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Nga Kaihanga Uku & beyond

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Nga Kaihanga Uku & beyond


Uku Rere

Pataka is proud to present Uku Rere: Nga Kaihanga Uku & beyond, a 27 year survey of contemporary ceramics by Baye Riddell, Manos Nathan, Colleen Waata Urlich, Wi Taepa and Paerau Corneal. Pataka has a long tradition of curating ground-breaking exhibitions of contemporary Maori art. This major touring exhibition of 60 handbuilt ceramic artworks sourced from public and private collections throughout New Zealand was developed in partnership with Toi Maori. The generous support of Creative New Zealand has made it possible for Pataka to tour the exhibition to seven venues around New Zealand. Uku Rere: Nga Kaihanga Uku & beyond illuminates the strength of the contemporary Maori ceramic movement in New Zealand. From Taepa’s chunky, rugged pots to the refined elegance of Nathan’s sculptural works, the exhibition showcases the remarkable vitality and diversity of the individual practices of the five influential artists. Over the last 27 years these artists have redefined and expanded ceramic art—imbuing it with indigenous concepts and a deep commitment to Maori culture. Riddell’s work embraces both Maori and Christian beliefs, while Nathan’s work is influenced by his father’s Maori identity and his mother’s Greek culture. Taepa combines innovative design with ancient Maori and Polynesian forms while Waata Urlich draws on the traditions of ancient Pacific Lapita pottery. Both Waata Urlich and Corneal are inspired by the powerful female figures, Mana wahine, in Maori creation stories.   The five artists are connected by their membership of Nga Kaihanga Uku, the national Maori clayworkers’ association co-founded in 1986 by Riddell and Nathan. The artists came together with the shared idea of making artworks in clay anchored in kaupapa Maori. Since then the organisation has developed a co-operative style of working and has provided a strong, nurturing environment for sharing knowledge and skills. While each artist has created a very distinct body of work, they continue to meet regularly, exhibit together and support each other’s work. Further, all five artists have engaged in significant cultural exchanges with international indigenous artists working in clay—an experience that has enriched their work. This important exhibition is the first major survey of contemporary Maori ceramics, and showcases the strength of Maori ceramic art in New Zealand’s contemporary art scene. Helen Kedgley director , pataka 7

left: Paerau Corneal Hinemanu, 1998 private collection

previous pages: Baye Riddell Seven Days of Creation, 2012 collection of the artist


Nga Kaihanga Uku

Ancestral guardians from the rising sun—to the setting sun, From the heaven and the earth joining at the horizon, Ancestral guardians—backward leaning, forward leaning, To the right of the heavens, There is a breathing, a murmuring, a reverberation, A quickening in the heavens, Here is your child, Safeguard it. translation of an ancient hawaiian chant polynesian religion published bishop museum 1927 E.S.Craighill Handy

For a seafaring migrating culture, the idea of a place called Hawaiiki or a place of origins has always had a flexible element to it. Through new technology and global travel, greater access to information reveals several connections with and similarities to a wide range of other indigenous cultures. What we know as Maori is a culture that evolved mainly in this land, Aotearoa. Traditional Maori culture had rituals that connected it with ancestors, beginning with the primal ancestors of earth mother and sky father, and reaching out across the history and life that Maori experienced both on the land and the sea. Early Maori were great navigators who travelled wide stretches of the Pacific Ocean by applying star navigation, knowledge of migrating birds, ocean currents, changing sea life, and the changing patterns and colours in the sky and sea. On the land the Maori became fearless warriors and protectors of their tribal family. Today Maori are of mixed heritage that includes many world cultures. Maori artists still work from the traditional base of their origins, learning and being inspired by the oral history handed down by their elders as well as rediscovering the missing links in their historical relationships with the South Pacific and the wider Pacific rim. This sense of strong identity enables contemporary Maori artists to openly interact with and belong to the rest of the world. The rapid rise and development of Maori clay art in the 1980s is celebrated in this exhibition. It is one of the most significant developments in the long history of Maori creative arts. The five artists, Manos Nathan, Colleen Waata Urlich, Baye Riddell, Wi Taepa, and Paerau Corneal, are the cornerstones of the contemporary 9

left: Manos Nathan Whakanuia ki Nga Rakau a Tutangimamae a, 1998 collection of darcy & anne nicholas


