Page 1

Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

Appraisal Study

PASALI Philippines, Children’s Desk November to December 2011

I. BASIC INFORMATION

1. Title of the Project

2. Name of Organization 

329/10183 – Community Appraisal for replication of project ‘  Enhancement of Tri­people Children  Rights and Development’  Childrens Desk ­  PASALI Philippines Foundation,Inc

      Address                 

Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines

      Contact Person/Number

Mr. Wahab I. Guialal, Program Manager +639162818118/(083)303­5274

3. Name Contract holder

Mokamad Q. Kusain

4. Project Duration

November to December

5. Project Location 6. Reporting period

General   Santos   City   (6   barangays),   Sarangani   (3  barangays), Sultan Kudarat (3 barangays) December 2011

7.  Total Project Cost

(Please refer to financial report of this study)

II. COMMUNITY APPRAISAL 1. Rationale Through its interventions the past five consecutive years PASALI  has brought significant changes to the lives of   the families and in particular the children of the IP and Moro communities of three  barangays  in General Santos  City   and   the   remote,   mountainous   village   of   the   Manobo   Indigenous   Community   in   Biao,   Palimbang,   Sultan   Kudarat.  The most notable changes in Gensan is that child protection services have become active in three levels: the City   Council for the Protection of Children (CCPC) now has longer arms, since PASALI has contributed to the inclusion   of many stakeholders in the Barangay Council for the Protection of Children (BCPC) of the three  barangaysand  have facilitated the revival of operations of these bodies.In addition, the Purok Council for the Protection of Children   (PCPC), which is a brainchild of PASALI, as well as the community Core Group have been working so intensely  that barangay officials see a significant drop in the number of child and family cases put forward at that level.  PASALI Children’s Desk has also effectively achieved its deliverables through its extended direct services; ranging   from   facilitating   street   children   back   to   school   and   their   respective   communities,   to   uniting   children   against   discrimination,   to   tapping   the   private   sectors   of   the   non­profit   and   commercial   sectors   to   work   together   in  educational side­supply initiatives, to active partnership with the Department of Social Welfare and Development   with its new social programs.  PASALI’s advocacy and partnership with the IP Manobo community in Biao, Napnapon, Palimbang, Sultan Kudarat   has   resulted   in   the   establishment   of   a   primary   school   recognized   by   the   DWSD   and   an   elementary   school   recognized by the Department of Education for a school of more than 150 IP children coming from the surrounding   nine puroks.   Now nearing the end of its three­year intervention program PASALI looks to the future of many other Tri­people  areas in need of similar interventions. In the six municipalities PASALI has its project of the Farm Support Scheme  –   System   of   Rice   Intensification   for   rural   households,   the   situation   of   children   is   found   to   be   in   dire   need   of   transformation. Schooling rates are low, particularly with the IP communities who would need to walk more 5 km to  get to the nearest school. In other cases, schools may be present, but parents cannot afford the tuition, the schools  supply costs, or even the daily transportation costs to and from the school. The rate of doctors or nurses to the   number of inhabitants can be as low as an appalling 1: 45,000, and even with the presence of a clinic, many   services necessary in the area are not available. 

1


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

With the introduction of the DWSD’s social program, the 4Ps the past year more children and families should gain  access to facilities, but this has not gone without troubles. PASALI has been able to assist DWSD Region 12 in   Palimbang in contact with beneficiaries as well as involved in validation of beneficiaries’ identity and complaints.  But as PASALI plans to enter more areas with similar zest, further assessment of the areas is needed. To this end,   PASALI conducted a study from November to December 2011 of this year to help provide a deeper understanding  of   the   living   conditions   particularly   of   access   to   education   and   health   of   the   vulnerable   sectors   in   the   other   barangays of General Santos City, three municipalities in Sarangani, and one in Sultan Kudarat.The result of this   study provides the base for the formulation of a social protection framework, out of which a package of pro­active  and participatory social welfare service can be designed.  2. Objectives  General Objective:  The results of this study form the guide for planning the extension of the Children’s Desk program of the PASALI.  Analysis of the area will provide the framework for the intervention, assessment, monitoring and evaluation of the   coming three­year plan. Specifically, this study: A specific objective of this study is to draw socio­economic and socio­demographic profiles of the sample children   of   IP   and   Moro   population   in   the  four  barangay   of   General   Santos   City   and   in   the  six  barangays   of  four  municipalities of Palimbang (3), Alabel (1), Kiamba (1) and Maitum (1).  Another   specific   objective   is   to   specify   the   living   conditions   of   the   Moro   and   IP   children   in   the   above   barangays/locations. This   data   will   then   be   used   to   recommend   and   draw­out   appropriate   and   integrated   interventions   towards  enhancement of the rights and development of children in the communities. 3. Design: methodology, procedure Methodology – The study utilized descriptive research design using both qualitative and quantitative approaches for  eliciting information  from  authorities  and recipients of the  above  mentioned  locations.  To  this end, approaches  included desk research or review of existing profiles of the areas, conducting sample focus group discussions and  participant­observation. Quantitative data is taken from the literature sources as well as sample questionnaires for   the target respondents.  Procedure  –   This  included:  (1)  review  of  relevant   literature   in   aid  of   formulating   questionnaire,   this  could   help  understand and provide the researcher of the different variables confronting the children; (2) instrumentation to fine  tune   and   finalization   of   the   questionnaires  based   on  the   situational  analysis  of   the   study  team;   (3)  training   of   enumerators, a one­day training be conducted after survey questionnaire is finalized to the target enumerators or   fieldworkers;   (4)   pretesting,   this   will   be   undertaken   to   determine   which   question   is   confusing   or   could   not   be   understood   easily   by   the   respondents.   This   exercise   is   an   extension   training   for   the   enumerators   so   also   to   measure the length of time consume in one questionnaire. This research was managed by the Study Team headed by the Program Manager, composed of the Children Desk  Coordinator, Advocacy Officer and the Admin/Finance Officer of PASALI. A Professional Research Writer and a  Statistician were hired to package the findings and analysis of the data into a book­bound form. Memorandum of  Agreement (MOA) will be signed and executed between the PASALI Management and the Research Writer. III RESULTS Below are descriptions of the living conditions of the families in relation to the situation of the children particularly  concerning access to education and health facilities in the areas where PASALI wishes to extend. 1. General Santos Location:

2


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

The city is bounded by municipalities of Sarangani Province namely Alabel in the East of the city, and Maasim in  the   South.   The   city   is   likewise   bounded   by South   Cotabato municipality   of Polomolok and Sarangani   Province,  municipality of Malungon in the north, and the municipality of T'boli in the west of the city. General Santos City is  the   center   of   commerce,   trade,   and   logistics   of   Region   XII   and   South   Cotabato,  Cotabato   City, Sultan  Kudarat, Sarangani Province and General Santos City (SOCCSKSARGEN) growth area.

