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WHAT DOES SOCIETY MEAN TO YOU?

“Ostensibly, art rarely impacts fundamental social needs directly as, for instance, law might in its effort to maintain order and peace or as humanitarian organizations might in providing food during famine. Art and design can even seem utterly insignificant in the face of social crises like war and poverty. However, the role of Facebook and Twitter in recent revolutions evinces the potency of design against tyranny. Ghandi’s advocacy of Homespun beautifully used design to articulate Indian social values to combat British oppression. Neither social networks nor Homespun were originally conceived to combat inhumane regimes, but they both embody an amazing human quality that pervades good design—their character contains a fundamentally social core that is able to help civilization.” BRENDAN McCARTHY, Artist “Society, at its best, is the enabler of progress for humanity through the collective network of interactions, exchanging and feeding ideas to increase the social, cultural, ecological and economic benefits, and contributing to overall wellbeing.” BURAK CAKMAK, Vice President, Corporate Responsibility, Swarovski “To me, society is the tended garden where love, art, fashion, music, food, beauty, and everything else is that makes up the humanity of community. Society is not a rich hierarchy, or something secret, but an exclusive club that includes everyone!” JULIE GILHART, Fashion Consultant “Society is a collective conscious, an incredible network of talent that, together, can achieve change in the world” LAURENT CLAQUIN, Head of Kering Americas “An arena to conform or provoke” NEIL GILKS, Director of Educational Initiatives at the Cfda “A community, populace or organization that co-exists in unity with or in opposition to a lifestyle, culture or philosophy (High Society, the Society for Creative Anachronism, the Society for Ethical Culture, Café Society…the Lucia Society… or any anti-organization.)” PHYLLIS MAGIDSON, Costume Curator at the Museum of New York City “society: identity / hierarchy / boundaries / territories : collective fear” SIKI IM, Designer “Society, as quoted in one of my favourite songs, is a crazy breed. A mystery to me, that comes in a form of a greed to which we have agreed: wanting more than what we need, and until we have it all, we won’t be free. Reductio ad absurdum, in my humble opinion.” STEFAN SIEGEL, Founder of NOT JUST A LABEL “Society is an infinite human network of private and professional lives.” TOMIO TAKI, PhD, Managing Partner, Takihyo LLC Life Trustee, The New School Member, Board of Governors, Parsons The New School for Design “Society is a network of people-to-people relations: born from a common interest, and strengthened by a common goal.” TOMODACHI Initiative Staff “We stand not only on the shoulder of giants but also on the sharp arrow of time that has a massive tectonic shift written deep within the immediate and future capabilities of our society. The list is fascinating and overwhelming from a 2045 Avatar project, to the Human Brain Project, to the re-opening of CERN in 2015. Poetry sings through my thoughts, as I wonder at the marvels about to be discovered and debated; with a hope that we will ask the right questions, remain truly curious and open to it all.” Zowie Broach, B O U D I C C A


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EDITOR Shelley Fox Donna Karan Professor of Fashion Director, MFA Fashion Design and Society ART DIRECTOR Jonathan KYLE Farmer ma(rca) Coordinator, MFA Fashion Design and Society Associate Professor of Fashion Design DESIGNER Chris Ritchie, Coa Design TECHINICAL ADVISORS Jim Ford, Laura Sjoberg, Jean Hansen, QUAD / GRAPHICS Printed by QUAD / GRAPHICS

MFA Fashion Design and Society Program Parsons The New School for Design PH 2 is a showcase of work by the 2nd graduating year of students of the MFA in Fashion Design and Society at Parsons, a highly selective program for talented, emerging designers that was initiated through the support of alumna Donna Karan. The program has continued to collaborate with external partners on projects including Donna Karan, Diane von Furstenberg, Olivier Theyskens for Theyskens Theory, Zegna Baruffa, Sophie Hallett, and Kering (formerly known as PPR). The students work has been showcased internationally, receiving global recognition and awards through participation in select events and competitions including International Fashion Showcase during London Fashion Week, winning of the prestigious Feel the Yarn competition at Pitti Filati, and placing as finalists and the winning design in the Graduate Fashion Design Competition organized by The Metropolitan of Art Costume Institute in connection with Alexander McQueen. Recently graduate work was selected for the prestigious ITS Competition (International Talent Support) in Italy for 2013. It is the first time that an American school or program has ever been selected for this highly prestigious competition. Parsons The New School for Design is a global leader in design education, with programs that span the disciplines of design and the fine arts. With the launch of the first fashion design program in America in 1906, Parsons is credited with the rise of Seventh Avenue, the epicenter of American fashion. Parsons has educated generations of leading American fashion designers, including Tom Ford, Marc Jacobs, Donna Karan, Isaac Mizrahi, Tracy Reese, Narciso Rodriguez, Anna Sui, Prabal Gurung, Derek Lam, Ohne Titel, Thakoon Panichgul, Proenza Schouler, Vena Cava, Alexander Wang, and Jason Wu. For more information, visit www.newschool.edu/parsons. To learn more about the MFA Fashion Design and Society Program, visit www.newschool.edu/mfafds

Contents Map..............................................................................................20 Letters......................................................................................22 Exhibitions Phase 2......................................................................................... 24 ITS................................................................................................37 Drawing with Scissors..................................................................39 Projects DVF:DNA.......................................................................................44 Feel the Yarn.................................................................................47 Touch the Fabric............................................................................48 PPR/POTLUCK.............................................................................49 Students..................................................................................59

