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C H R I S T M A S 2 0 1 3

Tails and Tales

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: In His Own Words

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Dear Santa

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Funders

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Train the Trainer 4 Touching Hearts

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Teaming Up

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Bridging the Gap 7

Achievements

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From Shelter to Helper

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With a Little Help

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Donor Acknowl- 12 edgment Fundraising Fun

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How Do you Say 16 Good-bye?

The Gift of Giving Giving is powerful. Winston Churchill once said, "We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give." In July we had the pleasure of meeting a wonderful family and a young man named Anderson. His story is powerful and demonstrates the resilience and strength that comes deep from within the human spirit. The end of the story has not yet been written so we will start at the beginning. One family, Robert, Carolyn and Katherine, with the heart to give, donated a beautiful Gilead as a Chocolate Labrador puppy in puppy pictured the fall of 2009. One volunwith Ashley his teer, Ashley, with the desire to raise and train a service dog foster takes the puppy named Gilead home. She works on potty training, leash walking, puppy biting, basic commands like sit, down, wait, and stay. Once Gilead had his complete vaccinations she started taking him in public for socialization. This step is so important; teaching the trainee about the world and how to behave in the world of humans where he is allowed to go as a service dog. Ashley watches him grow and encourages good behavior and teaches him intermediate skills like taking items and handing them to her. And then one day she lets him go to an advanced trainer; maybe the hardest step in the process. The advanced trainer, Donna, learns about Gilead's personality. She learns what he can do and what he needs to be taught and she continues his training. She teaches him how to retrieve a bottle of water from the refrigerator, to rise to load the washer, to turn on a light and turn it off again. She

falls in love with this sweet Labrador boy. She teaches him how to carry a grocery bag and walk with a harness on. Gilead travels with her to family vacations in Florida and New York. He is with her constantly; working. More than 100 miles away, a young man's life is changed when he is injured in an accident. He is told he will never walk again. With his faith as his strength, he also begins training, relearning old skills. Although he makes amazing progress, he still needs help. He needs someone to support him, to be an extra set of hands, to help him regain his independence so that he can complete high school and move forward with his journey. A friend tells the family about Canines for Service. The young man wants a service dog but his parents are not sure. They take a leap of faith and submit an application. After several months he learns he is approved for a service dog but when a match would be made is not known. So, they wait and he keeps working to improve his mobility. And then the call comes. A service dog is matched and team training is scheduled. In July, 2013, Anderson met Gilead for the first time and had an immediate bond. Together, they learn how to be a team. They worked hard during their training and now Anderson is relying on Gilead more and more. A family's prayers anAnderson and Gilead swered, a life is forever changed, and it all be- watch Donna walk gan with a gift...... away, giving the ďŹ nal

gift of our trainers


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In His Own Words One of my jobs is writing. Not novels, but grants, teaching techniques, various kinds of reports, and my portion of the annual newsletter. Anyone who truly knows me, if it involves paperwork, I would take a serious beating in order to avoid those tasks. So, as I was trying to put my thoughts together for the newsletter, my shoulder starts to ache all over again (yes, last year at this time I had a shoulder replaced). I start to complain and then I look at the pictures. The pictures on the wall of our clients, both civilian and Veterans, and I realize how truly blessed I really am. Looking at those pictures I understand that any of our clients would gladly trade their best day ever for the worst day of my life and be thrilled for the swap. Thanksgiving! It is then I realize how ridiculous I feel with the pain I live with when there are people that need our services. We plan for weeks, if not months, for this one day when the pilgrims celebrated their good fortunes. Our clients live with their disabilities all year round and the slight inconvenience of the pain, seems so inconsequential. Thanks to the miracles of modern medicine lives are being saved when in the days of the pilgrims they simply would have passed into the final realm. From the miracle of the surgeon who rebuilds the neck and back from a spinal cord injury to the surgeon who is airlifted to the battlefield to do emergency surgery closing off the veins and arteries of a soldier who lost 1,2,3 or even 4 limbs in battle. My job, our mission, is to provide those people with the highest quality service dog possible that will allow them the independence that they dream about. Our Therapy teams visit locations with their dogs to share the love they have for others who for one reason or another cannot have their own pets with them. The teams visit schools and work with children who have difficulty learning to read. All our volunteers are giving their time and treasures to serve others that may not have as much to be thankful for. What I am thankful for this year? I'm blessed and thankful to be surrounded by staff and volunteers who care more for others than they do for their own time. I'm thankful for the many and varied people who make our organization work. You see, in the past 17 years, we have been able to provide $8 million worth of services to our clients without charging them a fee! Something a lot of other non-profit organizations cannot say! I'm thankful for the funding God continues to provide, knowing that without His blessing, none of this would be possible. And last but by no means least, I'm thankful for a wife, who tolerates the long hours, days away from home, and putting up with all the issues that that entails. A wife who is as dedicated to these endeavors as I am. I am thankful for a job that I have such a passion for, I don't feel like I've worked a day in the past 17 years. My hope for this Thanksgiving and Christmas season is that you can look, see, and count the true blessings that no amount of money can buy. Happy Thanksgiving and a very Merry Christmas season.

Rick Hairston

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Dear Santa, For Christmas this year, I don’t need anything for me, because I am one of the lucky ones. I’ve gone from roaming the streets to having a great life, a great family and a very important job. Santa, every day I see more people who need a helper like me, and every day I see more wonderful dogs who need a purpose and a home. These nice people at Canines for Service work awfully hard to bring those two together, but I can see that they really need help. So this Christmas, here is what I wish for... •

A really big doghouse. By that, I mean one that’s around 10,000 sf. with warehouse and green space for us dogs to run in. With this, we could help so many more people get their service dog (the best gift in the world, in my opinion). It truly would be a “gift that keeps on giving.” I know this won’t fit in my stocking, but you can give www.caninesforservice.org.

More foster parents to open their homes to puppies as they grow up to be service dogs. I know they’d love making such a difference in someone’s life.

More volunteers to help plan events such as the Walk and Dog Dash and Poker Run.

More Walk participants and teams. Is there a better way to spend a Saturday morning than being at the park with your best friends?

