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Hello. I am

Patrick Munro McAffrey

patmcaffrey@gmail.com / 303.921.3448 / www.patrickmcaffrey.com


Graduated From University of Oregon; June 2012

Bachelor of Architecture with degrees in: Architecture Material and Product Studies


Part One:

Space


Acquire.

Transport.

Live.

Build.


the spread of a virus.

The topic of my thesis studio was Regenerative Design — how to rebuild after disaster. The disaster I chose to pursue was the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly Malawi. My idea is to spread awareness and prevention methods to rural areas through education on a local level. This evolved into something more. A bigger idea about how local production can begin to facilitate education on multiple levels and how it can also act as a catalyst for small local economies. This project is essentially a building that makes buildings, or building materials to be specific, and it teaches while doing so.

the spread of knowledge.

the process of healing .

completed in June 2012

(RE)generation

Many Parts to a Whole

Local Production + HIV Awareness in Lilongwe, Malawi


Answer: It depends on the disaster, of course.

The Question (revised): What is the responsibility of architecture in relation to the HIV epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa?

I have chosen to pursue this question in the context of “Social Disaster.” A term whose definition closely parallels that of

Answer: To give folks a roof over their head and a place to learn, heal, and progress.

The Question: What is the responsibility of architecture and built form in a postdisaster situation?

“Structural Violence ”

This refers to a form of violence where a social structure harms its own people by preventing them from meeting their basic needs. The disaster that I aim to regenerate from is the HIV and AIDS epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, more specifically, Lilongwe,

Malawi.

The important thing to remember here is that architecture is not medicine, it cannot cure or treat, but it IS able to, shelter, facilitate and benefit nonetheless. In order to prevent the further spread of this epidemic, it is imperative to instead spread knowledge of the virus, and the ways in which it can be prevented.


The Question (revised): How can architecture help to spread knowledge to rural areas that are otherwise without basic needs? Answer: Mobile, prefabricated buildings that provide a safe, welcoming setting for such matters to be discussed. In this part of the world, HIV affects everyone and every aspect of every day life. GDPs have drastically decreased over the last decade due to a severe depletion of the workforce caused by AIDS. Most of these countries did not have a lot of national exports to begin with. Additionally, the virus is leaving a lot of children orphaned, wives widowed, and heads of household in charge of an ever-increasing number of dependents.

+ =

The Question (revised): How can the production of pre-fabricated architecture contribute to the problems with economy and education? Answer: By producing something innovative that takes advantage of the area始s existing available resources and knowledge base that can be taught, learned and executed all at once.


urban context including open-air market

structural system

FUNCTION:

A Building That Makes Buildings. Prefabricated canvas tent structures

to replace existing corrugated metal and thatched roofing. Offering ease of maintenance, more day light an a more comfortable space to inhabit. Additionally, this structure can be implemented on several scales to fulfill various programmatic requirements.

+The kit would come in three sizes:

Small - for homes or market stalls. Medium - for Education, gathering, awareness. Large - for entire market halls, worship, large gathering.

+ Materials:

Canvas - for the primary shelter and enclosure Bamboo Segments - for structure Hemp Rope - for tension Miscellaneous Hardware - for connections A Box - for transport and pouring footings

+ A system of catwalks is implemented to help deal with grade change. The formal language will closely follow that of the handmade bridges that span the Lilongwe River at the marketplace.

site plan

sustainable elements

‘thread the needle’ intervention


tectonic model 3/16” = 1’

urban context model 1” = 60’

building model 1/16” = 1’


B.

B.

B.

A.

A.

