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Patrick R. Vokaty 2015 Master of Architecture Candidate Illinois Institute of Technology Architecture + Design Portfolio


Patrick R. Vokaty

2015 Master of Architecture Candidate Illinois Institute of Technology Architecture + Design Portfolio

academic work | graduate parallel arts miller beach art center....................1-18 the gatewave neighborhood marker..................19-20 sullivan spiral SOFA selection................................21-22 caffeinated worm vermiculture furniture..................23-26 “all my sons� production design.........................27-32

academic work | undergraduate flexible thresholds con-temporary house...................33-38 kudottu kampus aalto university................................39-46 re-unification publiCITY: recycling ruins...........47-52 integration cincinnati performance hall.......53-58 gardens to forts columbus food fort.......................59-64 the bulge knowlton hall installation...........65-70

additional design work graphic design..................................................71-74 travel sketches..................................................75-76 photography.....................................................77-78 artwork................................................................79-80


parallel arts

miller beach art center October - November 2013 Collaboration with: Marina Pozzan & Janette Szestowicki Instructor: John Desalvo When thinking of art and what the community of Miller Beach, Indiana is, one realized that art is not just sculpture and painting, it is a lot more. Art is associated to the meaning of craft and the will to create something, whether it be useful to our physical or mental survival. Located in the center of downtown, Parallel Arts is the new art center in Miller beach devoted to all of the arts: painting, pottery, culinary, etc. It is the key component in the “rebirth of Miller Beach.� The culinary half of the art center includes kitchens where students learn to cook and visitors can watch and even sample some work, as well as a culinary school restaurant, where the students are the chefs. The other half is dedicated to the arts with floating studio rooms which provide space for artists to work in privately, but also the chance to let visitors in. The theater located at one end of the center, provides space to express the representative arts, while the exhibition area is dedicated to art that speaks for itself.

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Miller Beach, Indiana site plan

studios on same axis as live work studios next door


Exposition Spaces 19600 sqft

Restaurant 5500 sqft

Culinary+Art School 15600 sqft

Indoor Walkway 3000 sqft

Theater Space 13600 sqft

Outdoor Walkway 10000 sqft

Total sqft: 67300

circulation studies (blue: public; orange: private artists)

program distribution

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A

B

C

D

5


6


A

B looking East

B looking West

C

7

D


East elevation

West elevation

North elevation

South elevation

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column and truss structural studies

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solar “marketrees� for seasonal farmer markets

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Culinary Arts Plaza (left); Culinary School Restaurant at night (above)

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Scarlet Ramp from Artist Live Work

Enters building


Through exhibtion spaces

To library/cafe


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the gatewave

neighborhood marker October 2013 Instructor: John Desalvo Collaboration with: John Derkach & Ben Strasser The Gatewave is a symbol for what was, is, and will become of the gem of a town that is Miller Beach, Indiana. Drawing upon what built up Miller Beach, the neighborhood marker references the Indiana Dunes and Lake Michigan through its layering and feathering nature; aviation pioneer Octave Chanute through similar constructure to his heavier-than-air flying machine; and the steel industry through the mechanics of the structure. The materials consists of 3/4” MDF board, 3/4” steel nipples, 1/2”x13”x8” hex bolts, 1/4” air craft cabel, and 3/4” crimps. The neighborhood marker stands at about twelve feet tall.

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sullivan spiral SOFA selection

October 2013 Collaboration with: John Desalvo & Mark Rustin John Desalvo and his firm, JDS Design, had been renovating an 1889 Louis Sullivan house in Old Town, Chicago. They had to recreate the original stair and wood work because it did not meet current code heights and was in poor repair. Desalvo’s clients allowed him to take the unused parts to re-purpose for an additional neighborhood marker for the SOFA Chicago Exhibition at Navy Pier.

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caffeinated worm vermiculture furniture

January - February 2013 Instructors: Kay Bea Jones, Ann Corley Silverman, Amy Youngs Can we accelerate composting? The Caffeinated Worm is a baker’s rack for the kitchen of a coffee lover. One can grow, grind, and make his or her coffee in one place. A camouflaged hatch on the primary shelf leads to the heart of the furniture: the vermi-coffee-compost. This manageably-sized stainless steel bin is built into the wood structure. Inspired by a spaetzle maker, the grate at the bottom of the baker’s rack releases the worm’s... fresh fertilized soil. In turn, the dirt can be used to nourish the coffee plants, completing the circle. This vermicompost solves the problem of wasted coffee grinds, filters, and of course, other food and paper waste. Having a bin conveniently located next to one’s coffee pot prevents spillage on trips to the garbage can, and the bin benefits from the moisture of the used coffee grinds and filters. The Caffeinated Worm is also an experiment to discover if a vermicompost can be accelerated.