Acknowledgments and Contributors to the MFA Fashion Design and Society Alistair O’Neill, Curator and Writer Alnea Miskiv AMAZON FASHION Ande Webster-Ahmad, Senior Office Assistant, School of Fashion, Parsons Andrew Rosen, President and Founder, Theory Anke Gruendel, MFA Studio Manager, School of Fashion, Parsons Bailey Goldenbaum, Video Editor, Stylesight Ben Lee, Professor of Anthropology, The New School of Social Research Brendan McCarthy, Artist Bruce Nussbaum, Professor of Design and Innovation Burak Cakmak, Vice President of Corporate Responsibility, Swarovski Carlos Teixeira, Associate Professor of Design and Management, Parsons Chiara Taddeucci, Lanificio dell Olivo Chris Constable, Starworks Group Chris Ritchie, Designer, Coa Design Courtney Malenius, Associate Director, Office of Graduate Admissions, The New School Daniel Reynolds, Head of Print Design, DVF David Sakover, Administrative Assistant, School of Fashion, Parsons Diane von Furstenberg Denise Wallner, Assistant Director of Operations, School of Fashion, Parsons Donna Karan Edward Kim, The Edit Desk Eric Wilson, Fashion Critic of The New York Times Fep Events, Inc Floriana Betti Bindi, Part-Time Assistant Professor of Fashion, Parsons Francis Wong, Senior Vice President Creative Director, Stylesight Francois Henri Pinault, CEO of Kering Franklin Bober, Stylesight Hannah Whitaker, Artist Ilaria Taddeucci Sassolini—Lanificio dell Olivo Isabel Archer, Knitwear Designer, St John Jason Campbell, Founder of JC Report Jeff Staple, Entrepreneur John Quinn, Academic Technology, School of Fashion, Parsons Josephine Tirado, Program Administrator, School of Fashion, Parsons Julie Gilhart, Creative Consultant Keith Baptista, Founder of Prodject KERING Knit Illustrated LANIFICIO DELL OLIVO Laurent Claquin, Head of Kering Americas LFUSA Luciano Bandi—Loro Piana MADE MACHINISTS – Qi Yun He, Michelle Lee, Pyung Soo Seo, Mizuki Okamura, Shu Fen Chen Maija Komulainen, Senior Designer, Calvin Klein Collections Marco de Felice, Colombo Industrie Tessili, Division of Marioboselli Jersey Martin Greenfield, Greenfield Clothiers Marvic Paulo, Director of Video Production, Stylesight Mathan Ratinam, Assistant Professor, Director of the Humanitarian Design Lab, Parsons Maud Lescroart, Marketing Director of Sophie Hallett Mazdack Rassi, Founder and Creative Director of Milk Studios Merton Owens, LFUSA

Michael Seiz Michelle Cordero, Director of Operations, School of Fashion, Parsons Neil Gilks, Director of Educational Initiatives, CFDA Nick Ponton, SHADES OF GREY Patrick Robinson, Fashion Designer Patti Cohen, EVP—Global Marketing and Communications, Donna Karan International Pierre Rougier, Founder of PR Consulting Phyllis Magidson, Costume Curator, Museum of New York City Paola Rossi, Zegna Baruffa Samantha Giordano, NARS Cosmetics Sara Kozlowski, Associate Professor, Director of External Projects, School of Fashion, Parsons Sarah Broach, Business Consultant Sarah Mower, Fashion Critic Shannon Welsh, Starworks Group Sharmel Williams, LFUSA Siki Im, Designer Sophie Hallett Stefan Seigel, Founder of Not Just A Label Stephanie Soto, Assistant to Dean, School of Fashion, Parsons Su Ng, Associate Manager for Part-Time Faculty, School of Fashion, Parsons Susan Nickel, Freudenberg THE FANCY The Knit Resource Center Tod Greenfield, Martin Greenfield Clothiers Tony Irvine, Stylist Tom Pnini, Artist Yvonne Watson, Associate Dean, School of Fashion, Parsons Zowie Broach, Boudicca SCHOLARSHIPS The MFA Fashion Design and Society program is made possible by Donna Karan, the estate of Richard Obus, the estate of Stephen W. Mason, Reed Krakoff and Coach, UNIQLO Co., Ltd. and the U.S.-Japan Council, The Diller – von Furstenberg Family Foundation, The Fancy, Tomio Taki, LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, Inc., and Swarovski. Contact Shelley Fox Donna Karan Professor of Fashion Design Director, MFA Fashion Design & Society Parsons The New School for Design foxs@newschool.edu 212.229.8966 For Program Information: www.newschool.edu/mfafds All Press Inquiries Deborah Kirschner Communications and External Affairs The New School kirschnd@newschool.edu 212.229.5667 x 4310 All Admissions Inquiries Parsons The New School for Design Office of Graduate Admission 72 Fifth Avenue - 3rd floor New York, NY 10011 Phone: 212.229.5150 or 800.292.3040 Graduate inquiries: thinkparsonsgrad@newschool.edu Illustrations by: Neil Gilks

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MECHANICS OF DREAMS SINCE 1791

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www.girard-perregaux.com This image is from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ extensive photograph archive, which will be highlighted in the Academy Museum’s exhibitions and programs.