Maori clay artist movement. They guide and work with other Maori artists working in clay under the name of Nga Kaihanga Uku. Although leading Maori artists like Arnold Wilson, Cliff Whiting, and others used clay as part of their art form, it took second place to their specialist areas of wood, stone, paint, and fibre. Shona Rapira Davies created major clay pieces in the 1980s and together with Kura te Waru Rewiri completed Wellington’s Pigeon Park commission. At the same time, Manos Nathan, Baye Riddell, Colleen Waata Urlich, Paparangi Reid, Hiraina Marsden, Wi Taepa and Paerau Corneal had been quietly working away at their clay art as individuals. Nathan and Taepa had already established themselves as contemporary wood carvers and sculptors. This was to have a big impact on the sculptural forms that were to evolve as Maori clay art and gives it another uniqueness. Manos Nathan, the son of a Maori father and Greek mother, is acknowledged as one of New Zealand’s leading artists. He is a technical perfectionist and highly skilled sculptor in clay, wood, stone and glass. His celebration of his Maori and Greek cultural inheritance inspires him to create the extraordinary clay forms that make him a truly international artist. He and his brothers were taken to Crete by their parents in the late 1950s. He attended the commemoration of the Battle of Crete in 2001 and the veteran’s pilgrimage in 2006. In 1989, along with Baye Riddell, he was given a Fulbright Award to work with Native American clay artists. He has continued to travel and exhibit extensively in the USA and Canada, working with Native artists in both countries. Baye Riddell is an artist whose work emerges from the soul of the land and the sea. His work sings of the land, like the earth mother gently beating out her heart rhythms in order to gather in her children. At times a profoundly religious man, he has developed symbols and new shapes to his work that rationalise his oneness with universal concepts. More recently his work has taken figurative form with new symbols while at the same time keeping the organic and earthy feel which typifies his best work. Wi Taepa draws on a wide range of experience, from his Maori culture to his time in Vietnam as a soldier, his notable journey through Africa, and his long and close 10


association with Native American artists. He is a man who absorbs experiences and knowledge like a sponge. His clay masterpieces are a reflection of a complex personality that draws on his culture, past experiences and his instincts. The ‘imbalance’ of his artwork gives it the power and energy that can only be unique to a truly liberated and mature artist. Paerau Corneal is the youngest of the five artists recognised in this exhibition. She has a passion for expressing and acknowledging the mana of Maori women both in a traditional and contemporary role. Originally beginning her creative life as a weaver she moved into more sculptural forms in the early 80s, utilising the coiling method that helped her to create large and powerful female images reminiscent of modern versions of the paintings of Peter Paul Rubens. Her women are strong, fluid and firmly fixed to the earth, yet with the appearance of being intellectual and spiritual. Her more recent work incorporates all that has gone before her but she has added woven wire bird-like pieces that give the sculpture another life beyond the earthy clay. Colleen Waata Urlich is the senior artist amongst the group. A charismatic and driving personality, she typifies the strong women of the Northern Maori tribes. She is widely travelled and networked, and her work reflects her deep knowledge and experience of Maori and Pacific cultures as well as her chosen profession as an artist working in clay. Colleen works closely with Native American clay artists and has exhibited regularly in the United States and Canada with the other artists in this exhibition. Like Paerau Corneal, the past and present strength of Maori women and their role in modern Maori society inspires her work. Her work is carefully conceptualised and put together with great sensitivity. She is also a Board member of Toi Maori Aotearoa, providing leadership to the contemporary Maori art movement. Only one thing is certain—that all are fired with the same ambition; and it is precisely this that creates the tension from which, when it is of high quality, beauty is born. rene huyghe, Art and Mankind, 1957 Darcy Nicholas contemporary maori artist

