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6TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE JONAS WOOD TWO x TWO ARTIST HONOREE


R OB ERT O CAVA LLI

EISEMA N JE W E L S

FR E DE R I C E DW I N CH U R CH , T H E I C E B E RG S, 1861, D AL L AS M U SU E M O F ART, G I F T O F N O RM A AN D L AM AR H U N T.


The Fall Season | 2017 Photographs October 11 Illustration Art October 13 Rare & Fine Wine October 13-14 Fine Silver & Objects of Vertu October 17 Modern & Contemporary Prints & Multiples October 23 Design October 24 Timepieces October 24 American Art November 3 Ethnographic Art: American Indian, Pre-Columbian and Tribal November 13 20th Century Decorative Arts, Including Tiffany, Lalique and Art Glass November 14 Texas Art November 18 Modern & Contemporary Art November 30 Fine European Art December 1 Rare & Fine Wine December 1 Fine Jewelry December 1-2 Luxury Accessories December 5 Decorative Arts Including Estates December 9-10

Visit HA.com for a complete calendar. Inquiries: 214.409.1444 | Art@HA.com

DALLAS | NEW YORK | BEVERLY HILLS | SAN FRANCISCO | CHICAGO | PALM BEACH LONDON | PARIS | GENEVA | AMSTERDAM | HONG KONG 46307


Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) Reflections on Girl (from the Reflections series), 1990 Lithograph, screenprint, relief, and metalized PVC collage with embossing Estimate: $100,000 - $150,000


EDITOR’S NOTE

Portrait Tim Boole, Styling Jeanna Doyle, Stanley Korshak

October / November 2017

TERRI PROVENCAL Publisher / Editor in Chief

Among the scintillating events this season, TWO x TWO is one of stellar finesse and intrigue. Who will place the winning bid for Jonas Wood’s Pink Plant Patio Landscape Pot featured on Patron’s 6thAnniversary cover? Not even co-founders and event hosts Cindy and Howard Rachofsky are yet privy until the 19th annual TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art 2017 gala and auction take place on Saturday, October 28. And this is an event where nary a detail is overlooked under the Rachofskys’ careful stewardship and that of Director Melissa Ireland, which raises funds for amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research, and the Dallas Museum of Art. DMA’s Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, Gavin Delahunty, interviews Jonas Wood, the 2017 TWO x TWO Artist Honoree in Mark Maker. Patron Magazine is proud to return as the media sponsor. One can only imagine what it must have been like to be an art student at University of North Texas while Kiki Smith was the artist-in-residence at the Institute for the Advancement of the Arts. Kiki Smith: Mortal mounts a major exhibition for the multidisciplinary artist heralded across the globe at our own Dallas Contemporary. Followers and yet-to-be admirers have the opportunity to take in her powerful work including Pilgrim, a massive installation of paintings on glass, exploring the human lifecycle through portraits of women. Steve Carter visits with Smith and DC’s Director of Exhibitions/Senior Curator Justine Ludwig in Mortal Immortal. Residing in Auckland Castle since 1756, two North Texas museums collaborated as caretakers for the conservation and presentation of Francisco de Zurbarán’s Jacob and His Twelve Sons. These colossal paintings made a first-time journey to America where they underwent restoration at the Kimbell Art Museum prior to installation at the Meadows Museum. Since this is only the second time leaving the castle, we recommend seeing this unprecedented exhibition on view through the first week in January and invite readers to learn more about Zurbarán’s thirteen canvases in All My Sons. Robyn and Michael Siegel welcomed their baby girl, Phoebe Tiger, just at press time. We were overjoyed to hear the news as days prior the couple opened their historical home to Patron. Teeming with marvelous contemporary art, their story inspired Modern Move. Fine art photographer Thom Jackson’s Dress I and Dress II influenced our fashion and jewelry feature. Full Transparency displays Jackson’s inverted images where looks of the season play a support ing role opposite spectacular pieces of jewelry shown in colorful glory. Those not yet among the droves of foodies awaiting the coming of Bullion to 400 Record, you soon will be. We checked in with Chef Bruno Davaillon and Thomas Hartland-Mackie on their nouvelle French brasserie set to debut within weeks. In addition to the Davaillon-helmed kitchen, the art, architecture, interiors, and every thoughtful detail has us sur la lune (over the moon for non-Francophiles). Kendall Morgan details what’s sure to be a standard-setting restaurant in All That Glitters is Bullion. Incidentally, Thomas Hartland-Mackie and his talented wife Nasiba, founder of The Tot, are this year’s T WO x T WO Gala Chairmen— perhaps supporting their efforts to raise important funds for the evening’s beneficiaries will garner you favor in placing a reservation at Bullion. Thanks for sharing six years with us. Year seven is being curated with you in mind. – Terri Provencal terri@patronmagazine.com; Instagram terri_provencal and patronmag

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F O R T Y F I V E T E N . C O M | M A I N S T R E E T | H I G H L A N D P A R K V I L L A G E | M c K I N N E Y A V E N U E | 214 . 5 5 9. 4 51 0 # FFT | # FFTONM AIN | #T THXFFT | # FREETOBEFFT


CONTENTS 1

FEATURES 66 MARK MAKER A figurative painter with an abstract sensibility, Jonas Wood will be honored at TWO x TWO. By Gavin Delahunty 74 MORTAL IMMORTAL Kiki Smith’s solo show at Dallas Contemporary is an epic exposition of her existential musings. By Steve Carter 80 ALL MY SONS Newly conserved Zurbarán works depicting Jacob and his twelve sons are on view at the Meadows Museum. By Nancy Cohen Israel 86 MODERN MOVE Classic architecture meets a contemporary art collection at Robyn and Michael Siegel’s Bertram Hill home. By Peggy Levinson 94 FULL TRANSPARENCY Thom Jackson’s fine art photography brings X-ray vision to season stunners from fine jewelry designers. Photography by Thom Jackson

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102 ALL THAT GLITTERS IS BULLION With a Michelin-starred chef, stellar décor, and an elevated art collection, a long-awaited restaurant is a feast for the senses. By Kendall Morgan

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On the cover: Jonas Wood, Pink Plant Patio Landscape Pot, 2016, oil and acrylic on canvas, 118 x 90 in. Photograph by Brian Forrest. Courtesy of the artist; Anton Kern Gallery, New York, NY; David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA; Gagosian Gallery; and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago, IL.

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B A L E N C I AG A

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EU R O P E A N A RT GA L L ERY

DALL AS MUSEUM OF ART

O P P O S I T E PAG E: BOT TEGA VENETA

PIET MONDRIAN, WINDMILL, 1917, DALL AS MUSEUM OF ART, GIFT OF MRS. EUGENE MCDER MOT T,

IN HONOR OF MR. AND MRS. JA MES H. CL ARK. PIET MONDRIAN, FARM NEAR DUIVENDRECHT, 1916, DALL AS MUSEUM OF ART, GIFT OF THE EDWARD AND BET T Y M ARCUS FOUNDATION.

G U CC I


BOTTEGA VENETA BURBERRY BVLGARI CANALI CH CAROLINA HERRERA COACH DAVID YURMAN EISEMAN JEWELS GUCCI HUBLOT JOHN VARVATOS LOUIS VUITTON MONTBLANC MULBERRY NEIMAN MARCUS NORDSTROM OFFICINE PANERAI OMEGA ROBERTO CAVALLI ROLEX SALVATORE FERRAGAMO TAG HEUER TIFFANY & CO. TOD’S TORY BURCH VALENTINO VERSACE


CONTENTS 2

DEPARTMENTS 8 Editor’s Note 16 Contributors Of Note 36 HORROR STORY Misty Keasler’s show at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth is haunting. By Nancy Cohen Israel 38 Noted Top arts and culture chatter. Fair Trade 56 A PAINTER’S GALLERY Movement, physicality, and presence define the artist roster at Nino Mier Gallery. By Eric Green Contemporaries 58 PRECIOUS MATERIALS Deedie Rose curates an out-of-the-ordinary wearable studio art collection for TWO x TWO. By Cindy Rachofsky

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Studio 62 CELIA EBERLE’S AESTHETIC SOOTHSAYING An artist’s practice is steeped in raw materials from the natural world. By Justine Ludwig. Space 64 CREATIVE OUTLET Donald Fowler lends his talent to usher in new artisans for an evolved Nasher Store. By Peggy Levinson There 108 CAMERAS COVERING CULTURAL EVENTS Furthermore ... 116 THE ACADEMIC MEANDERER Paul Galvez influences the Dallas Art Scene. By Chris Byrne

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CONTRIBUTORS

STEVE CARTER Dallas Contemporary’s Kiki Smith: Mortal is a blockbuster, a tour de force exhibition of the iconic artist’s recent work celebrating the human condition. In this issue, freelance arts writer Steve Carter visits with the artist and DC’s Justine Ludwig to profile and preview the show, which runs September 29 through December 17. “This is a really important exhibition, maybe even a gamechanger,” Carter says. “In some ways it’s like a distillation of Smith’s career-long thematic preoccupations.”

CHRIS BYRNE Chris Byrne is the author of the graphic novel project The Magician (Marquand Books, 2013) as well as the book The Original Print (Guild Publishing, 2002). He is Co-Chair of Art21's Contemporary Council and serves on the Dallas Contemporary’s board of directors, the American Folk Art Museum’s Council for the Study of Art Brut and the SelfTaught, and VisitDallas Cultural Tourism Committee. He is the co-founder of the Dallas Art Fair and was formerly Chairman of the Board of the American Visionary Art Museum.

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LAUREN CHRISTENSEN With more than 19 years of experience in advertising and marketing, Lauren consults with clients in art, real estate, fashion, and publishing through L. Christensen Marketing & Design. She serves on the boards of the Christensen Family Foundation and Helping Our Heroes. Her clean, contemporary aesthetic and generous spirit make Lauren the perfect choice to art direct Patron.

PEGGY LEVINSON A previous showroom owner in the Dallas Design Center and home magazine design and style editor, Levinson lends her design expertise to Patron. In Nasher-esque, she catches up with Donald Fowler, between his buying trips to Paris, on the artisans he hand-selected for the new titivated Nasher Store. Modern Move had Peggy visiting with Robyn and Michael Siegel in their historical home filled to the brim with contemporary art and the arrival of their baby girl, Phoebe Tiger.

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NANCY COHEN ISRAEL A Dallas-based art historian, Nancy is an ongoing Patron contributor who writes for other national publications of note. For this issue, she enjoyed covering two of the season’s most exciting exhibitions. First, in Horror Show, she highlighted Dallas’s own Misty Keasler whose exhibit Haunt is on view at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. And she delved into the newly restored paintings of Francisco de Zurbarán from Auckland Castle mounted at the Meadows Museum in All My Sons.

GAVIN DELAHUNTY Gavin Delahunty is the Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at the Dallas Museum of Art. His forthcoming projects include a survey of film and video artists from the 1960s to the present titled Truth: 24 frames per second and Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty, the first full exploration of the artist’s work in the U.S. for almost 30 years. Delahunty is widely published, with recent essays on Walter De Maria, Laura Owens, and Charles Ray, and a forthcoming text on the life and work of David Smith.

JUSTINE LUDWIG Justine Ludwig is the Director of Exhibitions/Senior Curator at Dallas Contemporary. In recent years she has curated exhibitions at the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, the Tuft University Art Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro. Ludwig holds an MA in Global Arts from Goldsmiths University of London. In Celia Eberle’s Aesthetic Soothsaying, Justine tells of the artist’s totems comprised of natural found materials.

KENDALL MORGAN A Dallas journalist about town, whose work has appeared in The Nasher and Patron among others, Kendall Morgan has spent her career examining the space where culture, art, fashion, and food align. In this issue she discovers All That Glitters is indeed gold, with the opening of the highly anticipated restaurant, Bullion, a venue that embodies all of these elements in one ambitious mix. Here she visits with Thomas HartlandMackie, artists of international renown, and the Michelinstarred Chef, Bruno Davaillon.

SHAYNA FONTANA From the windy streets of Chicago, Shayna Fontana is a fashion and interiors photographer living in Dallas with her husband Rand Horowitz and toddler, Oliver. Shayna’s work has appeared on the cover of Patron in addition to numerous fashion and home features within its pages. In Modern Move Shayna worked with stylist Kristen Richter to harness the spirit of Robyn and Michael Siegel’s 1926 home, adorned with an enlivened contemporary art collection.

JOHN SMITH An ongoing Patron contributor, Dallasbased photographer John Smith enjoys bringing out the art of architecture in his work. He consults with numerous architects, designers, and artists to bring their vision to light. In All That Glitters John took a sneak peek inside Bullion with Patron, the much-anticipated Chef Bruno Davaillon-helmed restaurant on Record Street, and captured Cindy Rachofsky and Deedie Rose on the eve of TWO x TWO in Precious Materials.

THOM JACKSON Jackson is a fine art photographer represented by Craighead Green Gallery and On Center Gallery in Provincetown, Massachusetts. His editorial work has appeared in Vogue, Italian Bazaar, and GQ. His images from Blurring the Line were acquired for The Resource Center’s collection. Thom's commercial career began with a trip to the former Soviet Union on an award-winning assignment for Neiman Marcus and set the standard for his work. The inspiration for Full Transparency stems from his two photographs: Dress #1 and Dress #2. STEVEN TAYLOR Steven Taylor is an American photographer and director based in Los Angeles working with both film and digital. His portfolio highlights a simplistic and sophisticated side of an artist whose identity is seamlessly paralleled in his own work. With a near painterly quality, he captured TWO x TWO Artist Honoree Jonas Wood for Mark Maker. Of the experience Taylor says, "I'm a fan so it never felt like I was working. I was just making sure I would remember my time with Jonas in his studio."


PUBLISHER | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Terri Provencal terri@patronmagazine.com ART DIRECTION Lauren Christensen DIGITAL MANAGER/PUBLISHING COORDINATOR Anthony Falcon COPY EDITOR Paul W. Conant PRODUCTION Michele McNutt CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chris Byrne Steve Carter Nancy Cohen Israel Gavin Delahunty Eric Green Peggy Levinson Justine Ludwig Kendall Morgan Cindy Rachofsky CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Kelly Alexander Josh Martin Bruno Marcy Meeks Tamytha Cameron Anjal Patel Anthony Chiang Kym Skiles Gary Donihoo John Smith Daniel Driensky Meg Smith Shayna Fontana Steven Taylor David Gonzalez Kevin Todora Thom Jackson Walter Weissman Robert LaPrelle STYLISTS AND ASSISTANTS Kristen Richter Phillip Groves Joshua Martin ADVERTISING info@patronmagazine.com or by calling (214)642-1124 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM View Patron online @ patronmagazine.com REACH US info@patronmagazine.com SUBSCRIPTIONS www.patronmagazine.com One year $36/6 issues, two years $48/12 issues For international subscriptions add $12 for postage SOCIAL @patronmag

is published 6X per year by Patron, P.O. Box 12121, Dallas, Texas 75225. Copyright 2011, Patron. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without express written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. Opinions expressed in editorial copy are those of experts consulted and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors, publisher or the policy of Patron. Unsolicited manuscripts and photographs should be sent to the address above and accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope for return. Publisher will take reasonable precaution with such materials but assumes no responsibility for their safety. Please allow up to two months for return of such materials.

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IMAGES PRESENTED MAY NOT REFLECT NEW CONSTRUCTION IN THE CONTINUALLY CHANGING DOWNTOWN URBAN ENVIRONMENT. THIS MATERIAL DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AN OFFER TO SELL NOR A SOLICITATION TO BUY IN ANY STATE WHERE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED IF SUCH REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN FILED. CERTAIN DESCRIBED SERVICES ARE SUBJECT TO FUTURE MODIFICATION BY THE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION AND MAY BE SUBJECT TO ADDITIONAL FEES. BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY AND THE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY LOGO ARE REGISTERED (AND UNREGISTERED) SERVICE MARKS USED WITH PERMISSION. EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED. WE ARE PLEDGED TO THE LETTER AND SPIRIT OF U.S. POLICY FOR THE ACHIEVEMENT OF EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY THROUGHOUT THE NATION. WE ENCOURAGE AND SUPPORT AN AFFIRMATIVE ADVERTISING AND MARKETING PROGRAM IN WHICH THERE ARE NO BARRIERS TO OBTAINING HOUSING BECAUSE OF RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, SEX, HANDICAP, FAMILIAL STATUS, OR NATIONAL ORIGIN.