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Phase 2 was made possible due to the generosity and support of Kering with special thanks to:

Laurent Claquin, Head of Kering Americas Emily Crooker, Project Officer Kering Americas The MFA Fashion Design and Society would like to thank all its supporting partners:

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content

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map The MFA Fashion Design and Society program is visualized through the mapping of the students origin, their projects, competitions, internships, exhibitions and the finally their new beginnings of their careers. We thank all our contributors from designers, educators and industry speakers whom have all given their time to the Program thus ensuring its success.

STUDENTS: Melitta Baumeister – BERLIN, GERMANY Si Jing Chen (Cindy) – BEIJING, CHINA Abigail Lewis – NEW YORK, USA Julian Guthrie – NEW YORK, USA Jia Hua (Daisy) – BEIJING, CHINA Hannah Jenkinson – LONDON, UK Jae Woo Lee – SEOUL, KOREA Min Young Lee – SEOUL, KOREA Yunmeng Li (Claudia) – NEW ZEALAND / BEIJING, CHINA Lin Hai – BEIJING, CHINA Amelia Lindquist – LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA Ji Hye Nam – SEOUL, KOREA Iwo Piotr Panszczyk (Piotrek) – POLAND / AMSTERDAM Isabel Rio Torres Murciano – BARCELONA, SPAIN Anna Mercedes Stephenson – LONDON, UK Yung Chi Tsai (Alison) – TAIPEI, TAIWAN CONTRIBUTING DESIGNERS / LECTURERS Alistair O’Neill, Curator and Writer - LONDON Andrew Rosen, President and Founder, Theory - NYC Brendan McCarthy, Artist - NYC Daniel Reynolds, Head of Print Design, DVF - NYC Donna Karan - NYC Eric Wilson, Fashion Critic of The New York Times - NYC Francois Henri Pinault, CEO of Kering - PARIS Hannah Whitaker, Artist - NYC Isabel Archer, Knitwear Designer, St John – LOS ANGELES Jason Campbell, Founder of JC Report - NYC Jeff Staple, Entrepreneur - NYC Julie Gilhart, Creative Consultant - NYC Keith Baptista, Founder of Prodject - NYC Knit Illustrated – NYC Laurent Claquin, Head of Kering Americas - NYC Le New Black – PARIS Maija Komulainen, Senior Designer, Calvin Klein Collections - NYC Martin and Tod Greenfield, Greenfield Clothiers - NYC Maud Lescroart, Marketing Director of Sophie Hallett - PARIS Neil Gilks, Director of Educational Initiatives, CFDA - NYC Patrick Cabesset, Le Officiel, PARIS Patrick Robinson, Fashion Designer - NYC Pierre Rougier, Founder of PR Consulting - NYC Sarah Broach, Business Consultant - NYC Sarah Mower – LONDON Siki Im, Designer - NYC Stefan Siegel, Not Just A Label – LONDON Swarovski – LONDON The Knit Resource Centre – NYC Zowie Broach, Boudicca - LONDON PROJECTS Diane von Furstenberg - NYC Donna Karan - NYC Feel the Yarn - Florence, Italy and Tokyo, Japan Oliver Theyskens for Theyskens Theory - NYC PPR Potluck – NYC Sophie Hallett – Paris Touch the Fabric - Milan, Italy Zegna Baruffa - Florence, Italy and Shanghai, China 20


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EXHIBITIONS / AWARDS Alexander McQueen / The Metropolitan Museum of Art – NYC Arnhem Biennal, Arnhem, The Netherlands DVF at SIFEC International Fashion Design Student Expo, Shanghai Fashion Week, China Fashion’s Night Out at Ports 1961, NYC Feel the Yarn - Florence, Italy and Tokyo, Japan Iberoamerican Design Bieniale, Madrid, Spain Lost Time is Never Found Again, London Fashion Week – London Made in New York – NYC OO was it a Dream? Norway Touch the Fabric - Milan, Italy ITS, International Talent Support, 2013, Finalist Paula Cheng, Graduate of 2012 – Trieste, Italy Dutch Design Awards 2013, Finalist Elisa van Joolen, Graduate of 2012 – The Netherlands The Moon has a Complicated Geography, Elisa van Joolen, Graduate of 2012 – The Netherlands INTERNSHIPS (all NYC based) Calvin Klein Collections Cynthia Rowley Diane Von Furstenberg DKNY Edun LFUSA Keds Marc Jacobs Opening Ceremony Peter Som Philip Lim Polo Ralph Lauren Regatta The Row Three ASFOUR Tim Hamilton ALUMNI IN THE INDUSTRY Araks, NYC Calvin Klein Collection, NYC CK Jeans, Womenswear Knitwear Designer, NYC CK Jeans, Menswear Knitwear Designer, NYC Coach, Designer, NYC David Lerner Collection, NYC DKNY, Outwear Designer, NYC Donna Karan International, Knitwear, NYC Narcisco Rodriguez, Head of Knitwear Narcisco Rodriguez, Technical Designer Ralph Lauren, Black Label Menswear, Knitwear Designer, NYC