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Baye RIDDELL Ngati Porou, Te whanau a Rautaupare

By cross referencing my cultural beliefs and other cultural accounts with the Bible, the only logical conclusion I can come to is that Christ is the fulfilment of every cultural path. As Maori, we come as far as Maui in our quest for eternal life and then the path ends. Our tipuna, I believe, also knew this and that is why they were receptive to the gospel message... Along with other Christian artists I am in a position to proclaim this message through my work, and indeed the message and cultural cross-referencing provides a wealth of artistic possibility... 1

Baye Riddell was introduced to pottery by Paul Fisher while living in Christchurch during the early 1970s. Like most potters in New Zealand at the time, Riddell’s early ceramics were strongly influenced by Japanese and UK practices. In 1979 he returned to his birthplace of Tokamaru Bay to live a self-sufficient lifestyle and reconnect with tribal roots. “Exploring my taha Maori was like my feet were connected again. . . my work began to incorporate Maori mythology and symbolism to a greater extent.” In the early 1980s he became involved with Nga Puna Waihanga; a dynamic group of Maori artists including Para Matchett, Cliff Whiting, Bob Jahnke and Darcy Nicholas among many others. “For me it was a very inspiring time. . . Within Nga Puna Waihanga we were going through the same kinds of things, validating Maori expression through new media... What came out of that period was a strengthening of my own work.” Riddell uses terracotta clay from his family land at Te Puia Springs, and prepares it in ways that reflect his care and respect for this material. “Initially I was the only Maori clay artist and then in the mid-80s Manos Nathan, Colleen Waata Urlich and Hiraina Marsden came in. . . Meeting Manos and Hiraina provided a major link in my Maori/Christian interface. Hiraina’s father was Maori Marsden, an Anglican minister, kaumatua, philosopher and writer. . . It was wonderful to sit with Maori and bounce ideas, to glean nuggets of understanding from his scholastic and spiritual knowledge of both worlds.” Combining political and spiritual aspects of taha Maori with his Christian faith enables Riddell to create work from what he calls a “culturally intact” perspective. Gateways are also a central theme in his work, with their symbolic meanings of challenge, decision, and the unknown. A founding member of Nga Kaihanga Uku, Riddell says that, regardless of the period in which a work is created, everything he makes is his own interpretation “of beginnings, of endings and of life in general.” 13

left: Baye Riddell Ceremonial, 1988 collection of tairawhiti museum —te whare taonga o te tairawhiti

1 Baye Riddell quoted in an interview ‘Crossing the Threshold’, published in Chrysalis Seed Arts, issue 22, November 2005


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left: Baye Riddell Mauri Ora, 1990

right: Baye Riddell Arawhata—Stairways, 2011

collection of the artist

collection of the artist


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Manos Nathan Te Roroa, Ngapuhi, Ngati Whatua

In my efforts to create an identity for works in clay, I have adapted design and symbolism from the customary art forms of wood, stone and bone carving; from ta moko and from the fibre arts of taniko and tukutuku. I have also drawn on the rich heritage of allegory and metaphor found in pakiwaitara, purakau and pepeha (folklore, myths/legends and proverbs) as a source of inspiration for the creation of Maori clay works.1

Manos Nathan has long been considered one of New Zealand’s leading ceramic artists. From the time he co-founded Nga Kaihanga Uku in 1986, the originality and exceptional quality of his work has encouraged emerging Maori artists to explore the potential of ceramics as a powerfully expressive medium. Born of a Maori father and Cretan mother, Nathan draws his inspiration from both Mediterranean and Maori cultural traditions. Visiting museums and galleries abroad in the 1970s enabled him to intimately engage with the ancient art forms of his Minoan ancestors, particularly the wealth of richly decorated pottery. When he returned to New Zealand he was called back to the north by tribal elders to carve the tupuna whare Tuohu on Matatina marae in Waipoua. After meeting and working with potter Robyn Stewart at a summer school in Northland, Nathan said “it seemed natural to transform woodcarving decoration into the medium of clay”. Maori have no ceramic tradition so when Nathan chose to transfer the skills he had honed as a traditional woodcarver to working with clay, he felt it was important to convince his elders of the medium’s spiritual integrity. He did this by creating ceramic vessels with ritualistic functions such as waka taurahere tangata (containers for placenta) and waka pito (for the umbilicus). If left unfired these waka would eventually disintegrate and return their contents to the earth. Since the mid-1990s Nathan has been developing a series of sculptural figure forms inspired by carved funerary chests used by his tupuna before European contact. “Part of my fixation with these taonga” he explains “is that my own people were the carvers of many of the chests that are now in major museum collections. . . My work talks about the alienation of these taonga from Te Roroa and other iwi in the area ... I hope my works serve as reminder of the desecration of our burial caves and the looting and removal of our taonga from our wahi tapu.”2