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fresh water

bean roaster coffee machine water tube (to dilute worm tea) bean grinder

sliding shelf ventilation screen coffee plant vermi-compost worm tea access fertilizer drawer extended pot

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all my sons

production design January - April 2013 Instructors: Daniel Gray, Janet Parrott, Mary Tarantino, Kristine Kearney, James Knapp To create a picture perfect but secluded atmosphere suggesting normality as well as a “layered consciousness” and hyperrealism for All My Sons, per the director’s request, constructing a highly layered and dense set is the answer. Adhering to Arthur Miller’s multiple themes and motifs used throughout the drama in all three acts will further convey all the characters’ emotions through this tragic story. Sticking to one stationery location, the Keller’s backyard, emphasizes Joe’s dark and inescapable secret. I plan to construct the 1920s picture-perfect house in a hyper-realistic morphed perspective to symbolize Joe’s skewed morals, and to add depth to the house and stage, conveying how financially fortunate the family is. The master bedroom window on the second floor of an elevation of the side of the house will be shown as well to convey isolation in its use. To keep the setting isolated from the neighbors and the world, a dense grouping of poplar trees, and a heavy fence, arbor, and gazebo, will surround the house. The deep front porch, poplar trees, fence, arbor, and gazebo will also add drastic shadows in each act to aid in each of the acts’ climaxes, and in the entire drama’s climax at the end. I will extend the tops of the poplar trees and the roof of the house above frame to give the space no escape. An unnatural positioning of the poplar trees in addition to the backyard fence will resemble bars in a cell. When Joe is playing with Bert, pretending that the Keller house is jail, the

metaphor in the scenic design will shine through, that Joe views his home as a jail. The question of Larry’s death is central to the plot of All My Sons, so I decided to make the apple tree, which is a memorial to Larry, roughly at center stage. This dark force had the power to destroy the Keller family. The morphed house’s perspective will point to it, along with the arrangement of the arbor, gazebo, and poplar trees. Having the tree split in two will adhere to many themes throughout the drama. Having one part of the tree crash into the gazebo, a material item will draw attention to Joe’s duty and responsibility and how his greed and material comfort blinded him to the murders he was committing. It references choices, consequences and ethics, and Joe’s moral dilemma when at a critical moment he put his family’s finance’s above the lives of courageous American soldiers. The split will also symbolize atonement and forgiveness and Joe’s final decision to escape from guilt by committing suicide over confessing and imprisonment. Having the tree split in two, will also draw attention to Kate’s realization that if Larry is dead, then Joe is responsible for his death. The two parts symbolize her two “dead” loved ones. The other trees stand like sentinels protecting Joe from suspicions of neighbors; however, the apple tree in the middle of the yard reveals the Joe’s core and truth.

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M-4E:

35: WHITE CYC 34: 33:

32:

31: 30: 29:

28:

27: 26: 25:

24: 23: 22:

M-2E:

21: M-3E:

20:

19: 18: 17:

16:

15:

14: 13:

12: 11:

M-1E: 6: 5: 4: 3: 2: 1: MAIN CURTAIN F: FIRE CURTAIN

10: 9: 8: 7:

DROP BOX POINT

LOADING GALLERY

BEAM 1

ACCESS TO CATWALKS VIA SOUND BOOTH DOOR LIGHTING, SOUND, STAGE MANAGEMENT & PROJECTION CONTROL BOOTHS

BEAM 2

SLOT 4

SLOT 3 SLOT 2

ACCESS TO CATWALKS SLOT 1

FOH TRUSS OPERATING GALLERY LINESETS 7-35

MOVIE SCREEN

PIN RAIL

TORM

LINESETS 1-6

ACCESS DOOR TO PIT

ALTERNATE POSITION -91"

The production design was split up into five parts: scenic, media, costume, lighting, and sound. Each section was taught by the chair of the specific department at Thurber Theatre: Drake Performance and Event Center at The Ohio State University. I individually worked with the designers, continuously polished each concept, and collaborated and discussed plans with the director of the production on a regular basis.

