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AND NOW / JAMES COPE finding a form of distribution/circulation that would bypass the existing structures of gallery/bookstore, etc. And it was important—to me at least—that they were free. The project was informed by the earlier strategies of Fluxus Publishing and Mail Art, as much as it echoed my teenage experience as a publisher of a fanzine. CB: You have been making artwork regularly since you attended Newcastle-upon-Tyne Polytechnic in the mid-80s—what do you consider to be the most important difference between your practice as an artist and that as a curator? I’m specifically thinking of your exhibition, Lost For Words, at Murray Guy in 2016. MH: I was always interested in the ‘hyphenated’ artist: the artist-writer, the artist-musician, the artist-curator, and so on. In my own work over the past 25+ years I’ve tried to maintain a practice as an artist, as a curator, as a publisher, and as a writer (although I write far less these days). Each of these disciplines interests me a great deal, but what interests me most is where they overlap. Artists such as Mike Kelley or Dan Graham have always been role models. CB: I’m a big fan of Judith Scott. Could you talk about how the show, Bound and Unbound, came about at the Brooklyn Museum? Did you have the opportunity to meet the artist before she passed away in 2005? MH: I lived in Oakland in the early 2000s when I was working as a curator at the Wattis Institute, and ‘discovered’ Creative Growth around this time. (I was very late to the party as the organization had been founded in the early 1970s!) I met Judith Scott on my first visit there, and we would see her regularly and had an opportunity to watch her at work. She had an extraordinary, contagious energy. Her work, of course, is among the most important of the 20th Century. The Brooklyn exhibition—Judith’s first retrospective in the U.S.—was curated by myself and Catherine Morris for the Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum. I couldn’t imagine a more perfect context for Judith’s radical vision. CB: I recently reread your post about Jessie Dunahoo’s work on view at Yukiko Koide’s booth during the 2017 Outsider Art Fair... MH: I was blown away when I first encountered Dunahoo’s work at the Outsider Art Fair. It has such an extraordinary, visceral presence despite the modesty of both its materials and construction. It is tempting to think about it in relation to, say, Robert Rauschenberg’s work of the mid 1970s (e,g., the Hoarfrost series), but Dunahoo’s work remains defiantly idiosyncratic. CB: What can we look forward to at White Columns? MH: Next up at White Columns will be the first New York solo exhibition by the Athens, GA-based artist, Katya Tepper, and a rare New York exhibition by the Oaxaca, Mexico-based artist, Dr. Lakra, which will be only his second-ever solo show in the city. In 2019, among other projects, we will present a solo exhibition of the work of Beau Dick (1955–2017), a project we initiated shortly before his untimely death in 2017. CB: Can you tell me about your involvement (if any) with The Matthew Higgs Society? MH: I had no involvement with The Matthew Higgs Society. I don’t think it was meant kindly! P

NOAH BARKER OLIVIA ERLANGER BRIAN FRIDGE LAZAROS ISABEL LEGATE DUSTIN PEVEY ELI PING MICHELLE RAWLINGS MAXIMILIAN SCHUBERT JEFF ZILM

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PATRON'S 7th Anniversary Issue  

Our annual October/November Issue

PATRON'S 7th Anniversary Issue  

Our annual October/November Issue