Office supplies. Personally, I don’t see why, but these nice people seem to think they need them. Check out wish list and Amazon list at our website. I’ve been a really good boy this year. All I want for Christmas is for everyone to paw it forward. Okay, a stocking full of treats and a new ball would be nice, too. Chief Executive Pup,

Titus Service Dog Titus is waiting for the stockings to be filled. Will you help? TAILS

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Funders ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Bonner Family Private Foundation, Inc. Cape Fear Area Combined Federal Campaign Cape Fear Chapter of the National Defense Transportation Association Coastal Carolina Combined Federal Campaign Community Health Charities of NC (Onslow County Combined Federal Campaign) explore.org, a direct charitable activity of the Annenberg Foundation

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Federation of Women’s Clubs of South Carolina Hueston Foundation Inc. Jared C. Fox Foundation Marino Family Foundation within the Raymond James Charitable Endowment Fund North Carolina State Employee Campaign Planet Dog Foundation The Exchange Club of Charleston Triangle Community Foundation, Inc.

Train the Trainer Training the trainer to ensure quality standards of practice is as important as standards of practice for training the assistance dogs. Canines for Service Inc. has developed a curriculum of training for the service dog trainer. What started as a continuing education program providing educational benefits to the prison handlers, in 2011 the curriculum was expanded and approved as a United States Department of Labor Certificate of Apprenticeship (DOL) in Service Dog Technician. Now, the curriculum is approved in multiple states and approved as a Veterans Administration Education Assistance Program. The DOL curriculum is a comprehensive training program that takes a handler from basic handling knowledge to advanced training and partnering with a client, progressively over 18 months. Each handler works with one or more dogs during their training and must pass competency-based assessments throughout the curriculum. The training includes criteria for selection of dogs, training procedures and equipment, basic, intermediate and advanced

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commands and evaluations, problem solving, placement readiness for the working dog and evaluating and partnering of a service dog with a client. The handler must also be proficient in animal health and welfare, proper positive -reward training methods, documentation and record keeping, presentation skills, client review and matching with a service dog to meet their needs and training the client to work with their service dog. Since approval of the curriculum as an apprenticeship certificate, 16 handlers have successfully completed the program. This includes the staff trainer ensuring the handlers have met standards of practice. As the industry of service dog training evolves, it is the responsibility of the service dog providers to ensure that not only the dogs are trained to defined standards but the trainers are as well.


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Touching Hearts, Changing Lives It is an exciting time around Canines for Service when a person is partnered with their service dog. Team training, when the person learns to work with the service dog selected from them, is very intense. It is an emotional and physically exhausting time for the person receiving the dog, their family and the staff and volunteers of Canines for Service.

Advanced Trainer Donna Sweetman gives a kiss to Gilead before he goes to his person.

How does it all start? It starts with the commitment of a volunteer to open their hearts and home to raise and train a puppy. The volunteer becomes a foster family, and the staff at Canines for Service is then charged with finding a 7-11 week old puppy. Most often our puppies come from local shelters or rescues but there are times when a puppy is donated by someone whose dog had a litter. What does it take to be a Foster? Our foster families are individuals, couples, traditional or non-traditional families that have a willingness and desire to help someone else. The foster comes to regular classes that are held at our facility to train the puppy under our direction and guidance. Fostering a service dog in training is a gift of patience and love. The foster also makes a financial commitment for the costs of food and veterinary care for the pup. The foster will have the puppy with them for at least one full year, sometimes longer, before the pup transfers to another trainer.

ness for placement and the category of service work. How is the client matched with the dog? Applications are received from people needing a service dog and a careful review is done to ensure the person's needs can be met with a service dog from Canines for Service. If we can meet the persons’ needs, they are placed on a wait list. As a dog is nearing completion of training, we start to look at the dog for its size and skills and review our approved applicants to make a match. Once a match is made team training is arranged. What happens during team training? During team training the client is brought into the community to spend five to seven days to learn how to work with the service dog matched to them. It is an intense week of training for the person to learn the dogs skills, how to command and control the dog and how to use the dog to help them with their disability. Team training is also a chance for the donor of the pup and foster to meet the client. It is a time for the trainer to say good-bye and the team to celebrate the new beginning. We need You to be a part of this special gift of independence on four paws. Contact us to learn how you can foster a service dog in training.

What happens when the pup goes to another trainer? When the pup transfers to another trainer it will begin training in intermediate and advance skills. The foundation skills the foster family worked on with the pup and the socialization are key to preparing a wellrounded service dog. When the dog is nearing completion of training, an assessment is done to determine the dogs readiFoster Puppy Raisers work on commands with service dogs in training TAILS

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Teaming Up Canines for VeteransÂŽ partnered its' 26th Veteran with their service dog the week of May 5th in Charleston, SC . Cpl Keith Dodson, Military Police, retired, received service dog Asher and in just one day they were already bonding. Our trainer, Laura Conn told us "Asher loves his person already. He's wedged himself between the two front seats [of the van] to get closer to his guy and has been laying his head on his lap and shoulder." Keith and service dog Asher practicing skills.

Team training was a week long process of intense training for the new team. Training was held within the walls of the Naval Consolidated Brig Charleston as well as in the community. Generous support was provided by the Fairfield Inn & Suites Charleston North/University Area and Harry Barker Inc. with a gift basket of dog items especially prepared for Asher to enjoy with his new person. The changes that are affected with the gift of a quality trained service dog are not often measurable. Canines for Veterans maintains close contact with our recipient and yet, there are times when even we do not fully understand the benefit of the service dog for the Veteran as well as the family. Read about SSgt Dean Suthard, USMC retired, and the difference his service dog Esther is making in his life a year after receiving the dog in "Dog at end of leash gets second chance helping humans" PFC Rick Hayes, retired, enlisted in the United

States Air Force in 1985 and served his country for nearly three years as an Aircraft Mechanic. Injuries left him needing to use a wheelchair and limiting his mobility. Rick came to Canines for Veterans seeking the help of a service dog. In March of 2013, he received service dog Malachi. Malachi started his training in our Wilmington program and was transferred into the Canines for Veterans program when he was ready for advanced training and we were in need of a handler. Rick and Malachi were featured in a Live5News story, Veteran Getting Service Dog, that provided a good representation of the intense training that happens when a client is partnered with their service dog. Jeremy Moore, U.S. Army, received his service dog Artemas, fondly nicknamed Artie, in June. Artie is a little over 2 years old and came from New Hanover Sheriff’s Animal Control. He was trained at the Naval Consolidated Brig in Charleston by a military prisoner for 14 months, and is a very happy lab who wants nothing more than to work. Jeremy did a lot of research before selecting Canines for Veterans, and ultimately chose us because of our reputation, the fact that we use shelter dogs, that we work with military prisoners, and are ADI accredited. Since receiving Artie, Jeremy is able to go out more and has started to re-engage in life outside of his duties. Gunner's Mate Chief Jeannette Tarqueno, a wounded Naval service member, officially received service dog Gaza on August 26 after a week of team training. She hopes Gaza