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THE MAGIC HAPPENS HERE AT THE EISEMANN CENTER 2017-2018 SEASON ON SALE NOW THEATRE SERIES

Forbidden Broadway 35th Anniversary Tour

Texas in Paris

With Lillias White & Scott Wakefield

Driving Miss Daisy

PostSecret: The Show

Five Performances: Feb. 15-18, 2018

Sheree J. Wilson & Clarence Gilyard

Five Performances: Apr. 12-15, 2018

Five Performances: Oct. 19-22, 2017

Five Performances: Nov. 16-19, 2017

Piaf! The Show

Rosanne Cash Black List River

Take 6 & Nnenna Freelon Spread Love for Christmas Tue, Nov. 28, 8 pm

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Martha Redbone Bone Hill: The Concert

Mummenschanz: you & me

Carefree: Dancin’ with Fred and Ginger

Amazing Grace The Musical

MAINSTAGE SHOWS

Sat, Oct. 28, 8 pm

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Apr. 19 & 20

Sat, Mar. 10, 8 pm

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A Night with Janis Joplin

METHODIST RICHARDSON FAMILY THEATRE SERIES

The Amazing Max

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Sun, Jan. 21, 2:30 pm

KEYBOARD CONVERSATIONS

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Sun, Feb. 25, 2:30 pm

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The TWO x TWO gala will take place at The Rachofsky House on Saturday, October 28, 2017. To date, TWO x TWO has raised over $68 million for amfAR and the DMA. Yuji Agematsu Justin Adian John Ahearn Hurvin Anderson Daniel Arsham Gijs Bakker Davide Balliano Lynn Batchelder Michael Bauer Jake Berthot Andrew Bick Sanford Biggers Sofia Björkman Barbara Bloom Katherine Bradford Dirk Braeckman Geta Brătescu Troy Brauntuch Fernando and Humberto Campana Gillian Carnegie Nathan Carter Douglas Leon Cartmel Jordan Casteel Monica Cecchi Matthew Chambers Susan Cianciolo Phil Collins Bruce Conner Minerva Cuevas

Carl D’Avila TM Davy Bettina Dittlmann Tomory Dodge Willie Doherty David Downton Gregory Edwards Sam Falls Shannon Finley Benedikt Fischer Morgan Fisher Derek Fordjour Fernanda Fragateiro Jessie Homer French Karl Fritsch Aaron Garber-Maikovska Sayre Gomez Rodney Graham Isca Greenfield-Sanders Leah Guadagnoli The Haas Brothers Heidi Hahn Kirk Hayes Jeppe Hein Secundino Hernández Lubaina Himid Richard Höglund Tony Horton Ridley Howard

Shara Hughes Parker Ito Ann Veronica Janssens Josh Kline Daniel Kruger Lee Kun-Yong Otto Künzli Bob Law Margaret Lee Anne Lindberg Matt Lipps Hew Locke Jake Longstreth Josh Bailer Losh Sarah Lucas Eric N. Mack Marco Maggi Erica Mahinay Robert Mapplethorpe Bruno Martinazzi Masatoshi Masanobu Alicia McCarthy William McKeown Jonathan Meese Anna Membrino Ana Mendieta Shuji Mukai Kazumi Nagano Kazumi Nakamura

Evert Nijland Thomas Nozkowski William J. O’Brien Alex Olson Judy Onofrio Catherine Opie Ray Parker Betty Parsons Tobias Pils Annelies Planteijdt Harvey Quaytman Noam Rappaport Michelle Rawlings Dan Rees Ben Rivers Daniel Rios Rodriguez Celia Rogge Matthew Ronay Amanda Ross-Ho Marzia Rossi Mimmo Rotella Robert Sagerman Lucy Sarneel Florian Schmidt Bernard Schobinger Maximilian Schubert Hugh Scott-Douglas Tomoko Shioyasu Gary Simmons

Timur Si-Qin Robert Smit Leon Polk Smith Anthony Sonnenberg Bettina Speckner Hito Steyerl Claire Tabouret Lorraine Tady Loring Taoka Henry Taylor Wolfgang Tillmans Quinn Tivey Hiroki Tsukuda Francis Upritchard Leo Villareal Don Voisine Lisa Walker Greta Waller Tom Wesselmann Zeke Williams Donald Roller Wilson Margo Wolowiec Matthew Wong Jonas Wood Rosha Yaghmai Anicka Yi Kim Yong-Ik Toshio Yoshida Petra Zimmermann

artist list as of September 7

View the full auction catalogue and register to bid at twoxtwo.org.


The Dallas Museum of Art exhibition Yayoi Kusama: All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins, on view through February 25, 2018, is made possible by the TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund and The Rachofsky Collection. The special exhibition features one of artist Yayoi Kusama’s iconic Infinity Mirror Rooms, which immerses visitors in a colorful fantasy of glowing pumpkins. The pending joint acquisition of The Rachofsky Collection and the Dallas Museum of Art through the TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund will mark the first work of its kind by Kusama in a North American collection.

DMA Members see it free! For tickets or more information, visit DMA.org/Kusama Yayoi Kusama: All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins is made possible by the TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund and the Rachofsky Collection. Image (detail): Yayoi Kusama, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins, 2016, wood, mirror, plastic, acrylic, LED, Courtesy Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / Singapore and Victoria Miro, London, Š Yayoi Kusama


OF NOTE

HORROR SHOW

Misty Keasler, The Giant Room, Netherworld, Atlanta, GA, 2016, archival pigment print, 42 x 42 in. Courtesy the artist and The Public Trust

T

he thrill of being terrified is the lure for those venturing into commercial haunted houses. In Haunt, Dallas-based photographer Misty Keasler captures these horror chambers and the actors who deliver adrenalin-fueled adventures. Keasler spent two years crisscrossing the country visiting these uniquely American sites. “I looked for the places that were the most over-the-top in terms of the work that goes into them,” she says. Images from the series are currently on view at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. As a photojournalist, Keasler has a documentarian’s eye. A visit to Terrell’s Thrillvania inspired this series. “I was fascinated with the details.” It led her to explore the physical and psychological impact of these amusements. The creators of these haunts work off our deepest fears. Andrea Karnes, senior curator at the Modern, says, “It is interesting to see one’s interpretations of what would scare people.” Keasler concurs, adding, 36

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“In the spaces, there is often a climax about what is scary in a room. I was photographing that immediacy and then began looking at what was happening around the edges.” In images replete with blood, zombies, and myriad gory details, the work also reflects the limits of photography. “There are a lot of factors at work that aren’t visual,” Keasler says. She speaks of the scent of cheap perfume and the fear frequencies that work on a biological level that contribute to the eeriness. Motion is also elusive. An oversized hand at Atlanta’s Netherworld overwhelms a small room. Operated by a staff member, the hand is in fact a puppet that can reach out and grab visitors. Its actual purpose is to keep thrill-seekers moving at this popular annual attraction. Nonetheless, by using long timed exposures, Keasler explains, “I was trying to get back the tension of the feeling in these spaces.” – NANCY COHEN ISRAEL


A RT WO R K A B OV E Tom Holland | Miller’s Mound | 2009 epoxy on aluminum | 52" x 83.5"

OPENING RECEPTION

10.27.2017, 5-8 PM Artist in attendance Complimentary valet parking

A RT WO R K B E LOW Tom Holland | Knudson | 1970 epoxy on fiberglass | 48" x 96"

SOLO EXHIBITION: 10.27.2017 - 12.2.2017

3 0 0 C R E S C E N T C O U RT, S U I T E 1 0 0 , DA L L A S , T E X A S 7 5 2 0 1 | 2 1 4 . 2 7 2 . 2 7 9 5 | B I V I N S G A L L E RY. C O M | A RT @ B I V I N S G A L L E RY. C O M


NOTED 04

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01 AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM The Souls of Black Folk features work from the Billy R. Allen Folk Art Collection. Explore the history of a North Dallas community in Facing the Rising Sun: Freedman’s Cemetery. Both ongoing at AAM. aamdallas.org 02 AMON CARTER MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART Abstract Texas: Midcentury Modern Painting runs through Oct. 8. Nature/Culture explores how nature counterpoints and enlivens our built environment through Dec. 10. Archiving Eden is an exhibition for North Texas photographer Dornith Doherty who showcases the work of international seed banks, through Jan. 14. Through Feb. 11, Caught on Paper surveys outdoor subjects that captivate American artists by bringing together more than thirty works. The film Hugh the Hunter engages with contemporary issues of race, class, and the practice of hunting, through Feb. 18. cartermuseum.org 03 ANN & GABRIEL BARBIER-MUELLER MUSEUM A continuing exhibition examines crests and symbols of the warrior class and the powerful samurai clans that used them. The museum sponsors a Lunchtime Talk every Thursday and Public Tours every Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. samuraicollection.org 04 CROW COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART Hidden Nature: Sopheap Pich displays Cambodia’s celebrated contemporary artist’s large-scale sculpture, Rang Phnom Flower, 2015, through Jan. 7. Styled with Poise: Figures in Japanese Paintings and Prints features depictions from townspeople to Japanese heroines. Visualizing 38

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Afterlife, Paradise and Earthly Spheres in Chinese Art explores three common themes found in art. Jade pieces from the Ming and Qing dynasties display in Sculpting Nature: Jade from the Collection. Fierce Loyalty: A Samurai Complete features the art and culture of the Japanese samurai. All four permanent collection exhibitions are ongoing. Image: Yu Araki, Still from Wrong Revision, 2016. Courtesy of the artist. crowcollection.org 05 DALLAS CONTEMPORARY Invisible Images: Asian Moving Images, McDermott & McGough: I’ve Seen the Future and I’m Not Going, and a solo show, Kiki Smith: Mortal open Sep. 29 and run through Dec. 17. dallascontemporary.org

Oct. 22–Jan. 28. Multiple Selves: Portraits from Rembrandt to Rivera runs through Nov. 5. Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail, runs through Nov. 12. Edward Steichen: In Exaltation of Flowers mounts a series of seven panels through May 13, 2018. dma.org 08 GEOMETRIC MADI MUSEUM Through Oct. 22, Biennial: Origins in Geometry recognizes emerging visual artists who work in geometric abstraction. geometricmadimuseum.org

06 DALLAS HOLOCAUST MUSEUM Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in World War II exhibits African American achievements and struggles and explores how the war served as a catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement, Oct. 2–Jan. 26. On Oct. 2, iRead Book Club will discuss Neighbors by Jan T. Gross as part of the Civil Discourse Series: U.S. Policy on Refugees from War Zones. Oct. 24 will celebrate Lauren Embrey as the 2017 Hope for Humanity Honoree. dallasholocaustmuseum.org 

09 GEORGE W. BUSH PRESIDENTIAL CENTER Portraits of Courage: A Commander in Chief’s Tribute to America’s Warriors tells the stories of members of the US Military in sixty-six full-color portraits and a four-panel mural rendered by George W. Bush through Oct. 1. Former Secretary of State, Dr. Condoleezza Rice, will discuss her latest book, Democracy: Stories from the Long Road to Freedom, and share her experiences as a policymaker, as she offers insights into today’s most important foreign policy issues, Oct. 10. On Nov. 5 hear fun and poignant stories from Barbara Bush and Jenna Bush Hager as they discuss their new book, Sisters First: Stories from Our Wild and Wonderful Life. bushcenter.org  

07 DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART Yayoi Kusama: All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins (2016) presents one of Yayoi Kusama’s signature Infinity Mirror Rooms through Feb. 25. In the DMA’s first fully time-based media exhibition, Truth: 24 frames per second brings together 24 pioneers of film and video from over six decades who focus on pressing themes to investigate the nature of truth and reality in contemporary life,

10 KIMBELL ART MUSEUM Casanova: The Seduction of Europe explores the 18th century through the eyes of one of its most colorful characters, Giacomo Casanova (1725–1798), who lived not only in Italy, but in France and England, and traveled to the Ottoman Empire and to meet Catherine the Great in Saint Petersburg. Bringing together paintings, sculpture, works on paper, furnishings, porcelain,


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silver, and period costumes, Casanova brings this world to life through Dec. 31. Image: Jean-Antoine Houdon (French, 1741–1828), Voltaire, 1778, marble 14.37 x 8.37 x 8.37 in. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. kimbellart.org 11 LATINO CULTURAL CENTER LCC will continue its focus on local Mexican American History during Hispanic Heritage Month with a music history exhibit. Musica! runs through Oct. 15. Join the LLC every third Wednesday of the month for Cine de Oro featuring El Miedo No Anda En Burro, Oct. 18 and Julieta, Nov. 15. lcc.dallasculture.org 12 THE MAC The MAC and The Cedars Union will present the city’s first adaptation of Bring Your Own Beamer (BYOB) on Oct. 14. Initiated by Rafaël Rozendaal in Berlin, BYOB is an exploration of the medium of projection. This onenight-only exhibition invites artists of all disciplines to cast visual content onto the walls of buildings throughout The Cedars. The MAC will participate in the fifteenth annual Cedars Open Studios on Nov. 18. the-mac.org 13 MEADOWS MUSEUM Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form, inspired by Picasso’s work Still Life in a Landscape, remains on view through Nov. 5. When both artists lived and worked in Paris in the early 20th century, Diego Rivera accused Picasso of plagiarizing the foliage from one of his own paintings. Drawing on works in the museum’s collection, as well as other works on loan, the exhibit presents evidence of the “borrowing” of motifs. Through Jan. 7, Zurbarán: Jacob and his Twelve Sons, Paintings

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from Auckland Castle is on view. Francisco de Zurbarán is considered a Caravaggisti for his exceptional use of chiaroscuro. Thirteen paintings offer a visual narrative of Jacob’s deathbed act of bestowing a blessing on each son, foretelling their destinies and those of their tribes. meadowsmuseumdallas.org 14 MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH Misty Keasler’s Haunt, 2015–2017 features thirteen themed haunted houses across America. Depicting Baroque interior rooms and exterior scenes, the exhibition takes photography to the edge of where it fails as a medium, through Nov. 26. FOCUS: Katherine Bradford runs Nov. 4–Jan. 14. Bradford is known for her vibrant palette, faux-naïf style, and eccentric compositions. Image: Katherine Bradford, Roast, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 72 x 60 in. themodern.org 15 MUSEUM OF BIBLICAL ART Glassworks by Brad Abrams display in Traditions and Transitions exploring life, death, faith, and nature. Two important exhibitions, Barbara Hines: A Celebration of Survival and James Surls: Through the Thorn Tree, mount in November. biblicalarts.org 16 NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony presents t he artist’s distinctive reworking of chanoyu, or a traditional Japanese tea ceremony, including the myriad elements essential to that intensely ritualistic universe. This multimedia exhibition runs through Jan. 7. Paper into Sculpture includes Marco Maggi, Joshua Neustein, Nancy Rubins, and other important artists who play on tensions between commonly held understandings of

sculpture and what paper can and cannot do, when pushed to its physical limits. The artists treat paper as a material with a palpable 3D presence by ascribing varied processes. Image: Installation view, Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, on view March 23–July 24, 2016  at The Noguchi Museum, Long Island City, NY. Photograph by Genevieve Hanson. nashersculpturecenter.org 17 PEROT MUSEUM Create robots, connect circuitry, and meet local makers on Oct. 14 for  Discovery Days. Prepare for takeoff on a space exploration and constellation investigation with Journey to Space, Oct. 20–May 6, featuring two massive rotating labs that give a glimpse of what it feels  like to be on the International Space Station’s  Destiny  module. Stimulate your brain with a sleepover on Oct. 6, followed by  the Spooktacular Halloween  sleepover on Oct. 27, and on Nov. 3 get an inside scoop at the Perot’s newest exhibition  Journey to Space at a sleepover. perotmuseum.org 18 TYLER MUSEUM OF ART Roadside Distractions showcases 25 of Daniel Blagg’s urban realist paintings that depict decaying objects along roads and the Sky Vue Drive-In in Tyler through Nov. 26. Andy Warhol: Screen Prints & Snapshots, Oct. 1–Jan. 7, includes a series of Warhol’s signature silkscreen prints drawn from the Cochran Collection of LaGrange, Ga., and a collection of his celebrity-centric Polaroids from the Meadows Museum of American Art at Centenary College of Louisiana.  Image: Daniel Blagg, Fly By, 2017, oil on canvas, 58 x 84 in. Courtesy of the artist. tylermuseum.org OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2017

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NOTED: PERFORMING ARTS

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01 AMPHIBIAN From Oct. 13 –Nov. 5, follow A Lost Leonardo as he renounces art and goes to work for the ruthless leader of the Papal armies only to return to create his lasting masterpiece, the Mona Lisa. amphibianstage.com 02 AT&T PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Step back to 1920’s Paris with The Triplets of Belleville. Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville joins Benoit Charest to perform the original score live while the film screens on Oct. 12. Pioneering pianist and composer Herbie Hancock performs in Strauss Square on Oct. 13. In the Elevator Project 2017/2018 series, Dark Circles Contemporary Dance celebrates its fifth anniversary with two new creations by Founder/Artistic Director Joshua L. Peugh. First, Peugh creates a world-premiere modern reimagining of the classic ballets blancs ‘Les Sylphides’ titled Les Fairies followed by Big Bad Wolf inspired by tales used to frighten naughty children from timeless stories. Oct. 19–21. Zakir Hussain, known for his explorations of music from across the globe, brings CrossCurrents to the stage portraying inspiration between the idioms of jazz and Indian music, Oct. 25. Bill Engvall, a Grammy-nominated recording artist and comedian, will perform at the Winspear, Nov. 2. attpac.org 03 BASS PERFORMANCE HALL Rent follows a pivotal year in the lives of seven artists struggling to follow their dreams. Oct. 17–22. Sex Tips for Straight Women from a Gay Man, Nov. 1–5, is a romantic comedy that takes the audience on a wild ride where no topic is taboo and insider ‘tips’ come straight from the source. Through Nov. 14–19, Irving Berlin’s White Christmas tells the story of a song-and-dance team putting on a show in a magical Vermont Inn and falling for a stunning sister act in the process. Image: The Company of the Rent 20th Anniversary Tour. Photograph by Carol Rosegg, 2016. basshall.com 40