Scale & demographic data: The total population of General Santos City was 529,542 persons as of August 1, 2007, based on the 2007 Census   of Population. By year 2011 there are about 275,777 total child populations, as projected by the General Santos  City Planning Office.  The number of households reached 111,927, which was 25,332 households more than the  number   of   households   posted   in   2000.   The   average   household   size   in   2007   was   4.7   persons.   The   overall  dependency ratio was computed at 60, which means that for every 100 persons in the working age group, there   were 60 dependents (56 young and 4 old dependents).  Of the household population 5 years old and over, 31.2 percent had attended or finished elementary education  while 35.8 percent had reached high school. Proportion of academic degree holders was 9.2 percent, an increase  of 4.5 percentage points from 4.7 percent in 2000. More   females   reached   higher   levels   of   education   than   males   as   shown   by   higher   proportion   of   females   with  academic degree (55.3 percent) and post baccalaureate courses (55.2 percent). Among the  household population 5  to  24 years old, majority  (62.9 percent) attended  school at  anytime during  School   Year   2007   to   2008.   Almost   the   same   proportion   of   males   (50.1   percent)   and   females   (49.9   percent)   attended school during said school year. Barangay  Upper   Labay  had   2,911   residents  by  the   end  of   2007,   with   an  estimated   child   population   of   1,663.  Barangay Sinawal had 10,861 residents by the end of 2007, with an estimated child population of 6,206.Barangay   Bawing had 9,573 residents by the end of 2007, with an estimated child population of 3, 267. Barangay Apopong  had 40, 642 residents by the end of 2007 with an estimated child population of 10, 743. The urbanization of all four  barangays is rural. Spoken languages: Main   language   is   “Visaya”   (Cebuano).   Spoken   languages   are   Ilonggo,   Tagalog/Filipino,   B’laan,   T’Boli,  Maguindanaon.   Number of School­Going Children 3


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

According to Department of Education, there are a total of 75, 809 (39,090 males and 36, 719 females) pupils in  General   Santos   City   from   Grade   1   to   Grade   6.   On   the   other   hand,   41,267   comprised   the   children   going   in   secondary schools as of academic year 2009­2010.  Ethnicity Among the moro, tribes present in the area of coverage of appraisal are 1) Maguindanaon, 2) Maranao, 3) Tausug,  4) Iranon, and 5) Tagabiwangan. The Maguindanaon and the closely related Tagabiwangan predominate among all  moro   tribes,   as  this   general   location   is  historically   part   of   the   Principality   of   Rajah   Buayan   and   the   combined  Sultanate of Maguindanao. The Maranao, Tausug and Iranun are found interspersed and in small numbers. The  Maranaos particularly in the public markets and mercantile trading centers. Among the Indigenous Peoples, tribes present in the area are the 1) Manobo, 2) B'laan, 3) Teduray, 4) T’boli.  General Santos City was once called “Dadiangas”, which is a B’laan term referring to a local shrub. The B’laan is   the largest indigenous tribe in the area, followed by the closely related T’boli. Among the Settlers, who comprise the vast majority of the people in the area, the known tribes are 1) Bicolano, 2)   Waray, 3) Cebuano, 4) Tagalog, 5) Illongo, and 6) Ilocano. Though also found in good number in the rural areas,  they are mostly concentrated in the more urban locations.  Other ethnic groups present are the Badjaos, a nomadic sea­based tribe originating from the islands of Western  Mindanao. They have pockets of families scattered in the SOCSKSARGEN area who mostly engage in peddling. In the expansion barangays, the distributions of ethnicity are as follows: Ethnicity Moro

IP Barangays

Barangay Apopong Barangay Bawing Barangay Sinawal Barangay Upper Labay Table 1

B’ L A A N  

35% 15% 60% 85%

M A N O B O

T’ B O L I

8% 3%

T E D U R A Y S

M A G U I N.

13% 13% 7% 5%

T A U S U G

M A R A N A O

Christian

B A D J A O

S A N G I L

S A M A L

18%

2%

13%

2% 4%

(Bicolano,W aray,Cebua no,  Tagalog,  Illongo,  Ilocano)

Total

50% 27% 30% 10%

100% 100% 100% 100%

Status: Settlers   generally   follow   the   norms   of   getting   birth   certificates   for   their   children   and   marriage   certificates   for  marriages. Issuance of birth certificates are quickly facilitated particularly if the births are made in licensed birthing  facilities.  But a good portion of the Moro populace and a large part of the indigenous tribes do not observe this practice, both   in applying for birth certificates and marriage certificates. Legal documentation of personal status and condition is   regarded as a foreign practice and not part of their socio­cultural way of life. For them, the legal bond is made   through “word of honor”.   As a result, when time comes that they badly need to avail of social public health and   education services provided by government, they have a hard time doing so. Only at this juncture do they work for   the application of such birth and marriage certificates in order to avail of the public service provided by government,   thus creating complications.  Access to Education: Elementary   and   secondary   education   facilities   (public   schools)   are   generally   present   within   the   vicinity   of   the  barangays identified, or in the next neighboring barangay for children aged 5 to 16 to go to. However, the issue is   not on the presence or availability of basic public education facilities, but on the accessibility to these facilities. In   several cases, children are required to walk between 30 to 45 minutes from their homes to the schools every day in   order to avail of basic education. Rural barangays generally have a larger land area compared to urban barangays  (about   twice   to  four   times as  large).   In  addition,   the   roads  and  access routes  of  these   barangays are   usually  4


