Page 1

MURAKAMI MADNESS AT THE MODERN PLUS: BEST OF THE ARTS


ABOVE: HANDBAG BY LONGCHAMP

SHOE BY BOTTEGA VENETA

OPPOSITE: HANDBAG BY CHLOE AT NEIMAN MARCUS

BOOT BY GUCCI AT NEIMAN MARCUS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GEOF KERN

FLORAL BY BOWS + ARROWS


Upcoming Auctions | 2018 Photographs | June 5 Urban Art | June 7 European Art | June 8 Fine & Decorative Arts Including Estates | June 8-10 Luxury Accessories | June 10-11 Summer Fine Jewelry | June 11 Asian Art | June 29 Big Fun! The Architectural Artifacts Auction | July 18-19 Asian Art | September 11 Consign by: July 9 Fine & Decorative Arts Including Estates | September 22-23 Consign by: July 20 Luxury Accessories | September 23-24 Consign by: July 11 Fine Jewelry | September 24 Consign by: July 10 Illustration Art | October 11 Consign by: August 16 Photographs | October 12 Consign by: August 17 Fine Silver & Objects of Vertu | October 16 Consign by: August 13 Prints & Multiples | October 22 Consign by: August 27 David Hockney (b. 1937) Amaryllis in Vase, from Moving Focus, 1984 Lithograph in colors on TGL handmade paper, with full margins 50 x 36 inches (sheet) Sold for: $75,000 | April 2018

Visit HA.com for a complete calendar. Inquiries: 214.409.1444 | Art@HA.com

Design | October 23 Consign by: August 20 Timepieces | October 23 Consign by: August 8 Texas Art | October 27 Consign by: August 31 American Art | November 3 Consign by: September 7 Modern & Contemporary | November 8 Consign by: September 13

DALLAS | NEW YORK | BEVERLY HILLS | SAN FRANCISCO | CHICAGO | PALM BEACH LONDON | PARIS | GENEVA | AMSTERDAM | HONG KONG

Always Accepting Quality Consignments in 40 Categories 1 Million+ Online Bidder-Members Paul R. Minshull #16591. BP 12-25%; see HA.com 50078


THE MASTERS. AT HOME WITH DALLAS’ MASTERPIECES,

they bring this city to life like no other group. In a spirit of collaboration that

has propelled some of Dallas’ most legendary real estate transactions, this premier networking group continues to do what it does

best—connecting people and properties. What does that mean for you? A more expertly facilitated sale of your prized property. A more perfectly matched home for your next move. Twenty-six of the most admired and knowledgeable real estate professionals in Dallas come together to put their resources and their vast experience to work for you. Insider

information, off-market hip pocket properties, Dallas’ most exquisite and prized estates—all leveraged for your benefit. Thinking of a change? Put the Masters to work for you.


LEFT FRONT ROW: JOAN ELEA ZER , Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s

RALPH RANDALL , Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s LEFT 2ND ROW: FAISAL HALUM , Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s

ERIN MATHEWS , Allie Beth Allman and Assoc. LEFT 3RD ROW: TOM HUGHES , Compass

Freeman Sotheby’s

BURTON RHODES , Compass

Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate Compass

STEWART

SUSAN BALDWIN , Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s LEFT BACK ROW: BECKY FREY, Briggs

EMILY PRICE CARRIGAN , Emily Price Carrigan Properties

LEE , Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate RIGHT FRONT ROW: SUSAN

MADELINE JOBST, Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s MARCUS , Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s

AMY

MARK CAIN , DET WILER ,

RYAN STREIFF, Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate RIGHT 2ND ROW: MICHELLE WOOD, Compass RIGHT 3RD ROW: LINDY MAHONEY, Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s

PENNY RIVENBARK , Ebby Halliday Realtors

Allie Beth Allman and Assoc.

JACKIE MCGUIRE , Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s

EMILY RAY-PORTER , Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate

DORIS JACOBS , Allie Beth Allman and Assoc. RIGHT BACK ROW: KYLE CREWS ,

JONATHAN ROSEN , Compass

FRANK PURCELL , Allie Beth Allman and Assoc.


For over 10 years, Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate has set Dallas sales records, representing billions of dollars in property for thousands of satisfied clients. Our reputation as the area’s dominant luxury real estate firm is founded on the combined strength of our dynamic team, dedicated to collaboratively cultivating an intimate understanding of Dallas’ premier neighborhoods, with emphasis on quality, character and design.

10400 Strait Lane/4949 Calleja Way · Preston Hollow · $8,775,000

Residences at the Ritz-Carlton · Uptown · $7,500,000 – $825,000

C.C. Allen | 214.912.8326 | cc@daveperrymiller.com

Sharon S. Quist | 214.695.9595 | sharonquist@daveperrymiller.com

4949calleja.daveperrymiller.com

SOLD, Represented Buyers & Sellers

6941 Gaston Avenue · Lakewood · $2,895,000

4404 Greenbrier Drive · HPISD · $1,825,000

DeCarla Anderson | 214.695.9043 | decarla@daveperrymiller.com

Betty Crawford | 214.770.4268 | betty@bettycrawford.com

6941gaston.daveperrymiller.com

4404greenbrier.daveperrymiller.com

Based on MLS Data for 2017 – Dallas defined as MLS Areas 11, 12, 14, 16, 17, 18, 25


See the best of Dallas real estate at daveperrymiller.com

3816 Miramar Avenue · Highland Park · $5,200,000 4655 Meadowood Road · Preston Hollow · $6,475,000 Molly Malone | 214.725.9969 | molly@daveperrymiller.com

Stephen Pryor | 469.387.0272 | stephen@pryorzelley.com Carol Ann Zelley | 214.668.0503 | carolann@pryorzelley.com

4655meadowood.daveperrymiller.com

3816miramar.daveperrymiller.com

13978 Hughes Lane · North Dallas · $1,775,000

2200 Victory #2104 & #1707 · The House · $1,199,000 & $850,000

Melissa O’Brien | 214.616.8343 | melissa@daveperrymiller.com

Henda Salmeron | 214.991.2237 | henda@hendasalmeron.com

13978hughes.daveperrymiller.com

2200victory2104.daveperrymiller.com | 2200victory1707.daveperrymiller.com


EDITOR’S NOTE

Portrait Tim Boole, Styling Jeanna Doyle, Stanley Korshak

June / July 2018

TERRI PROVENCAL Publisher / Editor in Chief

Following a brimming spring arts season, it’s time to slow down a bit for the summer. To that end, we enjoy musing over some great moments in the visual and performing arts, albeit too many to cover in our pages here. Lee Cullum reveals her favorite standout fall and spring performances while Nancy Cohen Israel highlights Edith Baker’s first-ever solo show, the Dallas Art Fair Acquisition Foundation Program’s selections for the Dallas Museum of Art, and the interesting pop-up shows surrounding the fair. Meanwhile, summer is not without its own exhibition blockbuster. Steve Carter shares details of Takashi Murakami’s major retrospective The Octopus Eats it Own Leg mounting at the Modern Museum of Art Fort Worth on June 10. Exhibiting the Japanese artist’s energetic anime-inspired characters, marrying East and West, ancient and modern, and high and low culture, the show is on view through September 16, 2018, as the season’s must-see. Summer is about beauty, vacationing while taking care of your skin, pretty frocks in lightweight fabrics, taking time for children and extended family, visiting friends, and seeing new places. To that end, we are thrilled to profile Dallas’ own cosmetic founder and skincare specialist, Susan Posnick in A Cinderella Story. Susan knows about visiting new places and summer’s must— sunscreen. Actually, she received the international MyAid Award for her COLORFLO foundations and Brush on Block mineral sunscreen. Peggy Levinson shares the scoop on Susan’s exciting trip to Vienna to receive top honors for her cancer-fighting brand at a two-thousand person gala in the City of Music. And whether dressing up or down for the heat, stylist Ariella Villa partnered up with photographer Sergio Garcia, whom we’ve officially lost to Los Angeles, to highlight some spectacular looks for the warmer temperatures in Sheer Madness. As a welcoming city, we love when the work of international artists come to Dallas. In Sleeping Around, Chris Byrne interviews sculptor Tony Matelli about his infamous sculpture, the hyperreal Sleepwalker that incited both controversy and delight in installations at Wellesley College near Boston, and the High Line in New York City. Thanks to passionate art collectors, Brett and Lester Levy, the insomniac now has a permanent home in Dallas. Lastly, how does a city say goodbye to an arts patron of the highest regard? At the age of 106, Margaret McDermott passed away on May 3, 2018, leaving a legacy in Dallas for many generations to come. As proud of her career as a journalist at The Dallas Morning News as she was of the arts she so richly bestowed, it seemed only fitting that another beloved journalist, Lee Cullum, memorialize this remarkable woman’s influence on North Texas. Undoubtedly, stories that include Margaret’s name will be shared untold times this summer. Enjoy the respite; see you in the fall. – Terri Provencal terri@patronmagazine.com; Instagram terri_provencal and patronmag

8

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


DALL AS C OUN T Y Q1 2018 Sales Over $5M

ALLIE BETH ALLMAN & ASSOCIATES LEADS 2018 WITH THE MOST SALES OVER $5 MILLION —AGAIN.

$83M

$5M ABA & Associates

Competitor

alliebeth.com Data source: Multiple Listing Service (MLS). Data provided is per office.


CONTENTS

FEATURES 36 MURAKAMI’S BORDERLESS WORLD The Modern's Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg presents a major retrospective for the Japanese icon. By Steve Carter 42 LASTING IMPRESSIONS Selections from the fall and spring arts seasons. By Nancy Cohen Israel, Lee Cullum, and Terri Provencal 50 A CINDERELLA STORY Susan Posnick receives an international award in Vienna. By Peggy Levinson 54 SHEER MADNESS The summer season arrives diaphanous and billowing. Photography by Sergio Garcia DEPARTMENTS 08 Editor’s Note

36

12 Contributors 20 Noted Top Arts and Culture Chatter. By Anthony Falcon Of Note 23 TIME OF THE TROUBADOUR By Steve Carter Contemporaries 32 SLEEPING AROUND By way of Wellesley College, to the High Line, Tony Matelli’s Sleepwalker will now rest at a permanent home in Dallas. By Chris Byrne Studio 34 BURN + BALM Lauren Woods’ Monuments for a New America. By Justine Ludwig 50

Coveted 62 WISHFUL THINKING Matthew Trent designs a custom bracelet inspired by a trip to the Central American rainforest. By Terri Provencal There 64 CAMERAS COVERING CULTURAL EVENTS Furthermore ... 72 MARGARET MCDERMOTT: FEBRUARY 18, 1912–MAY 3, 2018 By Lee Cullum

42

54 10

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

On the cover: Takashi Murakami, Klein’s Pot A, 1994–97, acrylic on canvas mounted on board in Plexiglas box, 15.37 x 15.37 x 3.37 in. Colección Pérez Simón, Mexico © 1994–97 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Photograph by Yoshitaka Uchida.


CONTRIBUTORS

STEVE CARTER In this issue, freelance arts writer Steve Carter lifts the curtain on the epic retrospective, Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg, which opens June 10 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. A worldwide phenomenon, Japan’s Murakami blends high culture with low, vanguard Pop with ancient tradition. Carter also profiles Charley Crockett, whose music mixes soul, blues, country, Cajun, and other influences. His new album, Lonesome as a Shadow, is his best yet. CHRIS BYRNE Chris Byrne is the author of the graphic novel The Magician (Marquand Books, 2013) as well as the book The Original Print (Guild Publishing, 2002). He is Co-Chair of Art21's Contemporary Council and serves on the board of directors of Institute 193, Dallas Contemporary, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, and the American Folk Art Museum’s Council for the Study of Art Brut and the Self-Taught. He is the co-founder of the Dallas Art Fair and was formerly Chairman of the Board of the American Visionary Art Museum.

12

JUSTINE LUDWIG Justine Ludwig is the Executive Director of Creative Time, a social justice public arts non-profit based in New York City. Ludwig previously served as the Deputy Director/ Chief Curator at Dallas Contemporary. In Burn + Balm, Justine delves into the social practice of Lauren Woods’ Monuments for a New America.

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

PAUL CONANT With over 19 years of editing experience, Paul lends his vast knowledge to magazines, books, dissertations, and beyond. In addition to work on local and national publications, other clients include Francis Collins (Seashell Prisoners), Victor Shane (In God We Trust), and Brenda V. Johnson (Transitional Journey). He also enjoys editing the details of Patron.

LAUREN CHRISTENSEN With more than two decades of experience in advertising and marketing, Lauren consults with clients in art, real estate, fashion, and publishing through L. Christensen Marketing & Design. She serves on the boards of the Christensen Family Foundation and Helping Our Heroes. Her clean, contemporary aesthetic and generous spirit make Lauren the perfect choice to art direct Patron.

SERGIO GARCIA Los Angeles-based photographer, Sergio Garcia, is the go-to source in the entertainment industry with a knack for capturing vivid actor, and musician, on-air personalities, executive headshots, and those seeking the unexpected. For Sheer Madness, Sergio paired up with stylist Ariella Villa to bring translucence and buoyancy to summer fashion collections from top brands.

NANCY COHEN ISRAEL A Dallas-based art historian, Nancy is an ongoing Patron contributor who writes for national publications of note including Lilith. She is also a frequent lecturer at the Meadows Museum. For this issue’s Best of the Arts feature, she covered a few of the highlights during Dallas Arts Month including the Dallas Art Fair and the pop-ups surrounding it, as well as a first exhibition featuring the work of legendary former gallerist Edith Baker, whose solo show was on view at Craighead Green Gallery.

PEGGY LEVINSON A previous showroom owner in the Dallas Design Center and interiors magazine design and style editor, Levinson lends her design expertise to Patron. In A Cinderella Story, Peggy visits with Susan Posnick following her attendance at Viennese gala, where she was honored with the MyAid award, an international recognition bestowed to those dedicated to fighting cancer.