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04 CASA MAÑANA Tim R ice and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Broadway-hit musical Evita brings to the stage the dynamic persona of Eva Peron, wife of former Argentine dictator Juan Peron. The story follows Eva from her young, ambitious beginnings to the enormous wealth and power she gained as Argentina’s First Lady. Nov. 4–12. casamanana.org 05 DALLAS BLACK DANCE THEATRE DanceAfrica 2017, a tribute to National DanceAfrica Founder Dr. Charles “Baba Chuck” Davis, offers a daytime festival and evening performances featuring Bandan Koro African Drum and Dance Ensemble, Oct. 6–7. Tower, a masterpiece utilizing all 20 DBDT and DBDT: Encore! dancers, will create the energy of a storm front—fog, thunder, and rain. Head to Uncharted Territory where avant-garde meets contemporary modern dance, as a duet is expanded into a full-company work, Nov. 3–5. Behind the Scenes provides an opportunity to view the working process of both DBDT companies and the three Dallas Black Dance Academy ensembles. Nov. 20 –22. Image: Dancer Zion Pradier. Courtesy of The Dallas Dance Project. dbdt.com 06 DALLAS CHILDREN’S THEATER Through Oct. 29, the slapdash detective work of Scooby Doo meets the witty banter of Glee in Goosebumps the Musical: Phantom of the Auditorium based on the book series. Ghouls and Graveyards is a spine-tingling collection of masterpieces and supernatural surprises that arrive just in time for Halloween. Join the all-teen cast for a night of fright as they present a collection of stories from horror’s greatest authors—Edgar Allan Poe and W. W. Jacobs—plus our own Texas ghost-lore, Oct. 13–29. DCT’s holiday specials include Frosty and Friends as well as A Charlie Brown Christmas, Nov. 17–Dec. 23. dct.org

07 THE DALLAS OPERA Samson is the only hope of the oppressed Hebrews, and none of the machinations of the Philistines can stop him. Dalila’s temptation of Samson will persist until she has what she wants: the secret of his strength. Camille Saint-Saëns’ retelling of Samson and Dalila is a passionate account of what happens when two forces of nature meet, Oct. 20–Nov. 5. La Traviata sees the famed courtesan Violetta Valery navigate the twists and turns of the one thing she hoped never to come up against: love. The attentions of the love-struck Alfredo turns Violetta’s safe world upside down, making her question whether this young man is worth giving up her independence. La Traviata features one of Verdi’s most beautiful scores, from the rousing Brindisi to opera’s most romantic moments. Oct. 27– Nov. 12. dallasopera.org 08 DALLAS SUMMER MUSICALS An Evening with Bernadette Peters is a celebration of DSM and the magic of musical theatre, featuring one of Broadway’s critically acclaimed performers. Guests will enjoy a crafted menu of culinary delights as well as special experiences designed to engage beyond the traditional dinner format. Nov. 4. dallassummermusicals.org 09 DALLAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA A Celebration of Singing highlights Dallas Symphony Chorus’s 40th anniversary concert and showcases the extraordinary talent of the chorus under the baton of Joshua Habermann, Oct. 8. Remix: Dvorák’s American Suite is an intimate series of classical concerts in a relaxed setting, Oct. 13–14. Yves Thibaudet returns to the DSO with the powerful exoticism of Ravel’s Piano Concerto for the Left Hand, Oct. 19–22. Conducted by James Gaffigan, Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini features Stephen Hough on the piano. Nov. 2–5. Saint-Saëns Organ Symphony


INTRODUCING THE FIRST-EVER LEXUS LC 500 WHAT STARTED AS PURE CONCEPT, LAUNCHED A NEW ERA OF PERFORMANCE AND DESIGN. The LC 500 is a collection of visionary ideas. 10-speed Direct-Shift transmission. Near-perfect weight distribution. An innovative suspension system that defies conventional logic, accommodating available 21-inch wheels* within a ground-hugging profile. The LC is also an uncompromising approach to design. Although the first seat design was technically perfect, it was the 50th prototype that had the exact fit and feeling to complement the unique LC driving experience. This intense dedication to craftsmanship and innovation results in a level of refinement you’ve never felt. A sound you’ve never heard. And a feeling you have yet to experience. Introducing the first-ever 5.0-liter V8 Lexus LC 500 and Multistage Hybrid LC 500h. Experience the future of Lexus. Experience Amazing. lexus.com/LC | #LexusLC

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is onstage Nov. 16–19. Harlem’s legendary jazz nightclub comes alive in Return to the Cotton Club for an evening of great jazz, soulful tapping, and showmanship, Nov. 10–12. Jaap Van Zweden Conducts Schumann's 3rd Symphony brings Prokofiev's poignant Sinfonia concertante to life, Nov. 24–26 with Alisa Weilerstein on cello. mydso.org 10 DALLAS THEATER CENTER Hair continues to assault the status quo while shining a bright light on the power of love over hate, peace over war, freedom over repression, and hope over despair, through Oct. 22. A Christmas Carol returns to the Wyly Theatre in a delightfully reimagined take on Dickens’s enduring classic where the audience is surrounded by the actors with magical ghosts flying above, scary ghosts bursting out of the floor, and snow falling on everyone, Nov. 22–Dec. 28. Image: Tiana Kaye Johnson in Hair. Photography by Elizabeth Boyce. dallastheatercenter.org 11 EISEMANN CENTER Actor Max McLean stars in C.S. Lewis Onstage: The Most Reluctant Convert, through Oct. 7. Funny-man Gerard Alessandrini and his poison pen return in Forbidden Broadway 35th Anniversary Tour, Oct. 20–22. In the new play, Martin Luther on Trial, Luther’s beloved wife Katie defends him as witnesses, including Adolf Hitler, Sigmund Freud, Rabbi Josel, St. Paul, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Pope Francis take the stand, Nov. 3–4. Texas in Paris is a musical by Dallas’s own Alan Govenar. Akin Babatunde directs this story of a white man and a black woman invited to France to perform at the Maison des Cultures du Monde. Lillias White and Scott Wakefield  portray the pair as they struggle with preconceptions but manage to forge a transforming spiritual bond, Nov. 17–19. eisemanncenter.com 12 KITCHEN DOG THEATER From t he award-w i n n i ng play wr ight 42

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Martyna Majok, Ironbound is a darkly funny, heartbreaking portrait of an independent Polish immigrant for whom love is a luxury and a liability as she searches for the American Dream, Oct. 26–Nov. 12. kitchendogtheater.org

16 TEXAS BALLET THEATER The Nutcracker invites you to journey along with Clara to a dreamland of heroic battles and breathtaking beauty in a holiday classic for all ages at the Winspear Opera House, Nov. 25–26. texasballettheater.org

13 LYRIC STAGE Disney’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame, from the Oscar®-winning team of Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz, is a lushly scored retelling of Victor Hugo’s epic story of love, acceptance, and what it means to be a hero. Based on the Victor Hugo novel, the musical features songs from the beloved animated feature, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and the film’s score along with new songs by Menken and Schwartz, Nov. 17–19. lyricstage.org

17 THEATRE THREE Darkly comic and poignant, Adding Machine is a musical adaptation of Elmer Rice’s incendiary 1923 play, onstage through Oct. 22. Lear is a moving work of dance theatre that tells of the relationship between King Lear and his daughters,  Oct. 26–Nov. 19.  Solstice: Stories & Songs for the Holidays celebrates winter with tales and storytellers inspired by the coldest days of the year, Nov. 24–Dec. 17. theatre3dallas.com

14 MAJESTIC THEATRE The Beach Boys are coming to Majestic Theater on Oct. 10. Some of the most quotable queens from RuPaul’s Drag Race will Werq Your World on the Official World Tour, Oct. 19. On Oct. 21, Rhett & Link's Tour of Mythicality presents the first-ever live stage show for the Internet's mostwatched daily talk show hosts. Three Dog Night celebrates the band’s four decades on Nov. 2. The world-champion beatboxer, Ball-Zee, and international vocalists join together in Gobsmacked! featuring stories told through a cappella, traditional streetcorner harmonies; cutting-edge, multi-track live looping; and beatboxing, Nov. 21–22. majestic.dallasculture.org 15 TACA A breakfast, panel, and luncheon discussion, TACA Perforum’s Cross Sector Collaboration: Intersections between Arts Organizations and the Broader Arts Ecolog y  gathers experts from across the country to engage the North Texas community on pressing issues in the arts and culture, Oct. 23. taca-arts.org

18 TITAS Powerful and unrestrained cannot begin to describe the impact of Rami Be’er’s choreography on Israel’s Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company. One of the top-touring dance companies in the world today, Be’er’s works are one of Israel’s most exciting cultural exports, Oct. 27–28. Cuba’s Malpaso Dance Company has brought Cuban contemporary dance into the 21st century. Cuba takes center stage with Cuba Malpaso’s Dallas debut, Nov. 10–11. Image: Malpaso, Indomitable Waltz. Photograph by Judy Ondrey. titas.org 19 UNDERMAIN THEATRE John follows a young couple in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, near the site of the bloodiest battle of the Civil War at an eerie bed and breakfast run by an eccentric innkeeper. See what horrors await, Nov. 8–Dec. 3. undermain.org 20 WATERTOWER THEATRE Pride and Prejudice beckons Jane Austen fans and everyone else who love a sparkling comedy about the entanglements of family, love, marriage, and money, Oct. 13–Nov. 5. watetowertheatre.org


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NOTED: GALLERIES

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01 ALAN BARNES FINE ART Alan Barnes Fine Art will be offering a discount off their entire stock at 20 – 50% off the retail price in October. This is an opportunity for collectors throughout Texas to expand their collections. ABFA will be running their sale through November. alanbarnesfineart.com. 02 ANDNOW Eli Ping’s solo show continues through Oct. 21. andnow.biz 03 ARTSPACE111 New sculptures by Danville Chadbourne are titled New Works. The opening reception will be held Oct. 26, and the exhibition will run through Dec. 2. artspace111.com 04 BARRY WHISTLER GALLERY Ann Stautberg: Recent Photographs presents imagery from her Houston neighborhood in hand-colored black-and-white photographs. Count the Hours features Ellen Frances Tuchman’s 3D abstract ions using her signature paper quillwork. Both conclude Oct. 14. Two shows mount Oct. 21–Nov. 25 both titled New Paintings, featuring work from Dallas artist Lorraine Tady and Marfabased artist Leslie Wilkes. Image: Lorraine Tady, Event Horizon, 2017, acrylic and solvent-based ink on canvas, 48 x 36 in. barrywhistlergallery.com 05 BEATRICE M. HAGGERTY GALLERY Martin Lam Nguyen’s solo show, Moments, opens Oct. 5 with a closing reception on Nov. 3. Nguyen is a Roman Catholic priest whose meticulous drawings and paintings weave time with life’s moments in both their goodness and silence. udallas.edu/offices/artgallery 06 BEEFHAUS On Oct. 4, the gallery will have a screening of a new film by Madsen Max. Oct. 7, the 44

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gallery will have an exhibition curated by Temple Shipley. Following that, on Nov. 4, BEEFHAUS will have an exhibition opening with works by Travis LaMothe of Dallas and Ryan Blackwell of New York. beefhaus.org 07 BIVINS GALLERY Richard Hickam: Expressions of Color traces Hickam’s development from photorealism to large-scale abstracts, to figurative abstractions, and displays his manipulation of color and brushstroke through Oct. 27. Tom Holland: Birds and Water, on view Oct. 27–Dec. 2, features Holland’s paintings and freestanding paintings, inspired by the flora and fauna of northern California and the wine country. Holland’s works can be seen in the permanent collections of the Whitney, MoMA, the Hirshhorn, and the Guggenheim, among many others. There will be an opening reception Oct. 27, and the legendary artist will be present. Image: Tom Holland, Magpie, 2016, epoxy on aluminum, 48 x 48 in. bivinsgallery.com 08 CADD CADD’s Third Thursday Happy Hour will be held on Oct. 19 at 500X Gallery and on Nov. 16 at Carneal Simmons Contemporary Art. caddallas.net 09 CARLYN GALERIE Carlyn Galerie has established itself as a nationally recognized store devoted to the sale of fine American art glass, clay, fiber, metals, and jewelry. carlyngalerie.com 10 CARNEAL SIMMONS CONTEMPORARY ART Resonant Fragments, the first solo exhibition for textile sculptor Jen Pack, continues through Nov. 11. Her work, largely fabric and fiber based, is known for bold use of color and energetic sculptural forms. carnealsimmons.com

11 CHRISTOPHER MARTIN GALLERY Martin’s organic works use the artist’s reverse-painting technique. Gregory Price’s glass sculptures offer a play between motion and gravity employing cast molding, forming, and fusing techniques. Brandon Reese’s stoneware sculptures are known for their simple forms created in a variety of methods. These works push the traditional boundaries of ceramic art. Michael Enn Sirvet infuses his works with organic expression in mediums such as aluminum, steel, wood, and acrylic. All are ongoing. christophermartingallery.com 12 CIRCUIT 12 CONTEMPORARY Glimpse Through Liquid closes Oct. 7. Builders, a group exhibition curated by Benjamin Terry, runs Oct. 14–Dec. 30. Builders brings together artists Katie Bell, Matt Kleberg, Keith Allyn Spencer, Benjamin Terry, Marilyn Jolly, and Brad Tucker. Each artist acknowledges the tropes of abstractionists throughout history, while forging their own visual language within the contemporary dialogue of painting. circuit12.com 13 CONDUIT GALLERY Maitri, an exhibition of new work by Matt Clark, runs through Oct. 14. Two new exhibitions open Oct. 21. On view through Nov. 25, the first one includes work by Anthony Sonnenberg in Let Your Flowers Grow, rooted in a candid personal narrative; this Houston-based artist’s second solo exhibition will include sculpture, drawing, installation, and video. The second show is Christopher Gee’s Elsewhere, in which the artist creates small-scale paintings that interrupt one’s sense of time and place. Gee’s subjects, animal and pallid human alike, are refined in their unwavering gaze. Image: Anthony Sonnenberg, Clock (man alone chimes the time), 22 x 23 x 11 in. conduitgallery.com


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14 CRAIGHEAD GREEN GALLERY Denise Brown, Jay Maggio, and Joey Brock’s group show closes Oct. 7. Next, CGG will present a trio of exhibitions—Marci Crawford Harnden’s Scattered, Heather Gorham’s Slipping Into the Glimpse, and Raymond Saa’s New Works, on view Oct. 14–Nov. 1 with an opening reception on Oct. 14. Fine art photographer Thom Jackson opens Nov. 18 through the end of the year. craigheadgreen.com 15 CRIS WORLEY FINE ARTS Future Glow featuring paintings by Trey Egan concludes Oct. 7. William Cannings’ inflated steel sculptures will be featured in Vetted. Running concurrently, Charlotte Smith's abstract drip paintings mount in Dreamscape. Isabelle Du Toit’s solo exhibition, Trace, featuring dramatic realistic wildlife paintings, opens Nov. 18 and runs through Dec. 30. crisworley.com 16 CYDONIA Homecoming, displaying the work of Michael Dumontier, Micah Lexier, Trish Tillman, and Emi Winter, closes Oct. 28. A Present Abstract, an exhibition of paintings, drawings, sculptures, and photography by Mark Dudiak, Niall McClelland, Jade Rude, Jon Sasaki, Derek Sullivan, and Jim Verburg, curated by Alex Bowron, runs Nov. 18– Dec. 16. A reception will take place on Nov. 18. cydoniagallery.com 17 DADA The Dallas Art Dealers Association is an affiliation of gallery owners and nonprofit art organizations. DADA promotes the highest standards of ethical practice within the profession and is dedicated to increasing public awareness of art. dallasartdealers.org

214.520.8300 emathews@mathews-nichols.com mathews-nichols.com

18 DAVID DIKE FINE ART DDFA was established in 1986 in the Arts District of Uptown Dallas where it resides today. The gallery specializes in late 19th- and 20th-century American and European paintings with an emphasis on the Texas Regionalists and Texas Landscape painters. daviddike.com

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NOTED: GALLERIES

O ne Of A K ind 27th Anniversary Show Continues

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Ornament EXTRAVAGANZA

Opens November 11th

19 ERIN CLULEY GALLERY Alison Jardine’s solo show, OBJECTS FROM A FUTURE PAST, continues through Oct. 14. SM ALL , a group exhibition of small works with participating artists Nic Nicosia, Anna Membrino, Rachel Livedalen, Rene Trevino, Kevin Todora, Rob Wilson, Will Heron, Oliver Clegg, Hidenori Ishii, Dennis Congdon, Josephine Durkin, and Marilyn Jolly, is on display Oct. 21–Nov. 25 with an opening reception Oct. 21. erincluley.com 20 FORT WORKS ARTS adrift showcases Hillary Dohoney’s combination of realism and trompe l’oeil through her seascape paintings through Oct. 14. DUETS DEUX is a reemergence of Duets: A Comparison of Realities, showcasing seven sets of artists working in similar mediums, themes, or styles in an effort to take the audience through an exploration of comparative works. DUETS DEUX opens Nov. 1 and runs through Dec. 30. fortworksart.com

SUSAN GOTT

Kittrell/Riffkind Art Glass Gallery 4500 Sigma Rd. Dallas, Texas 972.239.7957 n www.kittrellriffkind.com

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21 FWADA To fulfill its mission to stimulate interest in the visual arts through educational programs, art scholarships, and art competitions, Fort Worth Art Dealers Association organizes, funds, and hosts exhibitions of noteworthy art. fwada.com 22 GALERIE FRANK ELBAZ Galerie Frank Elbaz’s mangelos: Investigating the Limits of Painting, curated by Dr. Ivana Bašičević Antić, explores the work of Dimitrije Bašičević mangelos and Julije Knifer. Created in post-war Croatia, their art presents an attempt to resolve the problem of the ‘death of painting’ and could be described


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NOTED: GALLERIES

Artist Leslie Lanzotti, detail: False Reality (JFK–A Fractured Reality Series), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 in.

