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DESIGN IN HEALTH CARE:

Creating a better patient-centered experience.


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Don’t use words too big for the subject. Don’t say infinitely when you mean very; otherwise you’ll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. C.S. LEWIS

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Informational research diagram

Dr. Mark Rampton

Interviews

Health care admins

ibauhau5.tumblr.com

Free writes

Peter Jones

Institute for the Future

Dr. Rampton thinks the health care industry is heading towards a loss of personal connection. “The great thing about a good health care experience is the doctor’s connection with the patient.”

Admins tend to be resistant to change.

Admins are incredibly knowledgable.

Simple things tend to work really well.

Cloud computing

Paper dominates but most hospitals plan on merging to cloud based infrastructure.

Patch Leishman, Spring 2014

Design for Care: Innovating the Health Care Experience

“Toward a Science of Simplicity” George Whitesides TED talk

Oregon State University’s online database leads me to:

Initial searching leads me to:

We recognize simplicity when we see it.

Research begins - The following is a look at my research process and how I came to my final project.

Design question: Can graphic designers create a better experience for the patient, while utilizing current technology and design trends within the industry?

Creating a better patient-centered experience, informational research diagram

DESIGN IN HEALTH CARE:

April - Janurary


reflect on research

user-experience branding innovation technology attitudes communication

Relatable Crossovers:

“Usability Testing on 10 Cents a Day�

Creating a quick usability test using Qualtrics allowed me to make sure my intentions were being shown through.

Muse gave me a easy way to implement my design into a real html experience.

Utilizes the font that was the overall favorite amongst surveyors in my Experiment II

Muse implementation

Photoshop mockups

Aesthetics

Content development

Less about the Doctor, more about the patient

Persona creation helps me understand the user

Adaptable fonts

Preferred type of medical form

To read my full thesis, and a more indepth look at my process visit my portfolio at: PATCHLEISHMAN.COM

We are going to be met with resistance, have to take into account the current infrastructure, need to use accessible and intuitive design, must put the patient at the center, and we have to create discourse among all stakeholders

Cover Oregon site analysis

Experiment III:

Design in Health Care

Conclusion: In order to innovate the health care industry and create a better experience for the patient, we must first realize a few things:

Present project

Finalization

Site development

Sketches

Sitemap

Theme generation

Comparative site research

Target audience analysis

Concept development

Initial research

Efraze.com site redesign starts

Crafting my experiments for my final project

Experiment II:

Experiment I:

May - April June - May

Research paper completed!

Patch Leishman Spring 2014

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Understanding Health Care in America Spoiler alert: It’s complex. 66


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

The health care industry is fraught with complicated processes that are inefficient, dated, and fail to deliver a positive patient-centered experience. Health care is also a cross disciplinary field which makes communication difficult. So how can graphic designers effectively innovate the health care industry and thus create a better patient-centered experience? The first half of this book will address the current health care system in America, some of the barriers stopping a better patient experience, and how graphic designers can be better prepared to handle this exciting area of social design. Health care in America is a complex infrastructure that employs millions of Americans, all of whom are trying to achieve one goal: provide health care services in order to create a healthier America. But how well are those services being delivered? Is the patient getting the best possible experience? Do we have the patient’s every need at the center of the decision-making process? What about the many administrative tasks that are involved in health care? Many of these tasks rely heavily on paper forms, which are costly and non sustainable.