Every Canines for Veterans Team Training is celebrated with a placement ceremony. L-R: CO Chad Bryant, SPC Jeremy Moore with Service Dog Artemas, Rick Hairston and Service Dog Titus


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will be able to provide more independence and comfort in her life. Tarqueno has served a distinguished career in the Navy for more than 11 years including service in Yokosuka, Japan at Joint Base Pearl Harbor - Hickam, HI and onboard the USS Port Royal. Jeannette was struck on the left side of her head by a 30-pound armored plate bracket that was falling from the deck above. Despite the limitations of her injury, Jeannette sets the example of overcoming one’s obstacles to conJeannette and service dog Gaza tinue to live even on an outing during team training with the challenges she has faced. After the injury, she took and passed her Chief Petty Officer exams, as well as competed in the 2012 and 2013 Wounded Warrior games as a key member of the Navy cycling team. Tarqueno said, "As service members, it is sometimes difficult to put aside our pride and ask for help." Jeannette reached out to Canines for Veterans with the help of Safe Harbor and her case manager. After completing an extensive application, which included a video and documentation that she was no longer deployable, she was approved for a service dog and matched with Gaza to help her overcome her limitations and achieve her goal of completing a distinguished Navy career. "The application process asks for a lot of information and the video was most challenging”, says Jeannette. “but many groups require a service member to travel at their own expense for a face-to-face interview. Canines for Veterans has found a way to make the application process work without the expense or loss of time to the Veteran.” Service dog Gaza will accompany Jeannette and assist her with her balance issues, PTSD and issues related to her traumatic brain injury at her new post in Rock Hill, IL. "It's a wonderful program. I couldn't be more blessed to have such an incredible companion." said Tarqueno. Twenty-eight Veterans have been served since the creation of the Canines for Veterans program in January 2008. As we enter into the sixth year of the program, two Veterans will be partnered with their service dogs in January 2014 bringing the value of services provided, including the training of the prisoners, to over $3.0 million dollars.

Bridging the Gap There comes a time when we must ask ourselves, are we doing enough? How can we reach more people with our services? According to the CDC, the number of adults with any type of physical functioning difficulty is 37.4 million. That represents 16.2% of the population. According to the American Humane Association, there are roughly 20,000 service dogs in the U.S., half of which are guide dogs for the blind. There exists an enormous gap between those needing to be served, and those we are able to serve. Just over 50,000 service members have sustained physical injury and over 100,000 are diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) further increasing the needs for skilled service dogs to serve our population. Now, add the fact that Veterans between the ages of 1824 posted an unemployment rate over 20% in 2012. That number will grow exponentially as American troops exit Afghanistan by 2014. Over the next 5 years, a million more service members will be leaving the armed forces, many under the age of 24. They will face many obstacles in finding full time employment. Canines for Service has great potential to begin to close these gaps. We are a leader in the service dog industry developing and maintaining high training standards, seeking and attaining full accreditation, developing a unique training model and training methods in our Veteran’s program, and receiving approval by the U.S. Department of Labor as an Apprenticeship Program for Service Dog Technicians. While these are major accomplishments, it is just not enough. We do not receive any federal funding. We do not charge a fee for our service dogs. Yet, the value of one our highly skilled dogs is over Anderson and his new service dog Gilead $40,000. We rely heavily on volunteers and the generosity of donors, grants and other sponsors to run our programs. Canines for Service has a plan to reach more people, but we will only be able to make it happen with YOUR help. Canines for Service has outgrown it’s facility in Wilmington, NC. A larger facility will allow us to change the model of our civilian program in order to train more service dogs in a shorter time frame. (Continued on page 8)

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Currently the wait for a service dog is 2-5 years or more. Additionally, having a facility would allow us to offer to both veterans and civilians the opportunity to learn how to train a service dog in a vocational training program. More service dog trainers and more service dogs being trained means more people can be served. Our Raise the Roof Campaign is the first step in the process. We are raising the funds needed to move into the larger facility and equip it with state of the art equipment. You can help us do that by donating safely and securely online right now. A larger facility is the most pressing need for program growth but there are many ways for people to financially

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assist Canines for Service. Here are just a few examples: •

$25 provides one month of heartworm/flea prevention for a service dog in training

$50 provides one month of premium dog food and treats for a service dog in training

$100 provides for the annual wellness examination and vaccinations for one service dog in training

$300 provides a customized harness for a person receiving their service dog

$1,200 sponsors one service dog in training for one year

$2,500 sponsors a Team Training for one person when they receive their service dog and train with it

Look into your heart and ask yourself how you can be a part of giving someone the gift of independence. And then, give at Canines for Service.

Achievements, Accolades and Awards Assistance Dogs International (ADI) Accreditation was achieved at the end of 2012 with official notice arriving just after publication of the 2012 newsletter. Canines for Service is the only North Carolina based service dog provider to achieve this very difficult process of accreditation. So, why is the ADI accreditation so important? For years Rick Hairston has talked Rick Hairston is pinned by about standards in the industry. Jeanie at the Daughters of ADI is one step in defining standthe American Revolution ards of training for service dogs and all organizations submitting for accreditation are assessed to the same standard. Many of the military bases are requiring that service dogs for our service members and Veterans be from ADI organizations and this past summer a bill was amended (HR 1627) which defined that the Veterans Administration requires service dogs for veterans be from accredited organizations. Why are standards important to the general public? When you are shopping or dining, you should be assured that the service dog that just entered the building is not going to be

disruptive to your experience or worst yet, cause harm to you or someone you know. As a client, the person needs to know their service dog has been trained to provide the services they need, that the dog is suitable to be in public, and is healthy. Standards are important to all of us as providers, clients and the general public. Recently Rick Hairston was appointed to the Board of Directors for Assistance Dogs International North America and will begin serving a four-year term in January 2014. With the service dog industry being 30-40 years old, the ability to help shape the future and define standards for both service dogs and trainers in the industry is important. Canines for Service is honored to have the co-founder serve ADI. This past May, Rick Hairston and Canines for Service was awarded the Daughters of the American Revolution Community Service Award. This is the first time in chapter history a non-member was awarded this national honor. The Community Service Award is for outstanding service to veterans. (Continued on page 15)


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From Shelter to Helper Over the years service dog providers have learned the traits and characteristics of a good working dog. Many programs have comprehensive breeding programs but for Canines for Service the investment into a breeding program was not something desired with the over population of dogs. Instead utilizing the shelter dogs that are abundantly available was much more desirable. Why? In North Carolina alone in 2012 the kill rate of animals in shelters was 61%.