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laurent Laurent Claquin Head of KERING Americas First, I would like to congratulate all the Parsons MFA students on their incredible and inspiring work. I am truly impressed by the quality and level of expertise exhibited in these students’ collections. Specifically their global vision, aesthetic, and the seamless blending of creativity and wearability. In this evolving industry, talent and creativity are absolutely key to our business. Parsons offers unique and innovative programs to this group of globally diverse students, developing their individual perspectives by both fostering and challenging them. As the parent company to 20 luxury and sport/lifestyle brands, Kering believes in the importance of nurturing and cultivating young designers—which is why our partnership with Parsons is so important to us. This essential relationship building with the next generation of designers helps us in our business of cultivating the future of fashion. Kering is especially proud to support Parsons MFA students who we consider the future of the fashion industry. Congratulations again and I look forward to watching your careers blossom.

simon

Simon Collins Dean, School Of Fashion Since Donna Karan joined Parsons in recognizing the need for a world class MFA in Fashion back in 2008 I’m delighted so many of our industry friends have joined her. Their support helped us launch our MFA in Fashion Design and Society which last year graduated its first group of students to tremendous acclaim. Our MFA runway show was a highlight of New York Fashion Week, we staged an amazing exhibition in the Fashion District, and we produced the first issue of this magazine. The graduates of 2013 have maintained this standard of excellence by continuing to surprise us with their creativity, their breadth of skills, and their sheer professionalism. And so it is with great pride that we offer this second edition of our MFA magazine. It is testament to what Parsons students can achieve, with a little help from our friends. Great things lie ahead for the graduates of 2013 and we invite you to join us in supporting them.

shelley Shelley Fox Donna Karan Professor of Fashion and Director of MFA Fashion Design and Society If we are to maintain the spotlight on New York as a bright center and a resource for innovative design, we must nurture the next generation of talent right here. New York offers a unique and dynamic environment with a global perspective, which supports the cultivation of its future talent. This year I have been challenged and invigorated by the students’ personal visions, which have evidenced themselves throughout the projects and collections they have produced. Nothing is taken for granted with the talent that I have witnessed, and they have proven to be a continuing collective group of design thinkers. The internationalism and breadth of this 2nd graduating year has again proved to be vital to the growth and collaborative spirit of the next generation of designers. It is a privilege to now see them take their steps into the future and embark on their journey. 22


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exhibitions PHASE 2 ITS Drawing with Scissors


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piotrek 25


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isabel

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alison


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INTERNATIONAL TALENT SUPPORT

Paula Cheng, a graduate of 2012 from the MFA Fashion Design and Society program was selected as a finalist for ITS FASHION RESEARCH and is the first American graduate to ever been selected for this competition. She was amongst 10 finalists from 8 countries. The main sponsor DIESEL has been with ITS from the very beginning. Extract from ITS Press Release On 12 and 13 July the final event of the design international contest in the fields of fashion, accessories and jewelry, devoted to scouting and supporting young creative talents from all over the world, will be held in Trieste. The JURY for 2013 The finalists of ITS FASHION will be examined by: Imran Amed (Business of Fashion, a key blog for trendsetters), Lapo Cianchi (communication, special projects and international relation Director, Pitti Immagine), Laurent Cotta (in charge of contemporary design at the Musée Galliera in Paris), Floriane de Saint Pierre (Founder & Head of FSPSA and influential head-hunter), Deanna Ferretti (Maglificio Miss Deanna – Modateca), Nicola Formichetti (Diesel’s Artistic Director), Barbara Franchin (ITS Director & Project Supervisor) Harold Koda (Curator-in-Charge of the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum–New York), Sara Maino (Senior Editor Vogue Italia / Vogue.it), Ivana Omazic (Maison Martin Margiela) Anna Orsini (Strategic Consultant at British Fashion Council), Alessandra Rossi (Commercial Director Multi-Brand –YOOX Group), Renzo Rosso (President of OTB, backing the ITS project since its debut), Carla Sozzani (Galleria Carla Sozzani / 10 Corso Como), Marie Schuller (Head of Fashion Film at SHOWStudio), Ichiro Suzuki (winner of Fashion Collection of The Year in 2012). 38


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jKf Drawing with Scissors Designing and Patterning in 5D

2 D + 3 D = 5 D New York 2/13 Singapore 7/13 jonathan KYLE farmer ma(rca) Associate Professor of Fashion Design Coordinator MFA Fashion Design and Society jonathankylefarmer.com www.fashionfarming.com farmerk@newschool.edu


DRAWING WITH SCISSORS

D E S I G N I N G A N D PATTERNING IN 5D


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“If

clothes make the man, and man makes the clothes, is fashion a palindrome?”

So asks Jonathan KYLE Farmer, in his latest collection, Drawing with Scissors, which challenges the systematic assumptions underlying the creation and expression of fashion design. The traveling exhibition is composed of a series of exquisitely detailed, hand-rendered doll sculptures coaxed from humble white printer paper and combined with an animated film tracking their immaculate sentience in a conceptual fifth dimension. The result is a compelling presentation of provocative fashion forms humanized by intimate, sensitively wrought figurative details and immortalized in a continual loop of digital conception—a constant deconstruction and reconstruction of interlinking parts. Utilizing a skillset drawn from craft techniques ranging from fabric draping to fine woodworking, Farmer employed particulars such as dovetail joins, origami-esque folds and contiguous cuts to the doll sculptures, blurring the boundaries between their fashion form and their human form. As he pushes the concept of the palindrome outside of its comfort zone, he questions, “Where does the body begin? Where does the clothing end? If this philosophy of palindrome is considered and applied to the body as the last influence calculated into the design process, instead of the first, and in turn the clothes are used as the starting point from which to design the human body, what would the result be?” Farmer explores his query in a multilayered visual statement, conglomerating traditional bisects of craft and technology in a fusion of dimensionalities. “I work in a 2D process, I work in a 3D process, I use a lot of digital, I use a lot of analog, I move from a 2D process into a 3D process. A flat piece of paper gets folded in half, and then cut. That gets folded into a 3D process, and then it is digitized, and animated— yet it’s a 2D film, on a flat screen. I’m trying to find ways to make people realize that there is more than one way of doing something.” In the dual creative capacities of working as a fashion designer, and as a fashion educator in the Parsons MFA Design and Society program, Farmer’s approach to fashion is founded upon the belief that designers can innovate by re-imagining existent processes: “To me, it’s always been about how you’re looking at fashion. If you’re looking at it from one side, you know it from one side, and then it’s just that. But if you’re open to turning design around, or even looking through it, then you can change perceptions.” — Kira Craft 42