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

undeveloped or underdeveloped. Concretization of roads are usually limited to the portion of the barangay where   the local barangay hall is located, connecting this to the interconnecting routes leading to the poblacion or city   center. Beyond this point, dirt roads abound. For those fortunate to find support for tertiary education, the only affordable public education facility within the  general vicinity of the SOCSKSARGEN area is the Mindanao State University – General Santos City campus,  located in Barangay Tambler of that city. At a rate of PHP50.00 per unit, the aspiring undergraduate can enroll and   go to college. No other public tertiary education facility is found within that area. Problems and Protection concerns:  BCPC Functionality None was found to be functional BCPC among the 4 target expansion barangays in Gensan. They were found  weak in areas like organizational functionality (seen in the frequency of meetings), operationalization, coordination   work with quick response team, resource mobilization, capability building of members, and documentation and data  banking. Only Barangay Bawing was rated as semi­functional during the annual BCPC Monitoring last Nov. 21­25,   2011which was actually the previous year’s Most Functional BCPC.  The PCPC Concept and functionality Only   in   our   3   old   barangays   in   Gensan(San   Jose,   Fatima,   and   Tambler)   Purok   Council   for   the   Protection   of  Children (PCPC) works as support mechanism to BCPC. Various cases of children are addressed immediately in  the purok level lessening the burdens in barangay level. In addition, this leads to the formation of the core group  (consists of core representatives from 3 barangays that assists PASALI in most of child rights advocacy/project­ related   activities   (e.i.   Children’s   Congress,   Blood   Letting/medical   missions,   Undas,   year­end   gatherings,   etc.).  Specifically   in   San   Jose,   PCPC   had   paved   way   for   the   community’s   establishment   of   “botika­binhi”   (mini­ pharmacy),   upland   farming   (corn/vegetables/peanut)   and   animal   dispersal.   These   economic   activities   became  parents’ support in sustaining the schooling of children. Challenges faced on access to rights and services The remoteness of the area, lack of funds on the part of the barangay local governments and limited support from   city government on access for seminars and workshops on children’s rights and services, lack of interest/resistance  on  the   part   of   barangay  officials  to   advocate   and   implement   children’s  laws  (RA  9344)  and   programs  are   the   challenges faced by vulnerable sector like families particularly children. Problems faced by children ages 5 – below 18  Children aged from 5 to 8 year oldare malnourished and are not going to school, or are drop outs. Children aged   between 13 to 18 years oldengage in premarital sex, experience issues on early marriage, are involved in theft,  gang war riots and drop out from school. Problems faced by parents with children ages 5 – below18 Parents of children ages 5 to 18 generally experience issues on poverty,employment (unstable jobs),and financial  difficulty in providing for the basic needs (food and health) of their children, especially in sustaining their schooling.   They also generally have a lack of awareness on children’s rights and on how to access programs for children   from/by the GOs and NGOs.

Problems faced by youth ages 13 – 32 The youth  of  these areas lack vocational and basic livelihood skills and also  have  never undergone livelihood  training. Their access to employment opportunities is markedly lower than those living in the more urban locations.  There is also a lack of job opportunities within their immediate locale. Should they also go and apply for jobs with   private institutions, they generally run the risk of being rejected owing to their religious affiliation (Islam), or their   ethnic origin. Most employers favor hiring settlers than indigenous or moro. Problems faced by women, particularly ages 12 and above 

5


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

Among the IPs, most of the women from age 12 or 13 beyond, marry early and were not able to continue schooling   as they were believed to handle domestic tasks solely; in fact, as observed, in San Jose, majority are females that   availed of our numeracy and literacy program as they desire to continue schooling even thru a non­formal mode   (unfortunately, some husbands would not even allow their young wives to join our session as they fear that their  wives may eventually leave them after acquiring “higher education”. ) Capacity & Stakeholders:  Government agencies, NGOs and other sector bodies are working in the area for the development of these families DSWD   is   actively   serving   the   people   of   our   target   barangays   thru   Pantawid   Pamilyang   Pilipino   Program,   the   Feeding Program, and others. The City Health Officeregularly ensures the provision of Vitamin A and other medical  needs of young children and expecting mothers, RD Foundationregularly performs medical missions and provides  educational   assistance,   while   microfinance/lending   assistance   is   provided   by   Center   for   Community  Transformation(CCT), Center for Agriculture and Rural Development (CARD, Inc)., and the like. Attitudes: Although the disparity between rural and urban barangays in General Santos City in terms of level of development  and access to basic social and public services is considerable, it promising to note that the present dispensation of  local city government is forward looking and is committed to the principle and practice of inter­sectoral and inter­ stakeholder partnerships and convergences.  Though their funding constraints prevents them from addressing the comparatively deplorable  social conditions of  rural   barangays,   the   city   government   welcomes   help   and   assistance   from   private   and   civil   society   groups   to  temporarily provide the lacking services.  On the part of the local constituents of the appraised barangays, they are satisfied with the level of responsiveness   of their barangay local government, but lament to the limitations that they can do to address perennial social ills  therein.   Civil society is likewise well organized in the city. Apparently, during the LCPC meetings and strategic planning   workshop, there were various children’s organizations present. However, the level of capacity for interventions from  one organization to another varies, as well as the focused area or the children sub­grouping targeted by each.   Though all are part of one network of CSOs or another, convergence on addressing the plight of children in rural   areas having multicultural contexts is practically non­existent.

FGD Results Expansion barangays Apopong Of the 27 puroks in Barangay Apopong, 9 are resided with Moro and IP populations. Almost one fourth(1/4) of the   total   number   ofschool­aged   children   is  not   attending   formal   education   and   mostly   resort   to   the   numeracy  and  literacy program of Department of Education. This is partly due to scattered locations of the puroks which happened   to be  situated in seemingly isolated and mountainous areas. In the case of  Purok Acop, the  farthest one, the   children have to walk 6 kilometers every day in going to school. This has led to the rising number of working   children engaged in charcoal –making, buying and selling “bote­bakal”, cellophane­vending in city markets, and   other earned as jeepney conductors while other children are victims of dysfunctional families. They indulged in   alcoholic drinking, premarital pregnancies and eventually commit theft. These children also became vulnerable to   sexual abuse usually incest based on the Barangay Social Welfare Office last year, 2011. Common also is the early   marriage among 15­ year old IP and Moro female children. Unlike other barangays, Apopong was noted to gain several support fromGO and CSO partners in the previous  year mostly educational and medical assistance. However, internally, the BCPC was just recently activated and   received reorientation on committee functions and responsibilities by the members (including PASALI) of Local  Council for the Protection of children (LCPC). Almost all puroks are considerably availing better access to drinking water from deep well. However, some parts of   the barangay find it insufficient to meet the demand of the growing population. Accordingly, in partnership with the  Barangay Council, certain NGO promised to install a 3M­worth of water system but remains unrealized up to date.   6


