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Fall 2008

Poll Dancing

How the outcome of the 2008 election will affect Marquette students in very real ways

Also in this Issue: The generation gap • college slang • milwaukee destinations • broken yolk offers hope • Fall Fashion for guys & Gals


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Personal Politics

Marquette students will be affected in very real ways with the outcome of this landmark presidential election. by Sara J. Martinez

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Mind the Gap

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Let it all slang out

As the Millennial Generation comes into its own, questions about the perceived “generation gap” intensify.

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by Brooke McEwen

A look at why “slanguage” exists and why it really isn’t going to destroy the English language as we know it. b y Ka r isa T e l l

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departments WARMUP

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Editor’s Note Mr. Shutters has some dubious credentials for an Editor-in-Chief.

My Journal What is the Journal? The Marquette student body weighs in.

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City Buzz Milwaukee with little more than a U-PASS, and some grand architecture.

12 Campus Spotlight

“Broken Yolk” offers hope with its food, plus a few fashionable profs.

14 Stylephile

Fun fall fashion that’s priced for a college student.

COOLDOWN

29 29 Journeys

Senior Katie Malm, who worked on the upcoming film, “Public Enemies.”

30 The Last Word

Remember when? Plus, what to do until the next Journal.

On the Cover: Lindsey Hunt is a senior in the College of Communication. Photo by Jackie Poeschl.

http://journal.mu.edu

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http://journal.mu.edu


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MY Experience Fall 2008 STAFF Editor-in-Chief

Greg Shutters Assistant Editor

Sara J. Martinez Features Editor

Patrick Johnson Chief Copy Editor

Sarah Krasin Art Director

Greg Shutters Promotions Director

Becca Ruidl

Writers

Jesse Carpender Lissie Crichton-Sapp Natalie Emmer Brian Henry Patrick Johnson Caitlin Kavanaugh Sarah Krasin Rosemary Lane Nina Lewis Sara J. Martinez Brooke McEwen Matthew Reddin Becky Simo Colleen Stanfa Karisa Tell Jessica Victorino

Copy Editors Lia Dimitriades Jess Herrick Megan Hupp Becky Simo Katie Vertovec

Photographers

Michele Derdzinski Erica Headrick Kevin Kozicki Brooke McEwen Jackie Poeschl Morgan White

Designers

Patrick Johnson Alli Kerfeld Greg Shutters Peter Wagoner

Creative Consultants

Alise Buehrer Samantha Cavallo Rima Garsys Patrick Johnson

Online Writers

Erica Breunlin Samantha Cavallo Michele Derdzinski Tori Dykes Nick Herff Elizabeth Kannall Allison Keough Joey Kimes Elise Kokonas Kirsten Lehman Ben Martinez Jen Michalski Sara Patek Brenda Poppy Kari Powell Ryan Riesbeck Miguel Rodriguez Katherine Vowell

To advertise, call Student Media Advertising: 414-288-1738

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s we close in on voting time in the 2008 presidential race, we, the voters, continue to hear more and more about “experience.” Who is qualified to lead? Do the number of years one has served as a senator or governor make one more or less worthy to assume the highest position in our nation’s government? The question of experience is one that has also followed me as an editor-in-chief. What qualifications do I have to be the leader of the Marquette Journal? I have always considered my credentials to be worthy of an editor-in-chief, but in the extremely stressful weeks approaching the deadline for our Fall issue, I decided that I should re-evaluate my résumé. My first qualification is as an investigative journalist. Experience has proven that I can go out and get the real story, no matter how controversial it might be. For instance, in the fourth grade, I did a science project to find out which laundry detergent works the best (which happened to be Tide, and while we never reached a formal agreement, I still expect that check in the mail). Another thing that I believe qualifies me as a leader is my sense of integrity. Honesty in journalism is extremely important, even in the cutthroat world of limited circulation student life magazines. Honesty and integrity are traits that I have displayed time and again in my work. Not just here at the Journal, but also at my previous jobs, such as my stint as a drive-thru attendant at a Culver’s Frozen Custard. I never took anything from the cash register, and I never took any food without paying for it. The hot fudge, however, was another story, but I will save that for another editor’s note. So in the end, looking at my résumé again proved to be a good thing, and my previous journalistic experience in science fairs and working in fast food gave me the confidence I needed to oversee the completion of this issue. Hopefully it gives you confidence of its quality even before you have begun reading it! This year’s Marquette Journal is very much a departure from previous years, and hopefully you will agree with me that our new formula is more readable, more interesting and more suited to your needs as members of the Marquette community. But how should I know what’s best for you? Well, of course, I know from experience. Sincerely,

The Marquette Journal 1131 W. Wisconsin Ave. #006A Milwaukee, Wis. 53233 mu.journal@gmail.com Faculty Adviser

Dr. Steve Byers

Greg Shutters gregory.shutters@marquette.edu

http://journal.mu.edu

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“A Marquette newspaper that students write about to get people involved.”

by Jessica Victorino photos by Michele Derdzinski

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fter spending a day asking Marquette students what they thought the Journal was, these were our collected responses. Some hit the spot, while other people learned something new for the day. Although they all had the right idea, we had answers ranging from a newspaper to a piece of paper.

“A newspaper.” Bryan Mahoney, Freshman College of Arts & Sciences

“A bunch of selfwritten stories by well-educated people.”

“A publication similar to the Marquette Tribune, but it should deserve the same hype the Tribune gets.”

Arthur Kuprion, Junior College of Business Administration

Peter Costanza, Junior College of Communication

“A student life magazine.” “Magazine/newspaper thing.” Mike Movido, Junior College of Communication

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Matthew Mayor, Senior College of Arts & Sciences

Erin Lifke, Freshman College of Communication

“A piece of paper about Marquette news and about the world.” Julia Lichter, Junior College of Health Sciences The truth behind the Marquette Journal is it began in 1904 as a student annual. A couple of years later the Hilltop came about and became the official annual, while the Journal began its transformation into a literary magazine that allowed Marquette students to show their creativity through poetry, photographs, drawing and fiction. This idea stuck for a while, but two years ago the Journal became more of a lifestyle magazine, although some fiction was still included. Last year, as fiction and poetry were taken out of the magazine, feature stories about campus life began to make their way in. And now, this year’s staff is taking new ideas and running with them in hopes of a completely new Marquette Journal. It’s going to be big and it’s going to be fun, but different. An exciting kind of different, though. Be sure to keep a heads up on our publication dates.


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The inside scoop on what to do and where to go in downtown Milwaukee

Downtown Getdown

by Natalie Emmer and Nina Lewis photos by Morgan White

Mocha

U-PASS!

124 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Get on board the route 30 bus from Wisconsin Avenue and North 12th Street. Take the bus to the intersection of Wisconsin Avenue and Plankinton Avenue.

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fter a late night of studying you probably need a boost before pulling that all-nighter. If you’re looking for a change from Starbucks, you can always take a stroll down Wisconsin Avenue. On the corner of Wisconsin Avenue and Plankinton Avenue you will find Mocha, a coffee bistro located in downtown Milwaukee. Mocha serves a variety of drinks, from ice-cold chai shakes to Milky Way mochas, lattes or cappuccinos. Mocha also provides bagels, yogurt parfaits, sandwiches and delicious desserts like tiramisu and rice crispy treats. The prices won’t strain your budget because drinks and food range from $3 to $7 and MarquetteCash is accepted here. So whether you have an 8 a.m. class or are planning to stay up late, Mocha is open daily from 6 a.m. to midnight to help you stay awake through your busy day.

Jim Gaffigan’s Sexy Tour Milwaukee Riverside Theatre, 144 E. Wells St.

U-PASS! If you don’t feel like taking a late night walk, you can always take the route 90 bus, which departs at Wisconsin Avenue and North 10th Street. You will arrive at Wisconsin and Plankinton Avenues in less than five minutes.