CONTEMPORARY ART

22 as a par t of t he neo-avant-garde and protoconceptual practices in Europe. Through Oct. 28. Nov. 2–Dec. 16, Andy Coolquitt, Guillaume Leblon, and Matthew Wong are featured. Image: Matthew Wong, Day and Night, 2017, oil on canvas, 60 x 40 in. galeriefrankelbaz.com 23 GALLERIE NOIR Gallerie Noir is an award-winning interior design showroom known for its understated chic style with an eclectic edge. Their collection includes a vast assortment of customizable furniture, limitededition rugs, and one-of-a-kind art. gallerienoir.com

JFK - A Fractured Reality Featuring Artist Leslie Lanzotti October 14 - November 11, 2017

www.marytomasgallery.com 1110 Dragon Street | Dallas, TX 75207 | 214.727.5101 Hours: M-F 10-5, SAT 12-4 and by appointment

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24 GALLERI URBANE Jessica Drenk: States of Matter opens alongside Dentonbased artist Abby Sherrill: Modes of Moving Air on Oct. 14. Both solo shows run through Nov. 11. On Nov. 18, Rachel Hellmann: Doubling the Cube will open in conjunction with the 3rd Annual GIFT EDIT: a curated group show of small works featuring select gallery artists, and introducing new artists such as Dan Lam and Sean Cairns to name a few; both shows run through Dec. 30. galleriurbane.com 25 THE GOSS-MICHAEL FOUNDATION Nan Coulter, 14 SEPTEMBER 2017, displays a series of photographs taken during her travels over the past thirty years, with subject matters ranging from portraiture to abstracted land forms. Coulter asks us to consider the reality of the present and its relationship with the photographs hung on the gallery wall. Through Oct. 20. g-mf.org 26 HOLLY JOHNSON GALLERY On view through Nov. 4, Tommy Fitzpatrick’s Crystal Cities features a new body of work inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1940 project of the same name set for a Washington D.C. suburb that was never built. Exploring the material qualities of ink and canvas on paper, Drawing: Attn, an exhibition of


MEREDITH PARDUE

51 new ink drawings by John Adelman, will open on Oct. 14 with a reception and run through Dec. 23. Translating the notion of an ancient sacred space into a contemporary vocabulary, Margo Sawyer opening Nov. 18 will feature the artist’s large floor installation on view through Feb. 3. Image: Tommy Fitzpatrick, Portico, 2017, Plexiglas, 11 x 10 x 7.5 in. hollyjohnsongallery.com 27 JM GALLERY Acclaimed glass artist Carlyn Ray and her team present works whose brilliant, shimmering colors transform space. Formed at volcanic temperatures and blown into beguiling shapes, Ray’s glass forms capture both the magic of the medium and the passion of its creator. On display through Oct. 28. In A Ply and in a moment…for a moment, Shawn Saumell returns for a solo show opening Nov. 4 and running through Dec. 1. Image: Shawn Saumell, Jaunt, 2017, archival pigment print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag, 308 gsm edition: 5, 14 x 20 in. jmgallery.org 28 KIRK HOPPER FINE ART KHFA’s exhibition of Floyd Newsum, titled The Things I see, runs through Nov. 4. Next, the gallery will display the work of Dallas artist Carlos Donjuan and Alejandro Diaz, Nov. 11–Dec. 23. Dallas-based Donjuan and Diaz are known for their distinct figurative style that blends pop and European master painting with contemporary culture. kirkhopperfineart.com 29 KITTRELL/RIFFKIND ART GLASS One of a Kind is an exhibit of works created by 50 gallery artists to commemorate Kittrell/Riffkind’s 27th anniversary. The festivities will continue through October. Ornament Extravaganza! is a celebration of shape and color in time for the holiday season. There is an opening reception Nov. 11. The show continues through the month of December. kittrellriffkind.com

Saturday, October 14, 2017 Opening Reception, 5-8PM

Artist in Attendance Exhibition on display through November 11, 2017

1130 Dragon St. Dallas, TX 75207 214.761.2000 LauraRathe.com

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NOTED: GALLERIES

45 30 KRISTY STUBBS GALLERY Kristy Stubbs brings years of experience and expertise to the global art trade, often bringing notable artists to the US from abroad. stubbsgallery.com 31 LAURA RATHE FINE ART Zhuang Hong Yi: Chromatic Shift closes Oct. 7. On Oct. 14, LRFA debuts a new body of work by Texas artist and contemporary painter, Meredith Pardue. Drawing inspiration from Caribbean landscape and water formations, Pardue’s solo exhibition, Cenote Falls, will be on view through Nov. 11. Robert Mars & Stallman opens Nov. 18, displaying new work by contemporary mixed-media, Robert Mars, and painter/sculptor artist duo, Stallman. On display through Dec. 30. laurarathe.com 32 LILIANA BLOCH GALLERY Architectures of aspiration (aka RIP) is Kristen Cochran’s first solo exhibition at Liliana Bloch. Cochran continues her exploration into the idea of labor and the process of making, calling into question universal aspirational endeavors while exploring gestures related to the act of working, resting, and the fragility of the structures that support or impede our dreams from fulfillment. Oct. 14–Nov. 11. From Nov. 18–Dec. 30, LBG will host the work of Alicia Henry. Image: Kristen Cochran, Rainbow Tag, 2017, work shirt tag, 2.5 by 2.5 in. lilianablochgallery.com 33 LMB ART GLASS This Design District glass gallery features North American artists and focuses on quality and diversity, with pieces ranging from jewelry and gift items to freeform focal pieces. lmbartglass.com 34 LUMINARTÉ FINE ART GALLERY Geometric Investigations features Motte Thomas, Chun Hui Pak, and Scott Eakin whose works explore geometric queries that connect in three distinctly different ways thru curves, folds, and lines, mirroring the patterns of intricate processes found in nature. 50

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HEATHER GORHAM SLIPPING INTO THE GLIMPSE

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MARCI CRAWFORD HARNDEN

Through Oct. 28. Keiko Gonzalez will mount a solo show in November. luminartegallery.com

SCATTERED

35 MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES Martin Lawrence Galleries specializes in original paintings, limited-edition prints, and sculpture. martinlawrence.com 36 MARY TOMÁS GALLERY SPACE & TIME, showcasing Don Parr’s 2D and 3D color-field works, utilizing pristine salvaged airplane parts as his canvas; and Kenneth Schiano’s 2D panel paintings of textural, conceptual, and architectural imagery, ends Oct. 7. Leslie Lanzotti’s solo exhibition, JFK: A FR ACTURED REALITY, curated by Texas artist Dennis Blagg, opens Oct. 14 and closes Nov. 11. Lanzotti’s paintings expose the JFK assassination as a turning point in history and a landscape riddled with more questions than answers. Opening Nov. 18, TWELV E, the Best of 2017, is a gallery group exhibition. marytomasgallery.com

RAYMOND SAA NEW WORKS

37 PHOTOGRAPHS DO NOT BEND Bonnie & Clyde: The End offers historical photographs from the personal collection of PDNB Gallery Director, Burt Finger. Cowboys, Cowgirls, and Some Indians showcases cowboy culture through photographs by Bank Langmore, Chris Regas, Jeremy Enlow, John Stryke, and Edward S. Curtis. The still life work of John Herrin will run concurrently, featuring photographs of flower arrangements within his home that took on a different character in darkness resulting from the long power outage following Hurricane Ike. All three exhibitions run through Nov. 11. pdnbgallery.com

RECEPTION: OCTOBER 14 5 PM - 8 PM

OPEN: 10 / 14 / 17 - 11/11/17

38 THE POWER STATION Ending Oct. 26, PROXIMIDAD features the Dallas edition of the two-month-long, self-directed residency and cultural exchange between artists Jeff Gibbons and Gabriel Rico and institutions The Power Station and Cerámica Suro Contemporenea in Guadalajara,

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NOTED: GALLERIES M E A D OW S M U S E U M

SMU

DA L L A S

07 México, resulting in two separate exhibits that ruminate on the exchange. A one-night exhibition by Guadalajara, Mexico-based artist Carlos Ranc, titled An Exhibition of Failure, mounts inside Culture Hole on Oct. 14 from 10 p.m. to midnight. powerstationdallas.com

PICASSO/ RIVERA

ST I L L L I F E AND THE P REC ED EN C E O F F O RM

THROUGH NOVEMBER 5, 2017

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973), Still Life in a Landscape, 1915. Oil on canvas. Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Algur H. Meadows Collection, MM.69.26. Photo by Michael Bodycomb. © 2016 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. This exhibition has been organized by the Meadows Museum and funded by a generous gift from The Meadows Foundation.

M E A D OWS M U S E U M DA L L A S .O R G

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39 THE PUBLIC TRUST The Public Trust exhibits contemporary artwork by mid-career and emerging artists. The gallery’s program extends into publishing significant art publications, as well as limited-edition prints and other multiples. trustthepublic.com 40 THE READING ROOM In partnership with The Power Station, Carlos Ranc will give a lecture at The Reading Room on the history of Clipperton Island, as it relates to his project, An Exhibition of Failures, Oct. 12, from 6–7. Waterloo, opening Oct. 28, exhibits drawings by Angela Kallus featuring Little Blue Books, pocket-sized publications that were mass-produced between 1919 and 1978 on topics ranging from philosophy and literature to sex education and practical matters. Image: Angela Kallus, Double Blue Monochrome (Dorothea, Dorothea.), 2017, chalk, pastel, and graphite on paper, 10.25 x 14 in. thereadingroom-dallas.blogspot.com 41 RO2 ART In Can You Get That To Me By Wednesday? Austin Sparks illustrates the dysfunctional order of the human thought process through Oct. 10. Adam Benjamin Fung presents poignant findings from his journey to the Arctic Circle in Iceberg X through Oct. 28. Belgian artist Peggy Wauters mounts her miniature paintings through Oct. 28. Julia Trinh brings relevance to outdated magazines and phone books in Joy Element: Cutting Paper and More at The Magnolia Theatre, Oct. 12–Nov. 14. In Pegasus Armor, Joshua Goode mixes fact with fiction to distort the history and myths of each region he’s engaged with, Nov. 4–Dec. 2. Portrait artist Patty Rooney turns her attention towards female starlets


DALLAS

JESSICA DRENK

32 in Monster Stars, Nov. 16–Dec. 19. Ro2art.com 42 ROUGHTON GALLERIES Featuring fine 19th- and 20th-century American and European paintings, the gallery actively supports research in both American and European art. roughtongalleries.com 43 RUSSELL TETHER FINE ART RTFA manages estates and features renowned national and international artists, along with select artists from North America. russelltether.com

StateS

45 SITE131 THE GRID: order in a disordered world through Dec. 16 gathers talents from Ghana, Germany, and the United States, curated by Site131 co-founder Joan Davidow, defined by patterned work from Atta Kwami, who lives and works in Ghana and England; Christopher Dunlap, New York; Laszlo Thorsen-Nagel, German living in Marfa; and Brandon Araujo, from Texas. Image: Christopher Dunlap, I.N.S. 07, 2017, oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in. site131.com 46 SMINK WESTER N PL ANS, New Works by Robert Szot presents oil paintings on panel and works on paper by the Brooklyn-based, Texas-raised artist. Opening reception Oct. 14, on view through Dec. 22. sminkinc.com

Cozy Portrait of Jessica Drenk in her studio by Kristin Skees

44 SAMUEL LYNNE GALLERIES Founder of Reflectionist art, artist JD Miller mounts Absence of Color on Oct. 14. The solo show features paintings that present a departure for Miller who translates his colorful artworks into a monochromatic palette. Through Nov. 10. John Henry opens on Nov. 18 and will display an expansive body of work, with pieces being brought in from all over the country. The world-renowned sculptor will be in attendance for opening night. The show will conclude on Dec. 23. samuellynne.com

of

Matter October 14 - November 11

GALLERI URBANE

2277 Monitor St. Dallas TX 75207 • galleriurbane.com • 325.226.8015

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NOTED: GALLERIES Keiko Gonzalez the artist himself, a soft machine, a maker of a thousand paintings.

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47 SOUTHWEST GALLERY Join Southwest Gallery Oct. 7 for a father-andson exhibition featuring the work of Jesus and Iban Navarro. The duo brings rare expertise in photorealism through Oct. 28. Following tradition of the great Spanish painters of the 20th century, including Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali, the unique and distinctive artwork of Alvar Sunol has taken a revered spot in the history and iconography of our times. Sunol’s work will be on display Nov. 4 through Nov. 25. swgallery.com 48 TALLEY DUNN GALLERY This is Now, featuring new work by gallery artists, runs through Oct. 7. Two solo exhibitions open on Oct. 20 for artists Rima Canaan Lee and Leonardo Drew. Rococo on the Edge focuses on Lee’s newest photography series. Leonardo Drew will display the artist’s sculptures primarily comprised of found and reclaimed wood. Both exhibitions run through Dec. 16. talleydunn.com

Opening Reception Nov. 10th -7-9 p.m. Exhibition on view through Jan. 27th

49 VALLEY HOUSE GALLERY Mary Vernon: Paintings runs through Oct. 28. Vernon will give an artist talk on Oct. 14. The Grace Museum in Abilene will exhibit Mary Vernon: Painting is Drawing, through January 6. Donald S. Vogel (1917–2004), opening Nov. 4 celebrates the 100th anniversary of his birth year. Vogel, along with his wife Peggy, founded Valley House Gallery in 1954. His philosophy was to “celebrate each new day, knowing it is a gift in itself, and produce something of worth to be shared.” Image: Mary Vernon, Pond, 2017, oil and graphite on Yupo, 60 x 120 in. Courtesy of Valley House Gallery. valleyhouse.com

1727 E. Levee St. Dallas, TX  75207 214-914-4503 Luminartegallery.com | luminartedesign.com

50 WAAS GALLERY The gallery and studios will return in November with pop-up shows, panel discussions, and a heavy focus on women in the arts in America and around the globe. waasgallery.com.

Image: Keiko Gonzalez Detail: Bedrock, 60 x 72.

Soft Machine

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A02 51 WILLIAM CAMPBELL CONTEMPORARY ART Jeff Kellar’s Gravity + Light ends Oct. 14. Perpendicular to the Force of Gravity brings a sculpture exhibition by Beverly Penn. Penn casts elements from the landscape in bronze, creating an enduring stand-in for the ephemeral original, much like a memorial. The exhibition will run Oct. 21–Nov. 25. Image: Jeff Kellar, Reveal, resin, clay, and pigment on aluminum composite panel, 48 x 35.5 in. williamcampbellcontemporaryart.com AUCTIONS 01 DALLAS AUCTION GALLERY The Fine Jewels Auction, Nov. 8, will feature pieces from the collection of Mr. Kenneth W. Davis, Fort Worth, Texas. The sale includes diverse offerings, from turn-of-the-century antique jewels to pieces by contemporary designers. dallasauctiongallery.com 02 HERITAGE AUCTIONS Heritage Auctions will offer one of Norman Rockwell’s earliest Saturday Evening Post covers in its American Art Auction on Nov. 3. Purchased for less than $100 in 1954, the iconic Laz ybones spent 41 years with its whereabouts unknown after being stolen from its owner’s home in 1976. Recovered by the FBI in 2016, the work is expected to bring more than $1,000,000 at auction. A Prints & Multiples Modern & Contemporary Art Auction takes place Oct. 23, followed by Design Signature Auction on Oct. 24, Musical Instruments Auction on Oct. 27, American Art Signature Auction on Nov. 3, Texas Art Signature Auction on Nov. 18, and the Modern & Contemporary Art Signature Auction on Nov. 30. Image: Norman Rockwell (American, 1894 –1978), Laz ybones, Saturday Evening Post cover, September 6, 1919, oil on canvas, 26 x 24 in. Estimate: $1,000,000–1,500,000. ha.com

WILD SPACES, OPEN SEASONS Hunting and Fishing in American Art October 7, 2017–January 7, 2018

Free Admission #CaughtAtTheCarter Iconic works by Thomas Cole, Winslow Homer, and Andrew Wyeth are featured in this major exhibition of paintings and sculpture that demonstrates the aesthetic richness and cultural importance of hunting and fishing in America. Winslow Homer (1836–1910), A Huntsman and Dogs (detail), 1891, oil on canvas, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, The William L. Elkins Collection, 1924 This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. The local presentation is supported by BNSF Railway Foundation, Christie’s, Collectors Covey, Fort Worth Promotion and Development Fund, Joan and Walker Friedman, Karen and Tim Hixon, Julie and Scott Kleberg, Kleinheinz Family Foundation for the Arts and Education, Luther King Capital Management, Beth and Ron Parrish, Martha M. and J. Kent Sweezey, and Wells Fargo.

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FAIR TRADE

BY ERIC GREEN

A PAINTER’S GALLERY Movement, physicality, and presence define the artist roster in Nino Mier Gallery.