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WARM LED

WARM LED

WARM WASH R13 / 75° HARD

WARM WASH R13 / 70° HARD FOLIAGE PATTERN THROUGH TREES

WARM SUPPORT LIGHT PRACTICAL INTERIOR LANTERN

WARM WASH R13 / 40° HARD

WARM SUPPORT LIGHT

PRACTICAL HANGING PORCH COOL WASH R75 / 60° HARD WARM WASH R13 / 75° HARD

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PUNCHY 75° HARD

WARM WASH R13 / 75° HARD

COOL WASH R75 / 75° HARD


Lighting Plot: acting zones (pink); warm lighting (blue); cool lighting (orange)

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flexible thresholds con-temporary house Spring Semester Collaboration with: Ben Jaworski Instructor: Sandhya Kochar “The premise of the studio dealt with finding a new system/technique of deriving architecture that primarily relies on its own history in the making, it’s lineage of architectural thought and closely scrutinizing the residue prpoduced by modern architecture. The idea of sameness or the horrors of a sausage-produced artifact is a challenge that the studio has investigated. It is precisely in these conditions that we will find the new direction of techniques of building. The siting for experimentations of the architectural pop-up is in our very own city of Columbus before it can be exported to Asia and elsewhere.” -Sandhya Kochar Through Flexible Thresholds, we produced a manifesto of a catalogue of lies based on the “fluff” between architectural norms: megalomanical dreams, unfulfilled desires, potency of the fragment based on narratives, politically incorrect architectural statements with spatial and tangible possibilities. In a shotgun lot in the heart of German Village in Columbus, Ohio, we designed a series of organic frames of a house to be filled with and sometimes surrounded by pneumatic structures. We explored permanent and temporary inflatable housing and the possibilities and nature of double membrane fireproof PVC bubbles. Through on and off conditions, void and residual spaces were discovered, making for multiple mixed-use private and public spaces.

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LDS

VOKATY tsdhasdfjklhfjklsdhfjklasdfhlsdjkfhdjfhdjfhdjfdhjfdhslfjkhasdljkfhlasdjkfhladksjfhjkldasfhasdklfjhadslkjfha sdjklfhdjklfhaljdfhklasdjfhkdjasfhadjklfhkdjlaf hdlasfjkhdaslkjfhdskljf

MDF board and balloon study models (above) House frame series (right)

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T H E I N F L ATA B L E S 1. THE ESSENTIAL ( PERMANENT )

2 . T H E E N T E R TA I N M E N T ( T E M P O R A R Y )

a. foyer

i. living/party

b. coat closet

j. mudroom

r. g u e s t b e d ro o m

k. stairwell

s. guest bath

l. bedroom

t. balcony

g.

c. bathroom f.

d. kitchen

e.

e. pantry

l.

n. master

d.

h.

h. porch

q. stairwell/garden

k.

j.

t. r.

m. linen closet

f. dining g. study

3. THE CARRIAGE HOUSE (SHRINK WRAP)

o. master closet

q.

i.

p. master bath

c.

s.

m.

n.

b. a.

p. o.

T H E I N F L ATA B L E S

T H E I N F L ATA B L E S T H E I N F L A1 . TT HAE EBS SLE NET ISA L ( P E R M A N E N T )

2 . T H E E N T E R TA I N M E N T ( T E M P O R A R Y )

. THE ESSENTIAL ( PERMANENT ) a. foyer

. foyer

b. coat closet

a. foyer . coat closet

c. bathroom

. kitchen

. pantry dining

c. bathroom

d. kitchen

2 . T H E E N T E R T A I N M E N T ( T E M P O R A R Yj .) g. f.

g.

g. study

e. pantry

h. porch

3 . T H E C A R R I A G E H O UtS. E ( S H R I N K W R A P )

g.

e.

d.

h.

e. c.

r. g u e s t b e d ro o m

i. living/party

q. stairwell/garden

k.

j.

i . l i v ikn. gs t/api rawr et lyl j. mudroom

k.

j.

l. bedroom

e.

f .f . d i n i n g f.

q. stairwell/garden

k.

j. mudroom

e. pantry

d. kitchen

3. THE CARRIAGE HOUSE (SHRINK WRAP)

i. living/party

1. THE ESSENTIAL ( PERMANENT )

b. coat closet . bathroom

3. THE CARRIAGE HOUSE (SHRINK WRAP)

2 . T H E E N T E R TA I N M E N T ( T E M P O R A R Y )

j. mudroom k. stairwell

m. linen closet

n. master

m . l i np .e m n acs lt oe rs eb at t h

t.

t. balcony

r.