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left: Manos Nathan Whakapakoko II Nga Kaitiaki series 2, 1998 collection of the artist

1 Manos Nathan, artist’s statement 2 Manos Nathan quoted in conversation with Huhana Smith in Taiawhio ll, 18 new conversations with contemporary Maori artists, Te Papa Press 2007


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left: Manos Nathan Ipu Manaia Parirau, 2004 collection of darcy & anne nicholas

right: Manos Nathan Ipu Manaia Parirau, 2004 collection of darcy & anne nicholas


Colleen Waata Urlich Te Popoto o Ngapuhi ki Kaipara, Te Rarawa

Fred Graham was Colleen Waata Urlich’s first art teacher. The depictions of forces underlying the land in Graham’s images opened her eyes to a new way of seeing. As she was the only Maori student in Graham’s academic class, he took the time to explain to her that he and others like him wanted to express themselves as Maori artists, using modern media but incorporating customary iconography and motifs in a completely new way. Waata Urlich’s next art teacher, Mrs Whimp, encouraged her burgeoning interest in clay. During the late ’50s Auckland Art Gallery, under Peter Tomory, was a ‘happening place’ and Waata Urlich was encouraged by Auckland Teachers’ Training College clay tutor, Hillary Clarke, to take further art classes with Colin McCahon and Hamish Keith. At that time Hamish was rooming with Barry Brickell and the two were creating their own domestic tableware. In the 1960s Waata Urlich was part of a highly creative, energetic and committed group of Auckland art teachers who met regularly to work and share ideas and practices under the leadership of Murray Gilbert and other influential art specialists, including Ralph Hotere. After forty years of teaching art and part-time study, Waata Urlich began full time academic study, gaining an Applied Arts Degree from Massey University followed by an MFA from Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland where she chose to make ancient Lapita ceramic practices the focus of her research. Her resulting thesis on Lapita design traditions and the retention of clay knowledge by Maori totally negated the common assumption that Maori knew nothing of clay. This culminated in a paper presented to the International Archaeology Conference in 2003, celebrating fifty years since the first Lapita dig at Foue, New Caledonia. The knowledge Waata Urlich gained from this research, including a perceived contribution of the Lapita aesthetic to the patterns of weaving, tapa and tattau amongst Polynesian peoples, continues to inspire her contemporary art practice. Waata Urlich was mentored by the late Reverend Maori Marsden in Matauranga Maori related to uku or clay. This was profoundly important in providing a philosophical and spiritual foundation to her clay practice, reflecting themes underlying the formation of Nga Kaihanga Uku by Baye Riddell and Manos Nathan.

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left: Colleen Waata Urlich Ipu One, Lapita Series, 2002 collection of the museum of new zealand—te papa tongarewa


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left: Colleen Waata Urlich Nga kongakonga rere o tauira no tuku iho, 2004

right: Colleen Waata Urlich Hinaki—Eel trap, Kapowai series—Dragonfly Lake, 2007

collection of darcy & anne nicholas

collection of whangarei art museum—te manawa toi


Paerau Corneal Ngati Tuwharetoa, Te Atihaunui a Paparangi

As a sculptor in clay, Paerau Corneal has drawn on her Tuwharetoa and Te Atihaunui a Paparangi ties for the recurring theme in her work, mana wahine (female authority). In affirming the authority, intelligence and vision expressed by Maori women in their diverse roles in customary and contemporary culture, Corneal reclaims through clay their status as leaders, mothers, warriors and knowledge experts.1