INTROSPECTION

Patient is not at the center of the health care experience

Can we as graphic designers use current technology trends to solve problems within the health care system? Can digital platforms help create innovation within the health care industry? I believe graphic designers can use their abilities to design a better patient-centered experience. Through a deep understanding of the patient, utilizing current technology, and embracing the entire health care infrastructure, we can create real lasting change, which can provide a better patientcentered experience. To understand how graphic designers can create a better patient-centered experience, we must become enlightened to what health care in America is like. To do so, we will begin by stepping into the shoes of Rachel.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

From the Perspective of a Patient 88


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Q: Can a designer create positive moods in a patient through targeted design choices? A: I believe we can, by understanding the patients needs and using those to help drive our decisions, we can thus create a better experience for the patient. Rachel is an everyday middle class American. She lives in San Francisco with Rachel is an everyday middle class American. She lives in San Francisco with her family, a husband who works full-time, and works part-time herself to help pay their bills. One Friday, Rachel visited her endocrinology specialist. Rachel suffers from a thyroid problem; on this particular visit to her physician, lab work was recommended. In the U.S., most physicians’ offices tend to do lab work their own way but in the case of Rachel, her doctor wrote her recommendation on a piece of paper. That paper was then copied, with the original being filed away, and the copy given to Rachel. It was then Rachel’s responsibility to take that piece of paper with her and give it to the lab when she arrived. As we all know, life happens—and we aren’t perfect. Along the way home she lost her form, which meant she couldn’t get her lab work completed. By the time Rachel called the physician’s office, they were closed. Since it was a Friday, Rachel had to wait out the entire weekend. Fraught with worries over what the lab results could be, she felt hopeless and lost. On Monday, Rachel got a hold of the physician’s office and was promised that her paperwork would be faxed over to the lab. But, like I said earlier, humans are not perfect. Because the administrator was stretched thin due to a colleague being sick with a cold, the administrator failed to remember to fax over the form. Finally, days after the initial lab work recommendation, the physicians’ office was able to make another copy and fax it to the lab. Needless to say, Rachel was extremely frustrated. These frustrations trickled down, from Rachel to the administrator, and could have ended up negatively affecting an entire group of people. All of this frustration could be fixed if we designed systems that took the patient into account.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Epic quote iminent.

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Patch Leishman Leishman

Design in in Health HealthCare Care

Spring 2014 Spring 2014

The innovator’s challenge in healthcare is not a technological fix – it is more to understand and preserve core values of human care while changing practices for durable social and economic benefit. DESIGNDIALOGUES

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Framing the Health Care Experience in America 12 12


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Can you see the many holes in the previous example? Paper trails, dependence upon office hours, and the reliance on human memory are all acting against Rachel and her health care. One of the main points is that although Rachel is a unique individual, her frustration is not. Many millions of Americans are dealing with processes in the health care system that are out of date and fail to create a positive patient-centered experience. But before we begin to think about innovating the health care experience, we must first accept a few things: •

Health care is a complicated matrix made of multiple stakeholders such as IT specialists, physicians, technicians, administrators, producers, insurers, human resource personnel, and last but not least, patients. 1

Any innovation that may threaten the productivity of one or more of these groups will likely be opposed to innovation. Typically those with power, (doctors, nurses, people who write prescriptions, or manage other people) want to keep that power. This means making any real innovation in health care is hard to achieve, but not impossible.2 Aside from the power struggle, the implementation of any change into the system will include increased costs and risks.

The health care industry in America, and more specifically, large scale institutions such as John Hopkins, or Kaiser Permanente, are wary of creating risk.3 When asked about where health care is headed in America, Dr. Mark Rampton, a physician in Corvallis, Oregon, said “With the Affordable Health Care Act, many large hospitals are trying to get as many people into their hospitals as possible.”4 Perhaps the possibility why these large hospitals are wary of creating risk is because they are trying to keep the processes the same while bringing in as many people as possible, the desire to make more money, or the avoidance to flak. (not wanting to be sued)

Health care is a business, and the more business you have, the more money you’re going to make. Unfortunately this kind of thinking is hampering any notable improvement upon a patient-centered experience. Because large-scale health institutions like Kaizer Permanente have a firm grasp on the industry, this makes it hard, but not impossible, for designers to come in and enact change.5 Graphic designers are becoming more aware of this barrier between innovation and design, which is why smaller design companies like +Citizen are making big progress in the health care scene. +Citizen doesn’t have a large overhead looming over them, and this means they’re able to think more innovatively about the overall health care experience.

