN GREEN, JD ’02, was named a 2012 Rising Star by Ohio Super Lawyers magazine. He is an attorney with Kastner Westman & Wilkins and lives in Boston Heights. ■ CARLA JENKINS, MBA ’02, was promoted from economist with the Bureau of Economic Analysis in Washington, D.C., to a GS-13 program analyst with the Small Business Administration. ■ BRANDON DAVIS, BA ’03, is the director of industrial manufacturing at Industrial Process Group, URS Corporation. ■ VINKO KOVANOVIC, BA ’03, is a diplomat in the Defense Attache Office of the U.S.

Embassy in Ljubljana, Slovenia. ■ DANTE RODRIGUEZ, BA ’03, is an artist who lives in Lorain and works in the architecture and design department of the Cleveland Museum of Art. ■ TAD FITCH, BA ’04, MA ’06 and Psy.S. ’07, is a maritime historian whose new book, On a Sea of Glass: The Life and Loss of the RMS Titanic, was published to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the ship’s sinking. ■ CHEANNA HUDSON, BBA ’06 and MEd ’11, is a human relations analyst. ■ SASHANK GARIKAPATI, MUPDD ’07, works for WINIT, a mobile application development company in India.

2010s

■ BEVERLY BROWN, BA ’10, is the program director for Rainey Institute and served as choirmaster for the Gospel Gifts choir performance with Peabo Bryson, Ben Vereen, Lea Salonga, Jennifer Holiday and the Cleveland Orchestra in December. ■ PATRICK O’CONNOR, JD ’10, joined Murray & Murray Co., L.P.A. as an associate attorney. ■ BABETTE OESTREICHER, MA ’11, is the organization coordinator for Winker’s Creek Watershed partners. ■ CHRISTINE RADOMSKI, MA ’11, is an assistant at the Cleveland Artist’s Foundation, Cleveland’s Center for Regional Art.

ERIN HUBER, BS ’09 and MS Urban Studies ’11, was named one of Cleveland Magazine’s Most Interesting People for 2012. As an undergraduate, Huber and fellow student Lee Ann Westfall were the impetus behind the creation of the CSU Recreation Center’s rooftop garden. She also was instrumental in bringing a farmers market to campus. Huber is the founder of Drink Local. Drink Tap., a nonprofit organization that focuses on water sustainability, both locally and globally. Most recently, she has been working on a documentary film and project to help provide water for children in Uganda. She will receive the CSU/CSUAA Distinguished Alumni Award this year.

LOU TISLER, BBA ’92

and MBA ’94

IAN FRIEDMAN, JD ’97

THOMAS EVAN GREEN, JD ’02

PATRICK O’CONNOR, JD ’10

MICHAEL WARNICK, BMusic ’01 and MMusic ’03, is a staff sergeant in the U.S. Marine Corps and a trumpeter and cornetist in The President’s Own, an elite military band that comprises the U.S. Marine Band, Marine Chamber Orchestra, and Marine Chamber Ensembles. The band performs regularly at the White House and for more than 500 public concerts across the nation each year. Warnick recently returned to campus to perform as a soloist in concert with the wind ensembles and choirs from both CSU and North Olmsted High School, his alma mater. While here, he conducted master classes at both CSU and North Olmsted.

