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Spring 2018

Paths for All Newsletter

Featuring:

Stirling Community Hospital Health Walk

Plus: • Launch of Walking Football Scotland and lots more...

pathsforall.org.uk


Footnotes Spring 2018

Contents 3-4 In the news Features 5

Let’s get physical Shaping Scotland’s physical activity policy

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World-leading access Celebrating the 15th anniversary of Scotland’s Land Reform Act 2003

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Walking works wonders Our Spring Workplace Step Count Challenge begins on 30th April

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Walking football support Launching a new charity, Walking Football Scotland

10 If you want to get well, get walking Stirling Community Hospital Health Walk 12 Recognising the outstanding contribution of volunteers Pictures of our walking champions 14 Active Environments Path maintenance and technical advice 16 Improving paths in Kirriemuir Woods A Community Paths Grant allowed this woodland path to be upgraded Regulars 18 Word on the street Your letters, emails, comments and tweets 18 Packed Lunches 19 Poetry in Motion 19 The Quiz

Dear reader Welcome to the Spring edition of Footnotes. It features projects we support that are working hard at making everyday walking fun and accessible. There’s Health Walks for frailer adults at Stirling Community Hospital – see page 10. The Care about Physical Activity (CAPA) programme is linking care homes and very sheltered housing staff to their local Health Walks – see page 4. New charity, Walking Football Scotland is increasing the number of walking football sessions for men and women – see page 8. Our Spring Step Count Challenge starting on 30th April gets staff active at work – see page 7. Last year’s Spring Step Count Challenge attracted 4,663 participants in 963 teams who walked 2,147,483,648 steps or 960,843 miles which is the equivalent of walking from Land’s End to John O’Groats 865 times! Most entrants were women. A survey of 553 participants showed that 81% of respondents were physically active for more than 30 minutes, between 5-7 days each week, after the challenge. Many people also took the opportunity to socialise more with friends and work colleagues and spend more time with their family. Make your spring a social one by getting out walking more.”

Ian Findlay Yours sincerely

Chief Officer

On the cover Pictured are walkers Liz Ivatt and Jean Smith (L-R) of Stirling Walking Network’s Community Hospital Health Walk. Earlier this year the walking group were saddened to learn of Jean’s death. The 91-year-old had previously praised other walkers, saying: “With living alone, it is nice to get out and you get to know people really well. There are such nice people that come on the walk, I’ve made friends. They collect me and drive me to the walk. There’s no excuse not to come.” It was not surprising that many of her fellow walkers and dedicated Walk Leaders attended her funeral to celebrate her life. Read more about this Health Walk on page 10.


Footnotes Spring 2018

In the news... Funding for Health Walks in South Ayrshire South Ayrshire Council has received £10,000 from our Walking to Health grant to further develop their Health Walk network. We are working in partnership with the Council's Sport and Leisure team to improve physical, social and mental health and well-being by providing a range of new Health Walks, workplace walking programmes and training for Volunteer Walk Leaders. Schools are set to play a key role with the Council keen to involve children and young people.

Find out more about the Health Walks on offer using our online map at pathsforall.org.uk

More Dementia Friendly Health Walks

for every ability at The MoonWalk, ranging from 6 to We now have over 130 Dementia Friendly Health Walks 52 miles. Join thousands of taking place every week across women and men wearing decorated bras, as you walk our 22 Dementia Friendly through the streets of Walking projects. Edinburgh from Holyrood Park at midnight, taking in some of the city’s most famous sights. Register at walkthewalk.org

Walk in the Park

Disability Sport Fife (DSF) has teamed up with Fife Walking Currently, 17 projects have for Health programme, Bums been officially accredited as off Seats, to encourage less offering Dementia Friendly active and inactive members Walking. These projects have all to consider walking as part made practical considerations of their everyday routine. to make their walks more This initiative is part of the accessible and friendly. Get Out Get Active (GOGA) in Fife programme which DSF Doreen Rankin joined one of Beating breast has signed up to with support the Health Walks in June last from Spirit of 2012. GOGA in cancer year and she is really feeling Fife will inspire children, young Sign up for The MoonWalk the benefit: "I was finding that people and adults with a I wasn't doing enough exercise Scotland on Saturday 9th June physical, sensory or learning and set yourself an amazing and felt that it would disability to access and enjoy walking goal! encourage me to be out and active recreation. Organised by our Step about throughout the year. I DSF is offering 500-metre Count partners, breast cancer enjoy the company of walking charity Walk the Walk, this in a group and I always feel iconic and fun night-time event much better for having had some fresh air for the hour we has raised £20 million since 2006. Most of the money stays are out. I have recently in Scotland to help improve the completed a Paths for All lives of people with cancer. course which I found to be There is a walking challenge very informative and useful.”