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

On the other hand, most children suffer from cough, colds, and fever. Illnesses like arthritis, diabetes, eye cataract,   goiter and ovarian cyst (for women) are common among the adults including the elderly. Only the barangay health   center offers free but limited medicines.  Remarkably, women suffered from poor access to birthing facilities. The barangay has only one community birthing  home. Aside from the continuing birth delivery at home that consequently resulted in the late or non­ registration of   birth by mostly IP/Moro children, substantial 3 to 4 cases of maternal and infant mortality are recorded yearly. While   access to health insurance (Phil health) has still to be improved. About 40% of poor families were not facilitated to   avail of it. These families merely depend on fishing, carpentry, and driving motorcycles. Finally, the IPs’ Claim for their Ancestral Domain Title is still being processed. Presently, these lands are divided   among and assumed by settlers. Bawing Bawing   has   its  unique   and   varied   social  concerns.   Convergence   of   sustainable   efforts   is   needed   to   gradually   address and sever the culture of mental poverty of people that affects their living condition. Noticeably, as indicated  above, multicultural inhabitants abound in this community. The B’laans and T’bolis for instance are unfortunately   situated in dumpsites working as scavengers. While the Badjaos who are known as the coastal folks, seemed to be  unresponsive for change and miserably contented with its filthy and messy environment despite government and   CSOs   effort   in   organizing   and   facilitating   them   to   improve   their   quality   of   life.   These   people   customarily   procrastinate through gambling which sadly became part of their way of life. Apparently,   due   to   the   above­cited   conditions,   the   community   in   general   can   hardly   move   forward.   Its   local  government unit is pouring out its best to gain various external supports in order to address issues on health and  education,   hence   the   concerted   intervention   of   various   government   and   non­   government   organizations   thru  feeding, educational, and medical mission activities. However, due to lack of sustainability, problems on health and   education   still   prevail.   The   barangay   cannot   accommodate   all   the   children   for   immunization   and   de­worming   program. The lack of health facility (only one barangay health center and no birthing home) was pointed out as one   of the causes of the rising cases of malnutrition among children hitting the highest case on 2008. Skin diseases and  fever due to complications are also among the common disturbing health problems of children therein. Significantly,  4 died of tuberculosis last year due to unhealthy practice especially of adult IPs and Moros. Relatedly, Badjao  village is known to incur a high infant mortality rate annually (average of 5 infant deaths) partly due to absence of a   birthing facility.  Access to education is as well poor. Around 25% of children, majority are IPs, have not attended or eventually   dropped out from school for economic reasons and the far distance of the facilities ( 2 elementary and 1 high   schools) from residence. The farthest purok (Kalpungal) measured 20 kilometers consuming almost 2 hours of ride   (requiring P50.00/head as fare) on a single motorcycle to reach the school. Financially constraint, the parents will  be eventually forced to succumb from their aspiration to provide better education for their children.  Specifically, Badjao community suffered for poor access to water. They solely depend on the flowing (where on top  of it is their cemetery) resulting to consequent diarrhea among the residents particularly children.  Moreover, prevalence of dysfunctional family has led to the increasing cases of premarital pregnancies among 14  to 16 years old (common among Bisaya and Badjao children), drug addiction, and theft. Women, on the other hand,  were prone to domestic violence by their husbands due to infidelity (while the latter were away for fishing to earn for  living).  The IPs’(B’laans) struggle for their Claim for Ancestral Domain Title has also resulted to the recent tribal conflict  that cost lives of their loved ones. Also, non­registration of births are significantly common for IPs and Moros as  most  of  them are  reluctant  and  in  some cases,  lack awareness on how to  access   such documents from the   government. Sinawal Barangay Sinawal is considerably one of the barangays with low income constituents, dominantly IPs (Blaan). They  worked as pineapple and corn farm laborers with high involvement of children (25%) and youth who have not gone  or dropped from school due to financial constraints. Parents can hardly provide for the basic needs of children  (foods, clothing and school supplies) that will eventually discouraged the latter from pursuing their studies. 

7


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

Accordingly, per family have an average of 5 children and most women marry as early as 15yo. They engaged in   premarital   sex   with   young   partners.   Apparently   this   also   affects   children’s   nutrition.   Aside   from   problems   on   education and malnutrition particularly among IP families, they also have poor access to safe drinking water. They  only generate their water from deep well (submersible pumps) and a certain remote purok depend solely on a  spring. This water insufficiency has also affected the health of children as they became vulnerable to water­ borne  disease like diarrhea (common also are fever and cough).While adults usually suffer from influenza, lung disease,  arthritis and hypertension. The doctor only comes once a week on an irregular basis. Notably, only one barangay   health   center   is   present.   The   absence   of   other   birthing   health   facility   explains   the   continuing   practice   of   birth  delivery at home among women.  So   far,   for   2011,   only   Rotary   Club   and   Student   Body   Organization   of   Mindanao   Polytechnic   College   initiated  medical mission, relief operation and feeding among the indigent children and families. Parents were also observed   to have low awareness on children’s rights. The BCPC as well, was considered non­functional as the barangay  officials themselves poorly support children’s rights and programs. Upper Labay Around 20 % of the children are not attending elementary education and work as family helpers/farm laborers. This  goes up to 25% children who were not able to proceed to High School and resort to being sales ladies and house  maids in the city to augment family’s income. The distance of the school from house can also be one of the reasons   of the declining rate of the schooling –going children. In the case of those who lives in purok 8, the farthest purok,   the day care children has to walk 30 minutes to reach the school. While high school students have to walk for two   (2) hours from the farthest purok. In general, there are about 50% of children below 18yo who are compelled to   work or in the case of female children, they engage in  premarital pregnancies and later are arranged for marriage  as early as 12yo partly believing that they might escape life’s   adversity. While others spent their time hanging   around  in  the  neighborhood  while  smoking,  and  worst   is,  there  are  few  reported   cases  of  ransack or  theft   by  minors. The BCPC also is not active. There are even parents who do not know the rights of children. Only few external   support   was   gained   by   BCPC   from   NGOs   like   RD   Foundation,   Compassion   (religious   group)­both   providing  educational assistance and Sagitarius Mining Incorporated (which comes 3x last year for medical mission). The   barangay also  has  only  1  midwife  and  no  doctor  except  during  “City  Hall  sa  Barangay”.Recently,  7  Day  Care  children   were   diagnosed  having  TB  disease.   Commonly,   they  suffer  from  cough   and  cold.    About  30%  of  the   population has no PHIC. There are only more than 100 elderly are living from the total population who have poor access to water and with   poor living condition (still working in the farm). Presently, majority of the people depend only on the spring water  which is quite insufficient (available only during morning and afternoon). In fact, few children got LBM from drinking   water from spring. There is an alternate source, a deep well owned by private individual. Folks of purok Paradise  for instance have to walk 3­5 mins. to reach and pay an amount for the water from this deep well. A 4Ps survey was already conducted and it is hopefully to be implemented this year 2012.   DSWD had been  already   operating   in   the   place   for   the   CASH   for   WORK.   Each   family   receives   P2,500.00.   Some   microfinance  groups also offer loan opportunities. Farming and charcoal­making are the main source of income of the people. On   the average, families have 5­7 children.          2. Sarangani Location: 