r. g u e s t b e d ro o m s. guest bath

k. stairwell l. bedroom n. master

l. bedroom m . l i n e n c l o s eot . m a s t e r c l o s e t

t.

r.

s . g u e s t b aqt.h s t a i r w e l l / g a r d e n r. g u e s t b e d ro o m

l.

m.

s. guest bath t. balcony

r.

s. q.

t. balcony

i.

l. l.

m .n .

s. q.

s.


level 1, on

level 2, on

level 1, off

level 2, off


kudottu kampus

aalto university, campus 2015 Autumn Semester 2012 Instructor: Sam Rosenthal The Knowlton School of Architecture’s GUI Competition for fourth year students was a mock Aalto University, Finland Campus 2015 competition. The purpose was to design an attractive, lively center for the campus area between 48,000-52000 m2 (gross floor area). Being the largest assigned project in the history of the competition and in my academic career, its challenging site, lack of sunlight most of the year, and rigorous competition programme, taught me how to be more organized and bolder with my approach. After research on international campus safety and Finnish culture’s popular willow weaving, my objective was to weave the art/design, architecture/landscape, and film/theatre schools while preserving the exisiting circulation routes, but alternating them in a more effective and efficent fashion. To completely understand my idea, I built a plexiglass wall around the perimeter of the site and wove string to symbolize the circulation and views I wanted to preserve between the existing buildings and entrances of those buildings. I then wove decorative mesh, which represnts a woven steel structure and shrink wrap through the strings to form the integrated structure with a transportation hub core above the metro station. The density-changing shrink wrap represents glass panels, and its density is determined by what program needs light the most. The new heart of campus integrates the woven schools and circulation, including the street that was moved underground, and the separated pedestrian and bicycle paths.

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kt

M

M

sp

Leikki

-

sp

sp

sp

41


M

42


M kt

I

VTT V VT T TT M GE

SSA

A EE P E TR

sp

LIM

III

laboratorio III

schools’ legend film + theatre art + design architecture + landscape

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a. b.

e.

d.

c.

M


a.

c.

45

d.


b.

e.

46


re-unification

publiCITY12: re-cycling ruins Spring Quarter, 2012, Abroad in Rome, Italy Collaboration with: Liz Fischer & Azzalee Gethers Instructors: Kay Bea Jones & Beatrice Bruscoli A villa is a country house for the elite, surrounded by gardens and vineyards to highlight its wealth and importance. Across centuries, villa gardens once located in the suburbs of Rome have become public parks for recreation and fresh air for its citizens. In the same way a villa becomes a sublime creation in an elborate lansdscape, the “re-unification” that is the Art Center becomes the new precious artifact within the pre-existing Villa Borghese landscape. The views that are accessible by design, St. Peter’s, MAXXI, Piazza del Popolo, Termini Station, and the Colosseum, are highlighted for their role in the fabric of the city comprised of monuments. All viewports come together to form a 5-headed complex uniting a series of contemporary media. Each tube houses a different artist, with space for a workshop and a place to exhibit each artist’s work above. Similarly, other types of artists such as chefs, writers, and thespians, reside and work above their “gallery” space. Structure and circulation respond to the dynamic form that results from the intersection and collaboration of each artist’s domain. The division of public and private zones is also acknowledged through the East and West wings of the design center and within the circulation through the tubes. Visitors can only enter on the first level and pass the artists’ residence on their way up to the gallery through the core. The old Cosenza entry is also recycled in the design, emphasized by the inverted tube entry, drawing attention to the public entrance.

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secondary program

PUBLIC PRIVATE PUBLIC

GALLERY WORKSHOP

RESIDENCE WORKSHOP GALLERY

primary program

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PUBLIC

level 1

PRIVATE level 2

PUBLIC level 3

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integration

cincinnati performance hall Winter Quarter, 2012 Instructors: Brandon Clifford

The new Cincinnati Design Center pulls the two contrasting cultures of Main Street and Walnut Street together on the block between them off 8th Street. Each street and culture has its own entrance, which merges with the other in a building containing a collection of “floating� planes. The diverse compenents of the program are united and interact with one another in an open triangulated shell. the form of the shell follows the function of the design center and guides visitors throughout it. The apatures that the triangulation creates form views that allow for further interaction, inside and outside the shell.

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MAIN STREET

WALNUT STREET


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b. TICKETING & LOBBY c. CAFE d. RETAIL SHOP e. STUDIOS f. SUPPORT SPACES

i.

g. LARGE AUDITORIUM h. LARGE GALLERY h.

i. SMALL GALLEY j. SMALL AUDITORIUM k. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES & MANAGEMENT g.

l. LOADING BAY

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f.

e.

d. c.

b. a.

l.

j.