Paerau Corneal graduated with a Diploma in Craft Design, Maori in 1990 from Waiariki Polytechnic in Rotorua. She chose to study at Waiariki because of the craft programme’s strong emphasis on Maori design. Corneal notes that “many of the tutors were members of Nga Puna Waihanga (contemporary Maori artists collective) and the social, political, creative imperative of being Maori permeated through those artists and into our programme. Maori design was the platform to explore media with multimedia artists... the notion of ‘tradition’ as a determinant of media didn’t exist” From the late 1980s to the early ’90s Nga Puna Waihanga emerged as a strong and dynamic force within contemporary New Zealand art. Nga Kaihanga Uku (Maori ceramic artists collective) was sparked by the same motivations as Nga Puna Waihanga but evolved in its own way, in parallel to the larger collective. Corneal says her involvement with Nga Kaihanga Uku enabled her to sharpen the focus of her practice. The kaupapa Maori of the collective gave her the autonomy to be creatively experimental yet remain culturally and politically sincere within her contemporary art practice. “Considering the breadth of our experience and knowledge, there was never pressure to concede to personalities or iwi-ism and this is most likely the key to our collective success and rapid development of a Maori clay movement.” Corneal uses Mana wahine as the central theme in her art practice as a means of understanding what she describes as her “place as a woman within the world. . . I consciously moved away from the sexual gaze on the female form. The figures are symbolic, often flat-chested with one breast lower than the other, with exaggerated proportions and extensions. The work becomes about the form over the feminine.”2 After two decades of working as a solo ceramic artist within a loose collective, Corneal has recently embarked on a creative collaboration with dancer, choreographer and video artist Lou Potiki Bryant. The Kiri project began in April this year and explores the meeting points between clay and skin, uku and whakapapa, performance and art.

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left: Paerau Corneal Ko au te whenua ko te whenua ko au, 2008 collection of porirua city council

overleaf: Paerau Corneal Hinemoa and Hinemoa, 2011 collection of porirua city council

1 John Walsh in conversation with Paerau Corneal, Taiawhio ll, 18 new conversations with contemporary Maori artists, Te Papa Press, 2007 2 Paerau Corneal in correspondence with Natalie Friend, Toi Maori, June 2013


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Wi TAEPA Te Arawa, Ngati Pikiao, Te Atiawa

In te au Maori (Maori world view) uku (clay) is more than an artistic material, it is a blood relative. Working with it requires an understanding of the genealogical links between humanity and Papatuanuku (mother Earth). . . Negotiating this relationship is a defining feature of Maori ceramics. . .Throughout this whakapapa, relationships between people and the earth are constantly reinforced: clay gives birth to human life, from life comes death and from death comes renewed life. . .Using culture to reconcile one’s own mortality is something Taepa is acutely aware of. . . 1

In 1968 Wi Taepa joined the New Zealand Army and from 1970 to 1972 served in Vietnam as part of an elite guerilla fighting unit. Taepa rarely speaks of the physical hardships of war he experienced in Southeast Asia, but spending days constantly alert while drenched in chemical toxins and deprived of the most basic comforts obviously had lasting effects on his health and psyche. When he returned from the war Taepa entered the prison service and worked as rehabilitation officer at Wi Tako (now Rimutaka). As a descendant from a line of Te Arawa master carvers, he was able to use the teaching of customary Maori wood and bone carving to reconnect prisoners with traditional cultural values. In the mid-1980s Taepa left the prison service to become a social worker at Kohitere Boys Farm where he continued to use art in rehabilitation. When the cost of wood and the potential danger of carving tools obliged him to look for alternative media he turned to clay. “I found clay was the answer,” he recalls, “It can be easily manipulated into different forms, altered, taken away or built up. I was also introduced to low-tech firing of clay which still intrigues me to this day.” When Taepa joined the Nga Kaihanga Uku collective in the late 1980s his adventurous experimentation with the plasticity of clay was added to their communal pool of methods and ideas. Preferring asymmetrical organic form, Taepa chooses to model clay into vessels and sculptural forms by hand using coil, pinch and slab construction methods. He draws inspiration for decorating his simple forms from a wide variety of sources including traditional Maori and Lapita designs. Although his works may pay homage to kowhaiwhai, tukutuku and weaving patterns, his decorations are always innate responses to nature, history and cultural heritage rather than a slavish adherence to predetermined rules. 29