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ooking for something entertaining to do over winter break? Just in time for the holidays, comedian Jim Gaffigan is bringing his Sexy Tour to Milwaukee’s Riverside Theater. Jim Gaffigan is well known for his hilarious comedy shows, especially his famous “Hot Pocket” bit. His show will begin at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 31. With some extra Christmas cash in your pocket from your grandparents, you should be able to afford tickets, which range from $55 to $85.

http://journal.mu.edu

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Discovery World

U-PASS!

500 N. Harbor Drive

Hop on bus 90 departing from Wisconsin Avenue and North 10th Street. Discovery World is less than ten minutes away.

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f you head down to the lakefront one day, you might be curious as to what the silver-scaled pillars are and what’s inside the building. If you’re looking to see exotic fish, state of the art technology and science exhibits and artifacts of Wisconsin sailing history, then Discovery World is the place to be. Discovery World is located right off of Lincoln Memorial Drive near Milwaukee’s Summerfest grounds. The Reiman Aquariums at Discovery World give visitors the opportunity to touch a stingray or go aboard an exact replica of the Challenge, a 19th century Great Lakes sailing ship. Discovery World is also the home port of the S/V Denis Sullivan, a modern, educational sailing vessel modeled after the Great Lakes schooners of yore. Discovery World offers a college discount, so tickets are only $9.95. Its hours run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends.

Oriental Theatre 2230 N. Farwell Ave.

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U-PASS! Get on bus 30 Sherman-Wisconsin at the bus stop on the corner of North 12th Street and Wisconsin Avenue, and take the bus to the corner of Prospect Avenue and Kenilworth Place. Walk a few blocks to the theatre.

he Oriental Theatre is just a stone’s throw from downtown and is one of Milwaukee’s most remarkable treasures. Named after its East Indian inspired décor, the Oriental was first opened in 1927 and is as enchanting today as it was 81 years ago. If seeing the historic landmark itself isn’t reason enough to get you there, perhaps seeing the latest blockbuster film or indie flick on one of its three viewing screens will be. Named one of the 10 best movie theatres in America by Entertainment Weekly in 2005, there is little reason not to be intrigued. The Oriental also claims the world record for continued film engagement — “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” has played recurrently as a midnight showing since January 1978. Every second Saturday of the month, this tradition lures an eclectic mix of new and old patrons. The interactive show includes a live cast, and guests are encouraged to wear costumes. The next show is a special showing scheduled for Oct. 25. Regular shows will resume Nov. 8. To learn more, visit sensualdaydreams.com. To get movie showtimes visit landmarktheatres.com.

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Brady Street

U-PASS! Get on bus 10 Humboldt-Wisconsin at the bus stop on the corner of North 12th Street and Wisconsin Avenue, and take it to the stop at Brady Street.

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n the artsy East Side discover Brady Street. With a laid back, seemingly West Coast vibe, Brady Street is a hidden haven, skirting the chaos of downtown. Not only an auto thoroughfare, the street embodies a culturally diverse neighborhood that dates to the late 19th century. Today, Brady Street boasts nine blocks decorated with a plethora of shops, taverns, restaurants, lounges, salons and cafes. Brady caters to every unique need (or want, for all those shopaholics) of the individual. Regardless of age, income or history, on Brady Street the ideology “to each his own” resonates. Go there and let “your own” be heard.

The Milwaukee Repertory Theatre Patty & Jay Baker Theater Complex, the Milwaukee Center, 108 E. Wells St.

U-PASS!

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Get on bus 10 Humboldt-Wisconsin at ocated in the heart of downtown, the MilwauNorth 12th Street and Wisconsin Avenue kee Rep has played an integral role in Miland take it to Milwaukee Street. Then, waukee theatre for 53 successful seasons, and at either walk or take bus 11, 15 or 5, all of the brink of the 54th, an upset is highly doubtful. which stop within one block of the theatre. From classics like “Pride and Prejudice” to fresh works like “Eurydice” and “I Am My Own Wife,” the 2008-’09 season lineup has something to whet every theatergoer’s appetite. Also new this season is an innovative plan to attract younger audiences, as college students often forgo the theatre because of its toll on the pocketbook. In light of this, the Rep is offering $10 discount tickets to the 40-and-under crowd for any show playing in the Quadracci Powerhouse Theatre. To take advantage of this offer, visit the Rep’s special site at therep-entourage.com and look for the promotional code. Imagine — a night on the town with your friends, taking in a show at the theatre for the same price of a typical movie. For more information on the 2008-’09 season, visit the Rep’s Web site, milwaukeerep.com. (Remember to use the other site if you want the discount. It is supposed to be a secret!) http://journal.mu.edu

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architecture on the avenue

by Matthew Reddin photos by Kevin Kozicki

Looking east of campus, extraordinary edifices, superb structural styling decorates your drive ings of questionable architectural greatness, like “the Beer Can” McCormick or the bizarre Lalumiere Language Hall. It goes without saying that these buildings contribute to the distinct spirit and beauty of the Marquette campus. But limiting a list of great architecture to those found on campus is almost criminal, especially when you are only minutes away from buildings that may trump some of those. You don’t have to go far to find them; in fact, you can find four of the best simply by going down Wisconsin Avenue. If you do choose to go down Wisconsin Avenue and seek out these fine buildings, the first one you will find will be a mere instant off campus, Upon entering the Milwaukee Public Library, one is greeted by its capacious the Milwaukee Public domed atrium. The library was constructed in 1898. Library. Built in 1898, Central Library is not only the first building on our t’s always a good sign when you can’t count the examples of fantastic architecture on campus list, but it is also the oldest. To select the library’s on the fingers of one hand. You do OK at the be- design, a national competition was sponsored by ginning, when you check off the beautiful Gesu the library. The winning design was submitted by Church that is the heart of the campus, and then George Bowman Ferry & Alfred C. Clas, a pair of move on to Johnston Hall and Marquette Hall, architects whose first joint commission was the flanking it on either side. Raynor Library makes Pabst Mansion, 2000 W. Wisconsin Ave. the list, as does the Alumni Memorial Union. But now you’re up to five, and there are so many more The library’s design called for a fusion of French great buildings left, like the St. Joan of Arc Chapel and Italian renaissance styles and laid out an entire or Straz Tower. And that’s not even counting build- city block to house both the library’s collection and

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that of the Milwaukee Public Museum. This gives the building a sense of majesty and classical appeal, perfectly suited for the wealth of knowledge it contains. The building is shaped in the form of a large “U,” which was originally done so the library could take up one half and the Milwaukee Public Museum could take up the other. But in the 1960s, the museum moved into its own building, and the library took over the resulting space. Further down, adjacent to the Riverwalk, is 100 East, appropriately located at 100 E. Wisconsin Ave. This high-rise was built in 1989, but it was designed in the style of the traditional German architecture of the downtown area. The building is a reimagining of German architecture in more than just its appearance, however. It is built on the site of the former Pabst Building, built in 1891 and one of the first skyscrapers in Milwaukee. When the Pabst Building was torn down in 1980 after almost a century of existence, it was the tallest building to ever be demolished in Wisconsin. 100 East actually resembles the original Pabst Building, so it is truly more of a reborn, updated Pabst Building than a modern replacement. A few blocks down, at the corner of Jackson Street and Wisconsin Avenue, sits another one of Milwaukee’s historic buildings, the Wisconsin Gas Building. Built in 1930, this building is known not as much for its architectural superiority as for the “weather flame” that remains perpetually illuminated at its top. The flame, which was added in 1956, changes color to indicate the upcoming weather. Gold forecasts cold, red signals warm weather, blue means there is no change coming and a flickering light of any color means rain is expected. The building is mostly comprised of brick walls, although the bottom two and a half stories are made of granite, a sharp contrast to the sunny upper stories. As the building rises into the sky, the walls move closer to the center in the form of cubical setbacks, a hallmark of Art Deco style. The building has gone through changes in both name and owners over the years. Originally it was known as the Milwaukee Gas Light Building. but its name was changed to the Wisconsin Gas Building in 1966. In 2001, the building was purchased from We Energies by Paul Weise, who opened the building to tenants. Currently a Starbucks Coffee resides on the ground floor, a true sign of entry into the modern era. The last of these buildings “on Wisconsin” actually isn’t on Wisconsin — but it may as well be. A short walk from the point where Wisconsin Avenue be-