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projects DVF:DNA Feel the Yarn Touch the Fabric PPR/POTLUCK


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dvf:dna The Brief

During Fall semester 2011, the students were asked to explore their ‘Personal Identity’. Following on from this at the beginning of the Spring semester 2012 we asked them to understand DNA, not from a scientific perspective but from a design point of view. Firstly they were required to research and understand the DNA of Diane von Furstenberg, the woman and the company. The students visited the DVF head offices in the Meatpacking District in New York City and were given a presentation by the Directors of Design, Print and Embellishment. The questions were How has DVF defined herself and her label by doing what has been instinctive to her, and What processes has she gone through to get where she is today? How has her DNA been embedded within the brand? Human beings are all essentially the same on the inside but what makes us evolve and change is the small percentage of our makeup that is still not totally understood; the mutations.

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The students DNA, mutations, personality, and ability to evolve were being called on for this project brief. The aim was for the students to investigate their own design DNA and in turn mutate that with Diane von Furstenberg, the brand.


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claudia 45


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fty Feel the Yarn at Pitti Immagine Filati, Florence, Italy

hannah Pitti Filati trade fair hosted the third edition of FEEL THE YARN, the competition

for aspiring designers selected from the best international fashion schools.

Feel The Yarn is a training project which is organized by Toscana Promotion – Agenzia di Promotion Economica della Toscana and ICE – (Istituto nazionale per il Commercio Estero – Italian Trade Commission) in cooperation with CPF – Consorzio Promozione Filati and Pitti Immagine, to expand the creative knowledge of yarns manufactured by the best mills in Tuscany. Twenty young designers were in Florence from 4 to 6 July 2012. They presented their own creations, designed and knitted using yarns of 14 companies involved in the project. The theme of the 42 competing creations was “From Material to Immaterial”, conceived to encourage these young designers to interpret materials, yarns and colors to make them the real protagonists of their projects. The jury including public votes was composed of Janet Prescott, Fabric and Yarns Editor of Twist, Raffaello Napoleone, CEO of Pitti Immagine, David R. Shah, Publisher and Editor of Textile View and Laura Lusuardi, Fashion Director of Max Mara. This year there were students from the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology, Bunka Fashion College, Parsons The New School for Design, Polimoda, the Royal College of Art, the Fashion and Art Design Institute of Donghua University, Hochschule Niederrhein—University of Applied Sciences, Hochschule Luzern —Design & Kunst, Faculdade Santa Marcelina and The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

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The students from the MFA Fashion Design and Society were Alison (Yung Chi Tsai) and Hannah Jenkinson. Hannah received an Honoree mention from the judges of this years panel was paired with Lanificio Dell’Olivo, a company well known for its special and unusual fibres such as blends of African kid goats and Peruvian Andes baby alpacas. 47


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Dress straight neckhole soft; fabric without Neoprene behind

fabric bonded to Neoprene; loose fit; raglan sleeve

crystals on sleeves

crystals on pleats

about 10cm above the ankle

pleats flat inside bonded, loose hem.

melitta This

ttf Touch the Fabric 2012 at Pitti Immagine Filati, Florence, Italy

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year the organization Toscana Promotion introduced a second element to their competition, Touch the Fabric. Two students were selected from the MFA Fashion Design and Society, Melitta Baumeister and Jia Hua, who went on to collaborate with Italian fabric companies. Their work was presented at Milano Unica XV edition in September 2012.


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ppr The Brief PPR/Potluck

Through a game of chance the students were allocated a label from

those that sit under the PPR (now Kering) umbrella, and each student was asked to take on the role of the new Creative Director for one of the given labels, challenging the students to understand the legacy of each brand inherited whilst injecting –SELF- into the label.

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alison

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kering Professor Pinault Pays a Visit

Hannah Jenkinson, right, showing François-Henri Pinault, the chief executive of Kering, left, her work.

In September 2012 the 2nd year MFA students paid a visit to the PPR Americas (now known

as Kering) Head Office in New York to meet with Laurent Claquin for a presentation on the Kering companies, a presentation which expanded on the heritage and business foundation of each company.

The following companies were selected for the project: Alexander McQueen, Balenciaga, Bottega

Veneta, Gucci, Stella McCartney, YSL and Puma and the students were allocated a company by pulling a name out of a hat, known as the PPR Potluck project.