A.

ground floor plan

school second floor plan

third floor and factory catwalk plan

site section B

site section A


(RE)generation

Many Parts to a Whole

Local Production + HIV Awareness in Lilongwe, Malawi


entry perspective


Often times one can get caught up in the wash of daily life in an urban metropolis — and as a result, one may need a place to reflect, cleanse and purify. The Church of the Guiding Light will act as a beacon for Helsinki’s new residential development. Sited on an island at the end of a green ecosystem, this place will be one of warmth and welcome; providing close connections to the Baltic, and bridging people between their modern lifestyles and their Nordic Heritage. Through the combination of traditional orthogonal lines as well as contemporary Finnish organic forms, this chapel offers a sanctuary to its users that follows and alludes to the progress and traditions of Helsinki. *This was a group project created while studying abroad in Helsinki, Finland at the Helsinki University of Technology. completed in August 2009

(opastaminen valoa)

Church

of the guiding light.


floor plan

Foyer

wc

Cloak Room

wc

Deacon’s Office

exterior perspective

Open Office

Break Room/ Kitchen wc/ Locker Room

Pastor’s Office

wc/ Locker Room Meeting Room

Sacristy Church Area Support

guiding light perspective


(opastaminen valoa)

Church

of the guiding light.


exterior perspective looking up Main Street


The goal of this Main Street block redesign is to create a place where Coupeville’s locals as well its visitors are able to coexist harmoniously. In addition to connecting people, this design also aims to link the town’s long history to its future, and blur the boundary between the local neighborhoods and the more tourist-oriented downtown. completed in December 2009

Old,

meet new.


ground floor plans

kitchen

site plan

wc

form diagram

main street elevation


exterior perspective looking down Main Street


Old,

meet new.


exterior perspective


A Home For Our Time is one that greets not only its owners, but also its guests and passersby as well. A Home For Our Time is a host, and lends itself to gatherings in all types of settings, with all types of company. A Home For Our Time blurs its boundary lines, serving as a good neighbor to all who surround it. A Home For Our Time grows its own food, provides its own shade, lives and works all on the same lot. completed in June 2010

A Home

for our time.


south elevation

ground floor plan

section looking north

perspective looking towards living room


living room perspective


A Home

for our time.


Ground Floor and surrounding area plan N


The boxcar project was created as a visitor’s center for the folks at Aprovecho in Cottage Grove, Oregon. The primary goal of the project was to create something that was as sustainable as possible. One thing that fascinated me most about the project was the railroad that ran right through the site. I decided to create a small visitor space by “re-claiming” two unused boxcars and modifying them in a way that put no structural loads on them, and made the “boxcarchitecture” a comfortable space for humans to occupy. completed in August 2010

Boxcarchitecture.


over

2,000,000

24 Years

several smart hippies with a bright idea,

Ago,

came together to invent a smart stove that would help with the relief efforts in recently earthquakestricken Guatemala.

stoves have been made, and “several smart hippies” no longer does this project justice. Aprovecho is what they call themselves now, which in Spanish literally means “to make good use of” and ‘they’ are rocket scientists, doctors, and all-around humanitarians.

This is Aprovecho ’s permanent home,

Cottage Grove, Oregon.

THIS SMALL IDEA

HAS GROWN

INTO SOMETHING

MUCH LARGER. Today, these revolutionary stoves are being sent to developing nations all over the world, not only for disaster relief, but also for everyday use.

There is a railroad, a river, and a town with lots of friendly people.

Cottage Grove happens to be the Covered Bridge Capital of Oregon, and is home to one of the only covered railroad bridges in western America.


1.2 Miles From the

Aprovecho Research Facilities is a railyard where several old boxcars sit — unused and empty.

What if we could re-use a couple of these boxcars to structure a place that shared the

journey of Aprovecho and their stoves in a way that also related to the history of their current setting....?

So, you take two old boxcars, place them parallel to one another then shift them so that inbetween spaces are created. Put a strucutural cage around them and a roof on top that is sloped in a manner that collects rainwater to store in cisterns placed on site. This space is then sited adjacent to the existing old hay barn, which will be slightly altered and added to. The southwest corner of this existing building will be fully glazed to warm the space in the winter time, and photovoltaic panels will be placed on the roof to collect solar energy for the whole visitor center. The pop-out additions to this structure will serve as transition spaces and be designed with flat green roofs.


south elevation

west elevation

section looking west

site model


building model


Boxcarchitecture.