+Citizen’s mobile health tracking app

+Citizen, based out of Portland, Oregon, is an interactive mobile design agency, and they’re beginning to approach views on health care from a different direction. Instead of waiting for an individual to get an ailment, they are taking a preventative approach. +Citizen developed what they call their Hercules program, allowing individuals to track their health levels such as biometric readings, caloric intake, and physical activity wirelessly on their mobile phone. Essentially, the individual is given the tools and information needed to stay informed about their own health, thus taking health care into their own hands. These tools can be delivered easily to individuals, and may even be implemented into a physician’s work-flow. Perhaps Rachel will one day see this application, or a variant of it, at her physicians office.6

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Barriers Between Health Care and the Patient 14 14


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

“...Hello? Is Anyone There? Guess I’ll Just Check WebMD.”

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Communication Breakdown We understand that health care in America is complex, and has many individuals at stake. We also know that innovation is going to be difficult to achieve. One of the biggest hurdles in reaching this innovation is a lack of communication between personnel in the health care industry. Open communication between the power structures of healthcare in order to create a universal discourse is necessary. To do this, we need graphic designers who can: create accessible communication channels, refine the ultimate goal of delivering a better patientcentered experience, and produce a simpler way of obtaining health care. In order to understand how graphic designers can create better communication between the entities in the health care sector, it’s important for us to know how communication works. Communication is a two way street, and no one understood this better than Ferdinand De Saussure, a well known linguist in the 1950’s. Saussure laid out the process of communication as such: • • • • • • •

Sound-images create an image and our brain processes those images. It takes time and energy to process this information. Communication requires at least two people. At the start, there is a mental fact, or concept, associated with representations of the linguistic sounds (sound-images) used for expression. A given sound-image unlocks a corresponding sound-image in the brain, which is followed by a physiological process. The brain transmits an impulse which is sent to the organs used in producing sounds. Sound waves travel from the mouth of one person to the ears of another. This process continues to the next person but the order is reversed.7

An Idea occurs and is sent through words

Saussure thought the physical (sound-waves), physiological (phenotation and audition), and psychological parts (word-images and concepts) to be the most important parts of the communication process.8 Indeed these concepts are key to transmitting messages, but the psychological aspect of communication holds a greater possibility for impacting social change which may lead to a stronger discourse within health care. We’ve been taught that big innovation can lead to social change, and getting people to think critically about something is one of the most effective ways of changing people’s behavior.9 But how can we as graphic designers get society on board with social change? To answer this we can look at two of the most dominant ways in determining whether a society responds well to communication. 1. Psychological Connections - such as thoughts, concepts, and ideas. 2. Execution - The actual process of communicating language. Execution is always individual and the individual is always its master.10

The Idea is received, interpreted, and another idea is sent back


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Q: Can functions of designed systems be transmited via semiotics? Furthermore, a key concept that Saussure said in regards to social acceptance of language was “Among all individuals linked by speech, some sort of average will occur.”11

We now know that language is a two way street, and can be accepted among all individuals if our speech is linked. This commonality of speech in a given populous may even lead to an increased possibility of social change and innovation. This is in part due to the ability of a given society’s ability to think and communicate critically about a subject. Currently in the health care industry, the discourse among all power structures is very fragmented. If we as graphic designers develop systems that facilitate strong communication among everyone, it will lead to innovation within the health care industry. Aside from communication, there are other barriers that inhibit a better patientcentered experience, such as the stigma that comes along with health records being made available online. In fact, the government has tried to make it easier with bills such as the recent HITECH Act (designed to promote and expand the adoption of health information technology in order to increase the usage of electronic health records).12 Many people see it as an infringement, or loss of security when records are made available to them online. Dr. Rampton, a primary care physician in Corvallis, Oregon, says that the fear of personal records being compromised has fallen into the realm of paranoia. So much so that it’s inhibiting some of his patients from utilizing a platform at his practice, (Corvallis Family Medicine) which delivers their health records online, at the comfort of their home.13 Today data encryption is the most powerful it has ever been. However, nothing in our digital age is 100% secure. Take for instance the recent breach of millions of Americans credit card information at Target. One of the biggest department stores in the world, Target is not out of reach from security breaches. If people want a better patient experience, and I believe we all do, we must accept that digital solutions aren’t perfect but are more efficient, better for the environment, and can handle larger amounts of people easier than current methods. Overcoming the stigma that virtual information and change is bad will be a difficult task, but we as graphic designers can do it.