The project was developed over 4-5 weeks. On October 23rd the students were fortunate when

Laurent paid a visit to Parsons to view the final MFA projects in the auditorium where he was able to select 10 projects for François-Henri Pinault to view for his upcoming trip to New York.

Due to Hurricane Sandy, the visit by the CEO and other executives was cancelled. Fast forward to

January 30th 2013 and we had the honor, a surprise visit from Mr François-Henri Pinault and Laurent Claquin to view the work of the PPR Potluck project. Mr Pinault spent a considerable amount of time viewing the students’ work and giving them a personal critique, which was then followed by a 1 hour Q&A session with all the MFA students. We are both thrilled and honored to be collaborating again with Kering on the 2nd edition of the MFA Magazine. Note: PPR was officially changed to Kering in 2013. Full article available here: http://runway.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/06/professor-pinault-pays-a-visit Photography Credit: Erin Baiano 58


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melitta info@melittabaumeister.com +1 347 247 3420 www.melittabaumeister.com


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society? I see fashion always as a reaction to culture and social processes. As a designer being able to use fashion as a medium to reflect on society gives meaning to my work and ground to build on.

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thank you Vielen Dank an meine liebe Familie! 64


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biography Melitta Baumeister *1986 was raised in Germany. Her mother a tailor taught her how to sew from very early on. With the age of 16 Melitta attended a tailoring orientated high school. After completing tailoring school Melitta studied fashion design at University of applied Arts in Pforzheim until 2010. She completed a 6 month internship in the womens wear design department at Viktor & Rolf during her BA studies. In 2011 her BA collection was nominated for Apolda European Design Award. Her BA work has been published in “Fashion Thinking: Creative Approaches to the Design Process” in 2013, features as one of nine international fashion students. Melitta received a german student elite scholarship from German National Academic Foundation (Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes) and the full Parsons—Graduate Dean’s Scholarship which made her move to New York City in 2011 to attend the MFA program Fashion Design and Society at Parsons—The New School for Design. In 2012 she was nominated for “Touch the Fabric” competition in Milan/Italy.

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Photography: Paul Jung Creative direction: Timothy Baga Hair and Make-up: Tiffany Patton Model: Brianna-RED Model Management 68


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acknowledge Thank you Andreas Trick and Susanne Boden for supporting my ideas with material from CHT. Thank you Katharina for all you support throughout the last years. Marina thank you very much for your support. Thank you Anke for all your support. Alnea, thank you so much for your help. Thank you Dion for all your help. Thank you Paul Jung for shooting my work. Thank you Timothy Baga for your support. 70


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cause and effect A Film By Melitta Baumeister

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si jing Flower Tomb

chensj0709@gmail.com +1 347 221 4760 www.sijingchen.org


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acknowledge Robert Steir Chadney Spencer 77


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biography In a smooth going life, I always keep a pure and earnest heart to treat everyone and everything. Being attracted by the dark side of the universe. Animals and plants always are my best friends. Finding out the natural aesthetic and preserving them with the youngest and the most beautiful status, is my appreciation to keep the beauty forever.

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society? Society is infinite sea. Human beings are tiny fragile sand, Lying by the sea submarine will slowly worn smooth mellow. To see a World in a Grain of Sand. And a Heaven in a Wild Flower, Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour.

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thank you My parents: Houhua Chen and Lirong Wang, My main helper: Sirong Chen, Nelson Lo, Jue Jiang, My photographer: Weisi Dai and Hao Wu.

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Photography: Hao Wu Model: Dasha Thompson 84

Makeup: SijingChen


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abigail em dash _

abigail.daphne.lewis@gmail.com +1 618 803 8305 abigaildaphnelewis.com


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society? society: contains us / creates purpose / reduces us to parts of a whole — through relations, we mutually define each other. 88


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acknowledge schott ait glass global leathers loro piana supima freudenberg 91


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biography

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i design clothes for women who think. i design clothes for women who think. i design clothes for women who think. i design clothes for women who think. i design clothes for women who think. i design clothes for women who think. i design clothes for women who think.


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thank you tristan kraft nick jozanovic glen campbell anke gruendel floriana betti bindi susan nickel paul jung jin joo hong emily han ashlee young

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photographer / paul jung model / micaela dietrich studio manager / timothy baga hair / shannon wall makeup artist / ai yokomizo digital tech / sky oh grip / matt johnson 98


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julian Multi-Forward

julianguthrie@mac.com +1 718 773 9696 +1 917 539 6437 julianguthrie.com


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thank you Jeffery Banks Ryan Bernard Terry Dial Yvonne Watson Felice DaCosta Jonathan Kyle Farmer Shelley Fox Anke Gruendel Anna Alfaro Peter Niederlรถhner Francisco Costa Donna Karan George Guthrie Rosemary Guthrie Janice Guthrie Tim Guthrie Chana Benjamin Stephen Hardy Felicia Gironda Heather Taylor Larry Jordan May Tom Qu Yun He Doug Brandt Carlo Wijnands Zowie Broach Sarah Broach

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society? “Society” does not mean anything to me, as “society” does not mean, thus it cannot have a meaning… …To have a meaning, an intent is necessary, be it…a goal… a direction…an objective. “Society”, in so far as the word in of itself, does not have an intent. Society is life. It is the construct of how we as all beings live and organize our morals, values and attitudes. I write the response to this question as I am currently abroad… thus participating in a society that is not my own. I’m an American black gay male in a post-apartheid developing nation of South Africa. Here in Johannesburg, I have been told that to many black South Africans see my American nationality is seen as a privilege…a mark of “having made it”. Yet, I was also told that any public display of affection of homosexuality, could be life threatening…especially given that my partner is white. I’m staying in a hotel that is adjacent to the mall in which the school I’m teaching is located. Both are located behind fortified walls…as is the case with many homes and businesses here in Johannesburg. This is not the case in New York City. To save you as the reader from what could be a lengthy dissertation on my perspective of my current situation, observations and discussions with locals about the differences between and the similarities to Johannesburg and New York…and deservedly so, I simply end with… “Society” is what we as humans have chosen and choose to make it.