LEE CULLUM Lee Cullum is a Dallas journalist who balances her work in business, public policy, and foreign affairs with a passion for the performing arts. In the season just ending she found much to celebrate, both in music and theater. Jaap van Zweden delivered a fantastic finale at the symphony, and The Dallas Opera went all-out high-tech with The Sunken Garden. Add triumphs at the Dallas Theater Center and the Undermain, and it has been a very good year indeed.

JOHN SMITH An ongoing Patron contributor, Dallasbased photographer John Smith enjoys bringing out the artistic side of architecture in his pictures. He consults with numerous architects, designers, and artists to bring their vision to light through photographs. In this issue’s A Cinderella Story, Smith visited Susan Posnick’s downtown apartment to capture her distinctly chic style and the sunset.


Artist Masri, Between Black & White 0013, acrylic on paper, 28 x 22 in.

CONTEMPORARY ART

www.marytomasgallery.com


PUBLISHER | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Terri Provencal terri@patronmagazine.com ART DIRECTION Lauren Christensen DIGITAL MANAGER/PUBLISHING COORDINATOR Anthony Jay Falcon COPY EDITOR Paul W. Conant PRODUCTION Michele Rodriguez INTERNS Avery Foshee Megan Gellner CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chris Byrne Steve Carter Lee Cullum Nancy Cohen Israel Peggy Levinson Justine Ludwig

Finn Juhl’s One Collection only at SMINK

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Rhi Lee Karen Almond Greg Milano Sharen Bradford Kristi Redman Bruno Tamytha Cameron Scot Redman Lyza Renee Daniel Driensky John Smith Sylvia Elzafon Kevin Todora George Fiala Michael Velez Avery Foshee Theresa Webster Sergio Garcia Megan Gellner CONTRIBUTING STYLISTS Ricky Flores Craig Thomas Ariella Villa ADVERTISING info@patronmagazine.com or by calling (214)642-1124 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM View Patron online @ patronmagazine.com REACH US info@patronmagazine.com SUBSCRIPTIONS patronmagazine.com One year $36/6 issues, two years $48/12 issues For international subscriptions add $12 for postage SOCIAL @patronmag is published 6X per year by Patron, P.O. Box 12121, Dallas, Texas 75225. Copyright 2018, Patron. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without express written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. Opinions expressed in editorial copy are those of experts consulted and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors, publisher or the policy of Patron. Unsolicited manuscripts and photographs should be sent to the address above and accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope for return. Publisher will take reasonable precaution with such materials but assumes no responsibility for their safety. Please allow up to two months for return of such materials.

14

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


ANDERSEN SEATING SYSTEM RODOLFO DORDONI DESIGN

W W W. M I N OT T I . C O M

SMINK 1019 Dragon Street, Dallas, Texas 75207 www.sminkinc.com


CELEBRATING TWENTY YEARS COUNTDOWN TO


OF TWO x TWO FOR AIDS AND ART

OCTOBER 27, 2018


Cobalt Universe | 3-Dimensional Oil on Canvas | 60 x 48 in.

JD MILLER

SAMUEL LYNNE GALLERIES

1105 DRAGON ST. | DALLAS, TX 75207 | WWW.SAMUELLYNNE.COM | 214.965.9027


ONE A RTS P L AZ A

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT RESIDENTIAL SALES, PLEASE CONTACT

Byran Crawford | 214.404.8186

Emily Ray-Porter | 214.544.5698

Briggs Freeman, Sotheby’s Int’l

Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate

Faisal Halum | 214.240.2575

Sharon S. Quist | 214.695.9595

Briggs Freeman, Sotheby’s Int’l

Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate

Live life luxuriously at the prestigious One Arts Plaza. Treat yourself to high ceilings, massive terraces, sensational YLHZVDQGWKHoQHVWoQLVKLQJV The grand entrance provides you with twenty four hour concierge to meet your needs, valet, a rooftop pool overlooking Downtown Dallas, private owner’s ORXQJHDQGVWDWHRIWKHDUWoWQHVV FHQWHU:LWKLQZDONLQJGLVWDQFH WRPXVHXPV.O\GH:DUUHQ3DUN fabulous restaurants and tons of shopping, enjoy everything the Arts District has to offer MXVWRXWVLGH\RXUGRRU

#1905 1 Bed · 2 Baths · 1,264 SF

#2212 $775,000

#2009 2 Beds · 2 Baths · 2,524 SF

1 Bed · 2 Baths · 1,749 SF

#2202 $899,000

#1915 $1,649,000

2 Beds · 2.1 Baths · 2,784 SF

2 Beds · 2.1 Baths · 2,460 SF

#1909 $1,350,000

#2303 $1,889,000

2 Beds · 2.1 Baths · Study · 3,153 SF

2 Beds · 2 Baths · Den · 2,524 SF

$1,600,000

#2307 $2,299,000

1717 A R T S P L A Z A , D A L L A S , T X , 75 2 01, U N I T E D S T A T E S

3 Beds · 3.1 Baths · 4,839 SF

$5,000,000


NOTED 06

THE LATEST CULTURAL NEWS COVERING ALL ASPECTS OF THE ARTS IN NORTH TEXAS: NEW EXHIBITS, NEW PERFORMANCES, GALLERY OPENINGS, AND MORE.

12

01 AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM The Souls of Black Folk features work from the Billy R. Allen Folk $UW &ROOHFWLRQ ([SORUH WKH KLVWRU\ RI D RQFHà RXULVKLQJ 1RUWK Dallas community in Facing the Rising Sun: Freedman’s Cemetery. Both exhibitions are ongoing. The 30th Annual Texas Black Invitational Rodeo comes to AAM Jun. 15. aamdallas.org

Aug. 14. Scholar Talk: The Nazi Euthanasia Program features Dr. %HWK *ULHFK3ROHOOH .XUW 0D\HU &KDLU LQ +RORFDXVW 6WXGLHV DQG $VVRFLDWH3URIHVVRUDW3DFLÀF/XWKHUDQ8QLYHUVLW\ZKRZLOOGLVFXVV +LWOHU¡VÀUVWYLFWLPV-XQ2Q-XQSpeaker: Sam Mihara will discuss his experience living in Japanese internment camps. dallasholocaustmuseum.org

02 AMON CARTER MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART Through Jun. 17, In Her Image: Photographs by Rania Matar displays four bodies of work tracking the development of female identity through portraiture. Jan Staller: CYCLE & SAVED screens two VKRUWYLGHRVUHà HFWLQJRQDSRWHQWFRQWUDGLFWLRQRIFRQWHPSRUDU\ material. Through Aug. 19. Commanding Space: Women Sculptors of Texas runs through Nov. 18. Through Jul. 22, Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows traces the artist’s interest in color, light, and process. Opening Jun. 16, Multitude, Solitude: The Photographs of Dave Heath offers a survey of Heath’s deeply personal early work through Sep. 16. Jul. 28–Jan. 27, Hedda Sterne: Printed Variations heralds the artist’s variety of formal interests. Image: Hedda Sterne (1910–2011), Untitled (Metaphores and Metamorphoses VIII), 1967, lithograph Š 2018 The Hedda Sterne Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. cartermuseum.org

06 DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART Through Jul. 29, Laura Owens presents a survey of the artist’s \HDU career featuring over 60 paintings and objects from the PLGV WKURXJK WRGD\ The Power of Gold: Asante Royal Regalia from Ghana runs through Aug. 12, inspired by works in the DMA’s collection revealing the splendor of Asante regalia. Asian Textiles: Art and Trade Along the Silk Road draws from the DMA’s FROOHFWLRQ WR SUHVHQW ÀQH H[DPSOHV RI RUQDPHQWDO KDQJLQJV DQG garments. Through Dec. 9. Word and Image: Works on Paper from the 15th through 20th centuries focuses on artists who blurred the boundaries between art and text, through Oct. 21. Through Dec. 2, Journey of the Human Spirit, by Hopi artists Michael Kabotie and Delbridge Honanie, narrates the history of the Hopi people. Image: Michael Kabotie and Delbridge Honanie, Journey of the Human Spirit–The Emergence (panel 1), 2001, acrylic on canvas, Courtesy of WKH0XVHXPRI1RUWKHUQ$UL]RQD‹*HQH%DO]HUGPDRUJ

03 CROW COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART Fierce Loyalty: A Samurai Complete displays the art and culture of the Japanese samurai, and Earthly Splendor: Korean Ceramics from the Collection presents the museum’s Korean art collection consisting of works ranging from stone sculptures to paintings, through Sep. 9. crowcollection.org 04 DALLAS CONTEMPORARY Eric Fischl: If Art Could Talk, Harry Nuriev: 6 Fears, and Sara Rahbar: Carry me home will continue through Aug. Fischl is known for depicting the dark, disturbing undercurrents of mainstream American life. Harry Nuriev is a young Russian architect and furniture designer currently working out of Brooklyn. Rahbar is known for her Flag series in which traditional fabrics and objects were reworked as collages. dallascontemporary.org 05 DALLAS HOLOCAUST MUSEUM Manzanar: The Wartime Photographs of Ansel Adams chronicles the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, through 20

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

07 GEOMETRIC MADI MUSEUM Signs and Symbols HQGV -XO  DQG IHDWXUHV WKH à RRUWRFHLOLQJ KDQJLQJ SLHFHV RI 3HGUR 0RUDOHV DQG WKH *HRPHWULF ,QÀQLW\ VFXOSWXUHVRI0LJXHO3U\SFKDQERWKRI9HQH]XHOD2SHQLQJ-XO\ 20, the art of SK Sahni of India and Hernan Jara of Ecuador and Paris will mount. Image: Lane Banks, Untitled 2018, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 4 x 4 in. geometricmadimuseum.org 08 GEORGE W. BUSH PRESIDENTIAL CENTER )LUVW /DGLHV 6W\OH RI ,Qà XHQFH H[DPLQHV KRZ WKH )/2786 UROH KDV evolved over time, and how First Ladies have used their position to advance diplomacy and other social, cultural, and political initiatives. Through Oct. 1. The Art & Leadership of Winston Churchill will discuss what made Churchill an effective leader and how those lessons can be applied to today’s most pressing issues. This evening will be enhanced by the exhibition of a number of Churchill’s paintings with another artist delivering opening remarks, Former President Bush. Jun. 26. bushcenter.org


NOTED: VISUAL ARTS

15

07

09 KIMBELL ART MUSEUM From the Lands of Asia: The Sam and Myrna Myers Collection continues through Aug. 19. When Americans Samuel and Myrna Myers visited Paris in the mid-1960s, they decided to make their home there and built an extraordinary collection that until now, has never been exhibited publicly. This exhibit presents 400 objects representing key periods in the history of the art of China, Japan, Tibet, Mongolia, Korea, and Vietnam. kimbellart.org 10 LATINO CULTURAL CENTER On Jun. 16, Cine de Oro presents Loteria. Join the LLC for their next installment of Cine de Oro on Jul. 18. lcc.dallasculture.org 11 THE MAC The MAC POP Garden features a functioning natural-dye garden that demonstrates how plant dyes may be used in the creation of art through educational activities where participants may learn about the life of a plant, from the origin of a seed, its development over time, and the mature plant’s various uses. the-mac.org 12 MEADOWS MUSEUM Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida closes Jun. 3. Murillo at the Meadows: A 400th Anniversary Celebration continues through Dec. 2. At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase opens Jun. 24 and runs through Sept. 23. Image: Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917), Modern Muse (Meditation with Arms, Eve in Despair) (detail), c. 1900-6. Marble. Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Elizabeth Meadows Sculpture Collection. Photo by Laura Wilson. meadowsmuseumdallas.org 13 MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH FOCUS: Kamrooz Aram spans painting, sculpture, collage, and installation. Aram’s work investigates the complex relationship between Western modernism and classical non-Western art through Jun. 17. Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg features vibrant anime-inspired characters by Takashi Murakami, who blurs the boundaries between high and low culture, ancient and modern, East and West. Jun. 10–Sep. 16. themodern.org 14 MUSEUM OF BIBLICAL ART Barbara Hines: Celebration of Survival is on display through Oct. inspired by stories from the Torah that convey her deep commitment

02

to sharing the beauty of Israel and using art as a way to bring understanding and peace. biblicalarts.org 15 NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER A Tradition of Revolution presents a cross-section of the Nasher’s collection and sculptural innovations of the last 150 years within WKH FRQWH[W RI FRQFXUUHQW SKLORVRSKLFDO VFLHQWLÀF DQG VRFLHWDO shifts. Ranging from the beginnings of Modernism to radical experiments of the present day, the exhibition will include works never before seen at the Nasher, including recent acquisitions. The Nasher Sculpture Center and Lismore Castle Arts, Ireland, commissioned Luke Fowler to create a new sound sculpture for both locations in an exhibition titled Sightings: Luke Flower. Both exhibits run through Aug. 19. Image: Henri Matisse, Tiari (Le TiarÊ), 1930, Bronze, 9.625 x 7.875 x 5.625 in. Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection, Š 2018 Succession H. Matisse, Paris/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. nashersculpturecenter.org 16 PEROT MUSEUM From Jun. 23–Jan. 6, Ultimate Dinosaurs reveals exotic species that evolved in isolation in South America, Africa, and Madagascar. Through Jul., Being Human Hall offers twice as many interactive stations along with a virtual-reality experience, created by Groove Jones, that puts visitors in the South African cave wherein 2015 researchers discovered a new species of primitive humans, Homo naledi. On Jun. 22 Social Science: Being Human will explore what it truly means to be human. Asteroid Day on Jun. 30 will study solutions to minimize the threats asteroids pose to our planet. Discovery Days take place on Jun. 9 (Sports Science), and on Jul. 14 (Biolog y). Discovery Camps are Jun. 11–Aug. 17. Summer Nights themes include Jun. 7 (Music) and Jul. 5 (Summer Science). Sleepovers are Jun. 15 (Superhero) and Jul. 13 (Ultimate Dinosaurs). perotmuseum.org 17 TYLER MUSEUM OF ART Sticks and Stones: Works by Helen Altman continues through Jun. 11. Rewind: Selections from Private Collections, through Aug. 12, consists of pieces borrowed from private East Texas collectors. Artists included range from some of the earliest exhibited, such as Elaine de Kooning and Robert Motherwell, to recently shown talents like Lance Letscher. David Bates: Selected Works from Texas Collections, Jun. 24–Sep. 9, highlights a spectrum of work by Bates. tylermuseum.org JUNE / JULY 2018 21