64% of the shelter dogs are either placed or in

When Canines for Service was founded 18 years ago, a combination of breeder donated and shelter dogs were used with a higher percentage of dogs (75%) from breeders. The rate of breeder donated dogs that made it to placement was around 40%. In one year alone, six (6) two year old dogs were released from training due to hip or other health issues affecting our ability to partner approved applicants with a service dog and extending the wait time from two years to five years.

training

Within the last five years the use of shelter dogs has increased to 80%. Why the shift? Through training and documentation CFS has learned that 64% of the shelter dogs are either placed or in training and 36% have been released due to temperament or health (hip dysplasia, skin or food allergies). The success rate of placement increased by nearly 25% by using Litter mates Eli and Abner service dog in shelter dogs thus provtraining ing the benefits of investing into shelter dogs rather than a breeding program.

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The considerations made to use shelter dogs will depend on the model of the program. In our Canines for Veterans program dogs between one to two years of age are targeted. A modified Volhard temperament test is done at the shelter looking for a medium to high scoring dog. Certain traits are automatic disqualifications such as aggression to other dogs (fence fighting) or high prey drive. If the dog passes the temperament test it then goes to a local veterinarian and is brought up to date on vaccinations and then enters the training program for a trial period. If the dog does well during the trial period a hip evaluation by radiograph is done and if the results are good, training continues. Take for example what happened this past August. We selected a dog from the Colleton County Animal Shelter in Walterboro, South Carolina. Eli is a mixed of some kind, but happy and has a strong desire to work. He is one of those dogs that can spoil a trainer because if you show him a new task he gets it on the first try. On one of Eli's first big outings, he went to a Charleston RiverDogs game and you would have thought he had been to many before. Fast forward into September and our trainer gets a call from the same shelter. The shelter found Eli's brother roaming the roads and picked him up. After holding him for the necessary period the shelter called us to see if we were interested in him. The answer was yes. A bit underweight and not as confident as Eli, Abner joined the training program and is also on his way to becoming a service dog for a Veteran. Eli is targeted for placement in January, just 6-months after entering the program. And Abner, well, he might take just a little longer. Canines for Service is trying to do our part in valuing the shelter dogs for service dog work taking the dog from shelter to helper.


The Gift of Independence

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It takes up to three years to train a service dog, but you can help make a difference today by becoming a Continuing Companion. When you become a Continuing Companion your monthly gift will provide for a reliable stream of support that is vital to providing people with quality trained service dogs. Here Is How It Works • You determine the amount of your monthly donation, and you can change or stop it at any time. • Your credit card is charged on or around the same date each month and you’ll receive an email confirmation when charged. • Each January we’ll provide an annual giving statement for tax purposes. • Visit http://www.caninesforservice.org/Monthly_Giving and select the amount you wish to donate. Money Well Spent You can feel confident that your support is truly making a difference. As a Valued Partner of Guidestar Charity Partner, our organization has been reviewed by an independent sector and has met a high standard for transparency. At Canines for Service 91% of every dollar donated directly supports the programs and services. A Reminder of How Important You Are Canines for Service is not funded by insurance or the government and we receive no tax dollars. Please give locally to support programs and services in your own community. PLEASE MAIL TO: CANINES FOR SERVICE, PO BOX 12643, WILMINGTON, NC 28405 or give online at WWW.CANINESFORSERVICE.ORG  $25  $50  $100  $250 $500  $1000 Other $______  Please add me to your e-news: Email: _____________________________________________ Payment Options:  Check enclosed for $______________ payable to Canines for Service Charge my credit card:  Visa  Mastercard  American Express  Discover for the total of $ _________. ___________________________________________________ Credit Card Number Expires 3 digit security code

Donate in honor or memory of a loved one The gift is  in honor or  in memory In recognition of a  person or  pet Name: ______________________________

Name on Card_______________________________________

____________________________________

Donor Information Name _____________________________________________

Please send the acknowledgement to (no amount will be mentioned in acknowledgement):

City__________________________________ State _________

Name: ______________________________

Zip ____________ Daytime phone ________________________

Address: _____________________________ _____________________________________ City: _________________________________

Give online! It’s easy and secure: www.canineforservice.org/Donate 56-2118748 Canines for Service Inc.

State: ________________ Zip: ____________ This tribute is from: ____________________ ______________________________________


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With a Lile Help From Four Paws Canines for Therapy had a fantastic year in 2013 thanks to our generous and numerous volunteers who have a heart for service! Canines for Therapy is now being taught in four different locations in the Carolinas – Wilmington, Raleigh, Smithfield and Charleston. Our therapy team family has grown to approximately 225 Blazer working with a child in active teams with 72 new the Canines for Literacy program teams passing certification in 2013. Canines for Therapy teams have reached out to hundreds of people in hospitals, nursing homes, schools, long term care facilities and rehab facilities just to name a few. Our Canines for Literacy teams had hundreds of books and thousands of pages read to them in schools and “Zellie and I have very good news! We libraries throughout 2013 have been accepted as volunteers in both New Hanover and representing Canines for Therapy at Pender counties. The CaDuke Cancer Center and Duke nines for Literacy Library Hospital with their Pets at Duke!! We program expanded to reach have been through intense orientation children at three additional libraries and we are workand could not have achieved this ing on building the Canines without the wonderful training we for Literacy program in received with Teamworks Training and Brunswick and Pender especially Christie Canfield. We were Counties as well. on a volunteer list with Duke for over

two years!! Zellie and I are thrilled and the experiences at Duke are the most gratifying ever! .�-Beth

Some exciting events in 2013 included stress relief therapy visits to college students at Duke and Wil-

liam Peace Universities and visits with the Special Olympics Camp. The dogs are always popular with the campers at Special Olympics and for some of the participants it is the first time they get to interact with dogs. The college students loved the pet therapy visits and the dogs provided a much needed distraction and relief from the pressure of final exams. When the colleges called to schedule therapy visitations for the December exam period, our therapy teams stepped up and filled all the time slots in less than 24-hours. It is so popular with our Canines for Therapy teams that we had to ask if additional teams could help! Canines for Therapy is looking forward to expanding the program further with outreach to train pet business owners to become certified therapy teams and instructors for our program. For the literacy program we are preparing a 16-passenager van to become the mobile reading lab and already have e-readers thanks to the generous support of the Landfall Foundation. The van just needs a bit of a face-lift to be ready to get on the road in our community reaching and serving more children so they can experience the wonders of reading. Do you think you and your dog have what it takes to become a Certified Pet Therapy team? Classes are ongoing, so check the website for more infor- Nothing like a hug from a fourmation about how to legged friend when the stress is enroll. It’s easier than mounting you think and the affect you will have on the lives of others is immeasurable.