A: The answer is yes, more and more our culture is being accustomed to the visual communication of signs and symbols as effective messengers. Perhaps in the future health care will utilize a universal system of symbols for communication.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

A Different Type of Health Care Experience 18 18


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

At the heart of this paper, is the concept of designing systems for the patient in order to create a patient-centered experience. We as graphic designers must retool how the health care industry approaches the idea of service giving. We must design systems, applications, and experiences that take into account everyone, while putting the patients needs at the center. Not an easy task, but it is one that is sorely needed right now in our country. We know for a fact that people are fed up with our health care system, which is why for the last decade people have been booting up their computers and surfing the web to research their symptoms in hopes of finding health care solutions. Rather than living in doubt, or scheduling appointments with a physician, people turn to the web for guidance. Sites like WebMD offer the health seeker an ability to gain real information about a wide variety of health care information. The idea of learning by action and collaboration with others is what two media theorists, Thomas and Brown, find so fascinating. Thomas and Brown proposed that humans are beginning to learn in a different capacity. Instead of using the classroom, or in this case the doctors office, they are using the internet, and the ability to collaborate with others to find solutions. Coined as a ‘massive information network’, Thomas and Brown found that people resonate more deeply with something that offers intrinsic value.14 Take for example, a person who researches a health condition on their own. Typically a health seeker will find quantified explanations by a real physician, who’s then given suggestions to implement. Then that person will either implement

Spring 2014

those suggestions or choose to ignore them. Theoretically, according to Thomas and Brown, because that person researched the information themselves they will take those suggestions far more seriously than someone who is flat out told what to do. Thomas and Brown believe an envioronment which cultivates collaboration and personal action, something special occurs which is so strong and compelling that it easily creates a collective network. You can see the importance of the idea of a ‘massive information network’ in the hopes of creating better discourse in the health care sector. Perhaps if we incorporate the ability to collaborate easily with each other, we can create systems that are dynamic and offer increased discourse. One company is attempting a collaboration approach while taking out the doctor’s office entirely. Zipnosis merging the gap between real physician care and the ability to stay at your home. Zipnosis, a web based health care platform is qualified to handle a multitude of clinical problems entirely online. Zipnosis CEO, Jon Pearce, says “If other telemedicine companies are like Blockbuster, Zipnosis is more like Netflix. We are web based and can be used on any device. We’ve been able to build a company that is a true digital platform between a patient and a provider. We are targeting more than just information – we are focused on diagnosis, treatment and triage.”15 In theory, this is a great way to treat people without having them wait in long lines and fill out complicated forms. However, Dr. Rampton believes this is a problem. When asked about companies like Zipnosis, he said he’s pretty strongly opposed to the idea of an online health care system. He believes there is something that you cannot get from a computer-tocomputer interaction (i.e. empathy). Will web based platforms take out the need for a doctor’s office entirely? It’s doubtful. There are some medical issues that are too complicated to get advice on over the internet. Will devices in the future be able to take readings from your home and send them digitally to a physician who can extrapolate the data and give an honest assessment? Now that is a possibility. We do know that technology is advancing at an impressive pace, and most of these new mobile and web based applications have one thing in common: damn good design. Their websites are responsive, their apps are clean, they are easy to navigate, their typography is impeccable, and many of them create interesting touch points to engage the user. I believe if we are to make any innovation within the health care industry, we will need to flex our design muscles, and tap into our userexperience know-how, because as I have discussed, health care is resistant to change.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