NOTED: PERFORMING ARTS

06

16

01 AMPHIBIAN King Liz by Fernanda Coppel begins its run on Jul. 13 and tells the story of sports agent Liz Rico who takes on client Freddie Luna, a high school basketball superstar with a troubled past. King Liz runs through Aug. 5. amphibianstage.com 02 AT&T PERFORMING ARTS CENTER The Second City Summer Blockbuster brings laughter to the Wyly Theatre Jun. 6–9. The 2017/18 Broadway series closes with the musical Bright Star onstage Jun. 12–24. Dallas Theater Center's production of Hairspray runs Jul. 7–15. Babel ends the 2017/18 Elevator Series, Jul. 5–15. On Jul. 21, join Ira Glass for Things I Have Learned, the host of This American Life, for the #HEARHERE series. attpac.org 03 BASS PERFORMANCE HALL Waitress tells the story of Jenna, a waitress and pie-maker who dreams of a way out of her small town and marriage, Jun. 19–24. On Jul. 12, musician Suzy Bogguss will perform. basshall.com 04 CASA MAÑANA Mamma Mia! runs Jun. 2–10. casamanana.org 05 DALLAS CHILDREN’S THEATER How I Became a Pirate tells the story of Jeremy Jacobs finding a home and family in his musical adventure with a few of his pirate friends, Jun. 15–Jul. 8. dct.org

man’s struggle to fulfill his dream and ‘make it’ as a comedic actor in New York, through Jul. 30. eisemanncenter.com 10 KITCHEN DOG THEATER To celebrate the 20th Anniversary of its New Works Festival, KDT is offering an expanded series of nine staged readings over three weekends, Jun. 1–17. kitchendogtheater.org 11 LYRIC STAGE Guys and Dolls, the perfect musical involving the unlikeliest of Manhattan pairings, will run Jun. 8–10. lyricstage.org 12 MAJESTIC THEATRE Ledisi returns to the Majestic for her Let Love Rule Tour with guests Melanie Fiona and Tweet, Jun. 15. SNL Weekend Update host, Michael Che, performs on Jun. 22. Stand-up comedian Chris D’Elia will perform Jun. 23. The 7th Annual Dallas Hip-Hop Dance Festival returns Jul. 28. majestic.dallasculture.org 13 TACA The TACA Perforum Amplifier Workshop: Creating Your Next Steps & Roadmap to Racial Equality features Chantel Hobbs, Jun. 12. taca-arts.org 14 TEXAS BALLET THEATER Eternally romantic, Swan Lake runs Jun 1–3. texasballettheater.org

06 DALLAS SUMMER MUSICALS The DSM brings The Lion King to Fair Park, from Jun. 13–Jul. 7. Love Never Dies, The Phantom Opera Returns runs Jul. 24–Aug. 5. Image: Lionesses Dance in The Lion King North American Tour. © Disney. Photograph by Deen van Meer. dallassummermusicals.org

15 THEATRE THREE Self Injurious Behavior depicts a mother's journey coping with the decision to place her autistic son in a special-needs home, through Jun. 10. Les Liaisons Dangereuses runs Jun. 14–Jul. 8. theatre3dallas.com

07 DALLAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The DSO opens the summer with Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition Jun. 2. Ruth Reinhardt and the DSO return to Frisco with Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5 on Jun. 2. Reinhardt conducts Scheherazade on Jun. 9. From Jun. 15–17, Hollywood at the Symphony features some much-loved hits. mydso.com

16 TITAS Alonzo King Lines Ballet features impeccable technique, stunning dancers, and powerful visual works onstage at the Winspear Opera House, Jun. 9. The American modern dance company, Parsons Dance, hits the stage Jun. 30. Image: Alonzo King LINES Ballet. Photograph by RJ Muna. titas.org

08 DALLAS THEATER CENTER No one is allowed to talk about White Rabbit Red Rabbit; not even the actor knows what they will be performing, through Jul. 1. dallastheatercenter.org

17 TURTLE CREEK CHORALE Outlaws honors Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, and other country legends that have put their daily lives into music, Jun. 8–10 at Bass Performance Hall. turtlecreekchorale.com

09 EISEMANN CENTER KJ Dance/Legendary performs Jun. 2–4. On Jun. 10, the Royale Ballet Dance Academy will perform at Hill Performance Hall. Brad Zimmerman’s My Son the Waiter: A Jewish Tragedy is the story of one

18 WATERTOWER THEATRE The Last Five Years follows the story of Jamie and Cathy, two 20-something artists in New York, as their relationship blossoms and sours. Jun. 8–Jul. 1. watertowertheatre.org

22

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


OF NOTE 2 018 I 2 019 S E A S O N in association with AT&T Performing Arts Center

Charley Crockett. Photography by Lyza Renee

SU BSCR IBE TO DAY !

D E B UT

CAMILLE A. BROWN & DANCERS AUGUST 24.25 2018 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

DIAVOLO ARCHITECTURE IN MOTION SEPTEMBER 14.15 2018 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

STEPHEN PETRONIO COMPAN Y OCTOBER 19.20 2018 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

LI VE M US I C

A S PE N S A N TA F E B A L L E T A N E V EN I N G W I T H J OYCE YA N G OCTOBER 26.27 2018 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

COMPLEXIONS CONTEMPORARY BALLET NOVEMBER 09.10 2018 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

D E B UT

DORRANCE DANCE FEBRUARY 01 2019 WINSPEAR OPERA HOUSE

D E B UT

CH I N A’ S

B E I J I N G DA N C E T H E AT E R FEBRUARY 08 2019 WINSPEAR OPERA HOUSE

KYLE ABRAHAM / A.I.M MARCH 01.02 2019 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

TIME OF THE TROUBADOUR

Charley Crockett’s coronation as the next Texas troubadour has been rumored for years, but with the release of his fourth, Lonesome as a Shadow, he’s poised to take the crown. The San Benito native’s journey from itinerant street corner balladeer to big time reads like a chapter from Woody Guthrie, but his 10 years on the streets of New Orleans, New York, and exotic ports served him well. On Lonesome, Crockett’s gumbo of Memphis soul, blues, country, Tejano, and Gulf Coast is at IXOOERLODQGSURGXFHU0DWW5RVV6SDQJFDSWXUHGWKHHQHUJ\ with the singer’s touring band; they’ll be on the road for months to come. “Oh I love it, man, passing through towns, JHWWLQJWRVHHDOONLQGVRISHRSOHµWKH\HDUROGGHVFHQGDQW RI'DY\&URFNHWWUKDSVRGL]HV´7KDW·VWKHJUHDWWKLQJDERXW a musician’s life—we get to meet people from the whole spectrum of society…if you can’t draw inspiration from that, ,GRQ·WNQRZZKDW\RX·GÀQGLQVSLUDWLRQLQµ–Steve Carter

D E B UT

EZRALOW DANCE MARCH 29.30 2019 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

PILOBOLUS APRIL 05.06 2019 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

S PE C I A L E V E N T

COMMAND PERFORMANCE JUNE 01 2019 WINSPEAR OPERA HOUSE

PHOTO CREDITS: Header photo Beijing Dance Theater - Li Huimin; 1. CABD BGLP, Fana Fraser and Beatrice Capote, Photo by Christopher Duggan; 2. Photo by Leandro Damasco; 3. Photo by Julie Lemberger; 4. Photo by Sharen Bradford; 5. Ballad Unto, Photo by Sharen Bradford; 6. Photo by Haiyim Heron - ETM; 7. Hamlet, Photo by Han Jiang; 8. Drive, Photo by Tim Barden; 9. Biz Men, Photo by Angelo Redaelli; 10. Photo by Beowulf Sheehan; 11. Clifford Williams and Yuan Yuan Tan 2016 Command Per formance, Photo by Sharen Bradford

CALL

214.8 8 0.02 02

OR VISIT

AT T PAC .O R G / T I TA S JUNE / JULY 2018 23


NOTED: GALLERIES

46

11

01 ALAN BARNES FINE ART By bringing new art as well as 18th- and 19th-century pieces to the market, the gallery exposes people to even more quality paintings. alanbarnesfineart.com. 02 AND NOW The gallery boasts an impressive roster of artists working internationally including Dallas’ Jeff Zilm and Michelle Rawlings, and Austin’s Dustin Pevey, along with New York artist Eli Ping. andnow.biz 03 ARTSPACE111 Majestic Space featuring the work of Winter Rusiloski will close Jun. 6. Next, the Fifth Annual Artspace111 Regional Juried Exhibition will open Jun. 22 and continue through Jul. 28. artspace111.com 04 BARRY WHISTLER GALLERY NEW EDITIONS, a group show featuring recent lithographs by Jay Shinn, etchings by Danny Williams, photographs by Allison V. Smith, and ceramic works by Jonathan Cross, runs Jun. 9–Aug. 4. barrywhistlergallery.com 05 BEATRICE M. HAGGERTY GALLERY Onward Forward 2018, on view through Jul. 15, is a juried student show of local MA & MFA graduate students. This year’s juror, Holly Johnson, of Holly Johnson Gallery, chose the work of eight graduate students. udallas.edu/gallery  06 BIVINS GALLERY Soft Seduction, an exhibition of works by Moscow-based artists Lidia Vitkovskaya and Denis Mikhaylov, continues through Jun. 15. Inspired by Pablo Picasso’s belief that “It is your work in life that is the ultimate seduction,” the exhibition reflects the artists’ relationships with their own works and passions. bivinsgallery.com 07 CADD CADD will again celebrate creativity and community with a Sunday Soup Supper on Jun. 10. CADD’s Third Thursday Happy Hour will be held at Craighead Green Gallery on Jun. 21. caddallas.net

work, Invasive Species, on view through Jul. 7.  The one-person exhibition showcases vibrant works in porcelain that explore color, light, and translucency. Image: Jen Rose, Funnel Drop, 2018, mobile with glazed porcelain and stainless steel rope, 108 x 93 x 84 in. carnealsimmons.com 10 CHRISTOPHER MARTIN GALLERY With two additional galleries in Santa Fe and Aspen, the Dallas gallery will exhibit AVANTE: New reverse paintings by Christopher Martin, steel casts and bronzes by Jim Keller, metal structures by Michael Sirvet, and stoneware works by Brandon Reese. christopherhmartin.com 11 CONDUIT GALLERY Solo shows for Spencer Evans, Justin Quinn, and Roberto Benavidez continue through Jun. 23. Opening Jun. 30, Mimesis combines Matt Clark’s abstract painting methods with Jackson Echol’s elementograph process. Mimesis, an imitation of nature, describes the processes by which the artists worked through the series and the end result, large-scale two-dimensional works that appear layered and textural. Through Aug. 30. Image: Spencer Evans, Okada, 2017, oil on canvas, 10 x 20 in. conduitgallery.com 12 CRAIGHEAD GREEN GALLERY Three solo exhibitions will open at Craighead Green Jun. 23 and continue through Jul. 28, featuring Rich Bowman, Linda McCall, and Daniel Angeles. craigheadgreen.com 13 CRIS WORLEY FINE ARTS On view through Jun. 23, Steven Charles: You and I are living now is the artist’s first solo show in Texas since his 20-year career began in New York City. Also through Jun. 23, Robert Lansden’s delicate graphite-on-paper drawings are displayed in As Within, So Without. A new body of work by Anna Elise Johnson opens Jun. 30, displaying her first exhibition of oil-on-canvas paintings, in which she continues to explore temporal and physical layering. Image: Robert Lansden, Surrender #2, 2017, graphite on paper, 30 x 22 in. crisworley.com

08 CARLYN GALERIE Carlyn Galerie is a store devoted to the sale of fine American art glass, clay, fiber, metals, and jewelry. carlyngalerie.com

14 CYDONIA Cydonia will run Works On View through Jul. The exhibition features work that is playful, colorful, and on the whimsical side with a mix of artists from its stable. cydoniagallery.com