8


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

Scale & demographic data: Sarangani is   a province of   the Philippines located   in   the SOCCSKSARGEN region in  Mindanao.   Its   capital  is Alabel and borders South Cotabato to the north and Davao del Sur to the east. The Province has a total land area of 4,100.42 square kilometers.  Among the seven (7) municipalities comprising  the province, Malungon has the largest land area (896.63 sq. km.) comprising 21.78% of the total land area of the   province, followed by Glan (697.6 sq. km).  Maitum, with only 324.35 sq. km is the province's smallest municipality  with a 7.91% share of the provincial land area. Spoken languages: The population (305,321) of Sarangani is a mixture of people from various regions and tribes. The languages and  dialects spoken by its people are likewise varied. Cebuano is the most widely spoken language, particularly in the  municipalities of Alabel, Glan, Malapatan, and Malungon. In the municipalities of Maitum and Kiamba, Cebuano is  second only to llocano as the most spoken dialect. The major dialects spoken by the ethnic groups include, among  others, B'laan, Tagakaulo, Maguindanao, and T'boli. Number of School­Going Children The province has a total of 123,428 children enrolled in primary and 52,619 for secondary education respectively as   of 2010­2011.  Ethnicity The B’laan tribe is mostly found in the rural barangays of General Santos City and in almost all of the municipalities   of Sarangani province.  The T’boli are mostly found in the boundaries of Sarangani and General Santos that face   towards South Cotabato, as the T’boli ancestral area is found in Lake Sebu, Tampakan and T’boli, South Cotabato,  the latter two municipalities directly bordering Sarangani and General Santos. In the expansion barangays, the distributions of ethnicity are as follows: Ethnicity IP Barangays

Barangay Kawas, Alabel Barangay Maguling, Maitum

B’ L A A N  

M A N O B O

30% 15%

5%

Moro T’ B O L I

T E D U R A Y S

M A G U I N.

T A U S U G

27% 38%

3% 12%

M A R A N A O

Christian B A D J A O

S A M A L

(Bicolano,Wa ray,Cebuano ,   Tagalog,  Illongo,  Ilocano)

40% 30%

Total

100% 100% 9


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

Barangay Tambilil, Kiamba Table 2

25%

40%

35%

100%

Status: The  context   of   Sarangani  province   and   General  Santos  City  are   practically  same   under  this  heading.  As  with   General   Santos   City,   the   Settlers   generally   follow   the   norms   of   getting   birth   certificates   for   their   children   and  marriage certificates for marriages. Issuance of birth certificates are quickly facilitated particularly if the births are  made in licensed birthing facilities.  But a good portion of the Moro populace and a large part of the indigenous tribes of the province do not observe   this practice, both in applying for birth certificates and marriage certificates. Legal documentation of personal status   and condition is regarded as a foreign practice and not part of their socio­cultural way of life. For them, the legal   bond is made through “word of honor”.   In addition, almost all indigenous communities are remote in location from the province’s centers of socio economic   activity and access routes. Traveling from their comparatively isolated locations to these centers is not only tedious,  expensive and time consuming. In several cases, access to these communities can only be made by horse back or  on foot. As a result, when time comes that they badly need to avail of social public health and education services provided  by government, they have a hard time doing so. Only at this juncture do they work for the application of such birth   and marriage certificates in order to avail of the public service provided by government, thus creating complications.

Access to Education: The context of Sarangani province and General Santos City are practically same under this heading. As with General Santos City, elementary and secondary education facilities (public schools) are generally present  within and around the vicinity of the barangays identified for children aged 5 to 16 to go to.  However, the issue is not on the presence or availability of basic public education facilities, but on the accessibility   to these facilities. In several cases, children are required to walk between 30 to 45 minutes from their homes to the   schools every day in order to avail of basic education. In addition, the roads and access routes of these barangays  are   usually   undeveloped   or   underdeveloped.   Concretization   of   roads   are   usually   limited   to   the   portion   of   the   barangay where the local barangay hall is located, connecting this to the interconnecting routes leading to the   poblacion or municipal center. Beyond this point, dirt roads abound. For those fortunate to find support for tertiary education, the only affordable public education facility within the  general vicinity of the SOCSKSARGEN area is the Mindanao State University – General Santos City campus,  located in Barangay Tambler of that city. At a rate of PHP50.00 per unit, the aspiring undergraduate can enroll and   go to college. No other public tertiary education facility is found within that area. Problems and Protection concerns:  BCPC Functionality The province has its own way of monitoring the BCPC functionality as follows: Basic, Progressive, Mature, and  Ideal.   Its   effort   on   advocating   children’s   rights   are   apparent   in   most   of   the   municipalities.   Among   the   three   expansion areas, the municipality of Maitum was excellently known on its being “Most Child­ Friendly Municipality”   for two consecutive years (2008 and2009). However, affected by shifting (if not retained in the position) of political  leaders every after election, it unsurprisingly lost its title. On the other hand, based on the result of the BCPC  Assessment last May, 2011, Alabel has the poorest rate.  Out of its 12 barangays, majority (10) rated only in the  “Basic”Level  of  Functionality  including   Barangay Kawas  as  it  is  weak  in   most   of   the   indicators/criteria.   Finally,  Kiamba is considerably on its much bettereffort (all of its barangays ) rated “mature” just needing minimal endeavor   into becoming “Ideal”. The PCPC Concept