F

ounded in 2015, Nino Mier Gallery is a contemporary art space focused on bringing a diverse and international program to Los Angeles. Defined as “a painter’s gallery,” just over a year after opening the original gallery, Nino Mier expanded into larger digs next door, which made it possible to show a comprehensive body of work in both spaces concurrently, and use the original gallery as a project room. Known for launching the careers of Jan-Ole Schiemann, Thomas Wachholz, and Jana Schröder, Nino Mier Gallery recently began working with mid-career artists such as André Butzer, Michael Bauer, Anke Weyer, and Anna Fasshauer. While the Rhineland and other regions in Germany are well represented within the Mier roster, the gallery also shows local artists such as Louise Bonnet, Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, and Eve Fowler. To round out the current program, the returning Dallas Art Fair exhibitor began working with Ben Sledsens, a young Belgian painter, and Ginny Casey, a New York-based artist. Dallas collector Eric Green visits with the returning gallerist. Eric Green: How was the overall experience during your first year as an exhibitor at the Dallas Art Fair? Nino Mier: I had attended the fair the year prior as a guest and was impressed with the energy and quality of the fair. It was a nobrainer for me, and I felt that we had a nice booth and placement. Everyone was extremely accommodating, and the collectors we met seemed very interested and focused. The fair team does an excellent job of inviting exhibitors to various events and collection

tours, which I think is a nice bonus when one is new to a city. EG: Is there anything in particular about the Dallas art scene and its collectors that sets it apart from what is going on elsewhere? NM: I think the close proximity of great institutions like the Nasher, the Dallas Museum of Art, and wonderful private foundations and collections is a unique aspect of Dallas. There is a lot to see in the short time when one is in town for the fair, but it is manageable and, quite frankly, really impressive. Dallas to me seems like a place where the residents are excited about the fair, and the exhibitors share the excitement equally—it is a remarkably welcoming place. EG: What do you have in store for the 10th edition of the Dallas Art Fair next April? NM: We will present a solo presentation of Berlin-based artist Anna Fasshauer. Her hand-bent, twisted, and painted outdoor and indoor sculptures are incredibly physical, yet whimsical. EG: Why did you choose to present a solo booth with Fasshauer in Dallas? NM: Walking around the Nasher Sculpture Center, we really felt that presenting what I believe is one of the most exciting young sculptors working today to a new audience in Dallas, one that truly understands and appreciates sculpture, felt like a great opportunity. We will be presenting mostly outdoor sculptures this year. EG: As a gallery with a painting-focused program, what drew you to Fasshauer’s sculptures? NM: We don’t focus on painting because they are paintings per se, it’s about movement, physicality, presence, and I suppose

This page, from left: Louise Bonnet, The Veil, 2017, oil on canvas, 60 x 72 in. Image courtesy of the artist and Nino Mier Gallery; Anna Fasshauer, Birdy Croissant, 2017, aluminum, lacquer, and steel plate, 99 x 50 x 87 in. Image courtesy of the artist and Nino Mier Gallery. Opposite: Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, We're All Everything, 2017, oil on linen, 62.75 x 72 in. Image courtesy of the artist and Nino Mier Gallery.

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a certain type of melancholy that draws me to the artists that I am working with. Fasshauer’s sculptures are as much about structure as they are about the body. Everything you see is hand-painted or bent with her entire body, and not a single machine is used. That sort of energy in conjunction with the whimsical forms that she creates feels very fitting in a program like ours. EG: How did you begin to represent Louise Bonnet and Celeste Dupuy-Spencer? NM: I fell in love with both of their works during studio visits arranged by colleagues of theirs and offered both of them their first solo shows in Los Angeles. EG: How does a feature in the Whitney Biennial change an artist’s career? What’s next for Celeste? NM: Obviously, an institutional show, especially at the level of the Whitney Biennial, will always bring a lot of attention to an artist’s practice. Celeste painted a masterpiece for the show and it definitely brought a lot of institutional support to her practice. Celeste is a rare talent who works tirelessly, and it was a proud moment seeing her shine at the Whitney Biennial. Celeste will have her second show with the gallery in September of 2018, followed by solo shows at Shane Campbell Gallery in Chicago and Max Hetzler Gallery in Berlin.

interior design + art

ABOUT THE INTERVIEWER: Eric Green is the CEO of Real Time Resolutions and Resolution Capital. Green holds an undergraduate degree from Southern Methodist University, an MBA from the University of Dallas, a law degree from Texas Wesleyan University (Texas A&M University), and a fellowship from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He serves on the advisory board of the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Art Museum of Sonoma County. Eric and Debbie collect contemporary art with a focus on figuration and portraiture displayed in their home and offices in Dallas. The couple has three children who also collect. P

Photography by Dan Piassick Markus Linnenbrink, “HELLOONEWORLD”, Epoxy Resin on Wood

MARY ANNE SMILEY, RID, ASID maryannesmiley.com 214.522.0705

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Monica Cecchi, Day Glow Spring, 2016, necklace, vintage tin. 11 in. diameter. Courtesy of Galleria Antonella Villanova, Florence. antonellavillanova.it

Judy Onofrio, Bracelet, 1993, bracelet, Czechoslovakian glass seed beads, lamp works beads, and vintage beads, 4.75 x 4.75 x .63 in. Courtesy of Galerie Marzee, Nijmegen, Netherlands. marzee.nl

T

hough demure and entirely understated, when Deedie Rose attends any of the manifold art-related events across town, you can count on her to be donned in a beautiful dress designed by her daughter Lela Rose, paired with pieces of stage-worthy jewelry. Celebrated for her enduring philanthropy and donating a significant contemporary art collection along with the Rose-Asenbaum Collection to the Dallas Museum of Art, she exults in a lesser known genre known as portable or wearable art. “The field is very small and not many people know about these artists,” she says. TWO x TWO-goers are in for a treat with an opportunity to bid on a carefully culled selection of wearable art included in this

BY CINDY RACHOFSKY Benedikt Fischer, Shield ‘Oleum Oleum,’ 2013, brooch, plastic and remanium, 5.75 x 4.75 x 1 in. Courtesy of OONA Gallery, Berlin. oona-galerie.de

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CONTEMPORARIES

Precious Materials

Deedie Rose curates an out-of-the-ordinary portable art collection for TWO x TWO.

Deedie Rose and Cindy Rachofsky wearing works by Evert Nijland (Thorns 2, 2017), Petra Zimmermann (White Marble, 2013), and Sofia Bjรถrkman (What Has The Bird Done?, 2016). Photograph by John Smith.

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Annelies Planteijdt, Untitled, 1982/2017, bracelet, cardboard and thread, 3.13 x 2.5 in. Images shown are two examples of how the same bracelet can be worn. Courtesy of Galerie Marzee, Nijmegen, Netherlands. marzee.nl

Lucy Sarneel, Bundle II, 2010, brooch, zinc and wood, 4.38 x 4.38 x 2.38 in. Courtesy of Galerie Marzee, Nijmegen, Netherlands. marzee.nl

Karl Fritsch, Untitled, 2017, ring, oxidized sterling silver, .88 x .88 in., approximate ring size .75 in. diameter. Courtesy of the artist and The National, Christchurch, New Zealand. thenational.co.nz

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year’s auction made from precious materials not necessarily worth their weight in gold. Stemming from Rose’s desire to highlight these artists she says, “I thought this would be great for this field. It opens up the work and the artists to a wide group of lookers and collectors.” Cindy Rachofsky: How did you come into contact with the world of portable art, or wearable sculpture? Deedie Rose: In the early ’90’s, I was leafing through the pages of Metropolis Magazine, and abruptly stopped at some photos of what turned out to be stainless steel brooches, by an artist named Eva Eisler. I called the magazine to find out where she lived, and then looked her up in the New York City phone book. After I visited her, and bought some of her exquisite work, she told me about a gallery in Washington DC called Jewelerswerk. The day I walked into that tiny place, I was stunned by the things I saw, and my world of art and collecting expanded exponentially to include this new (to me) field.   CR: You are known as a collector of contemporary art, and as a supporter for contemporary architecture and design. How does your passion for this wearable kind of art relate to these other obsessions? DR: I have long been interested in contemporary architecture and design (no surprise if you have seen my crazy house), and contemporary art, especially sculpture. To me, wearable sculpture is just an extension of that. CR: You live with art all around you, in a house designed by Antoine Predock, and you have started to include this field of contemporary art jewelry in the installations of art in your home. You also have a vision for this kind of art being included in the encyclopedic collection of the Dallas Museum of Art (and have supported this in 2014 by the gift of the Inge Asenbaum Collection). Why is this important to you?   DR: These are artists whose medium happens to be adornment of the body, or jewelry, rather than painting, or sculpture. They are artists, like other great artists, who see the world in new and


CONTEMPORARIES

Petra Zimmermann, White Marble, 2013, ring, costume jewelry elements embedded in hand-sculpted acrylic (gold ring lines the inside against finger), 2.5 x 2 x 1.75 in. Courtesy of the artist and Ornamentum, Hudson, NY. ornamentumgallery.com

Daniel Kruger, Untitled, 2011, necklace, silver and pigment, 14 x 3.75 in. Courtesy of Galerie Rob Koudijs, Amsterdam. galerierobkoudijs.nl

Marzia Rossi, Alae, 2016, brooch, hand-chiseled silver and oxide, 2.4 x 6.7 in. Courtesy of Galleria Antonella Villanova, Florence. antonellavillanova.it

different ways, and who incorporate ideas into their art. They make us think. I believe they should be part of the pantheon of great art exhibited in a museum. CR: One of the most interesting things about these objects is that you can wear them. How do you decide what to wear? Are there certain pieces for certain occasions? DR: Certainly, there are different pieces for different occasions. I wouldn’t wear to the Mayor’s office the same kind of wild and crazy piece that I might wear to an opening at the DMA, or to the TWO x TWO auction. (Although Mayor Rawlings is so cool that he would probably not be surprised at anything that walks through his door.) CR: There are a number of artists who make this kind of wearable sculpture in this year’s TWO x TWO auction. How do the works represent the history of the field, and the issues that makers of wearable sculpture want to address? DR: Often these works are made of unconventional or poor materials. Unlike more conventional jewelry, the value of these works is not based on the value of the materials used to make the piece, but in surprising juxtapositions and the ideas incorporated. And that will be illustrated in the really fascinating works in the TWO x TWO Auction. They are really beautiful! CR: You’ve been buying this kind of wearable art for a number of years now. Has anything in particular from this year’s auction caught your eye, and might have you raising your paddle? DR: Oh my gosh, I am thrilled by the level of excellence of the pieces in the auction, and I have found myself obsessing over several of them. I have to continually remind myself that the goal of including works from this field is to elevate the visibility of, and to engage others in, the appreciation of this wonderful art form.   The TWO x TWO auction is just about the most successful thing I know of for giving visibility to artists and to galleries. These are really great artists that deserve to be shown in a museum, and this auction opens up the work and the artists to a wide group of collectors. P

Bettina Speckner, Brooch, 2011, brooch, found ferrotype, oxidized silver, white gold, photo-etching on zinc, and seed pearls, 3.38 x 2.25 in. Courtesy of Sienna Patti, Lenox, MA. siennapatti.com

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Celia Eberle’s Aesthetic Soothsaying

An artist’s practice is steeped in raw materials from the natural world.

C

elia Eberle is in the business of worldSimultaneously the sculpture references the Feejee building. She envisions our reality mermaid displayed by legendary showman P.T. Barnum populated by gods and monsters, filled at his American Museum in the late 19th century. This with latent energies of magic and ritual. famed hoax, widely believe to be real at the time of its Her art mines historic icons, cabinets presentation, was fashioned by fusing the mummified of curiosity, and the natural world—producing remains of a monkey and fish. What is striking about the works that appear to possess a past while uniquely piece is that it appears to be a historical object. Eberle’s speaking to the context in which they were created. technique implies the passage of time and use through Eberle’s output is driven by ideas that smooth edges and delicate detail. Neptune’s glossy and determine the medium in which they are produced. jewel-like surface is similar to that of monuments and She finds formal similarity between natural objects ritual objects that have been altered from the caress of and both personal and global symbologies. She countless adoring hands. This appearance of authenticity sources the required raw materials from all over the and evocation of wonder stems throughout her wideworld, often through online retailers and sometimes ranging oeuvre. right around her home in Ennis, south of Dallas. Her In Eberle’s work, time is collapsed. References to practice is global in nature—mimicking historical trade Medieval aesthetics comingle with those from the late routes—sourcing such esoteric objects as bone, teeth, 1800s and early 1900s. The artist adopts iconography diamonds, and marble. She mimics the Wunderkammer, that has withstood the test of time. Eberle asserts, assembling precious objects from around the “Our most elemental needs and desires are the same as globe, then elevating them via alteration when we first became sentient enough to write history, to and presentation. She has made create explanatory myths. For this reason, certain images combs from turtle shells, towers and ideas consistently appeal to us, and certain behaviors from bone, and elephants remain constant.” Her primary source of inspiration, nature, from alabaster. predates humanity and was the subject matter for the earliest works Each piece is a totem— of art ever discovered. evoking both foreign and In The Night Has a Thousand Eyes, pit-fired raku clay bats circle the fam i l iar my t holog ies. Eberle’s gallery. Unique individual sculptures are brought together to form a Neptune merges the classic omnipresent colony of bats frozen in mid-flight. In The Dead of Night, bone-carved moths similarly flock. These works suggest alchemy as raw material image of Christ on the cross with that of is transformed into animated creatures in flight. Eberle capitalizes the regal merman Neptune. Rendered in upon the inherent aesthetic qualities of the components that she uses— driftwood, the sculpture wears a crown of coral reminiscent of a crown of thorns. employing simplicity of form and gesture to make materials sing.

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STUDIO

BY JUSTINE LUDWIG PHOTOGRAPHY BY KEVIN TODORA

This interest in the natural world is manifest in her floral arrangements sculpted from bone and lapis lazuli. These sculptures are memento mori—a reminder of the fleeting nature of life. The reference is twofold as Eberle’s blooms are forever captured at their peak beauty and are produced from the skeletal remnants of a once-living thing. Eberle similarly captures the symbolism of flowers in a series of paintings made with blood on watercolor paper. Literally giving her lifeblood for her art, each bloom speaks volumes. Charged with loaded titles as Heartfelt, Loss, Obsession, and Love, these works evoke floriography, the language of flowers, an art form popularized during the Victorian era. These paintings bring to light a vein that runs throughout the artist’s work—the troubled relationship between man and nature. As Eberle states, “We have always used and abused nature to the extent that we could, and we have always been afraid that she will fail or turn on us, because she does. We forget that we are nature too.” Her message seems especially prescient as hurricanes, earthquakes, and wild fires devastate communities universally. Inspired by global, environmental, social, and political malaise, Eberle’s forthcoming undertaking will be a dance party for the end of the world. Imbued with dark humor and foreboding, she is assembling many works from the breadth of her career to set the stage, even composing an electronic soundtrack for the apocalypse, sampling holy music such as a Gregorian chant. As empires fall, new ones rise in their wake, co-opting their predecessor’s visual language. The artist’s oeuvre explores the cyclical nature of human aesthetic legacy. Eberle here posits herself as the last in a long line to repurpose historic tradition. If the end is truly nigh, the artist hopes we will greet it together, euphoric and sweaty, arms entwined. P

Clockwise from left: Celia Eberle, Heartfelt, 2014, blood on watercolor paper, 20 x 16 in.; Lost, 2014, blood on watercolor paper, 20 x 16 in.; Love, 2014, blood on watercolor paper, 20 x 16 in.; Obsession, 2014, blood on watercolor paper, 20 x 16 in.; Celia Eberle, The Dead of Night (detail), 2017, bone, dimensions variable; Celia Eberle, The Night Has a Thousand Eyes (detail), 2016, pit-fired raku clay, brass, glass, dimensions variable. Opposite: Celia Eberle, Neptune, 2016, driftwood, coral, 37 x 26 x 7.5 in.

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SPACE

BY PEGGY LEVINSON

CREATIVE OUTLET Donald Fowler lends his talent to usher in new artisans for an evolved Nasher Store.

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world-renowned art institution deserves a museum store that reflects a portent place in Dallas culture. Enter Donald Fowler, the director of retail for the Nasher Sculpture Center, with his extensive retail experience and discerning eye for the unexpected. His vision for the all-new Nasher Store is to illuminate the progressive mission of the museum. With a recent unveiling of the highly curated store, Fowler introduces us to exciting new artists who reflect ideas and trends that are current and enhance the Nasher experience. “I want the store to feel like an enjoyable vacation where the visitor can be surprised and amused, and maybe learn something at the same time,” describes Fowler. Most of the featured artists are novel to Dallas and exclusive to the Nasher Store. Here are a few of them: The Esque Studio produces a super glam 90s approach to glassware with colorgradated glass in surprising shapes like a votive bomb, a log vase, or a glass eyeball. An exclusive collection for the Nasher includes a skull decanter. Glasses from Gary Bodker have a distinctive midcentury style with architectural shapes, in clear and colored glass, some incorporating cork in the designs. Hand-blown glass vessels by Caleb Siemon of the Siemon and Salazar Studio display the iridescence and shiny, happy color of southern California. Their design aesthetic reflects the evolved craftsmanship of Murano glass with the restraint of Scandinavian design. Yves Klein Blue, the modern and on-trend color that is permeating the design world with its highly saturated ultramarine pigment, finds itself in an unusual application at the Nasher Store. The Greek design studio Sophia, whose motto is “Enjoy Thinking,” has created classical bookends and busts with Greek statues and Aristotelian quotes that come in

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this compelling color as well as black and white. New jewelry designers have an architectural approach to their products. Local artist Elizabeth Wimpress uses inspiration from her world travels to incorporate organic products in her designs like iridescent beetle wings in combinations with gems, leather, and salvaged nails from Hurricane Katrina. German artist Bernd Wolf creates simple minimalist designs using precious and semi-precious stones in combination with high-grade gold plating on silver. A highly polished lapis lazuli piece continues the playful Yves Klein Blue story in the store. From one of the Balearic Islands off the coast of Spain, the store brings Universe Majoral. From their collection, Fowler has selected organically shaped jewelry pieces—bracelets evoking waves or boats, a cloud necklace, or planet-shaped earrings that take inspiration from Mediterranean culture, creativity, and art. The Brooklyn-based artist Mia Lara finds stimuli where the beauty of nature and handmade creation meet. She uses semiprecious stones from India in loose connections on gold. To round out the jewelry assortment, the MIE Collection has simple earrings and rings in fun, whimsical shapes like lips, lightening bolts, and eyelashes. Even with these new offerings, an exciting new place to shop, the store has a spare, clean feel with fewer fixtures. The book collection is pared down to very special issues—like a tome on Andy Warhol or a children’s book illustrated by Salvador Dali; also, Esopus—which is a limited-edition annual featuring contributions from artists, writers, and musicians. In Fowler’s words, “Edit, edit, and edit some more. I want the store to have the feel of the Nasher itself—spacious and elegant, with breathing room around to let each special piece be seen.” P


Donald Fowler pictured at the revamped Nasher Store. Photography by Anthony Chiang

Where the art of living meets the art we live with.