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Donor Appreciation Nov 1, 2012 – October 31, 2013 Continuing Companions Sue Ann Almeter Neal & Elizabeth Andrew Kristin & Mark Ashton John & Cheryl Beall Peg Beam Phyllis & Raymond Becker Shelia Brothers Serge Carriere Suanne Echavarria Russell Dixon Allen Feezor Tracey Hensley Robert Hopson Cindy Horton Claudia Nolan Jim & Jean Popp Merry Rife Charles & Cynthia Straney Melissa & Jack Thomas Bobby & Pricilla Watson Jody White Harley Owners Group NR#2000 Road to Emmaus

The gifts of our generous donors make it possible for us to continue to fulfill our mission

Continuing CompanionsCanines for Veterans Jeff & Libby Berk Katherine Feast Raise the Roof Alfred Artale Stephanie Cable Laura Conn Heather Conn Karen Corum Madeline Daugherty Judith Girard Pat & Rick Hairston Michelle Hunting Laura & Jay Kranchalk Ann Lee Blanche Lloyd Lori Love Abbigayle Lucke Deirdre Maxwell Peggy Meddaugh Caitlin Morissette Betsy Nixon Christine Sears Kathleen Smith Nancy St. Claire Diane Tarqueno Jeanette Tarqueno Leslie & Ellis Tinsley General Robbie Adams Karen Anderson Kristin & Mark Ashton Bob Austin Barbara Mahoney Baker Michelle Bannon Robert Barkalow Mary Alice & Allen Baumgardner

Jill Blackman Glenn Blackwood & Kristen Rowe Barbara Blaisdell Ann & Raymond Borelli Christy & Mike Borst Michele Brown Lee Broyles Jewell Bryant William Buchanan Thomas Byrd Linda & Tim Calhoun Stuart Callari Nancy Carson Elizabeth Caulder Bud & LindaChadwick Sabrina Chike Lisa Clemente Eric Cleveland James & Madelyn Clow Susan Colby Heide Catherina Coppotelli Jean-Claude Corbi Charles Craft Virginia Craft Frank Crandall Janet Crowe Edward Cukauskas Caprice & Steven Curtis Charlotte Davis Tia Davis Beverly delMoral Melissa Devane David Dickson Patty & Brian Dickson Karen DiDomenico Stephanie DiStasio Deborah Donnelly Deborah Dowd Barbara & Jerome Duncan Jeanie Duvall Katherine & Walter Engle Beverly Esser Rebecca Evans Montese & Walter Fishel Robert French Christopher Freshman Susan Freyburg Anthony & Jane Galasso Jennifer Garay Kane & Terri Gaskill Sherron Gleim Joy Gochman Dane & Patricia Goodlin Suzanne Goree Jay Gowdy Dawn Greenberg Louise Guardino Nicole Guite Edward Haberberger Robert Hadfield Pat Hairston Kelly Hall Whitney Hammett Earl Hannon

Mary Ann Harris & Emma Nord Hearnshaw Estate Amber Hegler Ellen Heinberg Ann Henderson Tracey Hensley Renee Hobbs Annetta Horner Pamela & Phillip Humbaugh Kristy Irish-Becker Stephen & Ingrid Jaffe JapaJag Foundation Adam Jennings Marie Johnston Sharon Kalivoda Roy Kaplan Christine Kibler Benita Kinlaw Olivia Koenig Laurie Kroner D. Jeanne Laurain Donna Lee Phyllis Leimer Martha LeVasseur Ann Lewis Marcia Lytton Dee & Rick Maier Jocelyne & Ross Marino John & Julia Marshall Melanie & Sam McDonald Joan McGraw Cliff McLawhorn Wendy & Wendy McLawhorn Kristen Meaders Lil Mercer Tracy Miller James Mohs Mary and Dan Montimurro Judy Morris Lisa Morris Mary Beth & Daniel Mosca Marion Murdoch-Small Emily & Jeff Murtha Claudia Nolan John Nolan Matthew Overby Raymond Owens Jerry Panz Ashley Parker Tom Parmenter Dot & Rusty Pendleton Jennifer Pittman Earla & Mike Pope Nan E Pope Lisa Potter Nancy H. Pritchett Glenda & Michael Pryor Becky Raynor Anthony Repicky Merry Rife Steven Robertson Dana Rogers Jillian Roth Stephen Royal (Continued on page 13)

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Donor Appreciation (Continued from page 12)

Nancy Sheerer Joseph Silva KatieAnn Skogsberg Kale Smith Nancy Smith Basha Staub Greg & Terry Stier Karen Stroud Julie Therkelson Dennis Tomaso Joan VanCourt Tracey Varga Markus Warwick Irene Webster Henrietta Wildeboer Gordon Williams Saundra WIlliams Ellen Willoughby Gillian Winslow Crystal Woods Heather Woody Charles & Gail Younts A Proper Garden Allstate Giving Campaign Business Planning Coach Chords for a Cause Creekside Veterinary Clinic, PA Fuzzy Peach GE Foundation Good Search Grace United Methodist Church Greenwood Pet Camp Harrika's Brew Haus L+D Publishing LLC Money Mojo Morpho Designs Progress Energy Razoo Sand Dollar of Southport, Inc. Shallotte Rotary Club, Inc. Shell Island Homeowners Association Southeastern Cardiology Support the Fallen The Post and Courier United Daughters of the Confederacy, Ch'ston CH.4 United Way of the Cape Fear Area Urban Country Designs Ltd. Walgreens Charleston Westminster Presbyterian Church Whole Foods Market Coastal Carolina Women's Club GE United Way Campaign United Way of the Cape Fear Area Canines for Veterans Judith W. Adams Charlene Adkins Charlene Adkins Roy & Janet Andersen Joyce Ann

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Nov 1, 2012 – October 31, 2013