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comes Prospect Avenue will take you right to the entrance of the Milwaukee Art Museum. The newest architectural marvel to greet the city, the building is instantly memorable. Designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, the building is called the Quadracci Pavilion and resembles the prow of a ship overlooking Lake Michigan, with two expansive wings known as the Burke Brise Soleil. These wings serve as a sunscreen and have a wingspan comparable to that of a Boeing 747. But the majesty of this building does not end with its outward appearance. Upon entering the museum, you are greeted with Windhover Hall, an entrance hall as big as a two-story house. The hall has been described as a postmodern Gothic cathedral and lies below a 90-foot-high glass ceiling. The interior only adds to the building’s aesthetic appeal, making the museum even more definitively one of the most amazing works of architecture in the city. This is only a small sampling of the great works of architecture Milwaukee has to offer. Even on Wisconsin Avenue, there are more to choose from, such as the U.S. Bank Center or the Midwest Airline Center. Others, such as the Allen-Bradley Clock Tower or the Harley-Davidson Museum, exist throughout the city. If you want to see some prime examples of good architecture in Milwau- (above) Milwaukee’s 100 East Building (left) was built in 1989 and stands in the place of the former Pabst kee, I highly suggest taking the #10 bus route down Building, pictured right in this 1910 lithograph (courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries, Wisconsin Avenue. You might find that some of Archives Dept.). your favorite buildings are just down the street. (below left) Even in daylight, the Wisconsin Gas Building’s “flame” is unmistakable.

(below right) Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava designed the addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum, which has been often been hailed as an architectural masterpiece.

http://journal.mu.edu

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Broken Yolk, Mended life by Caitlin Kavanaugh photos by Lauren Stoxen

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overed in a white-crinkled apron, he hurries across the restaurant floor. Dashing from the sink to the table tops, he scrubs quickly, remembering he still has to take out the trash. Having done so, he returns to the sink to wash out the pans, keeping an eye on his surroundings, making sure to never miss an opportunity to talk with customers.

Gatto for a job, Montanez was permitted to work for an hour and a half each day. The job includes free meals from the restaurant as well as Montanez’s signature-white apron. In return, Montanez brings along his red flannel button up and beaming personality.

“It gives him a reason to get up in the morning,” His name is David Montanez, and he is arguably Gatto said, confirming his hiring decision. the most enthusiastic employee Milwaukee has Though cheerful now, life for Montanez was not ever known. always easy. “I’ve never called in sick, never came in late “I barely made it through high school,” Montanez and never took off of said with a small laugh, remembering his days at work,” the 58-year-old Sheboygan’s Urban Junior High School. Montanez said, folding his arms in an ap- At the age of 18, Montanez attempted to join the preciative stance. For military. “I tried out for every branch,” Montanez the past three months explained. “They said I wasn’t physically fit enough, Montanez has been but what it boils down to is they didn’t want me.” cleaning up at The Broken Yolk, located Feeling unneeded and unloved, Montanez turned at 2040 W. Wisconsin to alcohol. Today he has overcome that addiction and is proud to have put it behind him. Ave.

David Montanez proved he could turn his life around after starting his job at the new restaurant on campus.

hairdresser. “Last time my hair was so thick the barber asked me if I used a rake to comb it,” he said, flashing a smile that would give even the most animated cartoons a run for their money. “I said to the barber, ‘no, there’s no leaves in there!’ ” After moving past his mistakes and challenges, Montanez just wanted a chance to prove he could do something to the very best of his ability. This job gives him that chance.

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obsessions

“I think his intentions are good. He means well,” Gatto said, smiling as he simmered eggs in butAfter anxiously plead- Now his happiness remains intact both through ter. “Taking care of people is what the world is all ing with owner Jim working and through narrating his visits to the about. It doesn’t make you a hero.”

The Twilight Series by Sarah Krasin

n Aug. 2, Kortni Smith was one of the thousands who stood in line at their local bookstores for “Breaking Dawn,” the long-awaited fourth installment of Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight saga.

This semester, about 15 Marquette students are examining this popular culture phenomenon in an Honors Program Seminar Series appropriately entitled “A Philosophical Look at Vampires.”

“It kind of shows a desensitization to evil,” said Burrell, who is also enrolled in the course. “After taking this class, I think I’m less inclined to read (Twilight). I like the old image of vampires.”

Reid Eber, a junior in the College of Business Administration enrolled in the course, said an obsessed friend got him hooked on the series. Eber said he likes how the series takes a completely new look at the traditional “evil” image of a vampire.

Classmate Lauren Belisle, who has not yet read the series, said the phenomenon “sounds like the new Harry Potter.”

“I also feel like (Twilight) might be a little after my time,” said Belisle, a senior in the College of Smith, a sophomore in the College of Business “It moves away from the Dracula image we’ve had Arts & Sciences. “Maybe if I was in middle school Administration, said she has followed Meyer’s su- for the past 100 years,” Eber said. “I like the more I would’ve read them by now.” pernatural world where vampires, werewolves and complex, human version of the vampire.” But Eber claimed the books definitely aren’t just humans coexist since the very beginning. But as with every craze, the Twilight series has its for teens, noting that his mom and all her friends are currently hooked on the series. “I guess the obvious reason I like the books is be- skeptics. cause of the love story,” Smith said, referring to the plot that revolves around the strange attraction When Chris Burrell, a junior in the College of Arts “I’m not giving away ages or anything, but they’re between Bella, a human, and Edward, a vampire. & Sciences, was asked for his opinion of the series, definitely outside the middle school age range,” he laughed. “But it also has great characterization and an inter- he shrugged it off as just a fad. esting treatment of good versus evil.”

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by Rosemary Lane photos by Lauren Stoxen

Some professors show off their unique sense of style

James Scotton When James Scotton, a professor in the College of Favorite store: Communication, shows up to class, he is dressed Lands End Outlet. “I look around for cheap stuff. I to impress. Typically in a grey jacket and a cor- have some shirts with monograms on them, (but) responding Oxford and tie, Scotton describes his they’re not my monograms,” he said. style as “formal.”

Clothes fetish:

“I feel that since my students come to class, I Jackets with pockets. “I like jackets because they’re should treat them like adults and treat a classroom very convenient,” Scotton said. “Men don’t have like a formal setting,” Scotton, a Bay Side resident, purses, so where do you put all this stuff?” said.

Previous style moments:

He says he hopes one day Marquette students will When Scotton was the dean of the former School dress more professionally, holding “Formal Fri- of Journalism from 1978-1984, he said he wore “moccasins and a red-checked wooly jacket,” so he days.” would be more approachable for his students. And the style worked, he said. While colorblind, Scotton manages to coordinate colors with the help of his wife every morning. Weekend wear: Here is more of what he had to say about his style: “Sloppiest clothes possible — a pair of dirty shorts,” Scotton said. “My wife said, ‘You’re not leaving the house in that!’ ”

What he’s wearing: A plaid sportcoat with a checkered shirt and paisley tie. Complemented by khaki slacks and a brown leather belt.

Claudia pessarelli As a native Italian, Claudia Pessarelli said she tries to represent the Italian “fashionista” style when teaching her Italian language courses. “In Italy, you take care of yourself the best you can,” the Brookfield mom and instructor said. “Everyone is well presented. I want to present that to my students too — to see clothes the way they are.” Pessarelli also customizes her outfits with jewelry she makes herself. One piece she made combines linen and hemp with beads, wood and silver woven in.

Favorite stores: J. Crew, Banana Republic, Italian stores

Clothes fetish: “I’m addicted to scarves!” she said. “I usually fall in love with them and buy them. I use them 12 months a year, you will always see me with a scarf.”

Favorite article of clothing: A 14-year-old wool and cashmere Missoni scarf. “Every time I wear it I feel cozy,” Pessarelli said. “It makes me feel good.”