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biography Name: Julian Maurice Guthrie Sex: Male Nationality: American Place of Birth: Des Moines, IA Date of Birth: April 22, 1978 Siblings: None Current Residence: Brooklyn, NY 109


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acknowledge Jose Ballena Owner of Embroidery House Sponsor Anna Rosa Veliz Assistant to Owner of Embroidery House Sponsor “Tony” Tarek Bajati Consultant at USA Beading Sponsor Zack Faraj Owner of USA Beading Sponsor Anne Sampson Tannery Direct Sponsor

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Photographer: Mason Dent Model: Josiane Monteiro Model Agency: Major Model Management Hair and Make-up: Proma Mostafa 116


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jia A LOT

info@huajiastudio.com +1 347 854 8843 www.huajiastudio.com


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acknowledge Swarovski Element Get Silk Inc 121


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thank you First, I would like to thank my Mum for her strongest support of my two-year study. I would like to thank dear Yukun Cao for getting me through all the hard time and difficulties. Special thanks also goes to my sponsor Mr. Robert Wu and to my photographer Paul Jung. Finally, I would like to thank Siyang Liu, Kailu Guan, Renee Wang, Nelson Lo and all my friends that provide me most generous help in completing the collection. 123


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biography Jia Hua completed a bachelor in fashion design at Academy of arts and design, Tsinghua University before joining the MFA program. Jia Hua has worked and interned in different companies and studios, including Diane Von Furstenberg and Armani Collezoni retail store.

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Photographer: Paul Jung Model: Ana Leigh Cole Make up: Tiffany Patton Hair stylist: Lizzie Arneson Art director: Timothy Baga 130


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society? Rules, Relationships, Variations

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hannah My Heart La La La Hannah Jenkinson Hannah.Jenkinson@gmail.com +1 646 620 8242 +44 7742 340 881 http://hannahjenkinson.tumbler.com


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biography Hannah worked in the knitwear industry in London for a number of years before moving to New York to study. Her dream is to continue the reformulation of traditional crafts into modern uplifting clothing. Investments welcome. 135


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society? Society in terms of Fashion Design is about having an understanding of context. It is about historical, cultural and societal references, and being able to play with information and re-formulation. What is fashion, and what could it be in relation to our times. It is about tuning in to the subtle networks of communication that are around us, and feeling what is right. What is at the balance point of what has been seen and what hasn’t been seen.

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acknowledge Del Olivo Loro Piana Sheila’s Decorating The Knit Resource Centre Isobel Archer James Palmisano Maureen 139


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thank you Elizabeth Berdina Jenkinson Tony Jenkinson 143


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Photography: Stas May Model: Olivia Gordon, Ford NY Styling: Rebecca Dennett Hair: Kei Nakamura 146

Make up: Kuma


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jae Dis.Connect

JAE@jaewoolee.com +1 718 316 2991 jaewoolee.com


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HOW; The idea comes from a fabric manipulation

technique, the tearing of double-faced wool fabrics. There are many tiny threads in the space between the right and wrong side of the fabric which holds the fabric together. The tiny threads are removed one by one transforming the double-side fabric into separate two pieces creating wool fabrics creating a more sophisticated, lighter and softer fabric. Larger hand stitch lines transform the tiny threads with colorful threads allowing the fabrics to re-connect. I explore tailoring with the concept of connect and disconnect. My tearing technique is the disconnection, whereas my stitching technique is the connection.

The sense of color is key to my work. I explore color combination through the tearing and stitching techniques, where the soft color meets the vivid color and tiny threads combine with bold threads. CHALLENGES: I have to explore my unconventional techniques, unexpected colors, unique details, to challenge conventional ideas of beauty and taste. 149


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thank you My Parents, DAE SIK LEE, SU JIN LEE My Friends, EUN HEE PARK, HYUN JIN PARK 150


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society? Between me and you, us. Put the words. Try to find the meaning; Love, Hope and Believe beyound distance and difference.

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acknowledge Fabric Sponsor: Nancy Listorti, LANIFICLO F.LLI BACCI MFA Director: Shelley Fox, Jonathan KYLE Farmer 155


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Photographer: Sonja Georgevich Model: Miriam, Ford Models Make Up; Lizzie Lerman Hair Stylist: Dana Boyer 156


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biography I graduated from Ewha Womens University in Seoul, South Korea, majoring in fashion design. After working in Korean fashion industry in few years, I moved to New York to attend Parsons MFA program.

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dis.Connect A Film By Jae Woo

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min Curtain: The Redefining of Form Min Lee lee@minlee.net +1 646 206 7294 www.minlee.net


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society? We encounter others to observe, feel, acknowledge, evolve and revisit self.