Part Two:

Objects


This three-legged chair was made from one 4’ x 8’ sheet of 1/2” plywood, and was milled using a CNC router. The goal was to create something simple and quirky that spoke to the aesthetics of mid-century modern plywood furniture, using twenty-first century production methods. The back leg supports the weight of the chair and its user with no screw connection — just a kink in the shape. Otherwise, the entire chair is held together with just 8 allen-head screws. completed in March 2010 *This chair and instructions on how to build it were chosen to be published in a do-it-yourself plywood furniture book coming out in January 2012.

A Chair ...but different.


concept

process

product


A Chair ...but different.


Turner.

+

Spatula.

+

Scoop.

+

Ladle.


This project was born from a desire to eliminate unnecessary objects from the disorganized and sometimes chaotic utensil drawers that reside in most people’s kitchens. After exploring different ways to do this, it became apparent that flat, mixing objects are often used in conjunction with ladled, serving objects. This led to the design of a rather unusual form for the head of this tool — which when paired with the classic handle form — is in some ways everything you are familiar with, but nothing you have seen before. completed in December 2010

The

SpatuLoon.


spatula

spoon

SpatuLoon


The

SpatuLoon.


This group project was born as a way to introduce LEDs and “green� systems into the existing grid in Salem, Oregon for the Sustainable Cities Initiative. This light is intended as wayfinding in public parks, and would have a map etched into its corten steel face. It would be relatively small in stature for ease of maintenance, and the base would include a bit of translucent concrete that would flow off the bottom, along the edge of the sidewalk for several yards to alert users to boundaries, which would then allow for a greater distance between the lights. completed in March 2011

Finding the way.


exploded axon

map concept

40’

distance between elements

illumination concept


Finding the way.


inesLINES l nes

It all just starts with

The pages shown here were part of a ten-page, letterpressprinted, hand-bound book. The concept was that as humans, the primary way that we communicate our idea of the world around us is through speech and language — so how then could I use language and words to “illustrate� a set of seven, relatively well-recognized design objects? The words I chose are self-referential, but also comment on the elements and spaces they were used to create. All type was hand-set, and the book was printed in an edition of seven. completed in March 2011

Printed ines by hand.

on paper.


clockwise from top left: Chicago skyline in press bed; colophon page; Chrysler Building lead type; Chicago skyline printed; Chrysler Building printed; Reitveld Chair lead type.


clockwise from top left: Canals of Amsterdam lead type; Helvetica’s R; Corbu Haus; Rubik’s Cube; Reitveld Chair; Canals of Amsterdam; Helvetica lead type.


inesLINES l nes

It all just starts with

Printed ines by hand.

on paper.


This bicycle was team-designed as a preliminary scheme for the Oregon Manifest bicycle competition. The goal was to create a utilitarian campus bicycle that would appeal to everyone. The frame design is classically styled with modern details such as places to both house and hold a standard Ulock without damaging the frame, an internal gearing system, and a belt-driven drive train. In addition, the basket can be applied to the front or the back, and has built-in fenders. The goal was to make the bike part of your college experience for now, and part of your life when you leave. completed in June 2011 *After this preliminary design phase, a bike was built, and although the final form was different, a lot of these initial ideas came through in the final product, and the campus story drove the whole project. I did not participate in the construction, but this bike won the student category of the 2011 Oregon Manifest Constructor’s Challenge.

The

Campus Bicycle


*Internal hub, coaster brake, and a belt-drive system make this bike easy to maintain.

*U-lock attaches to down stem and the bottom tube has a notch for locking ease.

*Spring-loaded kick stand is always there when you need it.

5/2

5/4

*Measurements etched on seat post for proper posture.

5/6 5/8

5/10


The

Campus Bicycle


Portfolio