09 CARNEAL SIMMONS CONTEMPORARY ART Jen Rose explores the conquest of biomorphic forms in her recent

15 DADA The Dallas Art Dealers Association promotes the highest standards

24

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


44 of ethical practice within the profession and increases public awareness of art and the role and responsibilities of reputable GHDOHUVDQGQRQSURÀWYLVXDODUWVSDFHVGDOODVDUWGHDOHUVRUJ 16 DAVID DIKE FINE ART 7KHJDOOHU\VSHFLDOL]HVLQODWHWKDQGWKFHQWXU\$PHULFDQ DQG(XURSHDQSDLQWLQJVZLWKDQHPSKDVLVRQWKH7H[DV 5HJLRQDOLVWVDQG7H[DV/DQGVFDSHSDLQWHUVGDYLGGLNHFRP 17 ERIN CLULEY GALLERY -RVHSKLQH 'XUNLQ·V Everbloom ZLOO FRQWLQXH WKURXJK -XQ  $OLIHORQJPDNHUDQGORYHURIÁRUD'XUNLQGHFLGHVWRPDNH XSIRUZKDWVKHODFNVLQWUDGLWLRQDOJDUGHQLQJVNLOOVE\FUHDWLQJ DUWLÀFLDOÁRZHUVLQWKHIRUPRIVHZQFROODJHVZDOOVFXOSWXUH DQGLQVWDOODWLRQ7KHZRUNVIHDWXUHGLQEverbloom are the artist·s ZD\RIFUHDWLQJEORRPVWKDWVKHKRSHVZLOORXWOLYHKHU,PDJH -RVHSKLQH'XUNLQFlora 18VHZQGLJLWDOSULQWVRQSKRWR UDJ &RORU$LG SDSHU ODWH[ FRORUHG SHQFLO SDLQW SDVWHO DQG ZDWHUFRORUFUD\RQRQSDSHU[LQHULQFOXOH\FRP 18 FORT WORKS ARTS )RUW:RUWKDUWLVW-HUHP\-RHOLVIHDWXUHGLQKLVÀUVWVRORVKRZ titled A Beatbox Caviar, WKURXJK Jun  8QFRQYHQWLRQDO LQ VW\OH-RHO·VSDLQWLQJVVHUYHDVDSHHSKROHLQWRKLVSDVWRIIHULQJ DUHÁHFWLRQRQKLVXSEULQJLQJDQGOLIHHYHQWVWKDWKDYHIRUJHG KLVZRUOGYLHZIRUWZRUNVDUWFRP 19 FWADA )RUW:RUWK$UW'HDOHUV$VVRFLDWLRQRUJDQL]HVIXQGVDQGKRVWV H[KLELWLRQVRIQRWHZRUWK\DUWIZDGDFRP 20 GALERIE FRANK ELBAZ Object Lessons: Jay DeFeo Works on Paper from the 1970s will UXQWKURXJK-XO&XUDWHGE\3DXO*DOYH]WKHH[KLELWLRQ VKRZFDVHV ZRUN IURP WKH ODWWHU \HDUV RI 'H)HR·V SUROLÀF FDUHHUJDOHULHIUDQNHOED]FRP 21 GALLERI URBANE 'DQLHOOH.LP]H\·VVRORH[KLELWLRQ9LHZÀQGHUDQG0HO3UHVW·V VRORH[KLELWLRQlux,ZLOOFRQWLQXHWKURXJK-XQ6WXGLR9LVLW D JURXS VKRZ FXUDWHG E\ $VVLVWDQW 'LUHFWRU&XUDWRU $GULDQ =XxLJDZLOORSHQ-XQDQGZLOOIHDWXUHQHZZRUNE\*DOOHUL 8UEDQH·VURVWHURIDUWLVWVDVZHOODVVHOHFWLQYLWHGDUWLVWV WKURXJK -XO ,PDJH 0HO 3UHVW &ORXGEXUVW  DFU\OLF RQ SDQHO[[LQJDOOHULXUEDQHFRP

Jerry Skibell

Dallas, Texas skibellart.com Call for studio appointments 972.233.3838 | JUNE / JULY 2018 25


NOTED: GALLERIES

Kittrell/Riffkind Art Glass Gallery

21

Skulltini’s

by Marc VandenBerg

24th Annual Goblet Invitational Saturday, June 16 th 1-5 pm

Show continues through July

22 THE GOSS-MICHAEL FOUNDATION A new exhibition of works at The Goss-Michael Foundation, curated by international art advisor Filippo Tattoni-Marcozzi, has been selected to expose, inspire, confront, and reflect upon the use and abuse of the female body in contemporary art. Entitled Beauty and Subjugation from The Goss-Michael Collection, it will continue through Jun. g-mf.org 23 HOLLY JOHNSON GALLERY Purity, featuring new work by Geoff Hippenstiel, is on view through Jun. 16. Color Light Space: New Paintings by Eric Cruikshank runs Jun. 30–Aug. 11. The Scottish artist Eric Cruikshank’s new paintings analyze the qualities of color and light, explore notions of painterly space, and investigate the process of painting itself. hollyjohnsongallery.com 24 KIRK HOPPER FINE ART Lois Dodd and Roger Winter continue through Jun. 9. Winter, known for his figurative landscapes of hauntingly beautiful paintings of the mundane and unobtrusive, pays close attention to subjects seen in a glimpse. Dodd began her career in New York during the postwar art scene and was the only female founding member of Tanager Gallery. Her work is inspired by the rich character and natural beauty of the Northeast. Next, Prohibitor –Summer Group Show will run Jun. 30–Aug. 18. kirkhopperfineart.com 25 KITTRELL/RIFFKIND ART GLASS Introducing... showing two new artists to the gallery, Zachary Yuskanich and Ken Rosenfeld, ends Jun. 3. The 25th Goblet Invitational, featuring drinking vessels from over 70 artists nationwide, ranging from functional to fantasy, runs Jun. 16–Aug. 5. kittrellriffkind.com 26 KRISTY STUBBS GALLERY Kristy Stubbs brings years of experience and expertise to the global art trade, often bringing notable artists to the US from abroad. stubbsgallery.com

4500 Sigma Rd. Dallas, Texas 972.239.7957 n www.kittrellriffkind.com 26

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

27 LAURA RATHE FINE ART Lucrecia Waggoner: New Works continues through Jun. 16.


KENT WALLIS Exploring Plein Air

SOUTH WEST

GALLERY

4500 Sigma Rd. Dallas, TX 75244 972.960.8935

www.swgallery.com


NOTED: GALLERIES

RICH BOWMAN OPEN RANGE

09

DANIEL ANGELES BEYOND THE HORIZON

Summer Showcase exhibits brand-new works by Katherine Houston with an artist reception Jun. 23. Houston has worked with a number of mediums, grounds, and styles of painting. Her ‘reverse glass’ paintings on acrylic employ abstract motifs and bold references to landscape to explore the idea of infinite space. Through Aug. 30. laurarathe.com 28 LILIANA BLOCH GALLERY Unmade, Christian Fagerlund’s first exhibition at Liliana Bloch, consists of two recent series of oil paintings. The first is a group of back portraits examining self. The second series of paintings are distillations of complex visual moments—records of a specific time and location, observed and represented as ratio, value, and color. Through Jun. 16. Kathy Lovas’ #chair is on view in the foyer of the gallery through the summer. lilianablochgallery.com

LINDA MCCALL LIFE IN PIECES

OPENING RECEPTION S A T URDA Y, JUNE 23 5 - 8 PM ON V IEW JUNE 23 - JULY 28

29 LUMINARTÉ FINE ART GALLERY LuminArté Fine Art Gallery presents: FLOWMOTION on view through Jul. 28. FLOWMOTION features artist Judith Seay’s new works in oil and metal leaf. luminartegallery.com 30 MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES Blending the traditions of Surrealism, Cubism, and Fauvism, René Lalonde’s The Art of Love exhibition continues through Jun. 9. Specializing in original paintings, sculpture, and limitededition graphics, the gallery is distinguished by works of art by a host of international artists. martinlawrence.com 31 MARY TOMÁS GALLERY Color Play features artists Chalda Maloff, Tom Ortega, and Ellen Soffer, and sculptor Bill Holmberg, and runs through Jun. 16. Summer of 2018 Group Exhibition features a selection of gallery-rostered artists. Exhibition opens Jun. 23 and continues through Jul. 28. Image: Tom Ortega, Bittersweet, 2018, mixed media on panel, 30 x 30 in. marytomasgallery.com 32 PHOTOGRAPHS DO NOT BEND HIGHLIGHTS: New York & Dallas includes photographs by Jeanine Michna-Bales from Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad depicting historical landmarks and

28

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


13 eerie landscapes that a slave may have walked through at night to seek safety, and inevitably, freedom. Deeply compelling images from Jeffrey Silverthorne’s 1970’s series, Morgue, along with a selection of recently acquired photographs from the archives of motor-sport’s photographer, Jesse Alexander, are also on view through Jun. 23. pdnbgallery.com 33 THE POWER STATION )RUPHUO\ D 'DOODV 3RZHU  /LJKW %XLOGLQJ WKLV QRQSURÀW art space in Exposition Park hosts seasonal international exhibitions of note. powerstationdallas.com 34 THE PUBLIC TRUST The Public Trust exhibits contemporary artwork by midcareer and emerging artists. The gallery’s program extends LQWRSXEOLVKLQJVLJQLÀFDQWDUWSXEOLFDWLRQVDVZHOODVOLPLWHG edition prints and other multiples. trustthepublic.com 35 THE READING ROOM to Further Seasons, a group exhibition exploring images and texts about nature curated by Lucia Simek, continues through Jun. 9. Included are Jesse Morgan Barnett, Cassandra Emswiler Burd, Trevor Davis, Michael Dean, Erika Duque, Ian Hamilton Finlay, and Marjorie Schwarz among others. thereadingroom-dallas.blogspot.com 36 RO2 ART Cathey Miller: She Came from Outer Space continues at the Magnolia Theatre through Jul. 10. At Ro2 Art’s Downtown Pop-Up, 1DWKDQ3RUWHUÀHOG Elysian Aftertaste opens Jun. 2 and continues through Jun. 30. Up next at Ro2 Art-Cedars is Ken Craft: Ain’t Like I Thought and Nancy Ferro: The Past Informs, both on view Jun. 9–Jul. 7. Opening Jul. 14, CHAOS!!!!!! 6th Annual Small Works Spectacular will mount through Sep. 8. Ro2art.com 37 ROUGHTON GALLERIES Featuring fine 19th- and 20th-century American and European paintings, the gallery is distinguished for its scholarship and actively supports research in both American and European art. roughtongalleries.com

Jerry Skibell

Dallas, Texas skibellart.com Call for studio appointments 972.233.3838 | JUNE / JULY 2018 29


NOTED: GALLERIES

17

MULTITUDE, SOLITUDE The Photographs of Dave Heath On view June 16 through September 16, 2018 Explore the poetic images of one of the most original photographers of the last half of the twentieth century—Dave Heath.

Free Admission #DaveHeath Above (detail): Dave Heath (1931–2016), Kansas City, Missouri, 1967, gelatin silver print, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri Gift of the Hall Family Foundation 2011.67.23 This exhibition has been organized by The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri. In Fort Worth, the exhibition is supported by The Pangburn Foundation and in part by a grant from the Arts Council of Fort Worth.

38 RUSSELL TETHER FINE ART RTFA manages estates and features renowned national and international artists, along with select artists from North America. russelltether.com 39 SAMUEL LYNNE GALLERIES Through Jul., SLG mounts a group exhibition for their entire artist roster this summer including Metis Atash, Lea Fisher, JD Miller, Hans Van de Bovenkamp, David Yarrow, John Henry, Philip J. Romano, and Tyler Shields. samuellynne.com 40 SITE131 Two artists from Europe and one from California are featured in FR AGMENTS, closing Jun. 8. As its first resident artist, Manuel Burgene built a large-scale installation from found industrial materials near the gallery. Another international guest artist, Travis Lycar from Germany, shows his jagged, halting painted marks that fill over-sized canvases. Conceptual California artist, Puppies Puppies, joins the exhibition isolating the trigger apparatus from manufactured guns. Clay & Things will open fall 2018 and gather energetic ceramists, including Texas clay couple Eric and Morgan Grasham’s idiosyncratic clay composites. site131.com 41 SMINK PAPERWORK 3 is the gallery’s third exhibition of paper-based art. Featured are original works by Robert Szot, Paula Roland, Diane McGregor, Richard Hogan, Thel, and Signe Stuart. All of these represent a varied range of collectible paperwork– some three-dimensional, and many more drawn or painted on paper, on display through Jul. sminkinc.com 42 SOUTHWEST GALLERY Find Kent Wallis’ newest work exploring his Plein Air painting side at SWG. This show of more than 50 pieces focuses on capturing each season’s continual renewal with his poetic celebration of color. Kent’s spontaneous touch, bold pallet, and vivid color create an atmosphere of joy. Wallis’ work will be on view through Jul. swgallery.com 43 TALLEY DUNN GALLERY Talley Dunn mounts an exhibition of new work from Tim Bavington in the main gallery and Helen Altman in the project gallery continuing through Jun. 16. talleydunn.com

30

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


31 44 VALLEY HOUSE GALLERY Vera Barnett: Home, Jun. 9–Jul. 7, includes miniature trompe l’oeil paintings of still-life constructions depicting a domestic and artistic life at home. Trish Nickell: Points of View, Jun. 9– Jul. 7, features paintings of the Northwest coast in Portland, Oregon, as well as favorite destinations in France.  Miles Cleveland Goodwin: Prophecies, on view Jul. 14–Aug. 11, displays his soulful compositions narrating the story of his life and the essential nature of animals and the land. Image: Trish Nickell, Beynac en Bateau, 2017, oil on canvas, 28 x 40 in. valleyhouse.com 45 WAAS GALLERY Yoga 4 Love: Tools for the Mind, Body & Spirit For a Holistic Lifestyle compiles Lisa Ware’s nearly 20 years of gathered blessings in the field of healing work. The official book release and signing party will take place Jun. 30. waasgallery.com 46 WILLIAM CAMPBELL CONTEMPORARY ART Eric Fischl: Pinned Mylars opens June 2. In these pinned mylar works, Fischl creates images that are both striking in their saturated tones and infused with the subtle tension of figures twisting, reaching, and pushing out beyond the boundaries of the picture plane, representing the latest in Fischl’s creative process. Through Jul. 28. Image: Eric Fischl, Untitled (Handstand), 2017, Sublimation on mylar with pins and digital pigment print on paper mounted to acid-free board, 44.5 x 55.5 in. williamcampbellcontemporaryart.com AUCTIONS 01 DALLAS AUCTION GALLERY Mark your calendar for The Fine & Decorative Arts Auction, Sep. 26. dallasauctiongallery.com 02 HERITAGE AUCTIONS Summer auctions include the Urban Art Internet Auction Jun. 7, European Art Auction Jun. 8, the Fine & Decorative Arts Auction Jun 9–10, the Luxury Accessories Signature Auction Jun. 10–11, the Summer Fine Jewelry Signature Auction Jun. 11, the Online Photographs Auction Jun. 18, the Prints & Multiples Fine Art Auction Jun. 19, the Ethnographic Art Auction Jun. 26, the Asian Art Auction Jun. 29, and the Online Prints & Multiples Fine Art Auction Jul. 24. For the full lineup visit ha.com JUNE / JULY 2018 31


Tony Matelli's Sleepwalker finds a permanent home in Dallas. Photograph by Anthony Falcon

SLEEPING AROUND By way of Wellesley College near Boston, to the High Line in New York City, Tony Matelli’s Sleepwalker will now rest at a permanent home in Dallas.