To Sum It All Up... 20 20


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

We know that in order to innovate the health care industry we must realize a few things first: We are going to be met with resistance We have to take into account the current infrastructure We have to use accessible and intuitive design We have to put the patient at the center We have to create discourse among all stakeholders

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Sounds complicated right? Well it is, but we as designers strive for a good challenge. We live to look at complex situations by delving deep into research, only to surface with fresh ideas that make a difference in peoples lives. According to Banny Banerjee, a professor at Standford ChangeLabs, we need to retool our entire business strategy. At an AIGA conference in 2012, he said that there are two types of strategies: 1. Red ocean strategies-meaning all the sharks are going to one area, and the name of the game is bigger and better marketing. 2. Blue ocean strategies-where in you use your ingenuity to create value. He also listed a few notable capabilities and attributes that we as graphic designers should be striving to achieve in the 21st century: • • • • • • • • • •

Gain an empathic understanding of the human condition Synthesize and pose the right questions Frame the goals and shape the intentionality Create a common forum for discourse among stakeholders Bridges between the high level and the tangible Clarify and visualize complexity Propose strategic visions, imagine new possibilities Generate innovative concepts and solutions in terms of the larger vision Implement the solutions, and maintain design integrity Create new values, behaviors, agency, and outcomes16

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

My Final Thought We truly live in an exciting time full of innovative possibilities. The world around us is practically begging for graphic designers to start making notable improvements in the social front. Utilizing our design abilities in order to develop a better patient-centered experience is necessary for the health care industry to thrive. Opening our hearts and our minds into the possibility of business and human condition being aligned is not a pipe dream, but rather a real future. If we as graphic designers are willing and dedicated to designing for the patient, then we absolutely can make a difference. It’s time we realize that money isn’t everything, and in order for our society to continue to develop and grow, we must be willing to tackle tough social problems. With resources being used up more and more everyday, we need sustainable alternative solutions that are incorporated seamlessly into our lives. It’s time we design for the patient and not the market.

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Citations 1. Jones, Peter. Design for Care: Innovating Healthcare Experience. N.p.: Rosenfeld Media, LLC, 2012. Print.Page 12 2. Ibid 3. Ibid 4. Dr. Mark Rampton. Interview. February, 2014 5. Jones, Peter. Design for Care: Design as Care. N.p.: Rosenfeld Media, LLC, 2012. Print.Page 19 6. “WHERE WE’RE HEADED Health & Wellness.” +Citizen. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://pluscitizen.com/themes/health-wellness>. 7. Saussure, Ferdinand De. Course in General Linguistics. New York: Philosophical Library, 1959. Print. Page 11 8. Saussure, Ferdinand De. Course in General Linguistics. New York: Philosophical Library, 1959. Print. Page 12. 9. Saussure, Ferdinand De. Course in General Linguistics. New York: Philosophical Library, 1959. Print. Page 22. 10. Ibid 11. Saussure, Ferdinand De. Course in General Linguistics. New York: Philosophical Library, 1959. Print. Page 13. 12. “Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 22 Feb. 2014. Web. 13 Mar. 2014. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_ Information_Technology_for_Economic_and_Clinical_Health_Act>. 13. Dr. Mark Rampton Interview. February, 2014 14. Thomas, Douglas, and John Seely. Brown. A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change. Lexington, KY: CreateSpace?, 2011. Print. Page 30. 15. “Alexisavvy | Healthcare It & Consumer Health Blog.” Alexisavvy Healthcare It Consumer Health Blog. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://alexisavvy.com/2014/01/23/founder-interview- jon-pearce-ceo-of-zipnosis-online-diagnosis-and-treatment-is-here/>. 16. “Video: Banny Banerjee.” AIGA. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://www.aiga.org/video-gain- 2012-banerjee/>.