What she’s wearing: Pessarelli looks smart in a black Ann Taylor dress, a black blazer from Free People, earrings from Swarowski and a turquoise necklace that she made herself. Check out more professor fashion on our new Web site!

http://journal.mu.edu

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On Annamarie Andrews, sophomore, College of Communication: blazer, Forever 21, $28.50; sweater, GAP, $36.99; jeans, GAP, $59.50; shoes, H&M, $19.90; brooches, select stores.

On Jake Thayer, freshman, College of Nursing: sweater, TJMaxx, $40; oxford, GAP, $40; pants, Jimmyz, $20; shoes, Asics, $40; scarf, Polo Ralph Lauren, $60

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Brooches and jeweled pins are instantly eyecatching. Pin them anywhere for a sophisticated, pretty pop of color.

A dark color of denim has a slimming effect, and the flare below the knee balances out your lower body.

Looks created by Alise Buehrer and Rima Garsys Photos by Erica Headrick

V-necks will never go out of style, and scarves are newly popular additions to men’s closets. Together, they create a look that is both classic and current. http://journal.mu.edu

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Personal

Politics

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How Marquette students will be affected in very real ways by this landmark presidential election by Sara J. Martinez photos by Jackie Poeschl

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or most undergraduate students at Marquette, this will be the first presidential election in which we are able to vote. Even so, this election will be much more than a milestone in our own lives as we grow and develop. More importantly, it will dramatically change how the United States will continue to grow and develop in history. With the possibility of a black president or a female vice president, the American people have elected to break boundaries. “As historic as it is, what’s going to matter when the next president takes the oath of office is what direction that president is going to take this country in,” said Stephanie Trifone, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences. “As exciting as it is, ultimately my concern is not so much the history of it all, but it’s where we are going to be going over the next four years.”

“Many Marquette students seem to be very con- the economic policies of the next four years will cerned about the economy, especially because of not only shape the immediate future of the nation, its recent struggles,” said Matt Dambach, a senior but rather have global impact. in the College of Arts & Sciences. “In a few short years, we will be hitting the job Dambach, chair of Students for McCain at Mar- force, where the candidates’ policies will come into quette, said he believes this is inarguably an im- play,” she said. “The economy, and most imporportant issue, since even college students are a part tantly, the world, is at stake with our decision.” of the global economy and students will be moving Wilson, who is into the labor force in the next also on the exfew years. “The economy, and most ecutive board importantly, the world, of Students for Other students agree. is at stake with our an Environdecision.” mentally Ac“Students are going to graduate tive Campus, and need to get a job, get a place maintains that to live, and will need to start paying taxes on all of these things,” said Nicholas the environment must not be overlooked when Glaser, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences. it comes to making a decision on who to vote for. Noting how as the generation that will be living Justin Phillips, a senior in the College of Commu- in this world experiencing changes induced from nication, said he wants a president who will cut global warming, Wilson said students need to taxes and provide a strong economy, creating jobs choose a candidate who makes the environment a top priority. and lowering gas prices.

Where the country will be headed after our next president takes office is difficult to distinguish. On one hand, there is a revolutionary young man who campaigns on “change” and mobilizing the youth vote. On the other, there is a man who has witnessed revolution and has the experience and “As a student that will be graduating in just a few knowledge necessary to be a good president. months, I will need a job, a place to live, a car,” he said. “The worst thing would be entering that Regardless of who wins, every issue on which these situation with high taxes, (high) gas prices and a candidates base their campaigns will directly affect tough job economy on top of having to pay student college students as they enter the real world over loans.” the course of the next four years. According to Phillips, financial concerns are the basis of issues that attract the attention of college students, and money problems tend to grab stuMoney Talks With student loan payback looming around the dents’ attention as a voter base. corner and job prospects no longer limitless, the economic outlook of the future will directly affect Beth Wilson, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, suggested that with the decision on Nov. 4, young people.

“We need a shift in consciousness about the way we think about the environment,” she said. “This upcoming election will hopefully bring greener policies to the forefront of Congress and awaken a world that has been walking in sleep for too long.” Victor Soto, SEAC president and a junior in the College of Engineering, said student involvement in environmental issues has assisted in bringing national attention to the problem.

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Women and Family

their stance on (the decision),” Boles said.

With 55.6 percent of Marquette’s student population composed of women, it seems natural that On his Web site, under “Values,” McCain clearly students would want to focus on women’s issues. states his belief that Roe v. Wade should be overturned. Fagnan said this is troubling because this Professor of political science Janet Boles said that issue hasn’t been at the forefront of campaign disyoung women tend to be some of the most pro- cussion, and she feels McCain has been afraid to discuss the issue for fear of losing women voters. women’s rights groups in America.

Many people would like to start families but do not feel they are able to without a union, whether it is civil or marital, Hayes said. On McCain’s Web site, he states his belief that same-sex marriage should be an issue decided upon on a state-by-state basis, while noting that he believes in the union of one man and one woman. In 2006, both Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., and McCain voted against the federal marriage amendment. While Obama has stated that he supports civil unions, Hayes pointed out that a civil union is not a marriage, and he said he feels Obama is too vague on this issue.

Nevertheless, feminism isn’t quite as prevalent on campus as some hope, according to Ali Fagnan, co-chair of Marquette’s feminist student organization, Empowerment.

The most worrisome part, she said, is that overturning the decision might have other consequences regarding choices affecting women’s health, such as use of birth control or optional hysterectomies.

Fagnan, a senior in the College of Education, said she wishes candidates would explicitly acknowledge women’s concerns relating to domestic violence and abuse, women’s health care and the way

“I worry that overturning Roe v. Wade is going to have farther reaching implications than just abortion alone as far as choices women have in health “I feel as though many people, especially in the care and choices women make about their bodies,” LGBT community, blindly follow Obama, expecting him to spearhead all of the issues surrounding the LGBT community, which is not necessarily going to happen,” Hayes said.

What Next? Students agreed that an investment in the future begins with an investment in the now. While students may not yet understand the gravity of their choices, Trifone acknowledged that soon everyone will transition into the real world and recognize how their decisions today will affect their lives tomorrow.

women are treated in the military.

Fagnan said.

“I want them to tell me that they understand that Family structure is another issue that many Marwhile women have come a long way, the fight is not quette students hope to see addressed. over and we still have a long way to go,” she said. Devin Hayes, a senior in the College of Arts & SciBoles said that the victory of Sen. John McCain, R- ences, is the president of Marquette’s Gay/Straight Ariz., in this election would raise concerns among Alliance. women regarding the possibility of putting Roe v. Wade as a legal option at stake. Hayes said that when speaking of the lesbian/gay/ bisexual/transgender community, one of the bigOne of the most controversial decisions in Su- gest issues revolves around the idea of family. preme Court history, Roe v. Wade granted women the right to choose and maintain control over their “This is typically where marriage rights are located own bodies. as well as issues involving adoption,” he said. “The right to marry is a very important issue to the “McCain has said that he believes Roe v. Wade LGBT community and that also has an influence should be overturned, and presumably his court on the ability to adopt.” appointments would be screened according to

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As well as serving as co-chair for Students for Barack Obama, Trifone is the communications director for the Les Aspin Center Alumni Council, a non-partisan student group which is composed of alumni from the Les Aspin Center program in Washington, D.C. “It is really going to affect our lives, as much as we might sometimes be a little bit insulated from it on campus,” she said. Trifone said the Les Aspin experience is very focused on public service, incorporating and examining the full potential of public policy. Students on the alumni council come back to Marquette to continue the mission of what they learned. “This is really an opportunity to have four more years of the same thing we’ve been experiencing for the last eight years or to really try something new and to have a president who understands the issues and needs to challenge us,” she said. “We really have an opportunity to elect someone who the world respects; we need to be thinking ahead to our future.”