32

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

T

he sculptor Tony Matelli has become known for his hyperreal and adroit renderings of objects, which are commonplace as well as beautiful (and often both at the same moment). His most infamous work Sleepwalker (2014) has now become part of Brett and Lester Levy Jr.’s collection, installed on the grounds of their Dallas home. Its debut on the Wellesley College campus inspired a group of students to author a petition requesting that the sculpture be moved inside the school’s Davis Gallery, and when the school did not comply with their demands, the sculpture was later vandalized. Since then, the piece was subsequently placed on New York City’s High Line where it appeared in a record number of humorous selfies. Rarely has a work of contemporary art crossed into the public consciousness and been so stunningly reviled and embraced. Chris Byrne: Can you describe how you first conceived of Sleepwalker (2014)? Tony Matelli: Sleepwalker was first conceived in 1997, and the first version of it was made back then. CB: And what was involved to make the actual sculpture? TM: I wanted to make a sculpture that captured the sense of ambivalence I had about my life at the time. I wanted to create something that felt like it was in two worlds. Something kind of out of place, lost, and vulnerable. A sleepwalking figure perfectly embodies these ideas.


CONTEMPORARIES

BY CHRIS BYRNE CB: Were there any overt art historical references you were consciously alluding to? Sleepwalker seems to playfully acknowledge the work of John De Andrea and Duane Hanson. TM: I wouldn’t say I was alluding to Duane Hanson as much as just simply working within that tradition. I just think of it as the best visual language for that piece. CB: Was the sculpture made specifically for the exhibition Tony Matelli: New Gravity at the Davis Museum at Wellesley College? TM: Yes, Sleepwalker (2014) was. CB: At that time, you defended its location outside of the museum. TM: After visiting the museum in preparation for my show I was really impressed with the campus landscape. It was designed by Olmsted, who also designed Central Park and has great open spaces. I wanted to activate that landscape somehow, so I thought it was a perfect opportunity to remake the Sleepwalker as an outdoor work. There is a large open space next to the museum, which is visible from the final room in the top floor galleries. I thought that would be a great place for the sculpture because you would be able to see it from inside the museum. This echoed the dualities in the work. I thought it was perfectly placed. CB: It’s clearly a very provocative and compelling image, but were you prepared for its polarizing reception in Massachusetts? TM: I don’t see it as provocative at all. It’s literally a sculpture of a sleeping man; it is serene and even gentle. Startling because of its context perhaps, but not provocative. What I feel makes this work so compelling is that it’s an empathy magnet. You feel for the sculpture and its circumstances and can even relate. CB: According to the petition that appeared on Change.org, Sleepwalker was referred to as a “source of apprehension, fear, and

triggering thoughts regarding sexual assault for some members of our campus community.” TM: I believe what happened on that campus was a temporary abandonment of critical thinking and rationality. CB: I thought your response, “What they see in the sculpture is not in the sculpture” was great—it seemed to turn Frank Stella’s famous 1964 quote, “What you see, is what you see,” on its head if you will. TM: Yes, and things that were there, they couldn’t see. The students over and over referred to him as being “naked,” which was totally infuriating. He is not naked. Like I said, they were behaving more or less irrationally. CB: In 2016, the work was installed on the High Line as part of the group show Wanderlust. Artnet News’ article, See the Most Bizarre Photos of Tony Matelli’s High Line “Sleepwalker” captured only the audience’s candid, humorous interaction with the sculpture. Were you surprised by these seemingly conflicting reactions to the same piece? TM: Not one bit. CB: Sleepwalker has received extensive press, garnering international attention from both art and non-art media, i.e., BBC News, CNN, The Telegraph, among others. Is there any aspect of the work that you feel was misunderstood at the time, which you’d like to clarify now? TM: I think the sheer volume of press sort of distorted the work. It made it seem much more sensational than it really is. This is not a vulgar or crude work. It is sensitive, it is sensitively made, and the press distorted that. Look at the piece in a long shot on that green campus lawn and tell me otherwise. I don’t think so. CB: Do you have plans to visit Sleepwalker at Brett and Lester’s home in Dallas? TM: I would love to! P

From Left: Tony Matelli, Sleepwalker (Wellesley view 5), 2014, epoxy, fiberglass, steel, acrylic, and urethane paint, 69 x 21 x 34 in.; (Wellesley view 4) © Tony Matelli, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Contemporary, New York and London. Photo: John Kennard; Tony Matelli, Sleepwalker, 2014. Part of Wanderlust, a High Line Commission. On view April 2016–March 2017. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

JUNE / JULY 2018 33


BURN + BALM LAUREN WOODS’ MONUMENTS FOR A NEW AMERICA

P

utting a needle to a record rarely hurts like this. It shouldn’t feel like entering flesh. It shouldn’t haunt you for years after hitting the groove. Right? I cannot contemplate Lauren Woods’s work without a strong visceral pain. The Evidence of Things Not Seen #1 has stuck with me now for three years and shows no sign of abatement. The piece is so simple in its execution. A black record inscribed with a lone track sits atop a record table. A reading of the written statement to the Sanford Police by George Zimmerman, the man who shot and killed the unarmed Trevon Martin, plays. The words sear into you. Woods harnesses art’s ability to build a discursive space where some of the most challenging issues facing our society may be addressed. Her multi-faceted artistic practice merges history with the realities of the present. Taking on the structures of monuments, ethnography, and documentary practices, Woods demands her audience take a hard look at the now. She makes the kind of art that causes your stomach to churn and your breath to catch while leaving you transfixed. She makes you an active witness. This is art that cuts to the bone. A Dallas Drinking Fountain may most holistically exemplify Woods’ practice. In 2003, a metal plaque fell from the wall behind the water fountain of the Dallas County Records Building,

revealing a faded text it had intended to hide—whites only. This history that Dallas had attempted to gloss over was now suddenly and serendipitously brought back into the forefront. A glaringly obvious Band-Aid metaphor, the plaque intending to erase that history had actually preserved it. After a vote, the city decided to place another plaque adjacent to this ghost of segregation, reading, “If we cannot remember it, we will not learn from it, and we will not appreciate or respect the rights and the responsibilities that we enjoy.” Woods used this as a jumping off point for her project, deciding to drive the conversation deeper. Installed at the once “whites only” fountain, a 45-second video now plays archival footage from 1960s Civil Rights protests when you press the button before water is released. As a public, we are directly forced to contend with the reality of a fraught past and its continued and unrelenting echoes prevalent in our present. Conceived as a new media monument to the Civil Rights Movement, A Dallas Drinking Fountain’s future is currently in jeopardy as the building undergoes renovations, an irony not lost on the artist. In 2010, Woods took part in How Many Billboards? Art Instead. The massive public art project in Los Angeles, California, presented 21 artist-designed billboards. Her piece is simple—two lines of Urdu text written in white upon a black background. Translated, the text reads:

This page, from left: Lauren Woods, The Evidence of Things Not Seen #1, 2015, turntable, vinyl; Lauren Woods, A Dallas Drinking Fountain Project, 2013, new media intervention, Dallas County Records Building

34

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


STUDIO

BY JUSTINE LUDWIG

“As long as the earth and the sky last, Smile like a flower in the garden of the world.” It is a love poem by the seminal medieval Urdu poet, Vali Dakhni. Rendered in its original language, the poem was indecipherable to the majority of the LA populace and subsequently became a site of projected post-9/11 societal fear, despite its benign, even benevolent, message. Woods speaks to the politics of race, identity, and belonging— structures that define our current socio-political reality. (Kind of) Bluebonnets takes on the legacy of bluebonnet painting. The omnipresent Texas-specific art form captures the idealized landscape of cobalt blue that appears only briefly every spring. The paintings are romantic, often reminiscent of Thomas Kinkade, and feature barns and longhorns. Woods’ photographs draw upon this geo-specific artistic subgenre, but subvert the narrative. Bodies appear in (Kind of) Bluebonnets, specifically black bodies. Posed and contorted, they seem to sprout from the earth, organically becoming part of the landscape. Gesturally simple, the images are endlessly dense to unpack, presenting narrative threads of visibility, ownership, and representation. It has become a calling card of Woods’ oeuvre—an economy of visual language resulting in rich and complex commentary. Currently Woods is undertaking, perhaps, her most ambitious work to date for an upcoming solo exhibition at the University Art Museum

at California State University, Long Beach. Woods has hired Black actors, poets, and rappers to perform the (quite possibly dubiously) reported last words of unarmed Black civilians killed in acts of police brutality. These staged recordings are paired with those of real-life audio recordings featuring subjects such as Eric Garner, captured via civilian documentation. Each track is housed on a single record, played on a single turntable and activated by viewer participation. Woods builds a monument out of this sea of record players, comprised of 25 units. Taking a cue from The Evidence of Things Not Seen #1, now a multitude of black records speak through players. The artist focuses on the fractured and atypical vocal patterns of these victims of senseless violence, engaging the disparities between documentation and truth. By collecting these reports, the artist engages with the circus of bureaucracy, requesting records from federal, state, and local governments. The process of production becomes performance. Woods demands we contend with our history, in all its ugliness, as a nation. Refusing to allow her audience to forget the past or ignore the deep inequities of our present, Woods creates the possibility of building a better future. She employs via her arts practice civic due diligence in bringing to light the systems of oppression that many do not see. If indeed the winners of the past have written our history, maybe it is time we recast our victors. Woods knows this can only be accomplished by intervening with the public record. P

This page, from left: Lauren Woods, Birmingham Campaign, 1963, high school students are hit by a water jet from a firehose during a peaceful walk in Birmingham, Alabama. Photograph by Charles Moore; Lauren Woods, As long as earth and sky lasts..., 2010, Billboard, Los Angeles, CA

JUNE / JULY 2018 35


BY STEVE CARTER

MURAKAMI'S BORDERLESS WORLD

The Modern's Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg presents a major retrospective for the Japanese icon.

36

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


I

f you’re not already aware of Japanese artist Takashi Murakami, get ready for your introduction. Murakami mania is coming with the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth’s iteration of Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg. A three-decades retrospective of Murakami’s restless shape-shifting Octopus is an extravaganza, chronicling the 56-year-old artist’s journey from early works to paint-is-still-wet present. The exhibition was organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and curated by Michael Darling, Chief Curator. It opened in Chicago last summer, traveled to Vancouver Art Gallery earlier this year, and the Modern is the final venue. Destined to be a line-around-the-building hit, it reaches the Modern on June 10 and runs through September 16, 2018. Takashi Murakami is a phenomenon. He’s often elevator-pitched

as “the Andy Warhol of Japan,” but such shorthand scarcely says it all. While popular culture, anime, and manga inform his oeuvre, so does traditional Nihonga painting. At the same time the artist’s “Superflat” theory embraces “low culture” appropriations, giving his work the currency of a visual hip-hop, replete with “Mr. DOB" and other colorful recurring characters, he also references Japanese folklore, history, and nuclear realities. And though his instincts have led him to commercial collaborations with Louis Vuitton, Pharrell, and others, his work shows in major museums and galleries worldwide. Boundaries and borders are meant to be blurred and broken, and Murakami’s art is the embodiment of that impulse. “That’s where a lot of the fascinating tension in his work is, because there are things that feel ancient, but also feel very slick and contemporary,”

This page: Takashi Murakami, Flowers, Flowers, Flowers, 2010, acrylic and platinum leaf on canvas mounted on aluminum frame, 59.05 x 59.05 in. © 2010 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Opposite: Takashi Murakami, Flower Ball (Lots of Colors), 2008, acrylic and platinum leaf on canvas mounted on board, 59 in. diameter, Cari and Michael J. Sacks © 2008 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Photograph by Nathan Keay.

JUNE / JULY 2018 37


Michael Darling notes. “There are elements that are extremely Asian, and others that are very recognizable to the West, like Pop Art traditions. It keeps people on their toes; the work has this extra resonance—it doesn’t just sit calmly on the wall.” Darling first encountered Murakami’s work at LA’s Blum & Poe gallery in the late 90s—it made an impression. “It was shocking,” he recalls. “I’d never seen anything like it. There was a sculpture called My Lonesome Cowboy, which is a nude male figure with this stream of fluid looping around his head like a lasso, and also a female figure called Hiropon, who had fluid coming out of her breast, almost like a jump rope—very cartoonish versions of sexuality, plus big abstract paintings on the walls. It seemed so bold, radical, shocking and elegant, all at the same time.” Andrea Karnes, the Modern’s Senior Curator, also discovered Murakami in the 90s and was fascinated. “Like Warhol he’s so engaged in Pop Art, but coming from Japanese culture,” she says. “They straddle that line between commerce and fine art…the imagery is just so eye-catching—you have to deal with its candy colors and its weirdness.” Darling, who’s known the Tokyo/New York-based artist for 20 years, intended the show to be a painting survey, but key sculptures are included as well. “There were instances where certain paintings or bodies of work were originally exhibited with sculptures,” he continues, “and Murakami was blurring the boundaries between painting and sculpture. So we put sculptures into the galleries to enrich that dialogue a bit.” Karnes is installing the exhibition in a hybrid fashion. “It’s a combination of the way things flow and work in spaces, and trying to keep a chronology,” she explains. “The beginning actually happens on the grand staircase, which will be an immersive environment that’s his latest work, but when you go into the exhibition at the top of the stairs it’s chronological.”