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Bibliography “Alexisavvy | Healthcare It & Consumer Health Blog.” Alexisavvy Healthcare It Consumer Health Blog. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://alexisavvy.com/2014/01/23/founder-interview- jon-pearce-ceo-of-zipnosis-online-diagnosis-and-treatment-is-here/> “Communicating Information.” - Jisc InfoNet. N.p., 23 Sept. 2013. Web. 17 Mar. 2014. “Glooko.” Glooko. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Mar. 2014. “Institute For The Future.” IFTF: Health + Self. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Mar. 2014. Jones, Peter. Design for Care: Innovating Healthcare Experience. N.p.: Rosenfeld Media, LLC, 2012. Price, Emily. “Engadget.” Engadget. N.p., 6 Mar. 2014. Web. 17 Mar. 2014. Rampton, M. (2014, February 14). Personal interview. Saussure, Ferdinand De. Course in General Linguistics. New York: Philosophical Library, 1959. Print. Page 11. Thomas, Douglas, and John Seely. Brown. A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change. Lexington, KY: CreateSpace?, 2011. Print. Page 30. “Video: Banny Banerjee.” AIGA. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://www.aiga.org/video-gain- 2012-banerjee/> “WHERE WE’RE HEADED Health & Wellness.” +Citizen. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://pluscitizen.com/themes/health-wellness>

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792 px 612 px

DESIGN IN HEALTH CARE: Website redesign + labQ


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

What is usability?

A person of average ability and experience can figure out how to use the thing to accomplish something without it being more trouble than itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth. STEVE KRUG

(DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T MAKE ME THINK)

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Experiments

In order to better understand the direction I wanted to take for my thesis project, I set out to complete a series of experiments. These experiments dealt with a range of user experience related topics.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Public policy Responsive design Public opinion

Innovation Accessible Design

Social change Web-safe typographyWeb design Design for good

Health Care User Experience

Lakoff & Johnson Iconography Metaphors

Business emiotics

User-Interface Color theory Data visualization TED-X Linguistics

Digital Applications LiteratureUser-Testing

Information Design SaussureTouch Points Social demographics

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What is the psychology behind peoples choices?

Experiment 1: Preferred Form For this experiment I created a online and in person survey. The question I posed was “Upon your next doctors visit would you rather complete a paper form, digital form, google form, or doesn’t matter, and why?” I got over 100 responses and the results were as follows: 33 people prefer paper 45 digital 23 either 6 google Some of the reason why people chose paper were: What I’m used to / Easiest / Soothing Some of the resons why people chose digital were: Quicker / Saves paper / Data can be stored.

Results I found that it was quite split down the middle as far as what type of form people prefer. What I found most interesting were the reasons why people made the choices they did. Knowing the why helps me better understand the how. How do I create a better patientcentered experience? Insightful answers such as “I look at screens all day and there’s something soothing about writing on paper.”, gives me insight into how to design systems on a digital interface.


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

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Can a specific font create positive attitudes in a patient?

Experiment 2: Adaptable Fonts For this experiment I created a series of simple mockups for a site and paper forms, which used the same five fonts. The question I posed was “Looking at the following examples, rate them from least favorite to most favorite (based on legibility, and overall aesthetic) For your top pick what was it about that font the you liked?” I hoped to find out if I could created targeted moods through a font in order to make a patients attitude more positive, and can a font help create brand cohesion within health care. The typefaces people had to chose from were: Helvetica

Results Again, the reasons why were so interesting to me because they helped me understand why people gravitated towards the choices they did. Overall, the font most people chose was

Proxima Nova.

Proxima Nova

Some of the reasons why people chose this font were as such:

Chaparral Pro

“Cleanliness, comfort”

Clavo

“Light, energetic, honesty and authentic”

Bernino Sans

“Friendly”


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Positive attitudes created by the font helps prove my theory that fonts can create positive moods.