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ClassNOTES IN MEMORIAM ■ HIRAM BROWN, BS ’37, in December 2011 ■ ELWIN FRIEDL, BSME ’38, in November 2011 ■ BRUCE ALTMAN, BBA ’39, in October 2011 ■ F. LEO HASSETT, BBA ’41, in October 2011 ■ JACK BARES, BS ’43, in January 2012 ■ MICHAEL SIPKO, BSME ’43, in May 2011 ■ JUDD GROSS, BBA ’43 and JD ’67, in April 2010 ■ RUTH SHAUGHNESSY, BBA ’47, in March 2012 ■ PAUL DUBOIS, BS ’48, in May 2011 ■ PHILIP HASEY, BSME ’48, in February 2012 ■ EDWARD PARAN, BBA ’48, in June 2010 ■ JAMES CRAHEN, BS ’49, in December 2011 ■ RICHARD MORIARTY JR., JD ’49, in December 2011 ■ WILLIS BURTON, BBA ’50, in November 2011 ■ ALEX MEKEDIS, JD ’50, in August 2011 ■ JOHN MIZISIN, JD ’50, in December 2011 ■ MYRON WASSERMAN, JD ’50, in August 2011 ■ JUDGE LILLIAN BURKE, JD ’51, in March 2012 ■ SALVATORE CALANDRA, JD ’51, in August 2011 ■ JOHN REA, JD ’51, in October 2011 ■ WILLIAM SOLLIE, BSEE ’51, in February 2012 ■ ELMER COWAN, JD ’52, in November 2011 ■ RUDOLPH RIZZO, JD ’52, in December 2010 ■ MARTIN KISEL JR., BS ’54, in August 2011 ■ DANIEL MCCARTHY SR., JD ’54, in October 2011 ■ DONALD REUSCH, JD ’54, in May 2011 ■ ISHMAEL CHILDS SR., JD ’55, in February 2012 ■ HARVEY CLARK, BA ’55, in May 2011 ■ JUDGE ROBERT E. FEIGHAN, JD ’55, in April 2012 ■ CHARLES GALLO SR., JD ’55, in August 2011 ■ DENNIS IZOLD, BBA ’55, in March 2012 ■ MARJORIE THOMPSON, BBA ’55, in March 2012 ■ THOMAS O’MALLEY SR., JD ’57, in January 2012 ■ CHARLES DAHLBERG, BS ’58, in September 2009 ■ THOMAS SCHWARZ, BBA ’58, in September 2011 ■ ROBERT WEBER, JD ’58, in April 2012 ■ FLORIAN MIRAS, BBA ’59, in August 2011 ■ CHARLES SMERCINA, BBA ’60, in November 2011 ■ HAROLD WRIGHT, BSCE ’60, in September 2011 ■ RATHUEL MCCOLLUM, JD ’61, in November 2011 ■ CLARENCE “BUDDY” JAMES, JD ’62, in December 2011 ■ ANNE METZ, JD ’64, in October 2010 ■ BERENICE WOOD, BS ’64, in August 2011 ■ ROGER CRAMER, JD ’65, in October 2011 ■ JOHN SIMONE JR., BS ’65, in April 2012 ■ RAYMOND SCHULTZ, BA ’66, in September 2011 ■ WILLIAM WAGNER, BEd ’66, in November 2011 ■ DAVID ZEITZHEIM, JD ’68, in December 2011 ■ CLOID WINDMILLER, BA ’69, in July 2011 ■ DENNIS PRINCIPE, BA ’69 and MEd ’77, in January 2012 ■ ROBERT SHAFER, BBA ’70, in April 2012 ■ LEO JOHNSON JR., BBA ’71, in November 2009 ■ ROBERT KEELER, JD ’71, in April 2012 ■ RIDLEY NIMMO, BBA ’71, in November 2011 ■ JEANNE RENTON, BA ’71, in September 2011 ■ JEANNE ASHE, MEd ’72, in February 2012 ■ HENRY GARIEPY, BA ’72, in April 2010 ■ LEON HEARD, JD ’72, in December 2011 ■ DOROTHY

