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marginalia

p. 496/8-10 p. 503/5-6

p. 503/18-20

p. 503/38-41

[Every modern logician recognizes that the foundation of the theory of induction is to be found in the theory of probability.] noted [Russell came to hold that a table is a class of appearances.]: This is about as near to the truth as a logician can come. Cf. Sartre: ‘L’essence d’un existant … c’est la loi manifeste qui préside à la succession de ses apparitions, c’est la raison de la série.’—L’Être et le Néant, p. 12.92 [the table is not the sort of object which could be directly presented, so that the table could not be referred to demonstratively.]: Sartre: ‘Mais, en definitive, l’essence come raison de la série n’est que le lien des apparitions, c’est à dire elle-même une apparition.’—ibid. p. 12.93 ‘Ce que paraît, en effet, c’est seulement un aspect de l’objet et l’objet est tout entier dans cet aspet et tout entier hors de lui.’—ibid. p. 13.94 [The table, he seems to suppose, is reached by an inference; but all inferences concerning that which is not purely formal, are liable to doubt; hence, he seeks to justify the inference.]: The table is not inferred: it is intended. Cf. Husserl: ‘In unreflective consciousness we are “directed” upon objects, we “intend” them, and reflection reveals this to be an immanent process characteristic of all experience… The perception of a cube, for example, reveals a multiple and synthesized intention: a continuous variety in the “appearance” of the cube… Observation of this “stream” of “appearance-aspects” and of the manner of their synthesis shows that every phase and interval is already in itself a “consciousness of” something, yet in such a way that with the constant entry of new phases the total consciousness, at any moment, lacks not synthetic unity, and is, in fact, a consciousness of one and the same object.’—E.B. article “Phenomenology”.95

92.  B&N, p. xlvi: ‘The essence of an existent … it is the manifest law which presides over the succession of its appearances, it is the principle of the series.’ 93.  B&N, p. xlvi: ‘But essence, as the principle of the series, is definitely only the concatenation of appearances; that is, itself an appearance.’ 94.  B&N, p. xlvii: ‘What appears in fact is only an aspect of the object, and the object is altogether in that aspect and altogether outside of it.’ 95.  E.B. = Encyclopædia Britannica.

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Early Writings (Seeking the Path - Ñāṇavīra Thera)  
Early Writings (Seeking the Path - Ñāṇavīra Thera)  

Part B includes two early essays (Nibbana and Anatta and Sketch for a Proof of Rebirth) as well as notes from a Commonplace Book and Margina...

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