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How can a designer blend form and function in a mobile platform?

Experiment 2: Cover Oregon Analysis For this experiment I did a site wide analysis for Cover Oregon’s mobile experience. The question I posed was “Does Cover Oregon do a good job of creating a pleasant mobile experience?” I was trying to find out if a health care site was able to create a on-the-go experience that was fluid and intuitive for the patient. Some of the things I analyzed were: -Accessiblity -Impact -Language -Intuitiveness -Pace of information

Results There were a few things that Cover Oregon did well but there were far more things it did wrong. Some of the things I enjoyed was the use of large fonts (althought in some places it reverts to tiny text) and good spacing between elements. The things I found bad about the site was that it required you to use Internet Explorer during the registration process, even on a mobile phone. Big yield signs used for warnings create a bad attitude toward the site.


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

Spring 2014

Moving Forward I want to create something meaningful and desirable for people in need.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Project Scope

After analyzing the results from my experiments I came to the conclusion that I would redesign a doctors web site. The project scope would be to redesign a website for Elizabeth Fraze, a doctor practicing endocrinology care in the Bay Area. The website had to be approachable by a wide range of users, and allow the ability for patients to register online prior to coming in for their appointment.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

efraze.com, 2013

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Initial Research

I began by conducting a site wide analysis of the current iteration of the site. I took notes on where links went to, and the general flow that a user might take. In user-experience terms I did an out of box experience test. I recorded anything that came to mind.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

efraze.com sitemap HOME

About

News

Contact

Contact Form

Directions

Make Payment

New Patients

Literature

Registration

efraze.com navigation, 2013

The prominence of the doctor on the navigation system makes it seem more about her and less about the patient.

Observations Some things that stood out to me upon my initial experience on the site were as such: news seemed out of place because I wasn’t expecting a doctors site needing to have an entire page on news let alone having it be the second link to click on. Make a payment under the contact page wasn’t working because it was hidden, and would be better if it was made available in a clearer manner. Literature seemed like the wrong term to use for what it was intended to be which was a way for the doctor to post articles or information she thought would be beneficial to her patients. An easy fix would be to change it to blog. Another thing I noticed was the clear prominence the site places on the doctor which, makes it seem like it’s more about her than it is her patients health.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Concepting

In order to define the visual language of the website I had to have a clear understanding of the vision and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;voiceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of the site. When you boil it down to the bare essential you get the desire to help people get better.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

HOME

Contact

Registration

About

Online Form

Services

Directions

Health Blog

efraze.com proposed sitemap

Sitemap By creating a sitemap early on, it allowed me to have a clear indication of what the user was going to need from me as a designer and how they were going to experience it on the site. Some of the things I purposefully did was make the contact link the first thing patients will see so they know they can always find help quickly, and get rid of the payment feature. One of the last things I did was change the link literature to health blog in order to make it more clear as to what it was.

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initial sketch


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Photoshop was my ideal choice for designing the the wireframes due to its layer functionality.

Landing Desktop

About

Patient Registration

Wireframes Designing wireframes allowed me to get a good look at the user-flow (how the user will experience the site), without having to worry about the visual details.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

The experiments I did early on had a direct influence on my design choices. These experiments were based on user-experience, thus the choics that I made had a strong connection to the individual.

Spring 2014

This is very important because at its core, health care is an individual experience. While there are collective experiences shared in the process, largely you seek out better health for selfish reasons.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Headlines Sub Heads Body copy Dr. Fraze uses an approach thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s individual to each patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s situation. We understand that you have many choices when it comes to your health needs, and appreciate the consideration and trust you put in a healthcare provider. We look forward to helping you get your life back on track.

Typography The font I decided to use was Proxima Nova. It is a diverse family that translates incredibly well between print and screen applications.