972-807-9255 A Caleb Simeon vase is among the extensive glass offerings at the Nasher Store. Opposite, above: MIE Dreamy Eyelash stud earrings. Below: Grecian meets Yves Klein in Sophia's glam bookends and decorative objects.

1426 N Riverfront Blvd | Dallas, Texas 75207 www.guggenhome.com

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MARK MAKER

“A FIGURATIVE PAINTER WITH AN ABSTRACT SENSIBILITY,” JONAS WOOD WILL BE HONORED AT TWO x TWO.

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BY GAVIN DELAHUNTY PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVEN TAYLOR


Jonas Wood’s signature style is an uncanny blend of realism and abstraction that distorts the subject and adds a new level of meaning. His practice encompasses multiple genres, piecing together and layering a collage of memories, places, people, heroes, and art objects. –Gavin Delahunty, Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, Dallas Museum of Art

This page: Jonas Wood, Blue Rug Still Life, 2014, oil and acrylic on canvas, 105 x 103 in. Photograph by Brian Forrest. Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. Opposite: Jonas Wood pictured in his studio. Photograph by Steven Taylor.

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This page: Jonas Wood, Ovitz's Library, 2013, oil and acrylic on canvas, 100 x 132 in. Photograph by Brian Forrest. Courtesy of the artist and Anton Kern Gallery, New York, NY. Opposite: Jonas Wood, Shio's Studio on Blackwelder, 2017, oil and acrylic on canvas, 93 x 100 in. Photograph by Brian Forrest. Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA.

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he final weekend of October, Jonas Wood will be honored at TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art. Of the 2017 TWO x TWO Artist Honoree, co-founder Howard Rachofsky says, “Jonas is an incredibly generous and successful young artist and one of the wonderful art darlings in the world today.” Wood’s Pink Plant Patio Landscape Pot featured on Patron’s cover will be live auctioned on October 28 during the TWO x TWO auction and gala. “You couldn’t envision a more perfect example of his craft.” The “pot” or vase being a favorite subject matter of the artist, Rachofsky describes, “He takes an everyday object—an object that’s been painted for thousands of years—and gives it relevance and sense of place in today’s popular culture environment. This is classic imagery employed by Jonas to tell his story that fits him into the context of art history.” Gavin Delahunty is working in close partnership with the artist on a major survey of Wood's work for the DMA. Here, Delahunty, the Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, visits with Jonas Wood via telephone in late August during the height of their summer travels from opposite sides of the globe. Gavin Delahunty: Hi, Jonas. Can I start by asking you to provide us with some basic biographical information—where you were brought up, and where you studied, for instance? Jonas Wood: Okay, cool. I was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and I went to college in upstate New York to study science and psychology, minoring in studio art. I thought I was going to be a psychologist, so I worked in a hospital. Later I decided to return to grad school to study painting, so I moved to Washington. That’s where I met my wife, and that’s where I lived before L.A. I went from Seattle to L.A. GD: How long have you been a resident in L.A.? JW: I’ve been in L.A. since 2003. I worked in Laura Owens’s studio for two years, and Shio Kusaka (my wife) worked for Charles Ray for four years. GD: And you met Shio before you moved to L.A.? JW: Yeah, we met in Seattle. She was an undergrad in the ceramics program when I was in grad school. She worked at the art

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Jonas Wood, Spiritual Warrior, 2016, oil and acrylic on canvas, 88 x 98 in. Photograph by Brian Forrest. Courtesy of the artist and Anton Kern Gallery, New York, NY. Opposite: Jonas Wood, Robin and Ptolemy, 2013, oil and acrylic on linen, 25 x 18.5 in. Photograph by Brian Forrest. Courtesy of the artist, Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund, 2017/13.

library. I took out a lot of books and talked with her. Grad school was my first time seriously taking art. It occupied all my time; before that it was more like a hobby. So when I went to grad school in 2000, after the first week I said, “Okay, I’ll be an artist,” and that was the first time that I spent 24 hours a day trying to study and think about art. I didn’t really know that much about art history before then. GD: Can you describe an average day in the life of Jonas Wood? JW: Okay, average day. Shio and I take it in turns to wake up the kids, and then drop them off at school. I work from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., then back home, hang out, playtime, homework, then dinner. After the kids go to bed I return to the studio for two to three hours. I’m trying to work less at night because it’s not conducive to raising kids. It used to be that I’d work till whenever, sleep till whenever. But that is changing. GD: I have always detected a certain melancholy in your work—for instance, paintings of office spaces, or storage spaces, or desolate landscapes.

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Could you talk a little bit about this? JW: The subject matter that you choose has to be important to you. I guess it’s obvious. When I choose something that is emotionally charged, like an old bedroom, a family member, or a landscape, it keeps me focused. I had a pretty difficult time growing up, personally and in terms of my relationship with my family, in particular with my mother. So when I paint a picture of my mom, it is my way to create a more beautiful, peaceful memory. GD: Where do sports, as a subject matter, fit in? Your paintings of athletes often depict them as exhausted, undernourished, or even freakish. I find them compelling and at the same time difficult to look at. Do you approach those subjects differently than let’s say a family portrait? JW: I’m really into sports. It turns me on. I think most of my figurative works are distorted in some way. I like to paint unusuallooking athletes because I am searching for interesting things to paint. Freakishly large hands for example. I’m also turned on by their uniforms and the uniformity of sportswear in general. You


"Jonas is one of those artists who manifests a maturity beyond his years, and he loves art for its own sake. He explores art as a narrative but with his own particular point of view that’s quite distinct. How nice to be able to honor an artist with a major survey exhibition coming to the Dallas Museum of Art. This is a magic moment to highlight and showcase a new generation.” – Howard Rachofsky, Co-founder TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art

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Jonas Wood, Jungle Kitchen, 2017, oil and acrylic on canvas, 100 x 93 in. Photograph by Brian Forrest. Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA.

know, in sports photography, to avoid capturing spectators in the background, they capture the athlete in focus while keeping the background out of focus. I am interested in this abstraction. If you look closely at the background of some of my sports portraits there is a playfulness with color and abstract shapes. GD: I guess it’s less emotionally draining to paint an anonymous sports star than it is to paint your mother? You can still practice your painting but with an important emotional distance. JW: Yes, exactly. It is a different kind of pressure. It is fun to think about pure color and shape as opposed to personal relationships. With the sports pictures, I was looking for something that would be challenging to paint on a technical level.

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GD: It is well documented that collage as an artistic technique plays an important role in how you compose your pictures. However, I wonder if you could speak about collage in terms of thought process, in the way that we recall memories, for instance? JW: In grad school I was painting from life because that was how I was taught. If you wanted to be a painter of things and everyday life, you had to paint from there. So I tried that for a little while, and that wasn’t my thing. I wasn’t bad at it; I just didn’t have the patience for it. So I started working from photos. I would find photos that I wanted to use and chop them up. They were crudely chopped and ultimately had a certain violence because of the haphazard way I would put them back together. After 10 or 15


years, everything is much more intentional. I collage to bend space in a certain way. GD: Are there technological drivers that have enabled your distinctive style? JW: I wouldn’t say any current technologies, but I am very interested in printmaking. It is a new language for me. I don’t do digital. I like to cut it out, move it around, and glue it down. GD: You’re analog. JW: Yes, definitely. It’s not like I couldn’t do it on my computer; it’s not that, but I like the manual process. I’ve been printmaking for eight years now. When I discovered it, I was like, “Wow, this totally relates to how I paint.” When you make a silkscreen, for instance, you have to work from the back to the front of the image. If you look at my paintings after 2013, there’s so much that I’ve learned from making etchings also. A certain mark-making and line quality that wasn’t there before. You can see it in the large TWO x TWO painting. GD: The “Pink Plant Patio Landscape Pot”? JW: Yeah, the whole pot, the way it’s painted. It is a combination of what I was doing before I started printmaking, which was a lot of flat planes on top of each other with some line work and some mark-making—I am more conscious of those marks now. So printmaking as a technology has been really important to me. GD: You’re mining a technique in the same way you are excavating your personal archive, a strateg y for dealing with the past and the present simultaneously. JW: Yes, I guess. GD: Final question. I always felt your work applied a certain pressure to a “conventional” distinction between abstraction and representation. Could you talk about that? JW: Well, I definitely have bodies of work where I want the experience of viewing to approach abstract painting. I’m thinking about the tennis court paintings or basketball paintings. A dominant color, some lines, and an emblem or logo. It does relate to what I mentioned earlier, you know, identifying something that is interesting for me to paint. With the tennis court there was like, “Oh, this is something I can keep going back to.” It’s very meditative and compositionally minimal. I think of myself as a figurative painter, but I come to it from an abstract painter’s sensibility. I’m just trying to figure out the right balance that works for me.

§ Wood is included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; The Broad, Los Angeles; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. His work is currently part of a two-person show, Shio Kusaka and Jonas Wood, at Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar, The Netherlands. P

Above, right: Jonas Wood, Birds Card, 2005, colored pencil and crayon on paper, 30 x 22 in. Photograph by Thomas Müller. Courtesy of the artist and Anton Kern Gallery, New York, New York. Below, right: Jonas Wood, Wimbledon L, 2013, oil and acrylic on linen, 88 x 60 in. Photograph by Brian Forrest. Courtesy of the artist and Anton Kern Gallery, New York, New York.

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Kiki Smith’s solo show at Dallas Contemporary is an epic exposition of her existential musings.

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iki Smith’s restless multidisciplinary journey has evolved organically over its 40+ years. Mostly self-taught, the artistic practice of the self-described “thing-maker” has variously incorporated sculpture, printmaking, painting, photography, drawing, glass, textiles, tapestry, watercolor, installation, and collaboration, in exploring recurrent themes of feminism, human physicality, mortality, Catholicism, the animal kingdom, spirituality, myth-making, fairy tales, abjection, the AIDS crisis, sexuality, the sacred, and the secular. In sum, the human experience writ large. Additionally, Smith’s vita is festooned with laurels, with a short list that includes 2016’s International Sculpture Center’s Lifetime Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award; the U.S. State Department Medal of Arts (2012); “Honorary Royal Academician” from London’s Royal Academy of Arts; Time Magazine’s “Time 100: The People Who Shape Our World” (2006); more than 150 solo exhibitions worldwide; repeated inclusions in the Whitney Biennial, La Biennale di Venezia, and La Biennale di Firenze; works in the permanent collections of 30+ museums; membership in the American Academy of Arts and Letters; and the list goes on. So it’s cause for loud celebration that Dallas Contemporary is presenting Kiki Smith: Mortal from September 29 through December 17, a major exhibition of 2D and 3D works involving everything from a monumental stained-glass installation to woodcut, aluminum sculpture to papier-mâché. While Mortal marks the first time Smith has shown at Dallas Contemporary, the New York-based artist has a history in the area that includes a solo exhibition at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth (1996), a 2013 lecture at the Nasher Sculpture Center, and her year as artist-in-residence at the University

BY STEVE CARTER

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Top left and right: Kiki Smith, Pilgrim, 2007–2010, leaded stained glass in steel frames, 31 elements; installation dimensions variable. Photograph by G.R. Christmas, courtesy of Pace Gallery

This page: Kiki Smith, Winged Messenger, 2009, aluminum with gold leaf, 42.75 x 53 x 23 in. Opposite: Kiki Smith, detail from Pilgrim (Standing with child), 2010, leaded stained glass in steel frame, 92.25 x 34.38 x 10 in. overall; 79.75 x 31.93 x .5 in. panel. Photograph by G.R. Christmas, courtesy of Pace Gallery.

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of North Texas (2013–14). Justine Ludwig, DC’s director of exhibitions/senior curator, enthuses, “The central piece for the exhibition is titled Pilgrim and it’s a large-scale installation of paintings on glass that addresses the human lifecycle through portraits of women. It’s been shown before, but due to its massive scale it’s only been shown once before in its entirety, and we have the amazing luxury of having space here at Dallas Contemporary, so it’s giving us the opportunity of showing it.” Kiki Smith says the inspiration for the epic Pilgrim, begun in 2007 and completed in 2010, was “…a mixed-up mess of all these different things—I’d been asked to make an exhibition in a house in Germany, and I thought about how walking through a house is walking through a journey in one’s life—different moments in one’s life. My mother had died relatively recently after I was asked to do that, and I think that played a part. I was also thinking about the life of the Virgin Mary and how her mortality is what connects people to her; she goes through the pains of being mortal, whereas traditionally most gods are outside of mortality. But she connects—her story is about having compassion as a human being and then interceding on one’s behalf.” Another influence was The First, Second, and Last Scene of Mortality, an eighteenth-century needlepoint by Connecticut needlework artist Prudence Punderson; the work is an enduring folk-art treatise on mortality. Smith also recalls, “I had been drawing pictures of my mother and drawing pictures of another woman as the Annunciation, making something about life and transcendence and transitions from life to death, things that can happen in peoples’ lives.” It’s no exaggeration to suggest that visiting the Pilgrim installation is akin to a religious experience. Comprised of 30 or so large hand-painted stained-glass panels, it’s a walkthrough installation that allows visitors to view both sides of the works. When Pilgrim was exhibited at New York’s Pace Gallery back in 2010, it was similarly staged, but the iteration at Dallas Contemporary has been somewhat enlarged and modified to take advantage of the more expansive space. Smith’s original hope for the piece was that it could be a permanent installation, an actual building. “It might be like a chapel or something,” she says. “I had always thought about it as windows aligning. But you walk through it, and that seems to be a very good way too, because then you’re on a journey or on a pilgrimage, you’re moving through space. It’s kind of

This page, from top to bottom: Kiki Smith, detail from Pilgrim (Coming forth), 2010, leaded stained glass in steel frame, 92.25 x 66.63 x 10 in., overall; 79.75 x 31.93 x .5 in., 2 panels, each. Photograph by G.R. Christmas, courtesy of Pace Gallery; Kiki Smith, detail from Pilgrim (Annunciation with bird), 2010, leaded stained glass in steel frame, 92.25 x 66.63 x 10 in., overall; 79.75 x 31.93 x .5 in., 2 panels, each. Photograph by G.R. Christmas, courtesy of Pace Gallery. Opposite: Kiki Smith, Annunciation, 2008, cast aluminum with wooden chair, 62.25 x 23.38 x 27.12 in. Photograph by Pascal Martinez, courtesy of Pace Gallery.

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Kiki Smith, Messenger II, 2008, aluminum with gold leaf, 40 x 48 x 44 in.

a loose narrative that doesn’t really make any sense particularly, but you become active in it rather than being at a set point.” Smith has worked with glass off and on for about 30 years, and in the case of the Pilgrim panels, her approach was fairly basic. “It’s really a very simple way, just painting directly on glass,” she reveals, “and I didn’t use much color; mostly I was just painting black on clear glass.” Justine Ludwig adds, “The piece approaches the human lifecycle as a pilgrimage. It’s something that really takes advantage of our gallery space, and I think it’s one of Kiki’s important works that hasn’t had the visibility it deserves. I’m thrilled that we get to show it here.” At first glance the other 15 works featured in Mortal could be seen as a primer on Smith’s diversity—large sculptures in aluminum with gold leaf; the ink-on-paper series Blue Rain; two Chair papiermâché sculptures; Heute (Now), an enigmatic installation of a coffin,

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drop-leaf table, and dandelion puffs; and the Mortal woodcuts of her mother in the hospital, to name several. But Smith explains that many of them were part of the original exhibition at Pace Gallery in 2010: “They actually do all get tied to that time period, the time when I was making all that work; it all kind of fits together. But my work is always wandering from one place to another, just by what catches you. It’s just where your curiosity or your interest takes you to different places.” Justine Ludwig offers summarily, “My hope is that the exhibition functions as an open, creative, and spiritual space within the gallery. I’ve always likened museums to places of worship and places for free thought where one can feel safe, and I think this exhibition very beautifully shows those with the works presented in the show.” P


Top: Kiki Smith, detail from Pilgrim (Coffin), 2008, leaded stained glass in steel frame, overall: 92.25 x 99.25 x 10 in.; 79.93 x 32.06 x .5 in., three panels, each. Photograph by G.R. Christmas. Courtesy of Pace Gallery. Bottom: Kiki Smith, Ditch, 2002, bronze, wood and rubberized sealant, 77 x 53 x 18 in.

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BY NANCY COHEN ISRAEL PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT LAPRELLE

All My sonS NEWLY CONSERVED ZURBARÁN WORKS DEPICTING JACOB AND HIS SONS ARE ON VIEW AT THE MEADOWS MUSEUM.

This page, from left: Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Reuben, c. 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle; Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Simeon, c. 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle. Opposite: Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Jacob, 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle.

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ssemble and listen, sons of Jacob; listen to your father Israel.” Thus commands the Biblical patriarch Jacob in Genesis 49. Surrounded by his 12 sons, Jacob then foretells his prophecy for each of his progeny. Unlike many Old Testament stories, these figures did not provide a clear antecedent to Christian iconography and were therefore not especially popular subjects for large-scale European painting commissions. However, as Spanish exploration of the New World flourished in the 16th and 17th centuries, so did the notion of the

Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598-1664), Levi, c. 1640-45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle.