Durity said that while the Black Student Council is pleased to recognize the historical and cultural significance of Obama’s candidacy, the organization remains non-partisan and this year is focus“That might be something that would finally come “College students who haven’t voted before are less ing mostly on increasing political awareness and likely to vote at all,” activism and getting as many students as possible to fruition, giving a much according to John registered to vote. greater option for national McAdams, associservice,” Boles said. ate professor of po- Trifone said that there are huge efforts across the “I think young Americans country to make sure that students are registered litical science. Trifone said she agrees. are seeing that they are in and ready to vote on Nov. 4. She said the Les Aspin fact a part of the process Since this will be Center Alumni Council is also making a consider“If (Obama) wins this, I and a pretty important the first presiden- able effort to register more voters and increase the think you’re going to see a one, too.” tial election in size of the student electorate. president who really engagwhich a majority es the nation, and our age of undergraduates “I think we are a key constituency, and I think group in particular, in a call have the opportu- we’re ready to have our voices heard,” she said. “In for service,” she said. nity to vote, they are less likely to realize the im- the past we’ve not always turned out in the numportance of voter registration or to take the time to bers some of us have hoped for, to see from our peers, but I think this is an election in which we’re vote on location on Nov. 4, he said. Generation: Engage really going to make a difference.” Marquette certainly seems to be making an effort Declare Yourself. Rock the Vote. Choose or Lose. All of these are familiar titles, Web sites or market- to acknowledge the importance of election years, Durity noted that should Obama win the election, ing campaigns that cater to young men and wom- though, with many classes introducing political it would send the message that the youth vote does en in urging them to register to vote and to educate debate and election themes into coursework and count. non-political student organizations pushing for themselves before doing so. “(His) campaign has hinged upon the ability to student voter registration. mobilize the youth vote and to get people involved Politics is trying to engage young Americans, and it’s clear that media marketing has recognized the Melissa Durity, president of the Black Student who aren’t normal participants in the process,” she Internet as the easiest and most effective way to Council and a senior in the College of Health said. “I think young Americans are seeing that they reach out to youth. These sites make it effortless Sciences, thinks that many students are apathetic are in fact a part of the process and a pretty important one, too.” for the frequent surfer, providing outlets to register about the political process. to vote online and detailing campaign issues in a straightforward, user-friendly format. Who wants “They don’t realize how much it directly affects While Obama may be exciting young voters, Hayes to leave their dorm room to register at city hall, them,” she said. “This is why we’re pushing so hard said he believes young people’s enthusiasm for for students to get out and vote, regardless of which Obama seems more like the “trendy” thing to do. anyway? According to the respective organization chairs, candidate they support.” Boles said Obama, who has already shown his abil- Apparently, if the student electorate wants to make ity to rally young people, will put forth his enthusi- a difference, it needs to mobilize and prepare for the fight. asm for national service should he be elected.

Gay/Straight Alliance

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Marquette’s chapter of Students for Obama had 50 people at its first meeting, while Students for McCain has 40 to 50 active members. Neither candidate seems to have a stronger actively political and promotional following at Marquette, but not all supporters are engaged in the organizations’ sponsored activities.

Students for an Environmentally Active Campus

“I do believe there is a stigma attached to John McCain and the Republican Party around campus,” Hayes said. “It’s a strange feeling not being a part of the Obama fan club, especially when most of the people around you are a part of the fan club and expect you to be, as well.” Equally, it appears that students are enthusiastic about whichever candidate they have decided to support, and agree that the important trend in facilitating political support is increasing youth voter turnout. 18 to cast their vote in an online poll, and the site UR Votes Count said it aims to provide teens an provides information on all four candidates with opportunity to speak in one voice, with the poGlaser, who is president of Marquette’s chapter of an age-appropriate direction. tential to influence this year’s election and make Young Americans for Liberty, noted that he thinks a critical impact in the some students might follow the “popular” candi- Popular Disney star 2012 election, when “We are a key date without really understanding that person’s Selena Gomez, at 16 most of today’s teens policies. But, he adds, “Whether it be for Obama or years old, is the nawill be eligible to vote. constituency, and I think McCain, these students seem to truly be passionate tional spokeswoman we’re ready to have our about their candidate.” for UR Votes Count, While college students voices heard.” telling her peers that and young adults are they are the “next genthose who will ultimateeration” of voters. She ly be experiencing and Coming Soon promoted and kicked off the organization’s nation- managing whatever the next U.S. president brings College students and young adults are not the only al mall tour this summer to engage teens in stating to the table, it is the youth of America who will encounter the lasting effects of today’s choices. ones who are showing their passion and recogniz- their opinions regarding the election. ing their chance to make a difference. National organizations are noticing that teenagers are starting Gomez is quoted on the UR Votes Count Web site Soon, it will be their choice. The next generation to care about the issues as well. Several institutions saying, “Being a teen myself, I think it’s really im- of voters is just as important as this generation of are working together to create efforts that recog- portant we are educated on the issues that affect us voters, and how the next generation approaches nize the possibility of achieving a trend of youth all so when we’re eligible, we’re fully prepared to the 2012 or 2016 election depends on how young take on one of our greatest privileges and respon- adults and college students approach election ’08. voter impact. sibilities — voting.” UrVotesCount.com offers a forum for kids under

Now, more than ever before, elections have become a fashion trend. Support for a candidate is easily spotted by buttons and bumper stickers, and several high-profile designers have named their alliances by creating T-shirt designs emblazoned with the faces of favored candidates: designer Marc Jacobs’ Hillary Clinton shirt was popular when the senator ran for re-election in 2004, and the design was revived during Clinton’s run in the primaries earlier this year.

with Becky Simo rebecca.simo@marquette.edu

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friend of mine went on a date recently. It’s a really cute story, actually. He sat next to her in chemistry class one day, and, well, you know what they say about chemistry. She was wearing a campaign T-shirt, he had the corresponding button pinned to the strap of his messenger bag, and the sparks just flew.

As for my friend and her new guy? It didn’t last very long. It turns out he only had the button on his bag to pick up girls, a tactic which backfired spectacularly. So, whether you’re sporting shirts urging us to “Rock the Vote,” pinning on buttons featuring Sen. McCain’s face or donning any number of other stylish election-themed outfits, make sure you’re doing so for the right reasons. There are plenty of reasons to support either candidate. Because the shirt with his face on it is the cutest or brings out your eyes is not a valid reason.


Mind gap The

contributions by Brooke McEwen Jesse Carpender Patrick Johnson photos by Brooke McEwen

The Generation Gap, both real and perceived http://journal.mu.edu

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Our eyes are on the future by Brooke McEwen

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s forerunners of the future, we, the Millennial Generation, are stepping up to the start of the rest of our lives. A group of optimistic, technologically savvy and confident individuals, we puzzle the cohorts that came of age before us and are blazing our own trail for those who follow. The ever-enduring compilation of information through Internet, television and mobile phone portals has shaped the way we perceive the world, a world where the only constant is that nothing is constant. But whether teeming with excitement about high-tech advancement or remaining skeptical about work ethic in the work force, the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers and Generation X have formulated their views on our place in society.

in more exciting times.

72 percent believe we have access to higher paying jobs, and 64 percent think we live

“I see it being melded into a lot of applications,” he said. “The Internet, with the advent of wireless, is eventually going to be everywhere. I think we are going to have to realize that enough is enough and limit our integration at some point.”

Matusiak said he also uses Skype, an online phone But the truth cannot be assuaged that we have been service, in order to connect with his family abroad characterized as the “Look at Me” generation, ac- in Poland. Current technology poses a drastic cording to the Pew Research Center. change for the better; Matusiak said he remembers waiting hours for phone calls from his relatives to Social networking groups such as Facebook and come through or sending letters to Poland that MySpace have transformed communication for took six weeks to arrive at their destination. our generation. The power to connect with friends, plan social get-togethers and post photographs of Technology assists in maintaining the high value ourselves is at our type-happy fingertips. we place on tending to our relationships with friends and family. According to the Pew Research Ann-Margaret Swick, a freshman in the College of Center, eight out of ten Millennials say they have Nursing, said she spends time on Facebook simply talked with their parents in the past day, while another three out of four see their parents at least because it’s fun. once a week. “I really use it to talk to people who are far away,” Parents of the Millennial generation adhere to the Swick said. generalization of helicopter behavior, constantly As she perused her profile in the library, she also hovering over their young adult children and stepacknowledged her hours of Facebook leisure and ping in whether intervention is deemed appropriate or not. procrastination are one and the same.