10


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

The concept of the Purok Council for the Protection of Children is yet non­existent in the entire province. With  PASALI’s possible expansion and intervention, PCPC will soon be introduced. Challenges faced on access to rights and services The level of support of the local officials to children’s program had largely contributed to the functionality or non­ functionality of BCPCs in the area as a whole. Problems faced by children ages 5 – below 18  In Sarangani, poor access to health and drinking water are also notable. This is largely attributed to the remoteness  of the facilities from the communities where IPs and Moros thrive. Malnutrition and water­borne disease like  diarrhea are encountered by the children. Similarly, illiteracy and incidence of school drop­out are also issues that  concern these ages.     Problems faced by parents with children ages 5 – below18 Unemployment, lack of orientation on becoming responsible parents, lack of livelihood skills,and lack of information   and knowledge on the accessibility of education and public health programs of the  government and CSOs are the   problems faced by parents with children ages 5 – below18. Problems faced by youth ages 13 – 32  Dropping out from school either due to lack of interest or lack of financial support by parents, lack of appropriate   skill needed for employment, discrimination by the majority culture especially among IPs/Moros, engagement to   premarital sex, alcoholic drinking and drug addiction. Problems faced by women, particularly ages 12 and above  Early marriage, lack of seminar on responsible parenthood, poor access to educational and health that lead to the  increasing infant and maternal mortality rate Capacity & Stakeholders:  Government agencies, NGOs and other sector bodies are working in the area for the development of these families  Sarangani is a privileged niche where CSOs converging to address various issues and concerns in theprovince.   Aside from the government’s agencies (DSWD, DepEd, and the like) SPECTRUM, an organized network of CSOs  is active in its social commitment to help alleviate the living condition of the people.  Attitudes It is promising to note that the present dispensation of local provincial government of Sarangani is forward looking   and   is   committed   to   the   principle   and   practice   of   inter­sectoral   and   inter­stakeholder   partnerships   and   convergences.  Several   social   protection   projects  focused   on   children   and   their   mothers   have   been   initiated   by   the   provincial   government. Of note is their own version of the local conditional cash transfer program, which is geared to help the  most remote locations of the province which the national cash transfer program, the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino  Program have not yet entered into, or will enter into but in a year’s time or so. Though their funding constraints prevents them from addressing the comparatively deplorable  social conditions of  rural barangays, the provincial government welcomes help and assistance from private and civil society groups to  temporarily provide the lacking services.  On the part of the local constituents of the appraised barangays, they are satisfied with the level of responsiveness   of their barangay local government, but lament to the limitations that they can do to address perennial social ills  therein. Another issue is the comparatively lower level of technical know­how that the people perceive their local   government officials have in local governance. Civil society is likewise well organized in the province. Civil society organizations belong to either the Area­based  Standards Network (ABSNET)  Sarangani­General Santos,  and/or  to  the  Sarangani Province  Empowerment  for  Community  Transformation  Forum  (SPECTRUM).  Both are  civil society networks with  social protection  thrusts.  Though all are part of one network of CSOs or another, convergence on addressing the plight of children in rural   areas having multicultural contexts is practically non­existent, with the exception of one or two short­term, stand­ alone social service delivery activity in specific locations.

11


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

FGD Results Expansion barangays Barangay Kawas, Alabel Barangay   Kawas   has   multi­cultured   population   (a   total   of   5,   167   based   on   the   NSO,2007)composed   of   25   %  Maguindanaon, 15 % B’laan, and 60 % Bisaya. Two puroks are populated with B’laan families who are situated in  the remote and mountainous part of the barangay. Weak access to basic social services is apparent as only 1   elementary and high school respectively are present in the area. While only 3 day care centers are established to   cater the children aged 4 to 5 years old from 15 puroks. Attributed to the increasing percentage (20­25%) of out­of­school children (particularly B’laans) of the barangay are   the   far   distance   and   the   inability   to   provide   for   the   daily   fare   and   allowances   of   the   school­   going   children.   Accessible by a single motorcycle, the children will travel daily for about 15 minutes through rocky and mountainous   roads  to   get   to   the   school  and   pay  P80.00/child   fare   for   a   just   1­way  ride.   Consequently,   these   out­of­school   children will end up working in the farms. In addition, jet matic pumps are used widely by the people as source of   their drinking water. Only the barangay health center is available to cater for the medical concerns of the dominant poor population. The   government­paid doctor comes only once a week. Fever and colds are the common illnesses among children (6  years old and below). Majority of the problematic children engaged in premarital sex as early as 15 years old. While   others are addicted to computer games, alcoholic drinking and smoking.  Barangay Maguling, Maitum Only 58% out of 193 children aging 3­5 years old are enrolled in DCC, only 68% ( 96 out of 142)children aging 0­ 2yo are weighed monthly and 59 out of 88 pregnant women are immunized against tetanus,89% (482 out of 541)  families have access to safe drinking water and only 80% use sanitary toilet. The barangay is quite inaccessible creating pressure among the residents especially Moros, avail immediate basic   social services. Common health problems among the children aging 6 years old and below are malnutrition and   skin irritations. While those of 7 years old and above, aside from illiteracy, school­going children are at risks of   being not able to continue their studies due to financial constraints. Mostly, these children help their parents in the   farm and household chores instead.Most of the households solely depend on water pumps for their drinking water  making them susceptible to diarrhea and other water­borne diseases.      Barangay Tambilil, Kiamba About 25% children are not going to school and 60% worked as farm laborers (copra, palay, and corn); despite the   presence of elementary and high school facilities; few cases of children physically injured by family members were  noted, most of the children below 18 years old engage in drug addiction, alcohol drinking and theft, IPs aging 13­14   years old are into premarital sex already. On the average, per family have 4 children. Women marry as early as 16  years old.  Access to safe drinking water is poor as dominant of the households depend on pitcher pumps (within the house).   Same is true with accessibility to health facility. The barangay has no doctor of its own (no lying in and no doctor’s   clinic)­people seek medical attention from municipal doctor; they still seek help from traditional healers when sick.  Further, most of the children suffer from cough, skin irritation, and asthma while adults are also prone to cough,   arthritis, and hypertension. Expectant mothers has to travel for about 20 minutes to reach the municipal birthing   home. There are a few cases of women losing their babies at birth. Significantly, only 20% are senior citizens in the   community who also live in a poor environment with less access on government basic social services. Moro and settlers register their children’s birth as compliance to school requirements and there is a large portion of   IPs who needs assistance in complying birth registration requirements.   Residents are quite aware on the value of sanitation. They use latrine. Usually they eat rice, kamote, cassava,   vegetables, and own­raised livestocks (e.g. chicken) and fish, and retain traditional practice of gathering food from  swamps like “kangkong”. 12


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

  3. Sultan Kudarat Location

Palimbang and its neighboring areas

Palimbang up close Scale and demographic data: Palimbang is a 3rd class municipality in the province of Sultan Kudarat, Philippines. According to the 2000 census,  it   has  a   population   of   43,742  people  in   8,191   households.  Almost   half   (47%)  of   the   province’s  population   are  children. For the year 2008, there are approximately 323, 800 children 0­17 years old in Sultan Kudarat. Spoken languages: Mixed population is found in Sultan Kudarat Province. In Palimbang alone, Maguindanaon is widely spoken by the  people followed by Bisaya, Ilonggo, B’laan, and Manobo. Number of School­Going Children

13


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

For the school year 2008­2009, a total of 104, 686 school children were enrolled in 431 public and 15 private   elementary schools in the province. Secondary school enrolment for both public and private totaled to 44, 084.   These children attend school in the 51 public and 29 private  secondary schools found within the municipality.  Ethnicity Different ethnic tribes are present in Palimbang such as B’laans, Tedurays, and Manobos constitute approximately   twenty (20) percent of the provinces total population (NSO). The Teduray and Manobo tribes are found mostly in  the highlands of Palimbang, Sen. Ninoy Aquino, Bagumbayan, Esperanza, Lebak, and Kalamansig while B’laans  can be found in Lutayan and Columbio. In the expansion barangays, the distributions of ethnicity are as follows: Ethnicity Moro

IP Barangays

Barangay Kanipaan Barangay Dumolol Barangay Napnapon Table 3

B’ L A A N  

M A N O B O

2% 30% 30%

T’ B O L I

T E D U R A Y S

M A G U I N.