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Americas as a new paradise, and its native inhabitants were viewed as the lost tribes of Israel. Working in cosmopolitan Seville and often for the New World market, the self-taught painter, Francisco de Zurbarán, painted the series Jacob and His Twelve Sons, currently on view at the Meadows Museum. The history of these paintings, on loan from Auckland Castle in County Durham, is as layered as the Bible itself. These works may have been a commission destined for the Americas. “We do know that Zurbarán had at least two contracts with the Americas,” says Dr. Mark Roglán, the Linda P. and William A.

Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Judah, c. 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle.


Custard Director of the Meadows Museum. Other suites of Jacob and his Twelve Sons can be found in Peru and Mexico, bearing similarities to Zurbarán’s work and could possibly be workshop copies. By the mid-18th century, the suite of 13 paintings came up for auction in London. In 1756, Richard Trevor, the Bishop of Durham, purchased 12 of them. He was outbid for the last painting, Benjamin, which remains in a private collection at Grimsthorpe Castle in Lincolnshire. In his lifetime, Trevor commissioned British artist Arthur Pond to paint a copy of Benjamin. For the exhibition, Zurbarán’s Benjamin will be reunited with the other works. Pond’s

Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Dan, c. 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle.

version will be installed in a study gallery. In acquiring this work, Bishop Trevor spoke his conscience, and the acquisition had deep political implications. Trevor was a staunch supporter of equal rights of Jews. He was instrumental in the passage of the Jewish Naturalization Act of 1753. The bill was repealed a year later and two years before Trevor’s Zurbarán acquisitions. According to Edward Payne, Senior Curator of Spanish Art at Auckland Castle, “Displayed in the Long Dining Room of the Bishop’s Palace, where Trevor received visitors, the paintings transmitted a profound message of religious tolerance, representing a Jewish subject painted

Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Naphtali, c. 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle.

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in a Catholic context and purchased by an Anglican bishop.” In fact, says Amanda Dotseth, the Meadows/Mellon/Prado curatorial fellow who, with Roglán, co-curated the exhibition, Trevor built the “Long Dining Room” for these works. She says, “It is not only important that he bought them but also where he put them. The dining room is a space that bridges the public and the private.” Payne adds that these were probably the first works by Zurbarán on British soil. Since their initial 18th-century installation, the paintings have only left Auckland Castle as a group once before. This is their first time to be exhibited in the United States. After leaving the Meadows, the exhibition will travel to the Frick Collection in New York before being reinstalled in the Bishop’s Palace, which is currently undergoing restoration.  At the Meadows, gallery walls are covered with the same block and flock printed wallpaper pattern that is in place at Auckland

Castle. The pattern, from the London-based company Zoffany, dates to Trevor’s lifetime. The work underwent extensive conservation prior to the exhibition. The paintings have spent much of the last year in Fort Worth, under the care of Claire Barry, the Director of Conservation at the Kimbell Art Museum. Through her analyses, she made groundbreaking discoveries. “Three significant pentimenti (or artist’s changes) came to light through X-radiography and infrared ref lectography examination. Zurbarán apparently made these adjustments during this final editing stage, when he was perfecting the figures and considering their appearance within the series,” Barry says. The biggest surprise lay under the painting of Levi. Using X-radiography, Barry and her team discovered the image of a veiled woman, possibly the Virgin Mary. It confirmed that the workshop re-used an earlier canvas. It was an exciting discovery for Roglán, who says, “We’re able to learn how these works were created. He

From left: Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Gad, c. 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle; Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Asher, c. 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle; Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Issachar, c. 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle.

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started from the head. We can also identify his hand compared to those of his workshop.” Michael Howden of Auckland Castle meticulously restored the frames. “The original 18th-century frames were commissioned by the Bishop. They were simple yet beautiful. In the Victorian period, there was a change in fashion, and framers then essentially put concrete on top of them,” Roglán explains. After removing this Victorian embellishment, Howden spent about 100 hours sanding and then regilding the frames, all by hand. In Dallas, the exhibition is augmented by prints by Northern Renaissance artists. Woodcuts by Albrecht Dürer, on loan from SMU’s Bridwell Library; Martin Schongauer’s engravings of The Twelve Apostles, on loan from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and engravings by Jacques de Gheyn II, on loan from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, illustrate the visual inspirations that Zurbarán studied in preparation for his series. “Prints produced in

Northern Europe were cheap, mass-produced, and very popular in Spain,” says Dotseth. Zurbarán drew inspiration from other sources, too. Barry explains, “Zurbarán constructed the patriarch’s fanciful costumes from a creative synthesis of specific kinds of weavings and decorated leather, including upholstery fabrics for furnishing walls, cushions, curtains, and the like, that were known to the artist. While Zurbarán invented the exotic and generic costumes, he composed them from textiles that were quite specific. Zurbarán’s interest in these materials was not surprising given the fact that his father was a textile merchant.”  This rich, multi-faceted exhibition offers a unique insight to the workings of Zurbarán as well as to Bishop Trevor. Payne sums it up, saying, “This is a remarkable series of paintings by Zurbarán and a unique opportunity to raise the profile of this artist, and also to put Auckland Castle on the art lover’s map.” P

From left: Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Zebulun, c. 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle; Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598–1664), Joseph, c. 1640–45, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle; Arthur Pond (English, 1705-98), after Francisco de Zurbarán, Benjamin, 1756, oil on canvas. Auckland Castle, County Durham © Auckland Castle Trust/Zurbarán Trust. Photo by Robert Laprelle.

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This page: Samara Golden, Missing Pieces from A Fall of Corners #5, 2015–2016, foam, plastic, glue, and paint, 95 x 95 x 45 in. installed above the fireplace; antique Chippendale dining table and chairs accessorized with mango-wood Rivka vases from Made Goods. Opposite: Clockwise from upper left: Robyn and Michael Siegel with art: Jason Meadows, Sophie’s House, 2017, drawing on tracing paper, 29.5 x 20 in.; Shara Hughes, Oasis, 2016, oil, acrylic, Flashe, and spray paint on canvas, 60 x 52 in.; Joshua Nathanson, Exit Mode, 2015, acrylic and oil stick on canvas, 72 x 50 in.; Michael Williams, Virtuoso in Reverse, 2010, oil on canvas, 69 x 52 in.

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BY PEGGY LEVINSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY SHAYNA FONTANA STYLING BY KRISTEN RICHTER

MODERN MOVE CLASSIC ARCHITECTURE MEETS A CONTEMPORARY ART COLLECTION AT ROBYN AND MICHAEL SIEGEL’S BERTRAM HILL HOME.

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obyn Siegel grew up surrounded by art. She followed (and partners with) her mother Cindy Schwartz as an art advisor. Both mother and daughter’s family homes feature museum-worthy collections teeming with the work of significant modern and emerging artists. Robyn has fond memories of going to the Dallas Museum of Art with her docent mother, and admiring the art at NorthPark Center. She has an emotional attachment to her paintings admired much like her pets. In fact, many of the paintings in the collection feature animals—cats, dogs, chickens, bulls, and plentiful birds— in conceptual and abstract ways. When asked what her favorite painting is, she responded, “That’s like asking which is my favorite dog.” The Siegels have three lap-loving small dogs. Rather than opting for a modern home to house their growing art collection and family (a baby girl has just arrived), Robyn and husband Michael Siegel fell in love with a classic home built in 1925. The stately Georgian, by architect Bertram Hill, sits high on a lot in East Dallas commanding attention on the corner. It is an unlikely, yet perfect, spot for an important, growing, modern art collection—the natural light and large walls lend themselves to oversized paintings within their collection. Michael didn’t grow up in an art house as Robyn did, but has become an eager partner in the appreciation and acquisition. Canada Gallery in New York is among their favorite galleries as is James Cope’s And Now. Says Michael, “There is a timelessness

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This page, top: Katherine Bernhardt, Cheeseburger Deluxe, 2016, lithographic print on Somerset 300 gsm Velvet, 28 x 38.5 in.; Ragna Bley, Two Chord Wake, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 98 x 47.5 in.; Scott + Cooner’s Casa Milano sofa with gray geometric pillows from David Sutherland, Forty Five Ten pillows in lime and a Holly Hunt throw; Saarinen coffee table; Irma Objects porcelain vase on Sutton stool, both from Made Goods; vintage ottomans in blue leather from Robyn’s grandmother. Below: Shio Kusaka, (dinosaur 10), 2014, porcelain, 8.25 x 5.75 x 5.75 in.; Magdalena Suarez Frimkess, Horse #1, ceramic and glaze, 6 x 4 x 8.5 in. Opposite, above: Sayre Gomez, Untitled Painting in Cerulean, 2014, acrylic on canvas over panel, 40 x 30 in.; Mernet Larsen, Flat Tire, 2010, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 43 in.; brass and glass table with white marble Darcie Bowl from Made Goods; Becco chairs by Omar De Biaggio from Design Within Reach; Aubrie bags from Made Goods. Below: Original Rookwood Pottery-tiled garden room where the Siegels enjoy family time.


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about the house—like modern art—that is symbiotic.” Upon entering, you are immediately struck by the graceful lines and perfect proportions of the grand rooms. Wide-paned windows bathe the rooms in natural light during the day, providing perfect illumination for the paintings. The scale of rooms gives ample space for dramatic colorful works of art. Rooms flow into each other as if inviting you to move around, sit and chat, and enjoy each space and the visual delight you find there. It’s a wonderful home for entertaining. The Georgian architecture has a center hall plan with a grand entryway, a dining room on the right, and living room on the left. Each room is a gallery in itself. The dining room has an antique Queen Anne table with Chippendale chairs that Robyn inherited from her grandparents. Hanging above the fireplace is an entirely unique set of table and chairs. Missing Pieces from a Fall of Corners #5 is a multi-media work comprised of foam, plastic, glue, and paint by Samara Golden. The delicate sculpture seems to hang precariously on its side as the wall becomes the floor. It looks impossible and invites you to the sixth dimension. Two other notable pieces complement the Golden sculpture. Virtuoso in Reverse by Michael Williams features airbrushed drawings in popsicle colors with a translucent wash and thicker lines of paint that feature quirky, antic cats and characters. Facing it is the equally exuberant Exit Mode by Joshua Nathanson, showing the artist’s unique style of illustrating disjointed characters performing daily activities like swimming or walking. Across from the dining room is the living room with two separate seating areas. A vintage glass and brass table with chairs from Design Within Reach is awash with light from the front windows. A Mernet Larsen acrylic Flat Tire looks at two elongated figures from a non-specific viewpoint presents seeming detachment. Adjacent to the French doors hangs Untitled Painting in Cerulean by Sayre Gomez. The seating area in front of the fireplace consists of a Casa Milano sofa, Poltrona Frau chairs, and a Saarinen coffee table wonderfully juxtaposed with the carved fireplace mantle and picture frame moldings. Above the fireplace Cheeseburger Deluxe by Katherine Bernhardt presents everyday objects— shoes and burgers—in bright, flat colors. An amoeba-like acrylic abstract that is both organic and inorganic by Swedish artist Ragna Bley, Two Chord Wake, is mounted above the sofa. On the Saarinen table, a charming assortment of flowers, art books, and some important ceramics find a place to perch. Shio Kusaka’s dinosaur 10 charms. Kusaka grew up in Japan and became interested in ceramics from observing the ritual of traditional tea ceremonies led by her grandmother. Horse #1 by Venezuela artist Magdalena Suarez Frimkess has Aztec motifs and Native American imagery. The living room leads into an enchanting tiled garden room, most likely the number one selling point for Michael and Robyn when they first saw the house. All tile work in

Opposite page: Nicholas Hatfull, Citadel for Inspector Sands, 2016, oil and acrylic on cotton duck, 94.49 x 70.87 in. This page, above: Ann Craven, Yellow Fello II, 2002, oil on linen, 72 x 48 in. Below: Jonas Wood, Untitled (2 Yellow Birds), 2011, oil and acrylic on canvas, 42 x 32 in.

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This page top: In the nursery, Sam Falls, Untitled (Sand 9, Mexico), 2013, dye and sand on paper, 17 x 13 in. Above the crib hangs Dustin Pevey, Untitled, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 42 in. Below: Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Veteran’s Day, 2016, ink, gouache, and watercolor on paper, 24 x 30 in. Opposite page, left: (Clockwise from left) Richard Aldrich, Future Painting from Machine (Orange and Green), 2005, oil and wax on panel, 14.5 x 11 in.; Richard Aldrich, Cloth Machine, 2009, oil and wax on punctured muslin, 15 x 11 in.; Joe Bradley, Untitled, 2008, marker and colored pencil on vellum, 16 x 13 in.; Joe Bradley, Untitled, 2008, gouache on vellum, 16 x 13 in.; Katherine Bernhardt, Untitled, 2015, acrylic on paper, 18 x 24 in. framed. Right: Sarah Braman, June Cube, 2010, Plexiglas, spray paint, and steel, 28 x 24 x 24 in.; Matt Connors, Untitled, 2009, acrylic on wood, 25.5 x 20 in.

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the house is by Rookwood Pottery and is original to the house. A classic, white marble statue gazes pensively down into a green, glazed fountain. The spacious entry with a curved staircase is an art gallery in itself with paintings throughout and at each landing. An abstract geometric by Los Angeles artist Jason Meadows is at the front door. A playful, kaleidoscopic landscape Oasis by New York artist Shara Hughes embellishes the front hall. On the landing just above is an equally vibrant Citadel for Inspector Sands by Nicholas Hatfull, whose oil abstracts view modern life through the depiction of fast food. On the Beach, Sunglasses by Katherine Bradford of characters in midmotion in lush color can be seen beyond. The enchanting Yellow Fello II by Ann Craven hangs at the top of the stairs. The New York artist often paints bold portraits of birds and flowers. Another thematic bird painting is by Jonas Wood, Untitled (2 Yellow Birds). Wood uses overlapping textures that create a cutout appearance not unlike Matisse—he is this year’s TWO x TWO Artist Honoree. In Robyn’s office, where she spends time researching and choosing particular pieces for her art consultant clients, abundant inspiration from art continues. A Plexiglas cube by Sarah Braman stands precariously on its edge in the corner. An acrylic on wood by Matt Connors is above it. An untitled piece by Nathan Hylden shows a skater spliced and duplicated in a conceptual painting.

A Dream goes on Forever, by Friedrich Kunath, explores themes of melancholy and the existential nature of everyday experience. Neil Raitt’s Kaleidoscope Mountains endlessly repeats natural motifs and repetition in a form of abstraction. In the master bedroom is a gallery hanging of some favorite works of the Siegels—the two Richard Aldrich paintings are among their first acquisitions as art collectors. Aldrich is a writer, musician, and poet who investigates ideas through a variety of media. There is another Katherine Bernhardt of melons and ice cream cones in bright, flat colors. Two pieces by New York artist Joe Bradley depict minimalist figures in color-field painting. Leading into the sunlit nursery are two, Untitled (Chicken Drawing) by Texas artist Stephen G. Rhodes. The nursery is lovingly tended to and brims with more great modern art sure to inspire their budding art collector, Phoebe Tiger. Above the crib is a canvas by Texas-born Dustin Pevey, layered with paint and found images. Veteran’s Day by Celeste Dupuy-Spencer explores the idea of war through newspaper clippings, calendars, and watercolor photos. There are two Sam Falls works on paper that add interest to the negative spaces surrounded by dye and sand. A tiger mask of unknown origin has sentimental meaning to Robyn. Like her mother, the youngest Siegel is going to grow up living and loving great art. P

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY THOM JACKSON STYLING BY PHILLIP GROVES

FULL TRANSPARENCY THOM JACKSON'S FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY BRINGS X-RAY VISION TO SEASON STUNNERS FROM FINE JEWELRY DESIGNERS.

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This page: Harry Winston Forget-Me-Not diamond necklace set in platinum, 177 diamonds weighing 16.4 cts. at Harry Winston, Highland Park Village; Derek Lam black and white sheer floral sleeve turtleneck at Forty Five Ten; Brunello Cucinelli sheer tulle tiered skirt at Stanley Korshak. Opposite: Noir Kei Ninomiya velvet and lace long coat exclusively at Forty Five Ten. Photography by Thom Jackson/The Photo Division; Styling by Phillip Groves/On Set Management.

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This page: Eiseman Estate Collection 18K yellow gold necklace, 10 cushion oval-shape twist-textured links, alternating with 10 horizontal white gold connector links, 5 pave diamond links. Exclusively at Eiseman Jewels, NorthPark Center; Carolina Herrera button-front blouse with bell sleeve cuff and bows at Stanley Korshak. Opposite: Michael Tracy 22K gold handcrafted octopus with diamonds and opal exclusively at Stanley Korshak; Roksana ivory blush kimono at Stanley Korshak

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William Noble, “The Tibbett Suite” by Texan, Paul Flaco Circa 1940 in platinum and 18K yellow gold with 100+ step-cut citrine totaling over 850 cts. and accented at the center with 2 cts. European-cut diamonds, enhanced with 4.50 cts. round brilliant-cut diamonds. Exclusively at William Noble Rare Jewels; Mohair round-neck sweater degradé effect at Roberto Cavalli, NorthPark Center.

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de Boulle Collection Ciel Tassel Necklace with blue sapphires, diamonds, and black enamel set in platinum, exclusively at de Boulle; Zero + Maria Cornejo X-ray silk charmeuse long kou dress at Stanley Korshak.