“The workplace has become a psychological battlefield and the Millennials have the upper hand, because they are tech savvy, with every gadget imaginable almost becoming an extension of their bodies. They multitask, talk, walk, listen and type and text. And their priorities are simple: they come first,” said Morley Safer, CBS News correspondent Alex Matusiak, a sophomore in the College of Dawn Moon, associate professor of sociology, said and reporter of the “60 Minutes” piece The Millen- Engineering, many of her colleagues have nonials are Coming. ticed general parent involvement said while FaWhether we serve between student and teacher orcebook allows ourselves first or last, deals has increased over the past Whether we serve ourselves first or last, members him to stay few years. of our own generation generate positive concep- in touch with members of our generation tions about our offerings to the world. those out of his generate positive Inside the classroom, professors local reach, he conceptions about our do not wish to hear from outside Alejandra Salinas, a junior in the College of Arts also uses it to offerings to the world. the realm of campus with parent & Sciences, said society’s view on the Millennials’ communicate calls and e-mails concerning stusham of an image offends her, especially since she with friends dent matters, Moon said. spends much of her time giving back to the com- with whom he doesn’t regularly spend time. munity through volunteer work. Every generation encompasses generous as well as self-serving char- “Technology keeps people connected and allows Why does Moon believe parents meddle in our acters, she said. people to transfer information quickly,” Matusiak young adult affairs? She said parents of Millennials have provided their children with too much assissaid. tance. According to the Pew Research Center, 68 percent of us consider ourselves distinct and unique. Com- But even with technology’s relationship benefits, pared with young adults 20 years ago, 84 percent Matusiak said he notices a need for moderation. “They are not showing them how to do things, they of us feel we have better educational opportunities, are just doing it for them,” Moon said.

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And those individuals who coddled us through our childhood often uphold our greatest admiration. According to the Pew Research Center, our heroes are close and familiar. When asked to name someone we admire, we are twice as likely as older Americans to name a family member, teacher or mentor.

sounds of rock and roll. During the 1950s Elvis Presley shocked hoards of parents with his pelvic thrust dance moves. A decade later, the Beatles invented tunes that provoked swarms of screaming fans and inflamed disgruntled adults. Now, rap music incites feelings parallel to the youth and adults of yesterday with those of present day, Moon said.

Moon said she questions the actual differentiation between generations and believes age plays a large role in determining the way society behaved in the “Every generation is criticized at one time or another,” Moon said. “Whatever young people are past as well as present day. doing, they are doing it to distinguish themselves The genesis of “youth culture” evolved through from generations before.” the creation of popular culture during the postwar economic boom of the 1950s, Moon said. Young Previous generations grew up in a society strucpeople had disposable income and sought means tured differently than today. Then a transformaof merrymaking, seeking out the radical new tion occurred; today’s youth moved in a new di-

rection. The youth, the Millennials, seem drawn to the issues that affect the most people as opposed to the predicaments intertwined heavily with their beliefs, she said. Moon said our thought process as the Millennial Generation is progressive, and according to the Pew Research Center, our generation maintains a higher tolerance level than past generations. The center found that 58 percent of young adults said homosexuality should be accepted, compared to 50 percent of adults age 26 and older. On the issue of immigration, 52 percent of young adults said it strengthens a nation, compared with 39 percent of those age 26 and older. With the presidential election coming up so quick

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ly, these views will play a prominent role. Lillian Figg-Franzoi, a freshman in the College of Arts & Sciences who attended Marquette’s Barack Obama Block Party, said she feels excited about this election and the fact that young people seem strongly involved and opinionated. “Young voters are finding their own ways to become involved in grassroots campaigns,” she said. “Little steps go a long way.” Salinas, who volunteered to assist students in voter registration at the party, said, “I feel like it’s my civic duty to vote. There are people around the world that would die to vote. If you really support someone, you should show your support.”

Salinas said one election cannot solve the wealth of problems in the world, but she believes in Obama’s mission and character and, above all, that politics should go beyond political parties. As an Obama supporter, Salinas joins the majority of our generation that is more likely to identify with the Democratic Party than the Republican Party, making us the most democratic generation ever, according to the Pew Research Center.

if this is the direction we want to go. And if you don’t get involved, you don’t have a right to complain about the way things are.”

Since 2004, the trend in falling young voter turnout was reversed, according to the Pew Research Center. In 2004, young people actively participated in political campaigns, matching or exceeding the Baby Boomers in activities such as wearing buttons, displaying signs, attending rallies or persuadOn the cusp of full-fledged adulthood, our genera- ing others to vote, the study said. tion must recognize that we are the future, Salinas said. After college, the economy and job market As we, the Millennials, turn out to pack a political will affect all of us, and conscious voting efforts punch in the election, we are beginning to discover the power in both our youth and growing matunow will shape the United States later. rity. In the workplace, in the classroom and in the “Change is not going to come in a day; it’s going to homes we cherish, we are ringing in a global world come over years,” Salinas said. “We have to decide shaped by our turn-of-the-century philosophy.

who said change was easy?

“Even if the PowerPoint worked earlier, you can go back and someone’s changed something,” Scotton said. Rather than fighting with cords and buttons, ou’re sitting in lecture, cringing at the screech Scotton would rather stick to the basics. of the chalk on the board, hand pulsating with the pain of note-taking and wondering why your Then there’s John McAdams, associate professor white-haired professor can’t just get with the times of political science, who has been a leader of sorts and put a PowerPoint up on D2L. when it comes to bringing technology into the classroom. McAdams has maintained a Web site “It must be the generation gap,” you decide. “These since 1995 and has been uploading video clips for old guys just don’t understand the gadgets avail- more than a decade. He frequently uses the Internet and SMART Board to give his students a firstable today.” hand look at primary sources. For James Scotton, associate professor of journalDespite all this, McAdams calls himself a “technolism, that isn’t the case. ogy skeptic.” He’s not a fan of unnecessary technol“The generation gap is exaggerated,” he said. Scot- ogy and recognizes its unreliability in classrooms. ton keeps his lectures simple — his voice, overhead slides and the occasional VHS tape are the only “Writing on PowerPoints is no better than writing on the board,” he said. “There’s another piece of tools he needs. old technology, the hand-out.” Like Scotton, McCompared to more modern professors, who might Adams has also felt the burn of a malfunctioning use a SMART Board, a YouTube video and a Pow- PowerPoint or a DVD that just won’t play. erPoint all in one lecture, it might appear that Scotton is falling behind. But Scotton said he does Both professors denied any real difficulty adjusting to new technology. Keeping up with students his best to keep up with technology. keeps them young. “For older people, change is “It’s challenging but not overwhelming,” he said. hard,” Scotton said. “In an academic setting, I’m He’s been to PowerPoint workshops and can throw forced to change. It keeps one mentally alert.” one together when he needs to. Still, he prefers to These guys didn’t just fall out of a plutonium-fueled keep things simple. DeLorean, wearing dated clothes and blinded by “Technology is an aid, not an end in itself,” Scot- the bright future. They’ve been around to experience the changes in technology and adapt to them, ton said. just like you’ve finally figured out how to text mesBesides, technology can be unreliable and unpre- sage using T9. That said, sometimes it’s just easier to pick up the chalk. dictable.

by Jesse Carpender

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welcome to the ‘60s millenNium

and I really don’t want to know. It’ll save me from a bunch of nightmares in the future.