left: Wi Taepa Pataka, 2012 collection of the artist

1 Reuben Friend, curatorial essay to accompany an exhibition of Wi Taepa’s work in the Dean Gallery, City Gallery Wellington, June – September 2012


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left: Wi Taepa Waka, 2010 collection of the artist

right: Wi Taepa Ipu, 1992 collection of porirua city council


list of works Baye RIDDELL

Ngati Porou, Te whanau a Rautaupare Ceremonial, 1988 Terracotta clay, oxides, wood fired 775 x 380 x 380mm Collection of Tairawhiti Museum— Te Whare Taonga o te Tairawhiti Mauri Ora, 1990 Terracotta clay, slips and sgraffito decoration, oxidation fired 320 x 450 x 450mm Collection of the artist Untitled, 2002 Terracotta clay, wood fired 440 x 680 x 680mm Collection of Darcy & Anne Nicholas Nga Korero a Kawari— Conversations at Calvary, 2003 Terracotta clay, slips and sgraffito text, wood fired 940 x 700 x 470mm Collection of the Museum of New Zealand—Te Papa Tongarewa Whakapapa, 2010 Terracotta clay, wood fired and reduced 750 x 1130 x 105mm Private collection, Gisborne Arawhata—Stairways, 2011 Terracotta clay, slip decoration, gas fired 680 x 480 x 480mm Collection of the artist Wero, 2012 Terracotta clay 875 x 220 x 110mm Collection of Porirua City Council Seven Days of Creation, 2012 7 free standing totemic forms Terracotta clay, oxide, incised text and decoration, gas fired 1570 – 1690mm high x 280 x 180mm each Collection of the artist

Manos NATHAN

Te Roroa, Ngapuhi, Ngati Whatua Ipu Tawera, 1988 Clay, wood fired 200 x 210 x 210mm Collection of the artist Waka Taurahere Tangata, 1991 Clay, wood fired 205 x 335 x 335mm Collection of the artist Ipu Waiora, 1993 Local earthenware clay, wood fired 370 x 360 x 230mm Collection of the artist

Whakanuia ki Nga Rakau a Tutangimamae a, 1998 Clay, pit fired 170 x 320 x 320mm Collection of Darcy & Anne Nicholas Whakapakoko ll, Nga Kaitiaki series 1, 1998 Terracotta clay, wood fired 1260 x 350 x 370mm Collection of the artist Whakapakoko ll, Nga Kaitiaki series 2, 1998 Terracotta clay, wood fired 610 x 530 x 430mm Collection of the artist Whakapakoko lll, Nga Kaitiaki series 4, 2000 Terracotta clay, wood fired 1141 x 368 x 373mm Collection of the Museum of New Zealand—Te Papa Tongarewa Whakapakoko lll, Nga Kaitiaki series 5, 2002 Terracotta clay, wood fired 900 x 340 x 370mm Collection of the artist Ipu Manaia Parirau, 2004 Clay, oxides, terra sigillata, oxidation fired 320 x 270 x 230mm Collection of Darcy & Anne Nicholas Ipu Manaia Parirau, 2004 Clay, oxides, wood fired 440 x 380 x 160mm Collection of Darcy & Anne Nicholas Ipu Manaia Parirau, 2005 Terracotta clay, wood fired 580 x 360 x 190mm Private collection Tutei, 2006 Clay, oxides terra sigilatta 435 x 370 x 200mm Collection of the artist Tane Nui a Rangi, 2007 Clay, terra sigilatta, oxides, ceramic paints, paua inlay, oxidation fired 115 x 360 x 360mm Private collection Te Mata o Matariki me Puanga Kai Rau, 2007 Clay, terra sigilatta, oxides, ceramic paints, paua inlay 110 x 360 x 360mm Collection of Auckland War Memorial Museum—Tamaki Paenga Hira