Walking everyday, for a happier, healthier Scotland

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Footnotes Spring 2018

walks to several forthcoming sports events. • Fife Cross Country Championships, 17th May, Beveridge Park • Fife Track and Field Championships, 13th June, Pitreavie Athletics Stadium. To register please contact Norma Buchanan by email at norma.buchanan@fife.gov.uk

Active Highland Strategy launched Paths for All was delighted to attend the launch of the Active Highland Strategy in Dingwall. The Strategy to promote physical activity across Highland was drawn up by a partnership chaired by NHS Highland which brought together a broad range of community planning partners and other key stakeholders from the statutory and voluntary sectors including Paths for All. The overarching aim of the Strategy is to reduce inequalities and encourage and enable people to stay active throughout their lives. The launch event included a short Health Walk led by volunteers from the Step It Up Highland Dingwall group and a marketplace where all the partner organisations had information stands. These included Partnerships for Wellbeing and the Cairngorms National Park Authority which manage the local Health Walk projects Step It Up Highland and Active Cairngorms Health Walks, both of which receive our Walking for Health grants. 4

Care sector links with Health Walks Care staff in Aberdeenshire are being encouraged to link with their local Health Walk, to consider how walking could benefit staff and their older adults, and, to train as Health Walk Leaders. These developments are part of Care about Physical Activity (CAPA), an improvement programme led by the Care Inspectorate to help older people in care to move more often. Paula Bisset, Improvement Adviser for CAPA in Aberdeenshire, explained: “Carolyn and Angela from Mowat Court in Stonehaven did the [Walk Leader] training in January. Carolyn was able to support John, who has been with them in respite, to attend the walk, with the hope that he will be able to continue to walk with the group when he is back home with his wife.” Carolyn, Lifestyle Co-ordinator at Mowat Court, said: “It’s great to be linked with the Health Walk now and I’m looking forward to seeing how I can support our residents to walk a little more.” Meanwhile, Allachburn Care Home in Aboyne and Dalvenie Gardens very sheltered housing in Banchory joined forces for a walk at Potarch. Residents and tenants of both complexes met up with staff and family members for a stroll along the forest trails, walking bingo and nature spotting, followed by refreshments. With the support of Paths for All and their local Health Walk projects, Allachburn and Dalvenie Gardens are looking at ways of using walking to support physical resilience and develop more opportunities to connect with each other. The walk will now be a monthly event in their calendars, linking with families, schools and other community partners.

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Footnotes Spring 2018

Let’s get physical Paths for All supports policies that make it easier for people in Scotland to include walking, cycling and active travel in their daily lives. Being physically active improves our quality of life and walking is the easiest way for most of us to get more active, but we can all do with a bit of support in this. That might mean better environments in our towns that make walking more pleasurable, the opportunity to take part in a led walk or just having better paths and green spaces around where we live. These things don’t just happen, they are often the result of government policies, strategies, funding and legislation, which is why we are striving to ensure that our priorities are reflected in these. Our strategy sets out the main themes for this, walking for health, developing active environments and active travel, and these are the focus of our policy work. The benefits of this work may not become apparent for some time as things like behaviour change take time and commitment. Key policies that we have helped shape in the past and now promote through our work are the Physical Activity Strategy, originally published in 2003, that forms the bedrock for the Scottish Government’s Active Scotland Outcomes Framework, the National Walking Strategy, the Cycling Action Plan for Scotland and the Long-Term Vision for Active Travel in Scotland.