Fast forward to the summer of 2008. Let’s see, a bat became a dark knight, an alcoholic became a ironSEX. DRUGS. ROCK ‘N’ ROLL. clad hero, a robot proved our world is pretty much doomed to obesity and laziness and, oh yeah, ive words notoriously linked to one another. four beautiful, sex-crazed, middle-aged women stomped around New York City and comically Why? Well, that’s an easy one. They’re fun. took on Mexico. Great summer of movies (actuThese words aren’t dinnertime conversation or ally, it really was one of the best summers for movsomething you talk about with your parents, un- ies ever, but a little sarcasm never hurt anyone). less you’re living in an after-school special. They are the words you find high school students gig- I’m going to have to look past the amazingly sucwith Patrick Johnson gling about in the hallway or middle school kids cessful “Dark Knight,” bypass the action-packed trying to say to sound more grown up. Sex was a Robert Downey Jr. in “Iron Man” and disregard the patrick.johnson@marquette.edu private encounter (biblically it is only meant for a wordless-wonder known as “Wall-E” to get down husband and wife to consummate their marriage); to the best example of our lovely Millennial Gendrugs were only causes to crime and disaster; rock eration, “Sex and the City: the Movie.” ‘n’ roll was the link to it all. If you are saying to yourself, “If I hear one more Step into the new millennium where sex is one of thing about this damn movie, I might have to the most talked about taboos in the United States, puke,” then, I’m sorry, you might want to quickly and drugs have become a cultural movement rath- find a toilet or sink. I won’t be reviewing it or goer than a mobster’s only source of income. The ing over how much of a chick-flick it may be — I Millennial Generation is, in fact, a reincarnation of will be using it as the greatest example known to our parents living up Woodstock and pipedreams man (and woman, seeing as it is always best to be politically correct these days) about the “sexed up” in the 1960s and ‘70s. society we live in. How did we manage to get to this point of liberalization and an almost “shock-free” society? Maybe Lately, it has become extremely common to see we just have to realize that we really aren’t that dif- near-naked bodies plastered on jumbo-sized billferent from the generation that precedes us; the boards, “nudey magazines” (as Adam Sandler people who we could never imagine being “wild would have put it in “Billy Madison”) on newsand out.” It’s time to face the facts: we are our par- stands and films with SEX in the title. “Sex and the City: the Movie” has it all; the sex, the drugs and ents’ children. the rock ‘n’ roll. It aids in shining the light on the Let’s float back to, say, the ‘50s and early ‘60s. Here sex-driven society we live in. After all, if we were we meet two of the most iconic sex symbols of all still uncomfortable about the word sex, who would time: Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley. Both were have sat through that two-and-a-half hour “bangconsidered to be sex gods and every person at the up” of a comedy (and if you were offended by that, time wanted to marry, date or screw them. Look at you would have stopped reading a long time ago). the images of them — they were clothed, for the most part. Marilyn had her Playboy stint in 1953 Just think next time you go see a movie, even a as the “premiere” centerfold, but outside of that Disney movie (which is known for phallic symbols they were relatively “conservative.” These supposed — look it up for “The Little Mermaid,” “Aladdin” “sex gods” were a different breed, one that didn’t and “The Lion King”), and think about how much discuss the private facts of life or why the birds and our lovely society and culture is driven by sex and drugs. And why is that, you ask? Well, we are a genthe bees exist. That generation was sheltered. eration that just loves to look, see and talk about it. Let’s jet to about 1968, the year of a liberalized Sometimes we think because we talk about it we America. There was the musical sex-fest known as can experience it. Unfortunately, our societal valWoodstock, the Democratic National Convention ues cloud our judgment and lead us to “unwanted” that took the world by storm, a presidential candi- predicaments we aren’t prepared to handle. Think date set to change the world was assassinated and long and hard before you make these decisions — the Beatles’ “drug-induced” lyrics were streaming no one wants to be the next Jamie Lynn Spears. over the airwaves. Yeah . . . that was our parents’ generation. I’m not sure what exactly could have Remember, it really is just my opinion. But it is the been going on with our parents during that time, popular one.

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Let it all

SLANG

OUT Why slang, abbreviation and even (gasp!) texting really won’t do any permanent damage to the English language by Karisa Tell photos by Kevin Kozicki

“H

ey, dude, you wanna chillax at my crib punished speakers of the vernacular. College stulates? We can pregame before that kegger. dents came up with the term “lupi,” which means “wolves” in Latin, to rip on spies who snitched on Hope it’s not a total sausage-fest like last time.” students for using the vernacular. Do you know what this sentence means? Most college students would be able to decipher it with ease. Nowadays, college slang has branched out into all Despite what media reports tell us about youth de- areas of college life. Some slang words acknowledge stroying the English language and twisting it into the sexual freedom that comes with being on your some incomprehensible combination of slang and own for the first time. For example, “dormcest” is “text-ese,” it seems many parents and professors a romantic or sexual liaison with someone in the might be able to decipher the preceding sentence same dorm, in which case your roommate would as well. Slang is definitely spoken almost exclusive- have to be “sexiled,” accomplished by hanging a ly by youth, and as soon as an older person adopts sock on the doorknob or some other signal you it, we chuck it right out the window. But is it really both agree on. When the “bump ‘n’ grind” is over, someone will inevitably have to make the “walk of a whole different language? shame” back to his or her own room. One of the first examples of college-based slang dates back to the medieval universities of Western Building names and landmarks are the most often Europe. Colleges mandated the use of Latin and slangified words on college campuses.

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“Geographic location is one of the things that is shared by college students,” said Steven Hartman Keiser, assistant professor of English. “You have certain places that everyone needs to go, so terms pop up to refer to them.” At Marquette, for example, we’ve got “OD” for O’Donnell Hall, “Shuda” for Mashuda Hall, “the Abbey” for Abbotsford Hall, “the Beer Can” for McCormick Hall and “the Been” for Cobeen Hall. Then there’s “Shamu” for the area between Schroeder Hall and the Alumni Memorial Union, “the Wiggle” for the section of 11th Street that curves around Carpenter Tower Hall, “Angeblows” for the on-campus restaurant Angelo’s and “Toilet Paper Jesus,” a somewhat irreverent name for the statue outside the Jesuit Residence, in which it looks like Jesus has toilet paper billowing celestially around him. Slang depends on a hierarchical society, according to Tim Machan, another English professor. “One thing you need is a fairly clearly structured society with different classes,” he said. “You need similar arrangement of language varieties.” In other words, you have to have a standard variety of a language before you can develop a non-standard variety. So why develop a non-standard variety at all? To rebel against “the ’rents,” of course. “Slang can be a rebellion against the expectation that we will use Standard English in all places and at all times,” according to Anne Curzan and Michael Adams, authors of the book “How English Works.” Much like rebelling against the dress code by ripping holes in our jeans, we rebel against Standard English by using slang. What does slang do for a society? It draws clearer


boundaries separating one group from another, “Manscaping” is the act of removing excess body and it serves as a way to define yourself as part of hair, via waxing or shaving — on a guy. Other slang one group and not another. terms carrying a “man-” prefix include, “manorexia,” “mandals,” “manpris” and “man crush,” which, “Slang can be used to wield power and forge soli- respectively, can be used to talk about a skinny guy, darity within a group,” wrote Connie Eble, author male sandals, a pair of capris worn by a guy — and of the article “American College Slang.” Slang de- the respect and admiration one man develops for fines one group while excluding another, usually another. older people. A menagerie of different terms exist for expressing Furthermore, slang is what linguists call linguistic someone’s intoxicated state — wasted, schwasted, crunk, baked, fried, toasted, smashed, tipsy, hamplay. mered, plastered, stoned and trashed, to name “A lot of slang sounds fun or is fun to say or is fun a few — not to mention the various names concocted for alcohol and various drugs themselves. to use,” Machan said. If you want, you can “pre-game” before a “kegger,” According to Eble, who also wrote “College Slang where you’ll “double-fist” jungle juice and drunk 101,” many slang words are words already in the dial your “FWB” — friend with benefits. These lexicon that take on a different meaning. Slang is days you can also drunk text, drunk MySpace or also formed by adding prefixes and suffixes, put- drunk Facebook your “homeskillets.” ting words together, shortening words, forming acronyms, making onomatopoeia, rhyming and bor- What is it that makes the language of college sturowing from African-American English, among dents unique? Partly, it’s the unique atmosphere. Nowhere else is there a conglomeration of so many other methods. people, with so much in Sex and drinking have inspired the greatest num- common, in such close quarters. ber of slang terms. If you want,

practice (or “whatev”) together. Because of these shared experiences, the need for new words to describe these experiences arises. Another factor in the uniqueness of campus lingo is the diversity of the students. “Within a place like Marquette you’ve got 8,000 undergraduates alone (who are) all coming from different places,” Hartman Keiser said. How many times have you heard people argue the appropriate pronunciation of “bag”? And then there are Facebook groups defending the dignity of carbonated beverages, such as “If By Soda, You Mean Pop, Bitch.” A college campus is a veritable linguistic melting pot. Slang is attractive to college students because we work hard to build in-group solidarity with our peers, while asserting independence from our parents.