Takashi Murakami, Nuclear Power Picture, 1988, straw, cardboard, and silver and gold pigment on canvas, 76.96 x 102.75 in. Courtesy of the artist © 1988 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

38

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


Takashi Murakami, Isle of the Dead, 2014, acrylic, gold, and platinum leaf on canvas mounted on wood panel, 141.73 × 188.97 in. Courtesy of Gagosian Gallery © 2014 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

JUNE / JULY 2018 39


This page: Takashi Murakami, Tan Tan Bo Puking – a.k.a. Gero Tan, 2002, acrylic on canvas mounted on board, 141.75 x 283.5 x 3 in. Private collection, courtesy of Galerie Perrotin. © 2002 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Photograph by Adam Reich. Opposite: Takashi Murakami, Klein’s Pot A, 1994–97, acrylic on canvas mounted on board in Plexiglas box, 15.37 x 15.37 x 3.37 in. Colección Pérez Simón, Mexico © 1994–97 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Photograph by Yoshitaka Uchida.

The Modern’s take on the exhibition isn’t an exact duplicate show of its two previous iterations. The 70+ works that comprise Fort Worth’s Octopus include new pieces that were created specifically for the Modern. “Michael Darling was okay with us adding to the exhibition, and Murakami himself almost required it,” Karnes continues. “He said, ‘I want to stay engaged with this exhibition and I don’t want to see what I’ve already seen that opened in Chicago.’” In addition to the new works, the Modern negotiated some significant loans, including older works that didn’t appear elsewhere. “I don’t want to say what they are, I want them to be a surprise,” Karnes teases, “but they’re very iconic…” For Darling, curating the diverse show was the kind of challenge he revels in: “All that range is exactly what I look for in an artist that I’d want to do a big exhibition with—I want the audience to see evolution and change, not monotony.” The enigmatic title alludes to an ancient Japanese parable, wherein the octopus eats its own leg in order to survive—self-sacrifice for greater good, with the knowledge that a new leg will grow back to replace it. It’s an apt metaphor for an artist whose constant reinvention is predicated on where he’s been artistically, where he is now, and where he imagines himself moving forward.

40

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

A significant turning point in Murakami’s vision occurred in 2011, in the tragic wake of Japan’s earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear meltdowns. “That event had a huge effect on him, and he struggled with how to respond to it,” Darling reveals. “He’d been investigating these healing monk-like figures called arhats and decided to make a big gesture to that event, its aftermath, and victims, to mourn and understand it. His arhat paintings are very craggy and have an antique feel that’s so different from the more pneumatic, shiny, cartoon-derived figures that are in his earlier work.” Several gigantic paintings emerged, including 100 Arhats and 69 Arhats Beneath the Bodhi Tree. Murakami himself has commented that the monumental (328’ long) The 500 Arhats is his equivalent to Picasso’s Guernica; its creation involved over 100 art student assistants. Ultimately, Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg is a paean to the creative spirit, East, West, high art, low art, and the zeitgeist of globalism. And exit through the gift shop—Murakami mania will be rampant, much like the KAWS craze that accompanied his major survey in 2016–17. Andrea Karnes enthuses, “Even if you saw the show in Chicago or Vancouver, you should still come see it here—if you’re a Murakami fan, it’s the thing to do!” P


That’s where a lot of the fascinating tension in his work is, because there are things that feel ancient, but also feel very slick and contemporary. There are elements that are extremely Asian, and others that are very recognizable to the West, like Pop Art traditions. It keeps people on their toes; the work has this extra resonance—it doesn’t just sit calmly on the wall.” –Michael Darling, Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

JUNE / JULY 2018 41


BY NANCY COHEN ISRAEL, LEE CULLUM, AND TERRI PROVENCAL

Lasting Impressions Selections from the fall and spring arts seasons.

Above: Ruth Reinhardt conducts the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Photograph by Sylvia Elzafon. From left: Soundings: New Music at the Nasher, Bach's Musical Offering with Interludes from Lei Liang. Photograph courtesy of Nasher Sculpture Center; Ballet Hispanico, Con Abrazos Abiertos (Excerpt) featuring Dandara Amorim and Omar Roman. Photograph by Sharen Bradford.

42

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


H

as Dallas ever had a Golden Age of stagecraft to compare with the season now ending? In symphonic music, never, not until Jaap van Zweden blew in from the Netherlands to accomplish a startling apotheosis at the Meyerson over the past decade. At The Dallas Opera it’s a case of a Golden Age revived. Larry Kelly started at the top, creating the company with dazzling flourish: Maria Callas to open, followed in time by the American debut of Joan Sutherland and Placido Domingo. Those were heady days, and Plato Karayanis did his best to keep them going, but when he left, three general directors came and went, one lasting only four months. Keith Cerny stepped into the breach and put The Dallas Opera back in the big leagues with new commissions and star singers, also a supremely impressive maestro in Emmanuel Villaume and a master of contemporary music in Principal Guest Conductor Nicole Paiement. Fortunately Cerny, who departed months ago, also hired an omnicompetent artistic director, Ian Derrer, who is returning to take charge of the company after a stint running the Kentucky Opera. All the while, theater has been blooming, led by a growing band of directors who know how to bring a play to life. Katherine Owens, heir in a way to post-war dramatist Margo Jones, set the standard from her first productions at the Undermain. Then came Kevin Moriarty, bringing fantastic flair to the Dallas Theater Center, followed last year by Joanie Schultz, at the WaterTower. More about them later. But first to music. Jaap van Zweden thrilled audiences with Mahler’s Second Symphony and Wagner’s Die Walkure as part of his grand finale season, and when he had to withdraw from an evening of Mozart and Durufle for dental surgery in Amsterdam, assistant conductor Ruth Reinhardt did more than stand in for him, she stood as tall as many of the guest conductors sweeping in and out of the Meyerson in recent months, auditioning to replace the great maestro when he moves on to the New York Philharmonic. A child violinist in Germany, Ruth Reinhardt, now at 29, has forged an impressive combination of discipline and virtuosity. For

Alexander Canright, a piano prodigy and math whiz, graduates this month from Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts. Photograph by Anthony Falcon.

Nicole Paiement conducts Sunken Garden for The Dallas Opera. Photograph by Karen Almond.

JUNE / JULY 2018 43


Left: David Carl performs in Trump Lear for Kitchen Dog Theater. Photograph by Michael Velez. Above: Barry Nash and Stormi Demerson perform in Hillary and Clinton. Photograph by Karen Almond.

Mozart’s Concerto No. 20 for Piano and Orchestra, she joined forces with French Canadian pianist Louis Lortie. If Lortie played with easy precision and the rapid dexterity of one who had conquered all the Hanon Exercises by the age of three, Reinhardt more than matched him with zen-like articulation—not too much, not too little. Essentially contained during the Mozart, she soared in the Requiem by Maurice Durufle, leading orchestra and chorus in the kind of exaltation for which the Meyerson was made. Turning the pages of a score she scarcely glanced at, mouthing some of the words in Latin, she guided players and singers to heights seldom seen, much less heard. Ruth Reinhardt has not been the only extraordinary woman conductor in Dallas this season. Nicole Paiement of San Francisco, another French Canadian like Louis Lortie, conducted three singers on stage, two more on screen, plus an orchestra through a thicket of pyrotechnics called The Sunken Garden—all experienced by the audience wearing 3-D glasses. It’s a tour de force by Dutch composer Michel van der Aa and British novelist David Mitchell, exploring life as a choice over guilt and death. It’s also the kind of astonishing adventure I hope The Dallas Opera will continue under Ian Derrer. If Ruth Reinhardt championed elegant tradition and Nicole Paiement what has been called “the shock of the new,” musicians from Yellow Barn in Vermont merged the two into a night of Soundings at the Nasher. Moving on and off and all about the stage in their stocking feet, carrying their scores on an iPad along with their instruments, a large ensemble played Bach interspersed with Garden Light by Lei Lang. It was movement that made it memorable, and spellbinding too. The piano, harpsichord, and vibraphone stayed pretty much in place, but those on the cellos, violins, violas, double bass, bassoon, clarinet, and flute were constantly in motion between the offerings, and this banished the static nature of so much classical music. Soundings is Above, left: Cast of The Great Society at the Dallas Theater Center; Left: Kevin Moriarty is the Enloe/Rose Artistic Director of the Dallas Theater Center. Photography by Karen Almond.

44

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


always interesting, but this marriage of the twenty-first century to the eighteenth was exhilarating. If counterpoint was the order of the hour in music this season, for theater the watchword was relevance. The Great Society by Robert Schenkkan picked up where his All the Way, produced last year, left off in a co-production of the Dallas Theater Center and the Alley Theater in Houston. Together they chronicled the presidency of Lyndon Baines Johnson, his towering domestic achievements—voting rights, open housing, public accommodations, Medicare, Medicaid, PBS, the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities—as well as the tragedy of Vietnam. Astutely played by Brandon Potter, this LBJ showed us how government could work, at least on the home front, given gifted leaders, no matter how flawed. Also joining the rush to relevance was Lucas Hnath’s Hillary and Clinton at Second Thought Theater and Trump Lear at Kitchen Dog Theater. Written and performed by David Carl with direction from co-creator Michole Biancosino, this spoof called on Shakespeare to help elucidate the current occupant of the White House, surely the antithesis of LBJ except in the commitment of both to crude vulgarity. Motion was as crucial to theater this season as it was to music. Kevin Moriarty proved again at DTC, in his direction of The Great Society, that he knows how to choreograph actors, keeping them on the move and thus the audience awake. So does Katherine Owens. Her work on Three Sisters at the Undermain Theatre took a very good cast, and, through constant movement, made every moment scintillating. Chekhov, especially, left to a lesser director, can be unbearably slow, brilliant though he was. Not this production, which also was helped mightily by Sarah Ruhl’s new English version. She took the pretty language out of Chekhov and made him sharper, earthier, and more immediate than in earlier translations. The promising new arrival among Dallas directors is Joanie Schultz at WaterTower Theater, who made Kate Hamill’s adaptation of Pride

and Prejudice sing in a way that would have shocked Jane Austen, or maybe not. Austen was no stranger to creativity that stealthily shatters the status quo. The status quo hadn’t a chance at TITAS’ Command Performance, which played to a big, deliriously receptive audience at the Winspear. Classical dance from the Romantic era quickly gave way to the Age of Anxiety when Brazil met Puerto Rico as Dandara Amorim and Omar Román de Jesús took the stage with post-modern intuition of weird times to come. Amorim returned later, partnered not only by Roman but also by a sombrero, which she used to maximum effect, dancing the feeling that she “does not belong here.” But of course she does. Amorim is a major talent. So is Feng Linshu of Beijing Dance Theater who gave a riveting account of Facing the Ocean, commissioned by TITAS and premiered at the Winspear. You could call it the New Romanticism, youthful with the slightest touch of incipient irony. Luckily the Beijing company is coming next February with a full dance version of Hamlet. Let’s hope for the early return also of Desmond Richardson, an astonishing artist with the strength and physique of a gladiator, all applied to moves you would not think possible for a body so powerfully built, and certainly not for a dancer who has just turned 50. Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts continues to send budding star dancers to Juilliard—five last year and three this fall, with one more accepted there but going instead to University of California. Pianist Salvatore Z a n e l l i will head to Berklee College of Music in Boston to major in piano and composition, and Alexander Canright, a whiz at math as well as impressionist piano and the recipient of the Young Masters AP Award for composition along with the inaugural Outstanding Piano Student Award from BTWHSPVA, will pursue both music and numbers at UT Austin, having been waitlisted also at Harvard. So count on the Golden Age going on and on, refreshed by talent ever radiant, ever new.

Above: Katherine Owens and Bruce DuBose discuss Three Sisters at Undermain Theatre. Photograph by Theresa Webster. Right: Joanie Schultz is Artistic Director of WaterTower Theatre. Courtesy of WaterTower Theatre.

JUNE / JULY 2018 45


ONE-NIGHT STANDS In its first ten years, the Dallas Art Fair has served as the catalyst for April’s transformation into Dallas Arts Month. As part of this cultural bonanza, galleries are increasingly hosting pop-up exhibitions, optimizing the electricity generated by the fair. Out-of-town galleries are even expanding their programs beyond the three-day event. Prior to the fair, Harlan Levey Projects from Brussels and Anton Kern Gallery from New York jointly hosted a one-night exhibition at The Centrum. Levey says, “The Pop-Up appeared as a great compliment to the fair, a chance to present artworks and ideas in a way that offers a different physical and social experience.” Bogotá’s Beatriz Esguerra Art rented space in the Design District. The gallerist’s two-week exhibition included programmed events. Previous successes at the fair led Esguerra to ask herself, “Instead of spending my money in Miami or New York, why not do a pop-up in Dallas?” Former Dallasite Olivia Smith hosted an event that was, quite literally, a homecoming. Smith, the Director of New York’s Magenta Plains, says, “Ever since I moved to New York City, I have wanted to reconnect with the Dallas art scene. Throwing a party at my parents' house seemed like a natural way to do so.” She invited Half Gallery, Night Gallery, Lyles & King, and CANADA to join her in the one-night event. Local gallerist Jordan Roth of Ro2 Art and artist Arthur Peña also hosted satellite exhibitions. Roth cites the advantages of this arrangement, saying, “Our collectors were able to enjoy undivided attention while visiting SIDESHOW. While in the space, they took their time to view and contemplate without the distractions that occur at an art fair.” Peña presented One Night Only, featuring the work of Nicole Eisenman. He says it is “a national curatorial project and exists as an ephemeral, communal celebration. The sense of mystery and discovery surrounding the celebration serves to reward those who are culturally curious.” Vignette, held at the former Women’s Museum, showcased the work of 70 female artists, including Jin-Ya Huang. Her social art practice, Break Bread Break Borders gives a voice to refugee women. It also provides them with work, as they prepared the food for the preview event. During that evening, they had the opportunity to share their stories. “Food is such a great equalizer. It is a common language that we all speak,” says Huang. The success of these pop-ups augurs well for the Dallas Art Fair as they provide unique exhibition opportunities to increasingly sophisticated audiences. –Nancy Cohen Israel

From left to right, top to bottom: Bill Saylor, Claw Machine, 2018, oil, oil stick, spray paint, charcoal on canvas on panel, 36 x 48 in. Courtesy the artist and Magenta Plains; Beatriz Esguerra Pop-Up Gallery. Courtesy of Beatriz Esguerra; Ro2 Art Sideshow; Anton Kern Gallery and Harlan Levey Projects Pop-Up Exhibition at The Centrum. Courtesy of Harlan Levey Projects; Nicole Eisenman @ One Night Only. Photograph by Kevin Todora. Courtesy of Anton Kern Gallery; Jin-Ya Huang, Break Bread Break Borders at Vignette. Photograph by Daniel Driensky; Nicole Eisenman @ One Night Only. Photograph by Kevin Todora. Courtesy of Anton Kern Gallery.