More currently, we are making an input in several policy areas, including consultations on diet, activity and healthy weight; tackling social isolation and loneliness; the National Transport Strategy Review and the new Planning Bill. We also engage in regional and local delivery of policy, for example, through development plans, city deals and physical activity and active travel strategies. The Scottish Government uses data from the Scottish Household Survey to monitor progress in promoting physical activity. It does seem that things are going in the right direction. Scotland has, as a nation, become more active over the last five years according to this data. This increase, interestingly, has been driven by a rise in recreational walking. The percentage of adults who

Walking is for everyone, everyday, everywhere.

walked for more than 30 minutes at a time for recreation in the last four weeks has increased since 2012, from 59% to 67%.

“”

Scotland has, as a nation, become more active over the last five years

While women tend to be less active than men, they are walking more than men. The survey also tells us that while older people are less likely to be physically active, the proportion that are active has been increasing since 2007 and again this is primarily due to an increase in walking. Those living in deprived areas of Scotland or suffering from a long-term health condition are also less likely to be physically active. 5


Footnotes Spring 2018

World-leading access to world-beating nature It’s the 15th anniversary of Scotland's Land Reform Act 2003. This is legislation that helps everyone benefit from access and activity in our natural environment. Since our establishment in 1996 Paths for All is proud to have been involved with the successful implementation of the Act and Scottish Outdoor Access Code (SOAC).

“ ” We have come a long way and achieved much in the first 15 years, but there is always more to do.

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We have come a long way and achieved much in the first 15 years, but there is always more to do. There are many people who don’t know about their rights and responsibilities under SOAC, so the long-term education programme from SNH, delivered through countryside rangers and other organisations, still has a significant role to play in

promoting, protecting and upholding those rights and responsibilities. We look forward to being involved in promoting the great opportunities we have for everyone to enjoy experiencing our amazing landscapes, parks, beaches, hills, rivers and forests, and to value, respect and uphold the rights and responsibilities we have.

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Footnotes Spring 2018

Let walking work its wonders Our workplace Spring Step Count Challenge will begin on April 30th. Time to get your pedometers at the ready. Lasting for eight weeks, the challenge involves participants tracking their steps using activity trackers, pedometers and smartphone apps, and recording their activity on our Step Count Challenge website. Sign up as part of a team of five, take the opportunity to socialise with colleagues whilst walking, motivate each other to walk more and track your team’s progress on our leader boards. There’ll be weekly competitions and prizes to be won – in previous challenges these included photo competitions, favourite walk competitions, and walk to work challenges, with prizes such as Hunter boots, Fitbit activity trackers and even GoPro

cameras up for grabs. Weekly step goals will also be set online, which are based on your activity levels during the first week of the Challenge. You can also record running, swimming and cycling activities too. The Step Count Challenge team will keep you up-to-date with the latest leader boards, competition details, walker’s stories and more through twice weekly emails throughout the challenge. We’ll also be tweeting and instagramming. You can find us on Twitter at /step_count, through Instagram at /stepcount and on Facebook at /PathsforAllScotland The Step Count Challenge encourages people to walk

Scotland has superb walks everywhere.

more and feel healthier. Walking is a great way of meeting the recommended guideline of 150 minutes of moderate physical activity per week, and health benefits of being physically active include a 40% lower risk of Type 2 diabetes, a 35% lower risk of cardiovascular disease and a 30% lower risk of depression and dementia. Taking part in weekly walking activities also improves focus and concentration at work, gives you an opportunity to have fun with colleagues and helps you feel less stressed. You can sign up to our Spring Step Count Challenge online at stepcount.org.uk 7


Footnotes Spring 2018

Walking Football Scotland, a new charity established to encourage older people to stay involved in physical activity for longer, was officially launched in Stirling in December by Aileen Campbell, Minister for Public Health and Sport.

Teaming up to support walking football The sport has grown rapidly across Scotland allowing people to reignite their passion for football, despite age, injury or illness, simply by slowing things down. In addition to a multitude of health benefits, walking football is a perfect opportunity for players to meet more people and make new friends.