KOONTZ,

BS ’72, in April 2012 ■ DANIEL WISE, BBA ’72, in December 2011 ■ GEORGIA BAUER, BS ’73, in October 2011 ■ WARREN BRYANT, BA ’73, in February 2012 ■ RONALD LANDEN, MBA ’73, in September 2010 ■ CAROLYN TENEROWICZ, BA ’73, MA ’75, and Ph.D. ’92, in July 2011 ■ DOROTHY GAMIERE, JD ’74, in August 2011 ■ WILLIAM RICHARDSON, BEd ’74, in October 2011 ■ JOHN SCHULER, JD ’74, in August 2011 ■ JAMES TEMPLIN, MEd ’74, in January 2012 ■ EVERETT BELL, JD ’75, in August 2011 ■ BETTY ENGLISH, MA ’75, in April 2012 ■ ERNEST SOBIESKI, JD ’75, in November 2011 ■ DELANEY HAIRSTON, BEd ’76, in February 2012 ■ DANIEL PAPCKE, BS ’76, in March 2012 ■ KARL PEARSON, BA ’76, in August 2011 ■ JORGE ABAD, BBA ’77, in November 2011 ■ AVA HODOUS, BA ’77, in February 2012 ■ STUART MILLER, JD ’77, in February 2012 ■ DENNIS PRINCIPE, BEd ’77, in February 2012 ■ MARGARET PUCSOK, MEd ’77, in February 2012 ■ NICHOLAS VALENTINO, JD ’77, in December 2010 ■ FRED WALTZ, JD ’77, in April 2012 ■ LINDA NICHOLS, MEd ’78, in August 2011 ■ THOMAS DENOVA, JD ’79, in November 2010 ■ TERRENCE HORN, BBA ’79, in December 2011 ■ MARSHA KOELIKER, JD ’79, in April 2011 ■ VERNA MARPLE-CALLENDER, BEd ’79, in November 2011 ■ ROBERT SEELIE, BA ’79 and MPA ’85, in January 2012 ■ VIRGINIA BORZA, BA ’80, in February 2012 ■ CARL LEUSCHEL, BEd ’80, in December 2011 ■ BARBARA POLLOCK, BEd ’80, in November 2011 ■ WILFREDO MORALES, BSCE ’81 and DrEng ’93, in September 2011 ■ WALTER MAY, BA ’82, in December 2011 ■ MICHAEL BRYANT, JD ’82 and MA ’88, in August 2011 ■ TYREE WILLIAMS, BA ’83, in October 2011 ■ INGRID VON WACHHOLTZ REESE, BA ’84, in March 2012 ■ CHARLES HENRY, JD ’85, in January 2012 ■ TIMOTHY PAGE, BS ’85, in September 2011 ■ JAMES VANO, BBA ’85, in August 2011 ■ MICHAEL YOUNGBLOOD, BA ’85, in December 2011 ■ ANTHONY KELLON, JD ’87, in December 2011 ■ TODD BAILEY, BA ’88, in January 2012 ■ JULAINE VAN BUREN-NIRO, MA ’88, in January 2012 ■ ELIZABETH PEARSON BA ’89, in February 2011■ JOSEPH SCHAEFFER, BA ’89, in April 2011 ■ CHRISTOPHER GRAY, JD ’93, in April 2012 ■ JULIA KUZNETSOV, BBA ’94, in July 2011 ■ CHRISTINE KACIC, BA ’95, in December 2011 ■ BRIAN STACY, BBA ’97, in July 2011 ■ KENNETH TIEBER, BEd ’97, in April 2012 ■ RUTH COTTRELL, BSED ’98, in February 2012 ■ CONSTANCE HADA REMEIN, MEd ’00, in March 2012 ■ CHRIS CHAPMAN, BS ’02, in October 2011 ■ KIMBERLY YIRGA, MEd ’02, in August 2011 ■ BRANDON WARE, BBA ’04, in March 2012

Want to show your CSU pride while supporting student scholarships? It’s easy. Just purchase an Ohio license plate bearing the Viking logo and Magnus mascot. The cost of the distinctive Cleveland State plate is your annual renewal fee plus an additional $35. But $25 of the added charge

comes directly back to the University and will be used to support student scholarships. Personalized CSU plates, with initials, names or messages, are also available upon request and approval of the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles. For information, visit www.bmv.ohio.gov.

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orbit

CSU Each year, some 1,200 students from 80 countries bring a multicultural

Did you know?

perspective to campus.

CSU is a sustainability leader among all Ohio colleges, reducing energy consumption by 39 percent and saving $60 million in energy costs.

Buy fresh produce, bakery and more at CSU’s Earth to You Farmers Market, open Thursdays through September from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The market is on Euclid Avenue near East 18th Street. Scene Magazine named CSU “Best College or University” in its Best of Cleveland 2012 list.

In a recent survey, CSU residence halls rank among the best in the country for student satisfaction.

Some 1,000 pounds of food are composted each week during the academic year. CSU offers the only physical and occupational therapy programs

To cut down on CO2 emissions, CSU partners

in Northeast Ohio.

with Zipcar, Inc. on a car-sharing program.

Over 1,700 internships and co-ops link students to careers in business, The Monte Ahuja College of Business

technology, health

maintained full accreditation of business

care, civic and

and accounting programs by the AACSB,

nonprofit sectors.

a status that only five percent of business schools in the world achieve.

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We’re changing our lives through education . . . you can help us achieve our dreams.

Annual Fund support from alumni and friends helps Cleveland State University provide deserving students with scholarships and engaged learning opportunities. We’re proud to say that when they graduate, the vast majority of CSU alumni remain in Northeast Ohio, putting their education to work for the good of this region and improving the economy. We invite you to show your pride and support for Cleveland State University by making an Annual Fund gift. Your support pays dividends by transforming students’ lives through education.

Donate Online at www.csuohio.edu/giving Cleveland State University Foundation 2121 Euclid Avenue, KB 300 Cleveland, Ohio 44115-2214

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Cleveland State University Magazine  

Fall 2012 issue