Te Tatau Pounamu, 2009 Terracotta clay, terra sigillata, oxides, oxidation fired 490 x 275 x 105mm Private collection

Colleen WAATA URLICH

Te Popoto o Ngapuhi ki Kaipara, Te Rarawa Hina—Deity of the Moon, 1987 Northland terracotta clay and raku mix, paua shell, muka fibre and Waipoua kiwi feathers, wood fired with flashings 200 x 180 x 180mm Collection of the artist He Mokopuna Mahuika— Mahuika’s grandchild, Ipu Pungarehu series—vessels for ashes, 1992 Matauri Bay and white commercial clay mix, muka fibre, pounamu, paua shell, fantail feathers and duck feather, controlled smoke fired 365 x 180 x 180mm Collection of the artist Hine Tiri—deity of Plantations [2 free standing nikau forms], 2000 Raku clay, terra sigillata with stain, copper wire and clay beads, gas fired Approximately 1200 x 600mm Collection of Te Puni Kokiri Ipu One, Lapita series, 2002 Raku clay, wax resist, red and white terra sigillata, oxidation fired 720 x 460mm Collection of the Museum of New Zealand—Te Papa Tongarewa Nga kongakonga rere o tauira no tuku iho—Scattered fragments of pattern from the past, Lapita series, 2004 Raku clay, wax resist, red and white terra sigillata, oxidation fired 260 x 380 x 380mm Collection of Darcy & Anne Nicholas Hine Te Iwa Iwa—Deity of the Korari (phormium tenax) or flax, Lapita series, 2004 Raku clay, wax resist over red terra sigillata layered with white terra sigillata, muka fibre, domestic fowl feathers, oxidation fired 350 x 380 x 380mm Collection of Darcy & Anne Nicholas Hinaki—Eel trap, Kapowai series—Dragonfly Lake, 2007 White clay body, wax resist, terra sigillata, oxidation fired 430 x 380 x 380mm Collection of Whangarei Art Museum—Te Manawa Toi


Sitting in the Sun, Moemoea Series, 2009 Raku clay and terra sigillata, oxidation fired 520 x 360 x 260mm Collection of Darcy & Anne Nicholas Lord of the Isles—shipwreck, Kaipara Protest series, 2010 Etched white raku clay, wax resist, white terra sigillata, oxidation fired 335 x 225 x 95mm Collection of Porirua City Council Te Pu o Te Wheki—Kaikohe the heartland of Ngapuhi Iwi, 2013 White JB3 clay, terra sigillata, oxidation fired 330 x 230mm Collection of the artist

Paerau CORNEAL

Te Atihaunui a Paparangi, Ngati Tuwharetoa Hinemanu, 1998 BRT clay, oxides, oxidation firing   985 x 585 x 280mm Private collection Hinewaitapu, 1998 BRT clay, oxides, oxidation firing   960 x 540 x 300mm Collection of the Museum of New Zealand—Te Papa Tongarewa Manawa series, 2004 BRT Clay, oxides, gas fired/ reduction 850 x 350 x 300mm Collection of the Museum of New Zealand—Te Papa Tongarewa Ko au te whenua, ko te whenua ko au, 2008 BRT clay, oxides, gas fired  400 x 540 x 470mm Collection of Porirua City Council Hinemoa and Hinemoa, 2011 BRT clay, oxides, gas fired  50 x 500 x 600mm Collection of Porirua City Council Otautahi, 2011 BRT clay, oxides, gas fired  560 x 420 x 180mm Collection of the artist Birdtalk, 2008 BRT clay, gas fired 390 x 190 x 340mm Private collection KIRI: 1 & 2, 2013 Video presentations of collaborative performance work by Paerau Corneal and choreographerdancer and video artist Louise Pōtiki Bryant