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The project has been coordinated by partners including Paths for All, Age Scotland, the Scottish FA, and the SPFL Trust as part of the Scottish Government's Active Scotland strategy. At the launch, two of Scottish Football’s most inspirational figures, Rose Reilly, World Cup Winner and

trailblazer of women’s football, and former national team manager Craig Brown, were appointed patrons of the charity. Also attending the event was 88-year-old Bert Cunningham from Edinburgh who is the oldest regular player in the country. Gary McLaughlin, Chairman of Walking Football Scotland

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Footnotes Spring 2018 Pictured left to right are Derek Allison SPFL Trust, Ian Findlay Paths for All, Gary McLaughlin Walking Football Scotland, Brian Sloan Age Scotland and Andy Gould Scottish FA.

“”

There is a genuine buzz for the sport’s future

of Walking Football Scotland and we look forward to seeing it grow and flourish.” The new organisation already has 63 member groups with more than 1750 players who take part in regular sessions both indoor and outdoor. Walking Football Scotland has groups across Scotland from Stornoway down to the Borders. More information can be said: “We are delighted to have into a more active lifestyle found on the charity’s website again. so much support for Walking “There is a genuine buzz for walkingfootballscotland.org Football in Scotland. It has on twitter @walkingfootscot the sport's future and we're been amazing to see the or on Facebook delighted to have played an number of clubs grow with @walkingfootballscotland. integral role in the development more men and women playing each week “Walking football is a fantastic game. I play myself and would urge anyone and everyone to find their local centre. Go along and give it a try. The groups are very welcoming, and anyone can take part no matter age or ability. Apart from the fitness benefits, it’s a great way to make new friends and have fun.” walking Ian Findlay chief officer for your way Paths for All, said: “We’ve long been advocates of walking as Pictured are Walk Moray Volunteer Health Walk leaders the way to a happier, healthier nation and walking football is with our certificates which were presented with our free the perfect way to encourage gifts at a volunteer thank you lunch in Elgin. people to get off the sofa and

Everyday walking is the way to a happier, healthier life for everyone.

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Footnotes Spring 2018

If you want to get well, get walking Tricia Cumming, project coordinator with Stirling Walking Network shares how the successful Stirling Community Hospital Health Walk was developed. This Health Walk started out of a desire to engage with the NHS physiotherapy team based at the Stirling Community Hospital (SCH) and to have a shorter walk to cater for some of our frailer, older walkers who over time were no longer able to attend their usual Health Walk.

“ ” The walk soon developed its own identity and grew in popularity 10

Discussions took place with local GPs, the main team of physiotherapists and the Reach physiotherapist team who run the rehabilitation strength and balance classes at the Rehabilitation Hub at SCH. It was decided that Monday from 11am until 11.30am would be a good time for the walk, followed by refreshments at the RVS café. The walk soon developed its own identity and grew in popularity. We regularly have 25 walkers and it has also now become dementia friendly.

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Footnotes Spring 2018

Physiotherapists referred clients to us but some of the walkers came from the Rehabilitation hub classes, mainly because after the walk had finished, some Volunteer Walk Leaders visited this class and took the participants for a short walk to build up their confidence. Often, they would bring these people to the RVS café in the Hospital and introduce them to the existing walkers, who in turn would encourage them by saying: “I was there not that many weeks ago and I thought I wouldn’t manage this walk, but the Leaders have been so patient with me and I am now starting to build up my confidence and increase my fitness levels. I can manage the short walk no bother now.” We are very fortunate to have an exceptional team of Walk Leaders on this walk and they thoroughly deserved to be nominated for the Stirlingshire Voluntary Enterprise Inspiring Volunteers awards 2017 in the Outstanding Achievement in Health and Wellbeing category. They not only lead the walks week-in-week-out, but they bake cakes for walkers’ birthdays. We celebrated two walkers’ 90th birthdays last year and they organised a Halloween and a Christmas party too! Jimmy commented that: “I wouldn’t miss my Monday walk for anything.” This gives you a hint of the fun and camaraderie of the group. For many of the walkers who live alone, this is a lifeline both physically and socially.

walking your way The Clydebank Live Active Health Walk that started as the germ of an idea in early 2011 has now blossomed into a very successful walking group, so much so that in January the group celebrated their 500th walk.