46

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


JUNE / JULY 2018 47


EDITH BAKER'S UNFINISHED STORY

As one approaches the age of 95, there is a tendency to think that their life is an open book, its story already revealed. For Edith Baker, the legendary gallerist, that story is still being written. This spring, Craighead Green Gallery hosted an exhibition featuring 30 of Baker’s paintings, sculptures, and ceramics. The earliest work dates from the 1950s when, as a new arrival to the United States, she studied at the Art Institute of Chicago. She and her late husband, Fred, soon moved to Dallas where her studies continued at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts. During the 1960s, Baker made a name for herself as a painting instructor. After decades

Edith Baker: A Retrospective at Craighead Green Gallery. Inset: Edith Baker lost wax sculpting. Courtesy of Edith Baker

as a gallery owner, she has returned to making art. Baker’s daughter, Rini Andres, and gallerist Kenneth Craighead organized this, her first exhibition, as a birthday surprise. They borrowed work from former students, friends, and family who celebrated with her at an opening reception in April. Andres says, “It was a day of pure joy and happiness for her and for us.” The work remained on view for three weeks. Craighead says, “Most people had no idea that she was an artist. They were wowed and amazed by her talent and dedication.” –Nancy Cohen Israel

KAMROOZ ARAM Almost as a precursor to Dallas Art Fair, which included the entrée of Dubai’s Green Art Gallery to its international roster, the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth opened its FOCUS series with Kamrooz Aram on March 31. Following the Modern’s opening, Green Art Gallery, which cites artists “representative of our current moment,” also exhibited the work of Aram, an Iranian-born, Brooklyn-based, multidisciplinary artist whose practices span painting, sculpture, collage, and installation. While the 10th annual Dallas Art Fair is over, Aram’s latest work is on view through June 17 at the Modern and offers an examination concerning Western modernism and classical non-Western art. Mining the patterns of Persian rugs and geometric forms like triangles, collectors snatched up the artist’s offerings at Dallas Art Fair. Meanwhile, the Modern acquired Aram’s 2018 triptych Ornament for Extraordinary Architecture titled with a nod to the Tadao Ando-designed museum. All in all a nice spring for the forty-year-old artist. –Terri Provencal Kamrooz Aram, Ornament for Extraordinary Architecture, 2018, oil, wax, oil crayon and pencil on canvas, 78 × 168 × 1.875 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Green Art Gallery, Dubai. Photograph by Kevin Todora

48

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


TOP LOT

DALLAS ART FAIR GIVES BACK A privately funded grant of $150,000 enabled the Dallas Art Fair Foundation Acquisition Program to purchase eight works from seven artists at the annual event for the Dallas Museum of Art’s permanent collection. The diverse group of selected artists, Geraldo de Barros, Sanford Biggers, Alicia Henry, Shara Hughes, Tony Lewis, Matthew Ronay, and Brie Ruais, work in a variety of media. Dr. Anna Katherine Brodbeck, the Nancy and Tim Hanley Associate Curator of Contemporary Art at the DMA, oversaw the selection process. “Of particular interest to me was adding to our already strong collection of work by artists of the African diaspora, as well as continuing our dedication to the work of women artists,” she says. Brodbeck began the search months ago by combing through each gallery’s roster and determining the compatibility of individual works within the larger museum collection. Final approval for the work came after conferring with Dr. Agustín Arteaga, the Eugene McDermott Director. Brodbeck and Arteaga then provided a pre-opening preview to the couples whose generosity supported the Acquisition Fund. Many of the selected artists, such as Sanford Biggers, are multidisciplinary. Based in New York, Biggers often integrates film, video installation, original music, and performance into his work. Antithetically, his quieter selected tapestry, Sirocco, parlays his practice of combining conceptual work with an aesthetic component. Milan-based Massimo De Carlo presented Biggers’ work at the fair. Describes Biggers, “I have a nonhierarchical approach to materials, media, and processes and frequently combine transformed found objects with objects I make. By integrating them in various combinations, the final work collapses the boundaries between the ready and newly made and are ultimately a patchwork of processes as well as both material and temporal history. With the quilts from the Codex series, I see myself as a late collaborator with the original artists who made these antique patchworks. I spend a great deal of timed sensitivity ’listening’ to the quilts before I engage them, and I see parallels in this to how musicians collaborate on a song or performance.” –Nancy Cohen Israel Sanford Biggers, Sirroco, 2016, repurposed antique quilt, spray paint, acrylic, 68.5 ×77.5 in. Photograph by Todd-White Art Photography. Courtesy of Massimo De Carlo Milan/ London/ Hong Kong

Dallas’ own Heritage Auctions offered a single-owner rare collection of proofs from the estate of John Hutcheson in its fall and spring Prints & Multiples Auctions. Nude with Blue Hair by Roy Lichtenstein was the top-selling lot in the collection. “John Hutcheson was a Master Printer in all of the traditional printing techniques, including etching, woodcut, lithography, silkscreen, and papermaking,” said Holly Sherratt, Heritage Auctions’ Director of Modern & Contemporary Art, San Francisco. “During the 1980s, Hutcheson ran his own workshop in the New York City area and developed personal relationships with hundreds of artists." From a small edition of only 40 works and 12 proofs, the monumental Lichtenstein sold for $540,400 against a $300,000 low estimate. “The work epitomizes the incredible talent of Lichtenstein as a legendary Pop icon and the technical expertise of Hutcheson and the Tyler graphic team who helped achieve Lichtenstein’s vision using complex stencils and state-of-the-art printing methods,” enthused Heritage Auctions Vice President for Modern & Contemporary Art, Frank Hettig. Missing for over 40 years since its theft in 1976, a recovered Norman Rockwell masterpiece highlighted Heritage Auctions’ November 3 American Art sale. Laz ybones ( Boy Asleep With Hoe), known as one of Rockwell’s first The Saturday Evening Post’s covers printed in 1919, sold for $912,500. “The provenance of this masterwork,” said Aviva Lehmann, Director of American Art at Heritage Auctions, “is as remarkable as the painting itself.” Purchased in 1954 for less than $100 and stolen in June 1976, it was taken from Robert and Teresa Grant’s New Jersey home in a burglary. Aided by the FBI, it was returned to the family in March 2017. –Terri Provencal

Roy Lichtenstein (1923–1997), Nude with Blue Hair, from Nudes, 1994, relief in colors on Rives BFK paper, 51.19 x 31.63 in. (image), 57.81 x 37.56 in. (sheet), P.P. II (aside from an edition of 40), signed, dated, and annotated in pencil lower right, with publisher's chop, Published by Tyler Graphics, Mount Kisco, New York.

JUNE / JULY 2018 49


Susan Posnick with Amsterdam-based Hendrick Kerstens' haunting photograph. The hide rug and snakeskin table are by Gustavo Godoi.

50

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


BY PEGGY LEVINSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN SMITH

A Cinderella Story

A trip to Austria, a Viennese ball, a dance with a “prince,” all in the name of cancer-fighting beauty, Susan Posnick receives an international award.

W

hat girl doesn’t wish for her very own Cinderella moment? Or referred to otherwise, the just reward for life’s work? Susan Posnick just had hers—complete with a grand waltz with a “prince” (actor Graham Wardle in her case), in a Viennese ballroom before an audience of 2200 people. Her story is no less daunting than the other Cinderella’s—but certainly more rewarding for her and millions of other people. After developing skin cancer in 2002, she used her considerable expertise to create “Brush on Block,” an easy pigment sunblock that can be used by anyone. She was just awarded the International MyAid award for innovation in cancer prevention. Susan Posnick is an artist—her canvas is the face and her tools are makeup brushes and sponges, her paints are creams, colors, pigments, and vitamins—much of which she has concocted and mixed herself. Susan left a successful career as a makeup artist working for Vogue and Bazaar magazines in New York City to try her hand in Los Angeles on the big screen. She came through Dallas to visit friends and was struck by that blinding afternoon sun shining on those gold buildings that had for years wreaked havoc on Central Expressway. “I was literally blinded by the light and was so entranced that I took it for a sign I should stick around for awhile,” says Susan. Thirty-plus years later, Dallas has been the luckier for it. Susan lives on the 30th floor of a modernist downtown high rise designed in 1979 by I M Pei. The building’s diamond shape relates to the geometry of the city’s diagonally intersecting street grids, specifically where, nearby, Live Oak Street intersects downtown’s grid at a 30-degree angle. Placement of the building was carefully considered to relate to neighboring buildings and provide green space. Having this august pedigree prepares you for the subtle architectural elements of the building like polished steel walls and a robust art collection by Dallas artist JD Miller. It’s hard to tear your eyes away from the expansive views to the northwest. (You can see Jerry World on a clear day.) But, when you do, you find yourself in a personal space that is very much like Susan—artfully understated, sophisticated but genuine, and just a little irreverent. Her living room is furnished with a Danish

Houston artist Nathaniel Donnett’s untitled mixedmedia work explores psychosocial conditions.

JUNE / JULY 2018 51


A Marc Quinn floral, Sepas Mous, acquired through MTV RE:DEFINE hangs over the vintage sofa from Antiques Moderne. Vintage chairs purchased at Antiques Moderne juxtapose with the computer-designed rug from Blackstone Carpets. Inherited antique candlesticks perch on the table.

A beaded pony from South Africa and Mike Kury’s reclining figure from Ro2 Art sit atop the lacquer console from Gallerie Noir.

52

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

sofa and mid-century chairs she found at Antiques Moderne on Riverfront. The colorful graphic rug was one of the first needlepoint rugs that were completely designed on a computer. She found the white banquet and the lacquer console at Gallerie Noir in the Design District. The furnishings are a collection of pieces that she has lovingly found through the years that somehow all work together by the magic of an eye for scale and color. Susan’s eclectic art collection began with buying from charity auctions—among the first pieces were a series of drawings by John Lennon and a James Dean print. A lipstick print that speaks to her profession came from the Dallas Contemporary. When the Dallas Art Fair began ten years ago, Susan was an eager fan and frequent buyer. She was immediately captivated by a giant portrait of a young girl painted on paper bags. From Deborah Colton’s gallery booth, Houston-based multidisciplinary artist Nathaniel Donnett’s Paper Bag Kid series comments on the discrimination of skin tone within the African-American community. Donnett uses black plastic bags for facial features to blur tonality. Another Dallas Art Fair find was the haunting Hendrick Kerstens photograph of a young girl. Kerstens is a self-trained artist from


Lipstick prints from Dallas Contemporary reference Susan Posnick’s career in beauty and skincare.

Holland that began photographing his daughter Paula in the manner of Old Master paintings, often using household items as props. In this painting, her pensive face evokes Vermeer’s The Girl with the Pearl Earring. Another inspiring venue was Goss-Michael Gallery, now The Goss-Michael Foundation. At an early show, she was intrigued by the shadows in a blurry photograph. L’appartement 10 is by Francesco Patriarca, taken of a faded wall where a picture had once hung. Art advisor and curator Filippo Tattoni-Marcozzi has had a great influence on Susan’s collection and is a good friend. Says Filippo, “My dream clients are the ones that also become my best friends, and Susan has been one of the most fun. It is always much better to select art for people you know well, and Susan’s art pieces look perfect in her stunning new apartment. They truly reflect her colorful and sophisticated personality. She was quick to snap up the Mark Quinn floral when I curated the show at Goss-Michael. Marc Quinn, of the famed Young British Artists, is one of the most important contemporary artists of his generation. He made that special edition only available through me and it was just perfect for Susan—it’s as sexy and intriguing as she always can be!” P

Susan Posnick’s shares her arsenal of makeup and skincare.

JUNE / JULY 2018 53


dness

The summer season arrives diaphanous and billowing.