Wi Te Tau Pirika TAEPA Te Arawa, Ngati Pikiao, Te Atiawa Ipu, 1992 Clay, sigilatta lustre sprayed over wax resist 290 x 300 x 300mm Collection of Porirua City Council Ipu Pokurukuru, 1997 Clay, oxides, pit fired 315 x 335 x 334mm Collection of Te Manawa Museum and Art Gallery Ipu Pokurukuru, 1997 Clay, oxides, pit fired 350 x 325 x 325mm Collection of Garry & Ruth Nicholas Ipu Moko, 2000 Engraved clay, white sigilatta, gas fired 310 x 330 x 330mm Collection of Porirua City Council Ipu, 2000 Raku clay, gas fired 710 x 580 x 380mm Gifted to The Dowse Art Museum collection by Roderick & Gillian Deane Ipu, 2000 Clay, sand blasted, gas fired 780 x 700 x 800mm Gifted to Porirua City Council collection by Roderick & Gillian Deane

Ipu, 2011 Engraved clay, with orange sigilatta and manganese, gas fired 285 x 160 x 160mm Collection of Porirua City Council Waka (1) with tiki forms on pedestal base, 2012 Clay, manganese over Abbott’s sigilatta, oxidation fired 95 x 120 x 110mm Collection of the artist Waka (2) with tiki forms on pedestal base, 2012 Clay, manganese over Abbott’s sigilatta, oxidation fired 92 x 63 x 60mm Collection of the artist Waka (3) oval with tiki handles, 2012 Clay, manganese over Abbott’s sigilatta, oxidation fired 80 x 180 x 80mm Collection of the artist Waka (4) bowl with handles, 2012 Clay, manganese over Abbott’s sigilatta, oxidation fired 60 x 1423 x 116mm Collection of the artist Pataka, 2012 Clay, manganese over Abbott’s sigilatta, oxidation fired 280 x 325 x 335mm Collection of the artist

Ipu Toru Waewae, 2002 Engraved clay, manganese, gas fired 200 x 200 x 150mm Collection of Darcy & Anne Nicholas

Ipu Whenua, 2012 Clay, manganese over Abbott’s sigilatta, oxidation fired 415 x 350 x 346mm Collection of the artist

Ipu Iti, 2003 Engraved clay with red sigilatta, gas fired 140 x 110 x 110mm Collection of the artist

Waka, 2012 Clay, manganese over Abbott’s sigilatta, oxidation fired 130 x 470 x 180mm Collection of the artist

Kaitiaki I; Whakamaharatanga series, 2010 Clay, oxides, gas fired 850 x 170 x 170mm Collection of the artist Kaitiaki II; Whakamaharatanga series, 2010 Clay, oxides, gas fired 780 x 180 x 200mm Collection of the artist Kaitiaki III; Whakamaharatanga series, 2010 Clay, oxides, gas fired 580 x 130 x 175mm Collection of the artist


Published in July 2013 for the exhibition: Uku Rere: Nga Kaihanga Uku & beyond at PATAKA Art + Museum, Porirua 7 July – 27 October 2013 All text © individual authors All artworks © the artists Apart from fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission. Curated by Mark Hutchins Publication design by Sarah Maxey Photography by Forrest Smyth/ VirtualSilver Studio, except for: page 18: © The Museum of New Zealand —Te Papa Tongarewa and page 21. Printed by Service Print Ltd cover images :

Front: Manos Nathan, Ipu Manaia Parirau, 2004 Collection of Darcy & Anne Nicholas Back: Wi Taepa Ipu Moko, 2000 Collection of Porirua City Council

Cnr Norrie & Parumoana Streets, PO Box 50 218, Porirua City 5240, New Zealand. www.pataka.org.nz

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Manos Nathan Tane Nui a Rangi, 2007 private collection

UKU RERE  

Catalogue to accompany the Uku Rere exhibition at Pataka Art + Museum, Porirua, NZ