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Image caption goes here. Exterior necklace: Jorge Adeler 18K yellow gold, blue tourmaline, and diamond necklace exclusively at Forty Five Ten; Interior necklace: Ray Griffith 18K yellow gold, multi-crown work ball, and oval-link necklace with a diamond link toggle closure exclusively at Eiseman Jewels, NorthPark Center. Ulla Johnson Mara top at Stanley Korshak

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Sharon Khazzam, Reeni Necklace, 16-in. 18K yellow, white, and rose gold, diamonds 1.59 cts., amethyst, anthill garnet, aquamarine, beryl, sapphire, tourmaline, citrine, diamonds, emerald, imperial topaz, iolite, kynite, Mexican fire opal, moonstone, peridot, rubellite, and ruby, 127.36 cts. Exclusively at Ylang 23, Plaza at Preston Center; Rebecca Taylor petal-sleeve silk and tweed dress at Rebecca Taylor, NorthPark Center.

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WITH A MICHELIN-STARRED CHEF, STELLAR DÉCOR, AND AN ELEVATED ART COLLECTION, A LONG-AWAITED RESTAURANT OPENING IS A FEAST FOR THE SENSES.

Chef Bruno Davaillon and Thomas Hartland-Mackie inside Bullion.

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BY KENDALL MORGAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN SMITH

C

antilevered from a stone-and-glass skyscraper and framed by golden metallic scales, a picture window offers a glimpse into the plush heart of Bullion. A reimagining of a French brasserie by Michelin-starred Chef Bruno Davaillon, the year’s most anticipated new restaurant makes the 400 Record Building in downtown Dallas a culinary destination. Thomas Hartland-Mackie, the President and CEO of City Electric Supply, took over what was formerly the Belo Building in 2014 to house the operations of his family-owned electrical wholesale business. In addition to refreshing interior spaces and installing works of art by the likes of Doug Aitken, Daniel Arsham, Dan Colen, Alex Israel, and Richard Patterson, Hartland-Mackie had big plans for what has ultimately become the crown jewel of the site. “Our original vision was to create a beautiful iconic space that would attract a first class tenant to lease,” says HartlandMackie, who also houses the Eighty Three Creative Agency, Whitebox Real Estate, and the luxury baby site The Tot under 400 Record’s roof. “It wasn’t until we were presented with the opportunity of working with Bruno (that) we considered creating a custom restaurant concept from the ground up.” With the Mansion on Turtle Creek, the Saint Regis Los Angeles, and Alain Ducasse’s Mix in Las Vegas on his resume, Davaillon was ready for a project of his own. Two-and-a-half years ago, a fortuitous introduction from respected consultant and restaurateur Sharon Hage led Hartland-Mackie to make the chef an offer he couldn’t refuse. “We started talking and then everything moved forward,” recalls Davaillon. “I didn’t see the space in the beginning, but the concept of contemporary comfort French food, like a refined brasserie, was in my mind from the beginning.” A double entendre—Bullion both references the form of

gold and the Latin verb for “to boil”—the name perfectly reflects both its gilt environs and its indulgent yet unpretentious menu. “We were trying to find a French approach, but something easily relatable,” says Davaillon of the name. “It’s a mark for measure, and the name of the inventor of the gold coin (Claude de Bullion). It fit because the shape of the restaurant is almost like an upside-down gold bullion.” THE FOOD Although the menu was still being finalized in advance of the restaurant’s late-October opening, Davaillon’s offerings of potted Canard Confit and Foie Gras, Escargot Beignets, Sole Meunière, and Côte de Bœuf were designed for palettes both rustic and refined. “In a lot of French restaurants, people have the perception that it’s too luxurious and expensive or pretentious,” the chef explains. “I was trying to get away from it. When you go to France right now, the food people are eating in Paris (has) a more contemporary approach and a lighter touch to the dishes.” Because Davaillon was raised in the Loire Valley, the fine cheese and charcuterie of the region are a focus. Diners will view bakers assembling housemade breadbaskets or soufflés as they walk into the main dining room, and one may view the meats and cheeses on offer with a seat underneath the glass charcuterie case. A BTG café (Bullion To Go, naturellement) in the building’s lobby is a grab-and-go addition for morning pastries and quick lunch offerings. Perhaps the most exciting innovation of Bullion is its hydroponic farm, tucked away inside a higher floor of the building. In a petite 80-square-foot space, sweet marjoram, Greek oregano, Merveille des quarter saison lettuce, and basil Genovese are brought to life with the assistance of Dallas Urban Farms to grace Bullion’s salads and entrees.

No detail is neglected at Bullion where custom napkins are just one of the thoughtful touches.

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Arles Jr., 2016, and alkyd on canvas work by Nate Lowman and Anna Ostoya’s gold-leaf Lee 6 add to the interiors designed by Swedish architect Martin Brudniziki. 104an oilPATRONMAGAZINE.COM


THE DESIGN A blend of warm wood and cool brass, Bullion’s interior by the Martin Brudnizki Design Studio recalls everything from a plush private club to a luxury liner. “We wanted to build on the connection between Bullion and its antecedent state, gold, to create a leitmotif from which the design is centered,” says Brudnizki, a Swedish architect and product designer. “The interiors thus feature an Aurelian color palette…which features gold accents in the ceiling, lighting, and fixtures.” With the same mix of comfort and opulence its chef envisioned for the menu, bespoke velvet barrel chairs from the studio add contrast to a hammered brass bar. Sinuous banquettes in the main dining room were designed low enough to have a clear view of the 90-plus seats, positioned underneath the rosy glow of glass-blown flute lights from Brudnizki’s design studio, And Objects. The overall effect draws on the classic styles of the midcentury, yet the final result is far from a Mad Man redux. “I like all of my interiors to achieve a balance to ensure they don’t feel like a pastiche,” says the designer. “We didn’t want to thematize (sic) the space too much on Dallas’s mid-century history, but pull from this and that and make it feel current.” Says the restaurant’s general manager, Victor Rojas, “In three, four, or five years down the road, it will still look like it’s the future.” THE ART From the moment one ascends the twisting bronze and brass staircase intersected by the monumental Necklace of Dreams by French artist Jean-Michel Othoniel, it is apparent that this is a restaurant where the art isn’t just an afterthought. Curated by Benjamin Godsill, the work is a reflection of Thomas Hartland-Mackie and his wife, Nasiba’s dual passion for collecting. Slated to chair this year’s TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Gala, the couple have worked with Godsill for years building their personal collection. “When the family made the exciting decision to acquire the building and add this amazing restaurant, they always thought they’d put some art

in,” says Godsill, who also serves as the director of Darrow Contemporary. “We worked together to select some artists we thought would work in harmony with a super-sophisticated room and the amazing menu.” A digital piece by Jeff Elrod dresses up the elevator, while a gold-leafed print by Anna Ostoya acquired at the 2017 Dallas Art Fair hangs in the main dining room near a floral canvas from Nate Lowman. Los Angeles-based Elad Lassry’s surrealistic photographs adorn the hallway outside the water closets, paired to mimic the Tricolore French flag—an ode to Chef Bruno’s menu. But it is commissioned artworks by Kathryn Andrews, Matthew Chambers, and Othoniel that do more than just accent the space. Allowed to see drawings of Bullion in its conceptual phase, the artists responded to the design with supersized sculptures and canvases that reflect and complement its brasserie roots. Andrews, whose Run for President exhibition was a highlight of the Nasher Sculpture Center’s 2016 season, says her aluminumand-ink work of a giant flute was conceptualized in context to “the restaurant’s …relationship to the French brasserie, which typically has large mirrors adorning the walls. I wanted to work to wow diners as they enter, with its giant pop imagery.” The idea of jazz and music also inspired Chambers’s curved canvases of which blend acrylic with flocking in a textural crimson mix above the banquettes. “These works are supposed to mimic acoustic walls in jazz clubs,” he explains. “I think sitting below these paintings adds something. They have weight. It feels jazz clubby in there.” Godsill hopes that these works, which will be on permanent view, will make Bullion a worldwide artistic destination, not unlike Kronenhalle in Zurich and New York’s Lever House. “Some of my favorite restaurants have permanent or semipermanent collections. It’s so great to go back to those wonderful rooms and visit your old friends. We’re hoping international travelers will come back and have their favorites when they dine.” P

A commissioned restaurant-width, mirrored Kathryn Andrews aluminum-and-ink work plays to the French brasserie-feel. OCTOBER

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RETURNING AS

PRESENTING SPONSOR

Andrew Lipman and Michael Patrick of Cadillac have been long-time supporters of this event since meeting Cindy and Howard Rachofsky in 2010. Now at the helm of Cadillac Communications, they are thrilled to return with the brand’s official partnership for the second year as presenting sponsor. Cadillac has previously supported the important work of amfAR and is honored to also connect with the friends, patrons, and community of the Dallas Museum of Art, while continuing to help raise funds for AIDS research and the Contemporary Art Acquisitions Fund. Additionally, Cadillac will be supporting the events with a fleet of more than 20 all-new Cadillac CT6 plug-in hybrid vehicles, the brand's full-size luxury sedan, to chauffeur select attendees and hosted VIP guests throughout the weekend during TWO x TWO.


In support of amfAR, the international fine jeweler and watchmaker Harry Winston, Inc. created the limited edition Countdown to a Cure Timepiece. Each timepiece benefits amfAR’s Countdown to a Cure for AIDS Initiative focused on developing the scientific basis of a cure by 2020. As a milestone partner, Harry Winston’s support has helped amfAR to award 200 grants, including support for the amfAR Institute for HIV Cure Research, which brings teams of scientists together to collaborate on the search for a cure. The Countdown to a Cure Timepiece is available exclusively at Harry Winston salons through December 31, 2017 with 20% of the retail sales price from each limited-edition timepiece benefiting amfAR. Part of Harry Winston’s timeless Midnight Collection, the men’s version features a 42mm white gold case with a navy blue dial that is accented with a multicolor gradient, representing amfAR’s Countdown to a Cure campaign colors that symbolize the fade of the disease from crisis to cure, while the complementing 32mm women’s model is meticulously set with 12 brilliant-cut diamonds and 19 vivid gemstones, from rubies and sapphires to spessartite garnets.


Lucilo PeĂąa, Derek Wilson, Christen Wilson, Tom Sachs at Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony Photography by Daniel Driensky


TOM SACHS: TEA CEREMONY PATRON DINNER AT NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANIEL DRIENSKY

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THERE GRAND OPENING COCKTAIL PARTY AT FORTY FIVE TEN NAPA VALLEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEG SMITH

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Brian Bolke, Ken Fulk, Cindy Rachofsky, Jay Jeffers

Douglas Little, Jodi Lyn O'Keefe

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Michael Purdy, Bob Torres, Maria Torres


FORTY FIVE TEN DINNER AT THE HOME OF CINDY AND HOWARD RACHOFSKY IN NAPA PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEG SMITH

Unrestrained.

Cindy and Howard Rachofsky

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THERE THE DALLAS OPERA FIRST SIGHT FIRST NIGHT KICK-OFF PARTY AT SALVATORE FERRAGAMO IN NORTHPARK CENTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY CELESTE HART

Lynn Mock, Cindy Feld

Mark LaRoe, Dianne LaRoe, Rhonda Marcus

Kimberly Schlegel Whitman

Nancy Nasher, Jennifer Cerny, Keith Cerny

Misty Keasler:

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September 23–November 26, 2017 Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth 3200 Darnell Street Fort Worth, Texas 76107 817.738.9215 Follow the Modern Abaddon Hall, Haunted Overload, Lee, NH, 2016. Archival pigment print. 60 x 60 inches. Courtesy the Artist and The Public Trust Exhibition support is generously provided by the Kleinheinz Family Endowment for the Arts and Education.

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Chase Cooley, Bela Cooley, Lisa Cooley

Ekaterina Kouznetsova models Salvatore Ferragamo boots and handbag


DALLAS CONTEMPORARY HONORS ERIC FISCHL AT THE ELAINE DE KOONING HOUSE PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID GONZALEZ AND WALTER WEISSMAN

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THERE TACA 50TH ANNIVERSARY GALA AT ROSEWOOD MANSION ON TURTLE CREEK PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY DONIHOO AND KIM SKYLES

Lynn and Allan McBee

Laree Hulshoff, Ben Fischer

Linda Custard

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Dean Fearing and Wanda Gierhart

Donna Wilhelm, Wolford McCue, Michelle Thomas

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Wilfredo & Kellie Estrada


UNITED WAY OF METROPOLITAN DALLAS 30TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE RUTH SHARP ALTSHULER TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY AT THE OMNI DALLAS PHOTOGRAPHY BY KELLY ALEXANDER, MARCY MEEKS, TAMYTHA CAMERON, ANJAL PATEL

Margaret McDermott

Matrice Ellis-Kirk, Ron Kirk

Jennifer Sampson, Ruth Sharp Altshuler, Laura Bush

Margot Perot, Dr. Kenneth Cooper, Ross Perot

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FURTHERMORE BY CHRIS BYRNE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROXANNE MINNISH

THE ACADEMIC MEANDERER Paul Galvez influences the Dallas art scene.

A

rt historian Paul Galvez is helping to prepare the catalogue raisonné of Paul Gauguin’s Tahitian period (directed by Dr. Richard Brettell) and a book manuscript on Gustave Courbet while organizing shows in town. Chris Byrne: When did you relocate to Dallas? Was it for an academic position? Paul Galvez: I moved back in 2015 to be a research fellow at the new Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History (EODIAH) at UTD. Having taught art history for the previous two years at Wellesley College, it was a great opportunity to devote myself 100% to my book on the landscapes of Gustave Courbet, which was the subject of my dissertation at Columbia. It was a big step into the unknown, but the Institute and the arts community in Dallas have surprised me at every turn, in a good way. Indeed, things have been going so well that I’m staying another year to help launch EODIAH’s new MA program in art history. So officially, yes, the initial move was for an academic position. But in reality, it has turned out to be so much more. CB: I understand that you’re currently preparing the catalogue raisonné of Paul Gauguin’s Tahitian period with Dr. Rick Brettell. Can you talk a little about how your scholarly work informs your understanding of contemporary art? PG: There was a time when the great historians of modern art all wrote about contemporary art, or at least were conversant on what was going on in museums and galleries. This was because the discipline of art history was relatively young, and the study of modern art even younger (and the study of contemporary art non-existent), which meant that the only way to really learn about recent art was to write about it yourself. As the chronological gap between the “classic” modernisms like Impressionism and Cubism and the most contemporary art widened,

and as the field became more academically professionalized, the ability to write competently about both historical and contemporary practice became a lost art. It is as rare to find a historian of Impressionism who writes about video as it is to find an art theorist who writes about Monet. On the one hand, this is a good thing; specialization has produced research of greater focus and specificity. On the other, the cost of this specialization has been a rift between the art historian studying the past and the art critic writing about the present. In contrast, I try in my own work to show not only how what seems ultra-contemporary is often deeply shaped by the past, but also how the past can be re-read through the lens of the present. For example, we rightly claim to be in an age of globalization and multimedia. But already in the late 19th century, an artist like Gauguin was obsessed with cross-referencing Western and non-Western art, examining the nature of racial difference, and exploring these themes in an incredibly diverse range of media, from painting to prints to ceramics. CB: Do you feel that your art criticism and curatorial projects influence each other? Are these activities also related? PG: Definitely, although how they do so depends on the project. For instance, in 2012 I was asked to curate a summer show at Galerie Nathalie Obadia in Paris. It just so happened that I had recently written a catalogue essay on the French abstract painter Martin Barré and an Artforum piece on the American artist R.H. Quaytman. And I had focused, in both essays, on their respective installation strategies. So the show I eventually came up with—an exhibition pairing the two artists—was essentially an opportunity to put into practice the ideas I had written about. In fact, I had ended the Quaytman article wondering what would happen when curators would eventually have to mix and match panels from her different installations (which are usually kept separate). Well, I basically had to answer my own question, and the artist came up with a system for installing paintings from different parts of her oeuvre, which is something she hadn’t devised until that show.  Sometimes it’s the other way around. The show Meandering, Abstractly that I curated for Galerie Frank Elbaz introduced me to the extraordinary work of the Zagreb-based avant-garde artists, mangelos and Julije Knifer. As a result, I ended up previewing for Artforum a big exhibition of their work this past summer in Liechtenstein. That would have never happened if I had not curated the show. CB: This past year, in addition to  Meandering, Abstractly, you organized Paris, Texas at Frank Elbaz’s Dallas space. How did this relationship with Frank come about?  PG: It’s a cliché to say the world is small. But, really, who could’ve predicted that Frank and I, by completely independent routes, would have arrived in Dallas at the exact same time? When I was living in Paris, I met the artist Davide Balula at the last show in Frank’s previous space. I ended up writing for a catalogue essay for a show of Davide’s in Brussels and it was at that time that I got to know Frank. When we found out that we both had set out on new adventures in Dallas, we decided to work together on a series of shows at the gallery in the Design District. The idea was not simply to do an odd show here and there but to really establish a solid program. The fact that I had already written on one of his artists and that we were both Dallasite Parisians (or Parisian Dallasites) made working together a no-brainer. That led to the Meandering, Abstractly show. The US-Europe dialogue became more explicit (and less abstract) in the next exhibition, Paris, Texas. The title was a reference to both the town and a film by one of the great directors, Wim Wenders. The next exhibit will show collages and drawings by Jay Defeo, who is most well-known for her colossal sculpture, The Rose. P

Paul Galvez pictured with Allan McCollum's Collection of Two Hundred Plaster Surrogates, 1982/1983–5 on view at The Warehouse. The Rachofsky Collection.

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