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RGB: 101, 101, 101 CMYK: 59, 52, 51, 21 HEX: 656565

RGB: 89, 195, 221 CMYK: 58, 2, 10, 0 HEX: 59c3dd

RGB: 255, 255, 255 CMYK: 0, 0, 0, 0 HEX: ffffff


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Color Palette Creating a clean, calming, and healing color palette helped me produce positive feelings for the patient which helps enhance their experience of the site.

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Desktop navigation system

Typography hover states

ABOUT

Active

ABOUT

Hover

Although mobile devices canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t implement hover states effectively, desktop users have come to expect them. *Text inside colored boxes are white.

Navigation System Creating a flat navigation system was the logical choice for me. Keeping things simple and pure reduces confusion and the time it takes a user to think.


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Every moment we’re in a Web site, we’re keeping a mental running tally. It’s one of the main factors we use in deciding whether to bail out and deciding whether to ever come back. STEVE KRUG

(DON’T MAKE ME THINK)

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Imagery A large part of the research was spent looking at stock photos in order to help drive the vision of the site, which was to make it about the patient and less about the doctor. Images like this one help tremendously.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

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1.

1. Landing 2. About 3. Registration

Mockups Once I was settled on my wireframes and visual aesthetic I took to Photoshop to begin creating the look and feel of the website.


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

2., 3.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Device Mockups Comping out the website in actual devices helps visualize what the content is going to look like in itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s native environment.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Open space offers a clean aesthetic which helps create a positive attitude.

Conventional iconography helps strengthen the communication.

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Contact page


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

About page

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Environment Mockups Creating an environmental mockup helps me understand how the site translates to a mobile experience whether that be indoors or out.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Usability Testing

One of the last things I wanted to do was create a usability test to help determine if what I was designing was making sense to the user. I also wanted to make sure that the experience was pleasant and some of the intentional design choices I was making were showing through.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Scenario Question You have a friend who’s been talking to you about their endocrinology specialist (the study of hormones), and you’ve decided you want to check out their site and ask them if they’re allowing new patients. Head over to the website efraze02.businesscatalyst.com and perform this function. Q: How did you find the experience of trying to contact someone on the website? -Very straight forward -Button should be a little more visible. My eyes are drawn down to the blue icon. if the button is actionable, maybe it would be best to have it be blue as well. -Very easy. Was very visible. -Smooth and flawless -Very easy to find and straight forward Q: What did you think of the overall visual aesthetic? -open, easy to navigate and read, it feels ‘healthy’ -Clean, Inviting and professional. Makes me respect the practice due to their presentation -Clean, crisp, and welcoming, yet efficient. It is what I would want from a specialist in the medical field. -Good. Font was easy to read. Colors were pleasant to look at. The couple was a good visual. -Easy to read, easy to navigate. Colorful and fresh to look at. Q: Was the information legible and easy to understand? 10/10 said yes Q: Click on the area of the page that stands out the most.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Next?

The following is a rapid prototype I did for an application which utilizes finger print identification technology. The application lets patients log in with their finger and access their lab results in a clear and easy to understand manner. It also gives them the ability to request certain labwork without having to schedule an appointment with the doctor.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

labQ: labQ is a prototype application for the i-pad air 2. The application lets the patient use their fingerprint to log in making their labwork entirely secure.

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Labwork notification: Upon logging in, the user is greeted with a notification that they have labwork which needs to be authorized, thus giving power to the patient.


Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Labwork details: Labwork is laid out in a clear and easy to understand manner. The navigation on the left is simple and easy to understand. The patient has the ability to look at all their previous labwork if they so choose, as well as click deeper into work to get a visualization of their readings.

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Patch Leishman

Design in Health Care

Spring 2014

Thank you for taking the time to look through my thesis and process book. I greatly enjoyed my research into this exciting field of design. If you would like to talk to me about my research, health care, design, or any other topics, feel free to email me at patchleishman@gmail.com Sincerely, Patch Leishman

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DESIGN IN HEALTH CARE: Creating a better patient-centered experience  

Thesis project for my graphic design program. Oregon State University, Spring 2014.

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