43% 10% 20%

T A U S U G

10%

M A R A N A O

Christian B A D J A O

S A M A L

(Bicolano,Waray ,Cebuano,  Tagalog,  Illongo, Ilocano) 

55% 60% 40%

Total

100% 100% 100%

Status: The context of Sultan Kudarat province, Sarangani province and General Santos City are practically same under   this heading. As with Sarangani and General Santos City, the Settlers of the province generally follow the norms of   getting birth certificates for their children and marriage certificates for marriages. Issuance of birth certificates are   quickly facilitated particularly if the births are made in licensed birthing facilities.  But a good portion of the Moro populace and a large part of the indigenous tribes of the province do not observe   this practice, both in applying for birth certificates and marriage certificates. Legal documentation of personal status   and condition is regarded as a foreign practice and not part of their socio­cultural way of life. For them, the legal   bond is made through “word of honor”.   In addition, almost all indigenous communities are remote in location (upland areas) from the province’s centers of   socio economic activity and access routes. Traveling from their comparatively isolated locations to these centers is  not only tedious, expensive and time consuming. In several cases, access to these communities can only be made   by horse back or on foot. Also, there are three municipalities of Sultan Kudarat (Palimbang, Lebak, and Kalamansig) that are coastal and are  very much distant from the main cluster of municipalities of the province, as well as the provincial center in Isulan.   For one to travel from Isulan to Palimbang, one must pass through South Cotabato province to the south, then   General Santos City, then the western corridor of Sarangani Province before finally reaching Palimbang. For one to  travel to Kalamansig and Lebak from Isulan, one must pass through central Maguindanao to the north, almost   reaching the borders of Cotabato City at Awang, Datu Odin Sinsuat, before turning southwest to the Upi area of   Maguindanao before finally reaching Kalamansig. Palimbang and Kalamansig face each other over the Celebes  Sea, which is an 8­hour ride across by pump boat. As a result, when time comes that they badly need to avail of social public health and education services provided  by government, they have a hard time doing so. Only at this juncture do they work for the application of such birth   and marriage certificates in order to avail of the public service provided by government, thus creating complications. Access to Education: The context of Sultan Kudarat province, Sarangani province and General Santos City are practically same under   this heading.

14


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

As   with   Sarangani   province   and   General   Santos   City,   elementary   and   secondary   education   facilities   (public   schools) are generally present within and around the vicinity of the barangays identified for children aged 5 to 16 to   go to.  However, the issue is not on the presence or availability of basic public education facilities, but on the accessibility   to these facilities. In several cases, children are required to walk between 30 to 45 minutes from their homes to the   schools every day in order to avail of basic education. In addition, the roads and access routes of these barangays  are   usually   undeveloped   or   underdeveloped.   Concretization   of   roads   are   usually   limited   to   the   portion   of   the   barangay where the local barangay hall is located, connecting this to the interconnecting routes leading to the   poblacion or municipal center. Beyond this point, dirt roads abound. For those fortunate to find support for tertiary education, the only affordable public education facility within the  general vicinity of the SOCSKSARGEN area is the Mindanao State University – General Santos City campus,  located in Barangay Tambler of that city. At a rate of PHP50.00 per unit, the aspiring undergraduate can enroll and   go to college. No other public tertiary education facility is found within that area.

BCPC Functionality In general, BCPCs in the municipality of Palimbang are inactive despite government’s mandate. People even have  no concept on what BCPC is and how it functions. Hence, the need for our intervention. The PCPC Concept The concept of the Purok Council for the Protection of Children is yet non­existent in the entire province. With  PASALI’s possible expansion and intervention, PCPC will soon be introduced. Challenges faced on access to rights and services The level of support of the local officials to children’s program had largely contributed to the functionality or non­ functionality of BCPCs in the area as a whole. Problems faced by children ages 5 – below 18  Poor health condition among children aging 5 to 9 years old is observed. Children apparently lack proper medical  attention like immunization and deworming during their infancy. While children who nearly reach the finish line to  exit from the portal of elementary education and those who are aspiring to avail secondary education are at risk of  being affected to the family’s economic hardship. Hence, ending up being parents’ right hand to assist household   chores or attend to younger siblings. While others work in the neighboring urban areas as housemaids or nannies.  Problems faced by parents with children ages 5 – below18 Parents of children aging 5­18 below are generally struck with combination of problems. Financially, they fear of   being   unable   to   sustain   the   latters’   growing   demand   for   education   due   to   income   insufficiency.Psychosocially,  unlike parents of settlers (Christians)due to lack of awareness on the rights and welfare of children, they might not   be able to guide, understand, and provide the needs of the latter especially those entering the period of puberty that   are entitled to enjoy their being. Problems faced by youth ages 13 – 32  The   lack   of   opportunity   to   enjoy   the   benefit   of   being   teenagers   (13­   19yo)   unlike   those   in   the   urban   areas,   illiteracy/low   educational   attainment,   lack   of   livelihood   trainings   and   skills,   and   unemployment   are   among   the  leading problems of   youth ages 13 – 32 particularly IPs and Moros.  Problems faced by women, particularly ages 12 and above  IP women, in particular, as early as 12 years old and above are deemed as domestic objects.  They are deprived of  availing or furthering their studies. Without or lack of proper orientation, they are force to perform heavy duties  expected of being a wife and a mother. Biologically, their lives also are at risk especially during pregnancy (12 and  below 18 years old) and child birth delivery. Attributed to the absence of a health facility within the community,  these women are also deprived of the right to receive prenatal and postnatal checkups.   15