According to Eble, “Slang allows college students to endure and enjoy together that twilight zone between adolesyou can “precence and adulthood.” game” before a “kegger,” Not only are we physiwhere you’ll “double-fist” cally independent from jungle juice and drunk our parents, we’re also dial your “FWB” — friend becoming more linguistically independent. with benefits.

“Often slang vocabulary is highly developed in “Anywhere you get peoareas that are taboo for the general culture,” Eble ple together doing the same thing, like studysaid. ing at the university There are a whole slew of words that exist solely to level, there grows a lexitrash-talk the appearance of another person. For con around the activity instance, the word “butterface” describes a chick that happens,” Hartman with a hot body and a “fugly” face. A recent favor- Keiser said. ite, the “muffin top” is the roll of flesh that bulges We all go to class together, live together, party toover the waistband of too-tight, low-riser pants. gether and go to intramural innertube water polo

After we graduate from college and become the older people we so desperately try to separate ourselves from, our youth-centered slang slowly fades away. Often it is replaced with new slang from our workplaces http://journal.mu.edu

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AWOL?” Thurlow said. Plus, texting abbreviations are mainly used ironically in spoken English. People who say “LOL” instead of actually laughing when they find something hilarious are, in a sense, making fun of those who actually use the term. “I think that texting terminology is likely to stick around with a sort of ironic, nudge-nudge, ‘I’m being corny’ idea,” Hartman Keiser said. Panicked scholars need not worry because emailing and texting have their own self-contained varieties of language use that don’t affect spoken English or formally written papers. “I don’t think anyone would use text messaging words to write a class paper,” Machan said. “It’s not going to wander into other areas of usage.” Use of “text-ese” has a time and a place, and young people understand that. A student can make the choice to use “sum” instead of “some” or “2gether” instead of “together” in a lab report, but then again, that student also has the choice to use swear words or write in all caps or not do the assignment at all. Just because text language exists doesn’t mean it will permeate formal language. “I think that’s something that a lot of the hysterics who get worried about language in the world falling apart don’t get,” Machan said. “They really don’t get that human beings have brains and understand things like context.”

or other social groups we join upon leaving the ol’ alma mater. This switching on and off of slang is what differentiates slang from dialect. According to Machan, slang is used self-consciously and purposefully, while a dialect flows naturally at all times. College students have often gotten a bad reputation for ruining the English language. “The idea that college students are destroying the language is a very old one,” Machan said. As far back as the 1880s, the general public accused students of mangling the dictionary with slang. Technology also shares the burden of blame for the alleged decline of the English language. Baffled older people repeatedly shake their heads in confusion at “text-ese” such as, LOL, BRB and WTF, and some fear these acronyms will replace actual words in spoken English. So is your iPhone really the beginning of the end?

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“The idea that the Internet or text messaging or any of that is the end of civilization and the end of language is a bunch of hooey,” Machan said.

Some people say language is ruined, but the fact is language is constantly changing.

“It’s pretty easy to see change as somehow a bad thing,” Hartman Keiser said. “We want to believe Hartman Keiser concurs. “I think the effect on that the things that are happening in our generathe English language of texting and the Internet is tion have never happened before or that things are pretty superficial,” he said. “Just a few terms, the happening in ways that no one has experienced possibility of some alternate spellings — pretty mi- before.” nor stuff.” Perhaps the only thing technology has done to sigAnd even if acronyms do begin to replace actual nificantly change language is to create new ways words, what’s the big deal? Wouldn’t others rather in which to use language and to spread language hear “WTF” than the words this acronym actually around the world. stands for? “What might be changing the English language… Crispin Thurlow, author of the article “From Sta- is the fact that so many people are speaking it,” tistical Panic to Moral Panic: The Metadiscursive Hartman Keiser said. “There are several hundred Construction and Popular Exaggeration of New million native speakers of English and 3 billion Media Language in the Print Media,” points out non-native speakers of English around the world.” that acronyms already exist in the lexicon. Now that is baller. “What of comparable examples of less commentworthy acronyms such as ASAP, AKA, BTW,


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Name: Kathryn Malm Age: 21 College: Communication Campus Activities: Alpha Phi Sorority, PRSSA, Ad Club

My Journey I was an Accounting PA for the movie “Public Enemies” (directed by Michael Mann and starring Johnny Depp, Christian Bale, Channing Tatum and Marion Cotillard — summer 2009 release). I left school in the middle of April and continued my classes online while we traveled throughout Wisconsin filming in Oshkosh, Manitowish Waters, Wisconsin Dells, Madison, Milwaukee and Beaver Dam (among others). Shortly after completing finals, I moved to Chicago to work out of our main production office. The movie continued filming in the Chicago area until the end of June. The Roads I Took to Get There The people responsible for me having the opportunity to get this job are two Marquette alumni, Steve Muckerheide and Brian Wensel. I think keeping Marquette connections is very important and we should always be networking as students. After being able to get my first job in the film industry, I can only hope that this will open up opportunities for me to be able to help other Marquette students who would like to pursue a career in this industry. Continuing the Journey Ideally I would like to get back into film as soon as possible (when I graduate). There are many opportunities and roads to follow within film production, so I would like to spend some time finding what interests me most.

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Remember when?

“I’ll have my mom call your mom so you can come home on the bus with me next Thursday.”

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Nickelodeon used to have good shows? “Catdog,” “Ren & Stimpy,” “Are You Afraid of the Dark,” “Pete & Pete” . . . remember all those old classics? Remember running to your TV so you could sing along with the theme song? The 1990s were Nick’s golden days, back when slime reigned supreme and everyone wanted to compete on “Legends of the Hidden Temple.” And, of course, when none of the cast members got pregnant. Writing was an art? Girls, you know what I’m talking about — the gel pen craze. Our notes were brighter than the rainbow and our teachers would make rules on what colors we could use on our homework assignments so their eyes wouldn’t ache. R.L. Stine was more famous than J.K. Rowling? We all got the chills from the Goosebumps series, like “Night of the Living Dummy” (I, II and III). Then there was “Rainbow Fish,” K.A. Applegate’s “Animorphs” and doing the activities in the “Highlights” magazine.

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Watching a movie was a privilege? Movies like “FernGully,” “PreHysteria,” “All Dogs Go to Heaven” and “The Swan Princess” defined our childhoods. Not many of us noticed that “FernGully” is actually a political film about pollution…

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Nintendo 64 had the best graphics? Games like Super Mario, Glover, Yoshi Story and StarFox consumed our afternoons. And even before N64 came Super Nintendo, which allowed for hours of Duck Hunt fun (what was up with that dog anyway?).

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You would run home from the bus stop so you could make it in time for “Zoom” to start? Or how about “Arthur”? Shows like “Power Rangers,” “Dinosaurs” (if you don’t remember this one, look it up on YouTube) and “Eureeka’s Castle” are classics.

Disney had its “originals” that were actually original? We’re talking about “Bug Juice” (it doesn’t come in a jar), “Johnny Tsunami,” “Brink,” “P.U.N.K.S.” (starring a young Jessica Alba) and more.

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1957 “Jailhouse Rock” starring Elvis Presley premieres

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T HURSDAY JOURNAL ISSUE #1 RELEASE! 1945 Henry Winkler born

“The Fonz” on Happy Days

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SEE YOU IN DECEMBER!


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Marquette Journal, Fall 2008