David & Leslie Brady Leslie Brady Jennifer Brown Todd Brown Samuel Brubaker Ellis Caniglia Nancy Carson Douglas & Leila Chevalier Leona & Robert Ciszewski Aileen Condon Paulette Craig Judy Eiscle Virginia Foreman Julia & William Freeman Patricia Gooding Gale Grafe Dominick Grosso Dollie Hallman David Hamburger Thomas Head Susan Herndon Sharon Hoffman Barbel Huesken John Ingalls Janice Kelly Mary Koob Kevin Lee Kristen Lee Aimee Liddle Phyllis Linville Rick Lowndes Barry & Sharon Lynn George Marshall Constance Mason Mr. and Mrs. Brian J. McMerty Dale & Terry McMichael Daisy Miller Jean & Max Minkin Joan Naugle Jill Nickerson Michael Nickerson Capt. Robert Norris Carol Norris Kathryn Ormsby Frederick Osborn Kelsey Perry Marjorie Petersen Jean Prevatte Mary Roden Robert Rosato Jamie Sieja Diane Smith Alan St. Clair Jeremy Tomlinson Paul Winters Lillian Wister Rob Yammine Brunswick Town Chapter NSDAR Charleston Dog Show Charleston Exchange Club Auxiliary Charleston Riverdogs Civitan Club of New Bern, Inc.

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Dominick's Italian & American Deli Durham Vietnam Veterans Chapter 530 East Cooper Newcomers Club Enfuse Technology Solutions Evolve-Tec LLC Friends of NCVMA Foundation Harry Barker, Inc. Lead Dog LLC National Defense Transportation Association NC Roadrunners Club South Brunswick Islands Womens Club Susannah Smith Elliott Chapter DAR Susi Hamilton for NC House The Palms of Mt. Pleasant Resident's Association VFW 10624 Woman’s Society of BatesburgLeesville General Federal of Womens Club of SC-Paws in Action Jo Ann & Joe Bolchoz Malcolm & Sandy Burns Charles H. Euten Cary & Renee Hickman Michael & Nikki McDaniel Gary Reash Carol & Joe Ross Carol & Gary Echols Salley Jarrett St. George Womens Guild Marianne Albrecht Trudy Bauer Synita Gardner Lois Ann Hesser Christina O'Quinn Bethany United Methodist Church Women's Club Charleston Federation of Womens Clubs Charleston Junior Woman's Club General Federation of Women's Clubs of SC Junior Womans Club of Easley Lexington Woman's Club Woman's Club of Rock Hill Woman's Study Club of Ridge Spring Woman's Club of West Columbia Corporate Sponsor Saint Harry Barker Inc. Partner Best Friends Animal Clinic Elementis Chromium

Champion Stevenson Direct Fundraisers Jiacamo Appice Edward Borden Grant Caulder Bill Durkin John Flanagan Marc Glenn Ron Magadieu Jamie Moore Pete Pappas John Prince Stephen Prophater Kale Smith Bill Williams Bark for Brews—Charleston River Dogs Burrows Elementary School Charleston Dog Show Charleston Riverdogs Chords for a Cause Civitan Club of New Bern Creekside Veterinary Clinic Easter Bonnet Parade Fitness Mastered Fuzzy Peach—Porters Neck Grace United Methodist Church -Alternative Gift Market General Federation of Women’s Clubs of South Carolina— Paws in Action Greenwood Pet Camp Lights on Brevard Morpho Designs NC Runners Club—Run for the Roses Pet Expo RunRaleigh Races LLC Ruck for the Wounded Smokin’ in the Carolinas—JR Tobacco of Burlington, Inc. UNCW Students Dog Wash Urban Country Designs LLC Wholefoods Market Veterinary Services A Country Veterinarian Animal Medical West Best Friends Animal Clinic Four Paws Animal Hospital Myrtle Grove Animal Hospital Needham Animal Hospital Honorariums-Canines for Service Mary Alford in honor of Laura Turk Robert & Drusilla Barkalow in (Continued on page 14)


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Donor Appreciation

Abbot Weatherly, George Williams

(Continued from page 13)

honor of Bob & Nancy Barkalow Pat & Tom Butler in honor of Mollie Barnette Polly Chamberlain in honor of Dr. Carroll P. Osgood Michele Clancy in honor of Pat Hairston Ruth Clark in honor of Linda Noel Ashley Dorman in honor of Andrew Dorman Amanda Earnhardt in honor of Gina Safrit and Mary Jane Safrit Sarah Barker Edgerton in honor of Pat Edgerton Elizabeth Eggleston in honor of Troy & Maxine Wheeler Marian & Robert Elmore in honor of Honor of Dr. C.C. Fenno, Jr. Theodore Givler in honor of Sara DeWolf Stewart Greer in honor of Gerald and Cheryl Popovec Eileen Gregan in honor of Leslie Smith and Issac Pat Hairston in honor of Christina Prange Susan Hatch in honor of Ray and Nancy Symons Ingrid Jaffe in honor of Liz Jaffe Stephen Jaffe in honor of Liz Jaffe Edward Johnston in honor of Garham Tinsley & Esther Myrna Joseph and Don Joseph in honor of Mike & Chris Jones; Floyd & Elisa Van Buskirk; Paula & Dave Ordrichek Judilin Kerr in honor of Lt.Col. & Mrs. George M. Kerr James & Peggy Mahony in honor of Joe & Nancy Stoner and their girls Judith & Michael McGrath in honor of Tim and Robyn McGrath Fred & Stehanie Meyers in honor of Stepanie Meyers Emanuel Miliotis in honor of Bob & Lynette Forrest Veronica Nelson in honor of Melissa thomas Pamela & Dan O'Connor in honor of Joan Johnson David Onofrio in honor of All our wounded warriors Blaine Parks in honor of Janet Charbonneau D. S. Peterson in honor of Crystal Walters' birthday Debra Potts in honor of Katrin Hybarger Christina Prange in honor of Pat & Rick Hairston Carolina Priester in honor of Anne & Ben Porter Karen & Charles Reap in honor of Karen & Charles Reap Donna & Joe Repicky in honor of Pat & Rick Hairston Megan Rhea in honor of Barb and Gary Morris Megan Rhea in honor of Larry Rhea Ann & Bob Roscow in honor of Jo Cary & Tom Chock, Danny Cary, Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Miles & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Bill Gray & Family, Mrs. Denise Weatherly, Mr. & Mrs. David Mastrangelo & Family, Miss Jill Watherly, Mrs. Charles Roskow, Mrs. Diane Franklin, Mr. & Mrs. Larry Ford S. L. Sauer in honor of Bailey M. Ricketts William Schaefer in honor of Leslie Schaefer Rebecca Simmons in honor of Sarah Himmelhoch Nancy & Nelson Smith in honor of Wedding of Lora Morningstar & Richard Moyer Frances Snavely in honor of Jim and Alice Pate Bill & Marty Stanfield in honor of Mr. & Mrs. Robert Hobson and Mr. And Mrs. C. Heide Trask Robert Staples in honor of John David Staples Honorariums-Canines for Veterans Sandra Giese in honor of Jamie McKanna Lois Gruendl in honor of Dr. and Mrs. Charles Reap Kenneth C Kaufman in honor of Pam Kaufman Jaci Masztal in honor of Susan Stille Jerry & Christine Sanford in honor of Kirk Havens Christine Sanford in honor of Pete & Letty Ann from Waylon Leslie Smith in honor of Pat Hairston's Airedale babies New Bern Civitan Club's Veterans of WWII in honor of Art Behrer, Bernard Dougherty, Eddie Eddleman, Alvia Hearren, AL Friedlander,