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

Capacity & Stakeholders:  Government agencies, NGOs and other sector bodies working in the area for the development of these families  The DSWD’s CCT and Social Pension are catering the poor families and senior citizens. PASALI, in partnership  with line Department of Agriculture, largely contributed to the agricultural development in the area. In addition,  education of IP children was made accessible through the advocacy and networking effort of PASALI with DSWD   and Department of Education.  Attitudes Though he present dispensation of local provincial government of sultan Kudarat is young and known to be forward  looking,   it   is   heavily   influenced   by   the   traditional   politicians   of   the     previous   administration.   Nevertheless,   in  principle, they are committed to inter­sectoral and inter­stakeholder partnerships and convergences.  Though their funding constraints prevents them from addressing the comparatively deplorable  social conditions of  rural barangays, the provincial government welcomes help and assistance from private and civil society groups to  temporarily provide the lacking services.  On the part of the local constituents of the appraised barangays, they are satisfied with the level of responsiveness   of their barangay local government, but lament to the limitations that they can do to address perennial social ills  therein. Another issue is the comparatively lower level of technical know­how that the people perceive their local   government officials have in local governance. Civil   society   is   not   as   organized   as   those   in   South   Cotabato   and   Sarangani   provinces.   But   there   are   well   established NGOs that are based in General Santos City, Koronadal City, and even as far as Cotabato City that   have implemented and are still implementing projects in several communities in the province. FGD Results Expansion barangays in Palimbang, SK Barangay Dumolol Barangay Dumolol has almost similar social concerns with the neighboring barangays.  Manobo children from Sitio   Kidupong invest sweat in hiking daily just to reach the 1.5 hour elementary school located at the center of the   barangay. High school children on the other hand, have to walk for couple of hours or more to avail secondary   education at the other neighboring barangay. This poor access to education affects the increasing number of out­ of­school   children   (about   20%­25%)   especially   those   dwelling   upland.   Sadly,   there   is   no   existing   government   program on Basic Literacy or Alternative Learning System that could have saved these children from toiling in the   farm and getting married early (among the IPs), drug addiction, alcoholism, smoking, and premarital pregnancy  (among the Christian children). Absence of a health facility combined with poor access to safe drinking water also adds up to the people’s burden   especially   during   emergency   situation.   They   still   have   to   traverse   their   patients   through   the   20   minute­ride  municipal clinic where the doctor is available. However, the facility is poor enough to confine and accommodate the  patients   for   thorough   medical   attention.   Several   cases   of   infant   or   children’s   death   were   reported   due   to  dehydration and complications as immediate medical action was not provided.       Barangay Napnapon PASALI chose Barangay Napnapon because it is where its model IP community (Sitio Biao) is located. Sitio Biao   has 1 Day Care Center and Elem School (Gr 1­3) facilitated by PASALI for recognition in Department of Social   Welfare Office and Department of Education. The children have to walk for almost 1 hour from neighboring puroks  to school at Sitio Biao. On the average, per family has 8­9 children (1 wife) and 15 for multiple wives (2­3). Cases  on premarital pregnancies are common among IPs. Usually, women marry at age 15yo. Last two years ago, 4  women lost their babies at birth. While 1 woman died of giving birth. Children below 18 years old encounter problems on lack of educational supplies, slippers, and nutritious foods.   Fortunately, there is no report on children being apprehended for any major offense. From uphill, the police station 

16


Subiyah Bldg., Fil-Am Avenue, Purok 11-C, Barangay Fatima, General Santos City, Philippines 9500 E pasaliphilippines@yahoo.com.ph T(+63) (0) 9162818118 Wpasaliphilippines.org Facebook Migrant’s initiative transforms community through technology and Tri-people empowerment.

can be reached for 2 hours (7 kms.) hike down to the poblacion, while the barangay health center is accessible for   a 3.5­ hr. walk (14 kms).  The   residents   encounter   some   negative   experiences   since   they   became   beneficiaries   of   4Ps.   Recently,   they  discover removal of some names from the list if concerned beneficiaries are not present during/upon release of the   4Ps allowances. Notably, Cash for Work by DSWD in the community is not present despite the economic condition   of the people and availability of community farm lands in the area suitable for agricultural activity. Moreover, people have to walk for half kilometer to fetch drinking water from spring. Sadly, last 2008, many died of   cholera dominantly children  (27).  Aside from rice,  corn, camote, vegetables, chicken/ducks, pork,  and  fish,  the  residents also produced food from bamboo shoots, mush rooms, and “paco”. Milk is not properly introduced to kids  as parents are financially unstable to provide for it. Children commonly suffer from diseases like cough, colds,   fever,  diarrhea,  dizziness, stomachache,  sore  eyes,  blindness (1:3  children),  asthma,  and physical disability (2  cases). Same illnesses also are suffered by adults including cataract, arthritis,tumor, and hypertension. Processing of Claim for ancestral domain thru PASALI is on going. Main source of income are farming (corn/rice),   backyard gardening, and carpentry averagely earning P4,000.00­P6,000.00 monthly. Families mostly dwell in small  houses made of bamboo and nipa huts or cogon grass. Barangay Kanipaan Barangay Kanipaan is also a niche of a mixed ethnicities of people. Comprising the majority are the settlers with  55%, second in line are the 43 % Maguindanaons, and 2% are the migrating Manobos from uphill who avail of the   secondary education at the Poblacion of the municipality. In total, 25 % of the school­aged children are not attending school due to financial constraints and losing their   interest as neglected by OFW parents. Large part of them seeks refuge to drug dependency, alcoholism, smoking,  and simply loitering around the neighborhood. In most cases, female children as early as 14 years old end up being   single mothers while other male children are forced to help their parents in farm and fishing activities. As to then   accessibility to education, this is poorly illustrated on the presence of only 1 elementary school and absence of high   school facility in the area and only 2 day care centers to accommodate 4 to 5 years old children for preschool   education. Aspiring high school children labor for a 3­ km. hike daily to reach the high school facility in Milbuk, the  neighboring barangay.   Poor access to safe drinking water is also putting people’s lives at risk. Both children and adults became prone to  diarrhea as they get their water from shallow well. Sitio Donation residents have to spend 1 km walk just to fetch   water from the well.    Sick people hardly get immediate medical support and attention as only 1 health facility exists in the area. Aside   from   the   medical   doctor’s   absence,   affordable   medicines   are   available   only   from  the   other   adjacent   barangay  making   them,   especially   children;   suffer   from   fever   due   to   complications   and/   or   infections.   Sadly,   half   of   the  population is not facilitated by the government to avail of the health insurance while only 1 medical mission was  given by the local government last year.   The only NGO present in the area is PASALI Philippines Foundation that is deeply concerned with the tri­people   empowerment.   Specifically,   it   provides   the   appropriate   livelihood   trainings  for  the   youth   who   were   not   able   to   continue their schooling. It also addresses the farmers’ concerns and alleviates their living condition through its  program on Farm Support Scheme and practice on Systems of Rice/ Corn Intensification. 

 

17


Children's Desk Appraisal Study  

Appraisal study conducted in 10 target villages for the Second Phase project with Cordaid.

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you