Walking everyday, for a happier, healthier Scotland

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Footnotes Spring 2018

Volunteers recognised for their outstanding contribution We handed out over 300 certificates of recognition to volunteers nominated in our 2017 Volunteer Awards. Here’s a snapshot of some of these walking champions.

Stan Thomson, Volunteer Walk Leader with Banchory Health Walk project has been leading Health Walks since 2004. He is pictured with Kirsty Muirden, Aberdeenshire Health Walks coordinator at NHS Grampian.

There were smiles all round when Walk Leaders, Ian and Michael were recognised for being walking champions. They've changed their work shifts and overcome major illness to keep leading Glasgow's Pollock Health Walks with Good Move in Glasgow.

Community path volunteer Victor Reynolds (right) was presented with his certificate by Professor Max Taylor, Chairman Royal Burgh of Crail and District Community Council. Victor paid tribute to all the other people Walk Leader Brian Laidlaw with Good Move in Glasgow always who have maintained paths in has a huge smile on his face as he enjoys leading the Queen’s and around Crail. Park Health Walk and helping others to get active. 12

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Footnotes Spring 2018

Daniel Farquhar has been leading Health Walks in Bellshill with Get Walking Lanarkshire for more than 3 years. He is a carer for his elderly parents and even when his father was seriously ill, he managed to keep leading the Health Walk. He is very inclusive and makes sure that less fit walkers or those with disabilities in his group have an enjoyable experience, giving them time for a breather mid walk and seeking out routes that are interesting and without barriers.

Margaret, Pauline and John are committed and passionate Walk Leaders of the Donald Dewar Sports Centre walk in Drumchapel with Glasgow Life. Volunteer Walk Leader Steve Coomber (wearing the blue jacket) has been a major driving force behind the development of the Elgin Health Walk Group for the past 4 years.

Stride for Life project coordinator, Colin Melville was nominated for his outstanding work supporting volunteers with training and advice on how to safely lead a Health Walk and how to support and motivate walkers. Colin is pictured with Dementia Friendly Walk Leader Fiona Lough.

Margaret Muir (R) has developed Carnoustie’s Panmure Football Club’s Walking Football sessions ensuring everyone socialises after the game. Our 2018 Volunteer Awards open as part of Volunteers’ Week 1st – 7th June with a celebration event to follow later in the year. Be sure to nominate your Community Path, Walking for Health and Dementia Friendly Walking volunteers. 13


Active Environments

Footnotes Spring 2018

Improving the Clyde Walkway

The River Clyde Walkway is a 65km route from Glasgow City Centre to the World Heritage Site of New Lanark. It passes through some spectacular scenery and many interesting and important landmarks which offer insights into the rich cultural, natural and industrial heritage of the Clyde Valley. We are currently managing

a contract to improve a 1.3km section of the Walkway that was last worked on during the early 1990’s. This project is funded by Scottish Natural Heritage for South Lanarkshire Council with technical and administrative support from Central Scotland Green Network Trust. A new and innovative path construction technique is

being used to evaluate its effectiveness at upgrading existing path networks and utilising the existing path base material. Additional works will include installation of steps, drainage and directional signage. Once completed, a case study reviewing the effectiveness of this new technique will be produced.

Let’s get technical We offer free technical advice, support and training for community groups, community councils and development trusts looking to improve their path networks. If you require any technical advice to improve your paths, contact our Technical Officer, Graeme Anderson: graeme.anderson@ pathsforall.org.uk or on 01259 222 330. 14

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Active Environments

Footnotes Spring 2018

Road Safety Campaign Glasgow City Council is using our Smarter Choices, Smarter Places funding to run a road safety campaign in partnership with Police Scotland to influence better driver behaviour and improved road safety. The aim is to increase the numbers of people cycling because of safer roads. Look out for parking tickets and car park posters promoting better driver behaviour and active travel.