WALNUT STREET

MAIN STREET

a. LOBBY


g.

b.

8th ST

i.


gardens to forts columbus food fort Autumn Quarter 2011 Instructors: Mike Baumberger

Inspired by “Farm to Table” food entertainment, “Gardens to Forts” allows guests to pick or catch their organic food and bring it to stations for preparation. The site responds to its surrounding areas, including Downtown Columbus, Short North, and Arena District. The program revolves around its nucleus, the aquarium, which is penetrated with circulation and facility. The landscape is carved into gardens that serve as another place to pick up food and ways to access the upper levels. Guests are able to access the interiors and exterirors of the aquarium and gardens from multiple locations across the site. The site vectors, aquarium, and gardens collaborate with and respond to one another, creating multiple moments and routes of entertainment.

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aquarium garden circulation fort

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the bulge

knowlton hall installation Spring Quarter, 2011 Collaboration with: Ross Young Instructor: Zach Snyder After researching and making site plans of the Battle of the Bulge’s movements, we represented it in a small three-dimensional model with decorative mesh, yarn, tacks, and clothes pins. We chose a secluded stairwell in the Knowlton School of Architecture that has a cement column penetrating the landing for the large scale model’s location. After weaving multiple panels of wire to form our own custom mesh, the bulge became a self-supporting object that people could walk inside and around. One is guided into different positions by the shaping of the bulge and the positioning of the strings. Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects based the design and position of the structural columns of Knowlton Hall on the pathways pulled from The Ohio State University’s campus. To follow a pathway used to position the columns, the bulge wraps around the stairwell column, in line with the vector to view another column across the South Garden of Knowlton Hall. To make it visible for all heights, we guided the participant of our installation to crouch down to view the other column.

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67


exterior

69

interior


70


GRAPHIC DESIGN

all’estero in italia, 2012 K N O W LTO N S C H O O L O F A R C H I T E C T U R E , T H E O H I O S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y

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a m o r i d i s r per /co

route, trek , walk, course, , wander] ay w , ey rn u jo . alk, travel [percorso: n , go across, w v. go through

arie frane letter@ 7p m

y sunda y 27 ma ai monti, 7 o in rt a m n a s via Invitation to Italy Map Exhibition (above) 10/86 pages from Italy Study Abroad Publication (left)

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dis ease n’ dots 2012 top global diseases

H1N1

SWINE FLU

SALMONELLA

EBOLA

DENGUE

CHOLERA

ANTHRAX

visualizing global marathon | challeneg 1

july *dot size = intensity of outbreak/number of cases 1-100

august

september

october

november

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100-500

500+


“40 KSA students developed 15 projects for the Data Visualization Challenge, part of the 2012 Visualizing Global Marathon held over the weekend of November 9-11. The Knowlton School of Architecture ran its own internal competition in coordination with the larger Global Marathon, recognizing the top three projects developed for the KSA Competition. KSA Competition winners received $1,000 in prize money. The School’s participation in the Global Marathon, and oversight of the internal KSA Competition were managed by KSA Architecture Assistant Professor Karen Lewis.” Entries to both the larger Global Marathon and the KSA’s Data Visualization Challenge competition forcused on one of three Visualization Challenges: Disease Alerts, understanding the Global Flights Network, and Contexualizing the U.S. Presidential Election in Social Media. KSA Competition Winners: First Place: Elizabeth Fischer and Patrick Vokaty for “diease n’ dots” Judges: Deb Georg, KSA Landscape Architecture Doug Graf, KSA Architecture Lisl Kotheimer, Landscape Architecture Karen Lewis, KSA Architecture Matt Lewis, ACAD Rachel Kleit, KSA City and Regional Planning

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TRAVEL SKETCHES

Piazza Navona, Rome

Atop Piazzale Michelangelo, Florence

Piazza di S. Maria in Trastevere, Rome


Piazza di S. Bartholo, Rome

Pazza Santa Croce, Florence

Ratto di Proserpina, Rome

Tempietto, Rome

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PHOTOGRAPHY


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ARTWORK

“1525” (pen and ink)

“Elliott Anne” (ebony pencil)

“Moulin Rouge!” (colored pencils)


“Busch Bottles” (colored pencils)

“Booth Scandal” (acrylic paint, colored pencils, markers)

“Crossing the Hudson” (ebony pencil)

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Architecture + Design Portfolio