3+272*5$3+<%<6(5*,2*$5&,$ 67</,1*$1'35236%<$5,(//$9,//$

0DUQLVLONHPEHOOLVKHGVKLIWGUHVV)RUW\)LYH7HQRQ0DLQ9DGDDFU\OLFJHRPHWULFEDQJOHVDQG&O\GH¶0LUDJH·WRWH 7HQRYHUVL[DW7KH-RXOH6WHOOD0F&DUWQH\UXQZD\PHWDOOLFODFHXSVQHDNHU6WHOOD0F&DUWQH\DW+LJKODQG3DUN9LOODJH 0RGHO 1LQD . DW .LP 'DZVRQ $JHQF\ 3KRWRJUDSKHU·V $VVLVWDQW &UDLJ 7KRPDV +DLU  0DNHXS E\ 5LFN\ )ORUHV DW &DPSEHOO$JHQF\3URSVE\$ULHOOD9LOOD 54 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


¯

Kimhekim pearl and organza and cotton-layered vest dress DQG'ULHV9DQ1RWHQUHVLQKHHOHGFDQYDVSXPSV SLFWXUHG RQSDJH )RUW\)LYH7HQRQ0DLQ&LUFXVE\6DP(GHOPDQ sunglasses, Sam Edelman at NorthPark Center

JUNE / JULY 2018 55


Calvin Klein layered cotton eyelet and polyurethane coat, Forty Five Ten on Main; Brother Vellies ‘Bianca’ mesh boot, and Vanda Jacintho resin chain choker, Tenoversix at The Joule

56

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


Chanel paillette dress, acrylic gem-embellished polyurethane blouson jacket, resin logo cuff, polyurethane and leather fingerless gloves, grosgrain and PVC boots, & PVC logo tote. All available at the Chanel boutique at Highland Park Village

JUNE / JULY 2018 57


Gucci layered silk-organza embellished gown, Gucci at NorthPark Center; Birkenstock ‘Arizona’ sandal in EVA, Journeys at NorthPark Center

58

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


Delpozo draped cotton jacket & silk georgette pants (worn as skirt), Forty Five Ten on Main; Gigi Burris racellobraid-wrapped headband and Maryam Nassir Zadeh â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Palmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; calfskin sandal, Tenoversix at The Joule

JUNE / JULY 2018 59


ÂŻ Kimhekim Guifei organza jacket with peak collar and flap pockets, Forty Five Ten on Main; Stella McCartney leopard-print faux leather skirt, Stella McCartney at Highland Park Village; Kate Spade sheer, striped socks, Kate Spade New York at NorthPark Center; Vans checkerboard pool slides, Urban Outfitters at NorthPark Center.

60

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


Rachel Comey “Garner” oversized Italian organza cape top and Nomia faux leather skirt, Tenoversix at The Joule; Bauble Bar hoop fabric earrings, Grace striped sheer socks, and Jeffrey Campbell PVC wedge slides, all at Nordstrom at NorthPark Center

JUNE / JULY 2018 61


COVETED BY TERRI PROVENCAL PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG MILANO

WISHFUL THINKING

Matthew Trent celebrates 30 years of jewelry with a bespoke creation crafted by hand.

T

hree decades have passed since Dallas-based jeweler Matthew Trent opened up his eponymous shop featuring his own handcrafted jewelry worn by upper-crust denizens. To venerate the milestone of the family business, Trent has been experimenting with alternative metals in combination with extraordinary gemstones. Trent’s newest heirloom bracelet uses copper and green gold with white, yellow, and rose gold accents inspired by a trip to the Central American rainforest in Costa Rica. Says Trent, “The trip was during the rainy season, unbeknownst to us, and we were all about the wildlife. Frogs became the easiest to locate, and the colors on display from every frog were captivating. The poison dart, tree frog, all of them, were a feast for the eyes. You'd walk out of your hotel room and you'd look under a tree and there'd be a bunch of them sitting under there.” Recalling that unforgettable trip to the rainforest, Trent crafted an iconoclastically original bracelet where a red-eyed tree frog stares down a scarab belonging on another continent entirely. Both creatures sit atop a base made to look like bamboo shoots traversing around the arm. Entirely rapt, the demure frog is most desirous of the giant bug on the other side of the bracelet, which glimmers with an 8.44 ct graphite spinel. Trent dubbed the hand-cut original, Wishful Thinking. “I love the bug shape and color. I am very concerned with geographic accuracy with my subjects, but the spinel is a cornerstone of this piece, and the look, shape, and color dictated the scarab beetle.” And though Matthew Trent, located in Plaza at Preston Center, also offers readyto-wear collections and custom designs, there will only ever be one Wishful Thinking. “I like to make it hard on myself and, above all, trust myself and take risks.” P

Matthew Trent Original, Wishful Thinking bracelet, copper, 18K yellow and white gold, graphite spinel, 8.44 ct cushion, 1.27 ct total weight of rose-cut diamonds.

62

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


The Eye Ball in Celebration of the Dallas Art Fair at The Joule Photography by Kristi and Scot Redman


THERE DALLAS ART FAIR PREVIEW BENEFIT AT FASHION INDUSTRY GALLERY PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANIEL DRIENSKY, AVERY FOSHEE, MEGAN GELLNER

R.A. Session II, Lily Teklu

Brandon Kennedy

Linda Ivy, Steve Ivy

64

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

Anne Vieux, Alex Gardner

Leslie Diers, Bryan Diers

Francisco Moreno, Jen Ray, Monica Salazar

Jack and Kelly Cornell

Kelly Woods, Alexandra Bring-Lyles

Marlene and John Sughrue


THE EYE BALL IN CELEBRATION OF DALLAS ART FAIR AT THE JOULE PHOTOGRAPHY BY BECKLEY & CO., FORT LION STUDIO, KRISTI AND SCOT REDMAN

Jan Strimple

Bridget Hall and Chandra North

Noelani Malley, Darlys Michaelis, Robin Wilkes

Kimberly and Justin Whitman

Becca Dudley

Party-goers dance with Morris Day and The Time

Jeny Bania

Hannah Fagadau spots the pizza tower

5HHG5REHUWVRQDQG7-*ULIÃ&#x20AC;QZLWKPRGHOV

JUNE / JULY 2018

65


THERE ART BALL 2018 AT THE DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART PHOTOGRAPHY BY TAMYTHA CAMERON AND GEORGE FIALA

Brook Hazelton

Emily Summers, Steve Summers and Deedie Rose

Rebecca Enloe Fletcher and Catherine Marcus Rose

66

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

Rajan Patel, Jennifer Karol, Missy and Tim Peck and Brooke Davenport

Ceron and Becca Cason Thrash

Gonzalo Bueno, Todd Fiscus and Michael McCray

Carlos Gonzalez-Jaime and Agustín Arteaga

Lara Tafel, Nicole Forester, Christi Houser and Elisa Summers

Cindy and Howard Rachofsky


PATRON PRESENTS CURATED AT DALLAS DESIGN CENTER

Thank you for supporting

ART BA L L 2018

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEGAN GELLNER

Saturday, April 21 at the

REBECCA ENLOE FLETCHER | Chair BRIAN BOLKE AND FAISAL HALUM NANCY C. AND RICHARD R. ROGERS

| Live Auction Chairs

SIDLEY AUSTIN LLP Security Sponsor

Entertainment Sponsor

Lucrecia Waggoner, Janice Meyers, Carly Malm

MOODY FOUNDATION Education and Community Engagement Sponsor

HEADINGTON COMPANIES

Premier Hospitality Sponsor PEGGY AND CARL SEWELL/ SEWELL AUTOMOTIVE COMPANIES

AT&T Communication Sponsor

BANK OF AMERICA Menu Sponsor

DELIVERY LIMITED, LLC Moving and Delivery Sponsor

LOUIS VUITTON Luxury Sponsor

Dinner Sponsor

CLAY COOLEY AUTO GROUP Valet Sponsor

IN-KIND SPONSORS BELVEDERE Vodka Sponsor

BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Peggy Levinson

GLENMORANGIE Whiskey Sponsor

Video Sponsor

HALL WINES CAPERA RYAN/CHRISTIE’S

Wine Sponsor

Auction Sponsor

DALLAS ART FAIR FOUNDATION

HENNESSY Cognac Sponsor

Invitation Sponsor

MILLION AIR DALLAS

FENDI

Live Auction Private Transportation Sponsor

Fashion Sponsor

MODERN LUXURY DALLAS HALL ARTS RESIDENCES

Media Sponsor

Patron Party Sponsor

JENNIFER AND JOHN EAGLE/ JOHN EAGLE DEALERSHIPS Catalogue Sponsor

Kenneth Craighead, Cammie Marrs

J.P. MORGAN Financial Services Sponsor

MARY KAY Program Sponsor

NEIMAN MARCUS Red Carpet Sponsor

PNC After Party Sponsor

MY SWEET CHARITY Blog Sponsor

RUINART Champagne Sponsor

STRONG TRAVEL SERVICES Travel Sponsor

TODD EVENTS Event Production Sponsor

VOLCAN DE MI TIERRA CRISTALINO Tequila Sponsor

Jennifer Klos, Joe Demourelle

JUNE / JULY 2018

67


THERE 2018 NASHER PRIZE GALA HONORING THEASTER GATES AT NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY KISS ME FOR ENTERNITY AND BRET REDMAN

Natalie and Michael Sorrell

Howard Rachofsky, Cindy Rachofsky, Jennifer Eagle, and John Eagle

Matrice and Ron Kirk

68

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

Derek Wilson, Jeremy Strick, Christen Wilson, and Theaster Gates

Jed Morse, Margaret Morse, Doris Salcedo, and Azriel Bibliowicz

Theaster Gates, Nancy Nasher

Michael and Sharon Young

Kaleta Doolin and Alan Govenar


MTV RE:DEFINE HONORING TRACEY EMIN AT NORTHPARK CENTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRUNO AND IRWIN THOMPSON

Joyce Goss, Kenny Goss, Tracey Emin

Simon de Pury

Peter Doreshenko

David Haemisegger, Marc Quinn, Nancy Nasher

David Yurman, Sybil Yurman

Ian Davenport

Jessica Nowitzki, Nalin de Silva

Maxine Trowbridge, Brooke Davenport

Becca Dudley, Georgia Arnold

JUNE / JULY 2018

69


THERE ROCHE BOBOIS PRESENTS L'ARTESANÍA DE VIVER AT ONE ARTS PLAZA PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEGAN GELLNER

Ann Short, Adam Cook

Logan Jones, and DeAnn Stewart

Ashley Martzen and Carolyn Frani

Kristin Willow

Ishak Fernandez and Amanda Beck

Lee Lormand, J.L. Forke, Don Short

70

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

Lucy Billingsley, Shadow, Ann Short, Carol Quist

Chance Weick and Thomas Hein

Dan Rodriguez


1920/2020 CURATED BY KEN DOWNING AT ARTERIORS FLAGSHIP STORE PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHI LEE

Barbara Buzzell, Courtney Dunn Tauriac, Susie Straubmueller

Juliette Moussa, Mark Moussa

Sam Saladino, Lisa Duffee

Heidi Dillon, Ken Downing, Tina Craig

Adrian Zuñiga, Ree Willaford, Ken Downing

Erin Mathews, Russ Davis

TA K A S H I MURAKAMI JUNE 10 –SEPTEMBER 16 MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH 3200 Darnell Street, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 • 817.738.9215

www.themodern.org

© Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd.

JUNE / JULY 2018

71


FURTHERMORE

REMEMBERING

MARGARET MCDERMOTT FEBRUARY 12, 1912–MAY 3, 2018

BY LEE CULLUM

S

o much to be said about Margaret McDermott, but where to begin? With her years at The Dallas Morning News, where she was known as Speedy Milam? With her early travels to India, Europe, and Asia as a correspondent for the Red Cross during World War II? Her life in Japan and Germany after the war? With her late marriage to Eugene McDermott, co-founder of Texas Instruments, that almost didn’t happen? One night, Margaret told a small group at lunch, she returned home from a date with Gene, and stopped by the bedroom of her mother, Grace Milam, who was waiting up for her, and said, “I don’t think I’m going to marry Gene.” Bolting straight up in bed, Mrs. Milam retorted, “Oh, yes you are.” She did, of course, and it was the wisest decision of her life. Gene McDermott endowed her not only with a fortune but with the fortunate experience of a soulmate, found and kept, even after he was lost to her, for another 46 years. The things she learned from him, the things they shared, stayed with her, shaping a worldview honed from what Virginia Woolf called “many interests and much substance,” yet consolidated over time into disciplined simplicity.

That was her secret: E Pluribus Unum, from many avenues, one destination. As the years went on, Margaret took to wearing long dresses most every evening out, kept her face slightly tanned and her hair in a snow-white coif, all to superb effect, with beauty that endured to the age of 92 and even 102, as photographs attest. The habit of giving, begun with Gene McDermott, grew predominant, and always she was among the first to support a new endeavor, never waiting to see how it would go. Topping off was not her disposition. Margaret McDermott was cornerstone to the core. She also was admirably loyal to her friends. She never forgave a director of the Dallas Museum of Art for disparaging a Texas painter she revered years ago. Much later, when Patsy Swank, longtime pal from the Red Cross and The Dallas Morning News, died, Margaret spoke at the service and was especially solicitous of her children. She was many things to many people, yet always the same. She was Margaret McDermott, and, to paraphrase Virginia Woolf once again, in searching for a phrase, I could find none to stand beside her name. P

Clockwise from top left: Margaret McDermott pictured with the DMA’s Roslyn Walker celebrating the publication of The Arts of Africa, 2009; Margaret McDermott with Lady Bird Johnson at the DMA’s presentation of El Greco of Toledo, 1982; Margaret McDermott pictured with two South Asian objects featured in the Arts of Man exhibition, 1962. All images courtesy of the Dallas Museum of Art.

72

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


920 S. PEYTONVILLE AVENUE SOUTHLAKE | $3,700,000 TRACEY CHAMBERLAIN | 214-986-7623

4618 CHEROKEE TRAIL BLUFFVIEW | $3,695,000 MICHELLE HOPSON | 469-583-5441

9505 INWOOD ROAD OLD PRESTON HOLLOW | $3,200,000 CINDY SOLICE | 214-417-1737

Unmatched Local Expertise. An Unrivaled Global Network. A Trusted Name for over 70 Years.

25 BRAEWOOD PLACE DALLAS - GLEN ABBEY | $8,450,000 CINDY O’GORMAN | 972-715-0190

Ebby.com ©2018. Equal Housing Opportunity.


June/July Issue: Best of the Arts  
June/July Issue: Best of the Arts