Path Skillz Our Active Environments team is offering an exciting opportunity to organisations across Scotland that work with young people, aged 16-25. Path Skillz is a 5-day learning experience which aims to equip young people with the knowledge and practical skills they need to successfully plan, manage and deliver a community path project. Over the course of 4 modules, participants will work in a team to problem solve and plan how they will upgrade a path in their local community before finally applying their knowledge to improve their identified path, gaining practical skills in the process. As well as developing skills in project planning, path management and community engagement, participants will be given opportunities to develop stronger communication, team work and presentation skills. If you are an organisation working with youth groups and would like to find out how you can get involved, email roxanne.kerr@pathsforall.org.uk or on 01259 222 395.

Scotland has superb walks everywhere.

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Active Environments

Footnotes Spring 2018

Funding makes Kirriemuir Community Woodland Park more accessible knowledge and skills to undertake such a project. We had an architect, an agricultural consultant, an accountant, a farmer, experienced machinery operators, and a forestry worker amongst our volunteers, as well as enthusiastic locals who wanted to make a positive difference to our environment." Westmuir Community Development Trust in Kirriemuir, Angus received funding from our Community Paths grants to improve their Community Woodland Park path network which had suffered from frequent flooding.

“ � Doing physical work out of doors was a pleasure for some of our more sedentary volunteers

Ian Cobb, Director with the Development Trust shares what the group achieved with a team of willing volunteers and funding for materials and equipment. "The upgraded 250 metre section of path now allows

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visitors to explore a hidden corner of our Community Woodland Park allowing access in all types of weather. A total of sixteen volunteers were involved in the project with ten or eleven working in the Park on each of our three work days. We all gained a greater understanding of the various processes involved in this project; from surveying and planning, managing the operations, operating machinery, to handling the materials. Working together on a worthwhile project gave us a great sense of achievement. Doing physical work out of doors was a pleasure for some of our more sedentary volunteers. The best thing about this volunteer project was the camaraderie. It is important to attract volunteers with sufficient

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Active Environments

Footnotes Spring 2018

Here are pictures from other projects that benefited from our Community Path Grants to make lasting changes to Scotland’s walking environment.

Clockwise from above: 1. Peffery Way Association, Highland 2. Earlston Paths Group, Scottish Borders 3. Catterline Braes Action Group, Aberdeenshire 4. Leuchie House, East Lothian 5. Sunart Community Company, Highland 6. West Ardnarmurchan, Highland

Walking is for everyone, everyday, everywhere

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Footnotes Spring 2018

Word on the street

Packed Lunches

Our social media pages are full of inspiring quotes and comments from walkers. Here are just a few examples: “Enjoying this more and more exploring new places and 'step counting' each day!”

Apple and raspberry strudel Ingredients 1 eating apple, such as Braeburn 55g frozen or fresh raspberries 2 tsp light soft brown sugar 25g sultanas ½ tsp ground cinnamon 2 large (approx. 48x25cm) sheets of filo pastry Rapeseed oil, for brushing Preparation 1. Preheat oven to 200ºC/180ºC fan/gas mark 6. Line a baking sheet with non-stick baking paper. 2. Peel, core and slice apple; combine with raspberries, brown sugar, sultanas and cinnamon in a bowl. Set aside. 3. Cut each sheet of filo pastry width ways into thirds, so you end up with 6 smaller rectangular pieces. Lightly brush 3 pieces with rapeseed oil; layer oiled filo pieces on top of each other on a sheet of non-stick baking paper. Repeat with remaining 3 pieces of filo to make 2 stacks of pastry. 4. Spoon some apple mixture down the centre of each stack of pastry, leaving a good border around edge. For each strudel, fold short edges in, then fold long edges over mixture to enclose filling completely. Pinch edges together to seal. Turn over and place, seam-side down, onto the baking sheet. Brush lightly with oil. 5. Bake in oven for 20–25 minutes or until crisp and golden brown. Remove from oven; once cool dust with a little icing sugar. This recipe originally appeared in Heart Matters, the British Heart Foundation's free magazine for people with heart conditions. Sign up for free at bhf.org.uk/heartmattersmag or call 0300 330 3311.