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Pet Honorariums-Canines for Veterans Connie Poore in honor of Sheena Karon Adams in honor of Sheena Memorials-Canines for Service Ann & William Boewer in memory of Vernon Harness Donald Dow in memory of Susan Kadala Deb Dowd in memory of Margaret Ann McCall Barbara & Ronald Downing in memory of Kimberly Benton Paula & Jim Farlow in memory of Melvin "Benny" Mann Pat & Rick Hairston in memory of Teresa & Joe Nowak Cinna & Michael Hatcher in memory of CW3 Kevin Hatcher Beth & Henry Hawthorne in memory of Stedman Gage and Anne Craven Dorothy Jamison in memory of Benny Mann Elizabeth Jordan in memory of Patsy Anne Jordan Dorothy & Phillip Kadala in memory of Susan Kadala Ann Roskow in memory of Marilyn Leindecker Wanda Lewis in memory of David A Lewis Martha Lurie in memory of Jean Coffey Bill Mathews in memory of Richard Nor-fleet Robert McConnell in memory of Melvin "Benny" Mann Ron & Cynthia Moyer in memory of Melvin "Benny" Mann Darla & Steve Murphy in memory of Aquilles Karl & Suzanne Nagle in memory of Benny Mann Jean Naughton in memory of Jean Coffey Mark Palkovic in memory of Marie Cirone Mark Palkovic in memory of Robert Smith Mark Palkovic in memory of Sammie Thomas Shessler Palkovic in memory of Marie Cirone Thomas Shessler Palkovic in memory of Robert Smith Joan Powell in memory of Bill Maier Lucia Robinson in memory of Penrod, Sooner and Katie Mcculloch Norma Smith in memory of Robbie Mary Ann Dicker in memory of Ben Sparenberg William Stickle in memory of Susan Kadala Eve Turek in memory of Susan Kadala Amy & Douglas Vallette in memory of Benny Mann Deborah Warner in memory of Kenny Leitch Memorials-Canines for Veterans Walter & Mary Ann Dicker in memory of Jim Chilson Edwin & Elaine Harrington in memory of Dorothy Sandlin Barb & Fredrick Osborn in memory of Lt. Cmdr Thomas B. Cullen (US NAVY Retired) Robert Staples in memory of John David Staples VFW Ladies Auxiliary 10624 in memory of Pat Carwells Pet Memorials– Canines for Service Kristin & Mark Ashton in memory of Blinkin Kitty Martha & William Boney in memory of Jericho Michele Brown in memory of Molly Michele Brown in memory of Suzy Lucy Bush in memory of Flash Pat Butler in memory of Molly Muff Clark in memory of Mystery & Blue Neal Andrew in memory of Buddy Eleanor Covan in memory of Covan's Captain Rusty Cae Emerson in memory of Kingsley Cae Emerson in memory of Presley Henry-Emerson (Continued on page 15)


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Donor Appreciation In Memory of the ones that served…. 'Well done, good and faithful servant! ‘ Matthew 25:23

Lily

October 31, 2013 (Continued from page 14)

Deborah Gandy in memory of Oreo Jane Garrett in memory of Li'l Girl Elizabeth Glover in memory of Juneau Pat & Rick Hairston in memory of Calah & Delta Mae Jeannie Jones in memory of Woodrow Elizabeth Keller in memory of Karly Barbara Kuhn in memory of Tucker Barbara Kuhn in memory of Mookie Anne Leaser in memory of Beefy Phyllis Meole in memory of Charlie Deborah & Michael Mullen in memory of Molly Thomas Shessler Palkovic in memory of Sammie Jennifer Sauceman in memory of Buddy Martha Scarlett in memory of Doc James & Jane Suits in memory of Blue Frank & Glenna Tichy in memory of Laci Frank & Glenna Tichy in memory of Merlin Frank & Glenna Tichy in memory of Simba Deborah Warner in memory of Faith Dan Warnes in memory of Cruiser Keller Construction Services, Inc. in memory of Karly Pet Memorials– Canines for Veterans Cheryl Forester in memory of Whiskey, Sadie and Ben Best Friends Animal Clinic in memory of Kayella, Hunley, Trixie Best Friends Animal Clinic in memory of Babe, Max, Brutus and Hershey Best Friends Animal Clinic in memory of Kiko, Tippy, Shem, Sugar and Sugar Best Friends Animal Clinic in memory of Max, Rocky, Bubba, Skylar, and Molly Best Friends Animal Clinic in memory of Puddin, Sandy, Lucy, Muggs, and Cooper Robin Meehan in memory of Bell Rebecca Robbins in memory of Bell

Eden

Nov 1, 2012 –

Matching Gift Program Bank of America Bayer Health Care Match Bristol-Myers Squibb GE Foundation Give with Liberty-Liberty Mutual GlaxoSmith Kline Global Impact—Pitney Bowells Johnson & Johnson McKesson Foundation c/o JK Group Inc. Progress Energy Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Foundation Triangle United Way Verizon Foundation Gifts-In-Kind Air Compassion for Veterans All About Dogs Candlewood Suites-Northwoods Carrabba’s Italian Grill CBS 10 WILM Dog Living Fairfield Inn—Charleston SC General Federation of Women's Clubs of SC Holiday Inn Express & Suites— Ashley Phosphate Charleston SC Jameson Inn—Wilmington NC Wilmington Orthotics & Prosthetic Rescues/Shelters Adopt-An-Angel Colleton Animal Shelter Doc Williams SPCA Francis R. Willis SPCA New Hanover Sheriff’s Office Animal Services R.A.C.E. Inc.

