Page 1

Week 6 Term 4

St Patrick’s School Fete CAKE STALL BBQ PICK A BOX WHITE ELEPHANT & PLANTS COLOUR ME CRAZY & HAIR SPRAY LUCKY NUMBERS RIDES FOOD GAMES FUNKY FROG BOOK STALL PHOTOGRAPHY SHARK BAIT & LITTLE FISH NAILS & TATTOOS RAFFLES ALIENS GO HOME COMPETITIONS Photography Art Drawing Coloring In DEVONSHIRE TEA HOT FOODS & DESSERTS BRIC A BRAC LOLLY STALL

This Friday 16th November In the School Hall

The Fete begins at 3:30pm until 7:30pm or sold out to y a w t a e r g It’s a ay d i r F a d n e p s Afternoon


School Calendar

ST PATRICK’S IS A NUT AWARE SCHOOL - A reminder of our practices • Food should not be shared between children at recess and lunch time.

November

Food/sweets will not be given that contain nut ingredients e.g. chocolates in classes.

•14th - Kinder Orientation Morning Session 2

Education for students on Food Allergies and Healthy Foods is incorporated into the school curriculum.

•16th – School Fete

•21st - Kinder Orientation Morning Session 3

We ask parents to ensure that birthday cakes are peanut and nut free.

•21st School Board Meeting

There is regular in-servicing of teachers on using epipens.

Annual revision for staff on procedures for children who are allergic to peanuts and nuts

• •

•30th Mission Mass 9:30am in the Church •30th – School Disco

Pictures of children with plan displayed in the staffroom, classrooms and other appropriate areas.

December

“Nut Aware” Statement to be included in Parent Handbook and included as part of information on parent information nights and included in school Parents being informed which classes contain children with nut allergies.

•14th - Whole School Mass 9:30am

3rd – 14th – Junior Primary Intensive Swimming

•17th – Year 6 Graduation Mass

COUNTRY KIDS MARKET Country Kids is a market specialising in items for maternity, baby and child. Come along to our special Christmas Market and grab a bargain at the quality preloved stalls, shop for stunning and unique Christmas presents at the local handmade stalls, and grab a tea or coffee and some Christmas

•19th – Last Day of the School Year for Pupils •20th – 21st – PD Days for Staff

treats at Country Kids Kitchen. Professional family/baby photos with a Christmas sleigh will be available for purchase. There will be three lucky door prizes of a family pass to Magic Mountain, and SANTA WILL BE VISITING FROM 11AM - 12NOON!  Held at the Twyford Hall, Merimbula 9am - 1pm on Saturday 8th December.   Entry by Gold Coin.  For more information or to book a stall contact: Clair on 0411 528 174 or countrykidsmarket@bigpond.com  

FETE NEWS We still need volunteers for the various Fete Stalls for this Friday. If you can help out at all, even for an hour, please contact Karen on 0407007556 Your help will be very much appreciated! ARMBANDS The ! !

!

!

!

!

!

Armbands. Enclosed is $ ! !

!

!

Family require !! !

!

!

!

!

!

(Cheques are to be made out to St Patrick’s P & F Assoc. Cost of Rides Pre Purchase $25; At Fete $30)

! COMPETITION ENTRY FORM Name: !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

Class: !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

Age: ! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

Name of competition being entered: !

!

! !

!

!


THE IMPORTANCE OF READING TO CHILDREN - An article from Mem Fox Mem Fox, a famous Australian author wrote recently in the Canberra Times about the importance of parents when it comes to the development of good readers. I found on the internet an article of one of her talks about the same topic. Read on and check the advice of one very informed person. Mem Fox writes: "I beg you all to read superb books aloud to your children! Begin on the day they are born. I am very serious about this: at least three stories and five nursery rhymes a day, if not more, and not only at bedtime, either. Read with passion and expressive abandon, maintaining the same variety in your voice at exactly the same place in the story or rhyme every time, keeping the same louds and softs, the same highs and lows, the same fasts and slows. In this manner your children will begin to remember the words by remembering the 'tune' of your reading. Memorising a rhyme or story and turning the pages at the right time is an important step in learning to read and should never be discounted as cheating. Fill their minds with a torrent of wonderful words, familiar and unfamiliar, common and grand, basic and lofty. And always make it a wild and joyful experience. If a borrowed story book or nursery-rhyme book becomes favourite, do your utmost to purchase it for your child. Children who have lived in book-filled homes prior to going to school are known to be scholastically advantaged for the rest of their lives. And children who have memorised eight nursery rhymes by the age of three, so I have been told, are always the best readers by the age of eight. As children become more and more familiar with a book, play games which focus on individual words and letters, such as covering repetitive or rhyming words with your fingers and letting the child guess which word might be underneath. Make it harder and harder - but keep 'fun' uppermost in your mind - by asking what letter the hidden word might start with. Or you might choose common words like 'and' or 'the' and find them on every page yourself, pointing them out to the child with squeals of excitement at each new discovery; then let the child find them, as a game, always as 'fun'. Write the words on a piece of paper in a sentence that has meaning to the child: e.g 'Chloë loves the beach and Nana,' and stick it on the fridge. Provide a variety of writing materials: different thicknesses of pen and crayon and pencil, scraps of computer paper, tiny notebooks, real exercise books, and coloured paper and leave them lying around so that children can draw, or draw/write, or pretend to write, or really write anything from notices for their bedroom doors, to shopping lists, letters to grandparents, complaints to parents, requests to Santa, and so on. It is tremendously important for the recognition of letters, and the relationship of those letters to sounds, that children should grapple with their own print as early as possible. Reading and writing go hand in hand: each depends upon, and improves the other, in a cycle of development.     The books read by the children should be beautiful, intrinsically rewarding books such as Where the Wild Things Are, (scary), The Giant Devil Dingo (how the world became), Guess What? (disgusting), Julius, the Baby of the World (hilarious), Hop on Pop (easy), and Koala Lou (touching). These beautiful books create a need by satisfying a need. If we didn't know chocolate was delicious we'd never crave for it - so it is with books. These books all feel smooth, smell nice, look enticing and present their readers with real rewards for the effort of reading them. Another essential thing to be found in a book-loving home is that the parents usually take parenting seriously. They role-play parenting like mad. They know they ought to read to their children so they do. The kids are caught up in a bookish world.

! At night they are warm and safe with a big, loving, protective parent beside the bed reading them stories night after night. In the day time they squeeze on to a comforting lap and in the security of a parent's loving warmth listen to all manner of horrors and joys coming out of books. The relationship between parent and child during the stories is one of warmth and love which makes the child associate books with warmth and love and pleasure and security. How attractive books become! And, lastly, for children to be able to learn to love books they need time to read; a quiet place to read in; warmth in winter; a comfortable spot to curl up in; and enough light to read by. Reference: www.bubhub.com.au/info/articles/toddler/the_importance_of_reading_to_children.shtml

Week 6 Newsletter Term 4  

Week 6 Term 4 2012

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you