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Carol Anne, Healthy Valleys, South Lanarkshire

“The Stenhousemuir and Helix Buggy Walks have been absolutely outstanding. They are, without doubt, the best thing I've joined since having my baby. It's been so helpful to get out for a walk while meeting new mums. I've made some great friends and the chance to discuss things has been invaluable. I will be recommending it to every new mum I meet! I can't thank Barbara and Gillian enough for providing this opportunity.” Donna Nimmo, Step Forth, Helix Bairns

“I can’t walk but use a mobility scooter and the Leaders are great at finding where the lowered pavements are if there are steps to go a different route. I really enjoy the company and meeting new people.” Muriel Wilson, Put Your West Foot Forward

“Apart from compliments on the amazing difference the work has made to the area, the project has brought together residents who previously only met in passing and having worked together on the path has made new friendships and a community spirit of doing something for our estate.” Ballogie Community Association

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Footnotes Spring 2018 “I walk more regularly and for longer distances. Made new friends with common interests.” Fay Waddell, Walk It, Eyemouth

“The group helped me get my confidence back in taking walks. Heart failure had made me anxious about going [out] on my own so that my walking fitness and tolerance was poor. I am now more able to undertake regular walks with or without company.” Caroline Deerin, Get Walking Lanarkshire, Biggar Health Walk

Poetry in motion In the Valley of the Esk

by Jedburgh Walk It Leader, Stephen Smith The great, green rounded hills, Tightly squeeze the valley of the Esk, Where the river in spate hurtles on Down to its rendezvous with Ewes Water, And its final, destined emptying Into the wide Solway. On a sun-softened day, We walk the rough tracks and pathways Through dense and close-growing forest, Jungled along the wooded glen, Swift-sudden showers soak our faces – A natural cleansing. A group of surprised sheep Gather on the track, horns lifted, Defiant at first before they cut and run, No rams here to challenge our passing As we head on through lush abundance, By the clattering water.

The Quiz Fill in the missing letters to find 5 signs of spring you might see when out walking.

1. 2. 3. 4. c 5.

m f

d k

g

k s s

Send your answer to Sheena Corcoran at our Alloa office address – it is on the back page of the newsletter or you can email your answer to: footnotes@pathsforall.org.uk Your entry needs to be in by Friday 22nd June 2018 for a chance to win a £20 High Street voucher. Good Luck!

Congratulations! A. Bothin from Hamilton is the winner of a £20 High Street voucher for answering our winter quiz correctly. “Pace” was the missing word from the word search.

Shop We have a range of products in our online shop pathsforall.spreadshirt.co.uk Send your news, photos and poems to: footnotes@pathsforall.org.uk or post them to: Office 8, Forrester Lodge, Tullibody Road, Alloa, FK10 2HU by Friday 22nd June 2018 for the Summer edition and receive a £20 High Street voucher if your story is featured.

If you would like a printed copy of Footnotes please email footnotes@pathsforall.org.uk with your name and address, or telephone our office on 01259 218 888.

Everyday walking does you wonders.

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Footnotes Spring 2018

Looking to become more active? Try a walking meeting and move more during your working day. “This is better. Nice to get some fresh air while we discuss things”

Illustrations: Dan Parry Jones

“Ok, perhaps we should take a break. Stretch our legs for a minute”

Find out more about our workplace walking at pathsforall.org.uk

Contact us Paths for All (Head Office), Office 8, Forrester Lodge, Tullibody Road, Alloa FK10 2HU Tel: 01259 218 888 email: info@pathsforall.org.uk web: pathsforall.org.uk Keep up to date with us at: twitter.com/PathsforAll twitter.com/step_count facebook.com/ PathsforAllScotland instagram.com/pathsforall

walking your way Letham Happy Wanderer’s in Angus enjoyed a wintry walk around Forfar Loch.

Paths for All is a partnership organisation, for a full list of our current partners please visit: www.pathsforall.org.uk

Paths for All Partnership is a recognised Scottish Charity No: SC025535 and a Company Limited by Guarantee No: 168554 incorporated 19 September 1996 at Companies House, Edinburgh. Registered Office: Office 8, Forrester Lodge, Tullibody Road, Alloa FK10 2HU.

Footnotes Spring 2018  

Paths for All's newsletter is full of inspirational stories about people who are feeling happier and healthier from everyday walking. There'...

Footnotes Spring 2018  

Paths for All's newsletter is full of inspirational stories about people who are feeling happier and healthier from everyday walking. There'...

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