Joy

(Continued from page 8)

President and CEO Rick Hairston was honored on June 8th in Greensboro, NC by the AMVETS. Canines for Service received the NC Battleship Award distinguished service to the military for our Canines for Veterans program. It is always our honor to serve our veterans with a quality trained service dogs to assist them in regaining as much independence as they once knew. To learn more about Canines for Veterans visit our website.

Jacob

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Fundraising Fun What fun we had at the 2013 Canines for Service Walk! Despite the weather report threatening torrential rains, hundreds of supporters came out with their dogs to support Canines for Service. For the first time we added a Dog Dash - a 2 mile fun run with your dog, no timing, no pressure, just fun! Everyone who ran had a chance to win a prize. Thanks to our GREAT sponsors, we are able to hold this event annually. We will be doing it again, and in 2014 we are adding more fun activities to do with your dogs. Don’t miss it! The 2014 Walk & Dog Dash will be held on March 29, 2014 at Hugh MacRae Park in Wilmington. Sponsorship and vendor opportunities are currently open. It is a great way to reach the community and support a great cause at the same time. Canines for Service would also like to thank the many groups who held fundraisers on our behalf. The support of groups in our community and beyond is important to us and essential for the people we

serve. These included Bark for Brews— Charleston River Dogs, Burrows Elementary 2013 Walk and Dog Dash School, Charleston Dog Show, Charleston Riverdogs, Easter Bonnet Parade, Fitness Mastered, Chords for a Cause, Civitan Club of New Bern, Creekside Veterinary Clinic, Fuzzy Peach—Porters Neck, Grace United Methodist Church -Alternative Gift Market, General Federation of Women’s Clubs of South Carolina—Paws in Action, Greenwood Pet Camp, Lights on Brevard, Little Chapel on the Boardwalk— Vacation Bible School, Morpho Designs, NC Runners Club—Run for the Roses, PayPal Giving Fund, Pet Expo, RunRaleigh Races LLC, Ruck for the Wounded, Shell Island Resort—Guest Bartender, Smokin’ in the Carolinas—JR Tobacco of Burlington, Inc., UNCW Students Dog Wash, Urban Country Designs LLC, and Whole Foods Market.


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How Do I Say Good-bye? To experience the loss of a loved one is to know the depth of grief and despair, the ache and the longing for one more kiss, one more hug, one more I love you. To those who have known the unfailing love of a dog and to say good-bye is to know the emptiness and heart ache like no other. To long for one more happy greeting at the door, one more bark, one more tail wag, one more lick on the face or one more moment of snuggling close….

Delta Mae May 22, 2002—October 18, 2013

"...love knows not its own depth until the hour of separation." Kabil Gibran

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We confide in them, we cry to them, we feed them, walk them and care for them. They make us laugh, frustrate us at times and give us the gift of deep and unconditional love.

Many of our supporters have come to know the happy, perky face of Delta Mae. A fixture at the Canines for Service events for years, the neutral of all neutral dogs for our therapy classes, the lover of children and puppies, oh how she loved puppies! Delta Mae became the icon of our pet therapy program. What many do not know is Delta Mae was an unruly puppy; jumping on everyone, mouthing her happiness. At almost 2 years old Delta Mae settled down when I got serious about becoming a Canines for Therapy team. You see, my friend Carol had received a terminal diagnosis and was losing her 7-year battle with breast cancer. Delta and I started visiting Carol in her home and Delta Mae instinctively knew that Carol was fragile. She would gently rise on the sofa and give Carol a kiss on the cheek and run over to Carol’s husband and play robust with him. When Carol entered into the Lower Cape Fear Hospice and Life Care Center, I made arrangements for Delta Mae to visit her friend. We had just finished our training as a therapy team and our first “job”

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was a gift from the heart. Delta Mae and I shared Carol’s last nine days. We would arrive and Delta Mae would climb into bed and lay by her friend. Carol would pour her heart out to Delta Mae. We laughed, we cried, we loved. And, in the final moments, Delta Mae laid by Carol’s side with her head in her hand as Carol took her last breath. A gift from the heart that was a gift from Carol to Delta Mae and me. Carol made me see what this special little dog had to give to others; her love. And, in Carol’s memory, we gave. Delta Mae and I enjoyed five-years of visits at hospice. Delta brought comfort to countless families and laid with many people as they took their final breath. She gave love; the one thing she was best at giving. This past February Delta Mae was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. Her big heart was indeed big, but not in a good way. We nursed her, gave her medications, brought her to countless veterinary appointments, fed her home cooked foods, cared for her, carried her when she needed us to, and gave her all that we could. On October 18th, as Rick and I held our sweet girl in our arms, we said good-bye to her and let her go. My sweet Delta Mae, you knew instinctively that I was yours and you were mine. You came to me in a time I deeply needed your love. A bond deep beyond what most people can understand or will ever experience. You led me to experience what I never thought I would. You are my once in a life time, my eternal heart dog. Delta Mae, Melta Dae, Radar, MaeMae, Beautiful Girl, Butter. How do I say goodbye to the one that has been my light of my heart, my one and only MaeMae. You loved unconditionally and as I felt the last flutter of your heart beat I must remind myself of God's promise that we will walk together again. We love you always.


Canines for Service Inc.

Board of Directors

Joe Stoner—Volunteer

Janet Charbonneau, Chair

Nanc Stoner—Volunteer

Sabina Newman, Vice-Chair

Newsletter

Deborah Crowder, Treasurer/ Secretary

Pat Hairston, Laura Kranchalk, Christy Borst

Steve Jaffe

Member of

Shawna Rogers

Accredited Member, Assistance Dogs International

Staff Rick Hairston, President & CEO Pat Hairston, Program Manager Laura Kranchalk, Office Manager

PO Box 12643 Wilmington, NC 28405 Phone: 910-362-8181 E-mail: information@caninesforservice.org

Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce Association of Pet Dog Trainers

International Association of Canine Laura Conn, Instructor-Service Dog Professionals Technician Network for Good Caroline O’Brien, Trainer—Canines for Service North Carolina Center for NonProfits Christy Borst, Admin. Assistant Reading Education Assistance Dogs®, Affiliate program

Trainers Megan Crayton– Volunteer

Special thanks to outgoing Board of Directors Chair, Jim Ware, for his leadership and volunteerism. Changing Lives, Four Paws at a Time

“Service to a just cause rewards the worker with more real happiness and satisfaction than any other venture of life.” -- Carrie Chapman Catt

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