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biography Min Lee was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea. After completing bachelor degree on Textile art. She moved New York City in 2007 where she worked for innovative fashion design studio, Rogan and Zero Maria Cornejo. After various projects she decided to get back to academia and to re discover her depth and vision for clothing at Parsons on the MFA program. She is determined to create simple, poised clothing without pretense. Her style is the mark of her heart, her convictions, and her intellect. She engages in a deeply intimate, yet calculated dialogue with the human form. Shared with this poetic intention is a rigorous attention to the formal elements of cut, line, proportion, and shape. 166


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acknowledge Limonta – Maurizio Issaco Mokuba – Dean Stadel Banner sign company – Nicole Piach Dormeuir - Luke Mayers Holland and Sherry - Martha Zulueta Greenfield clothiers – Tod Greenfield 169


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thank you Julian von der Schulenburg

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Photographer – Matin Zad Models – Marshall B at New York Models, 172

Max Runes at Wilhelmina Models


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claudia ORIGINS

claudia@claudia-li.com +1 347 909 4350 www.claudia-li.com


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society? Society is the reality check for me. It is a standard, which I want to surpass and be a part of the change. In the words of Mahamad Gandhi “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.� 176


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biography Claudia Li, 25, is from New Zealand. She was born in a small town by the south lake in China, spent her childhood in Singapore before moving to New Zealand. With a background in fine arts, Claudia graduated from China Central Academy of Fine Arts and earned her BFA in Fashion Design. During 2009 – 2010, Claudia travelled to London where she studied at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design. During her BFA, Claudia was heavily involved in Fashion Art, an international exhibition for conceptual and artistic fashion held every year. After her graduation, Claudia was selected for the 2010 Shanghai World Expo London Case ZED Pavilion Fashion Show. Claudia’s work was also selected to exhibit in major exhibitions like “2010 Reach and Touch International Contemporary Fashion Exhibition” and “2010 International Copyright Expo Fashion Show”. In 2011, Claudia moved to New York to join the MFA Fashion Design and Society program at Parsons. During the two-year program, she completed capsule collections inspired by projects with DVF and Bottega Veneta (PPR). Claudia has also developed a new technique, called “Roving”, which is used in her MFA final collection. She is currently living and designing in New York City. www.claudia-li.com


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acknowledge Lanificio Dell’Olivo S.p.a. Felise Erolal Maddie Chen Nelson Lo


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Photographer: Claudia Li Hair and Make up: Jie Li Model: Ali Walsh


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thank you My father Yifei Li, my mother Yanfang Wang, my family My mentors Shelley Fox and Jonathan Kyle Farmer Jie Li, Anke Gruendel, Sara Kozlowski, Yue Lv, Xi Chen, Gang Liu, Patrick Lee Yow, Stephanie Cooper, Cheng Zeng

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lin BLANK Lin Hai linhai@linhai.us www.linhai.us


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biography Originally came from Beijing and currently based on New York Had experience in Diane von Furstenberg Not only works as a fashion designer but also works on video and installation. 193


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acknowledge COLOMBO Spa Industri Tessili MARIOBOSELLI JERSEY Freudenberg LP 194


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society? Society means possibility.

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thank you Yingzi Cui Chunxie Lin Liuying He Shelley Fox Jonathan Kyle Farmer Anke Gruendel

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blank A Film By Lin Hai

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amelia MARK MAKING AMELIA LINDQUIST Amelia.lindquist@mac.com +1 562 221 0708 amelialindquist.com


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Growing up with a mother as an artist has always meant that my household was the place to be for crafting. The idea of hands-on creation was always with me and as time passed I accumulated more crafts. From an early age I truly learned to respect crafting for what it was, even though what I was doing might have been a somewhat naive, I recognized it as something that required skill, time, love and care. Of course my mother had a huge influence on both my sisters and I, but it wasn’t until I spent the early summers of my life learning how to bead tiny little pouch necklaces in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where the beads were cheap and the skill was that of the local Native Americans, that I started to realize how much I loved laborious crafts. I would always be obsessed whether it be beading, knotting friendship bracelets, origami or sewing little things for my friends. This obsession translated into the way I work with each project today.

Being a Pisces I contain the skill of a professional daydreamer and I always feel a strong sense of nostalgia in my work. Nostalgia is particularly relevant to the current project I am working on, which explores denim through mark making through light and examining light through the lense of my experience of growing up in California as well as a sort of nostalgic relief of denim construction through bonding.

My mother and grandmother had a real knack for sewing, for example my grandmother would sew all the family clothes for family trips and for my mom when she was young, and she invested her skill into making matching clothes for my sisters and I. But my creative supportive family doesn’t stop there. My Farfar, the Swedish name for father’s father on the Swedish side of my family, was a woodworker for a large period of his life, sculpted beautiful wood objects out of raw wood, leaving the originality of the

As Dreyfus gives the example of Heidegger’s ‘everyday knowhow’ through the example of the Japanese ceremonial teacup vs. the Styrofoam cup, it is apparent that ritual has contributed to my interest in denim. Everyone has had a pair of jeans or something denim in their lifetime. My connection with denim has turned into something sacred and closer to a ritual than a mundane garment. Growing up my dad always wore the perfect example of jeans. He wore them to work with a button up shirt, to a coffee shop with a t-shirt and tivas, to

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found piece so that it became part of the final design. He showed me that materials could dictate the design outcome, which brings me to my own work. I like to sample whatever material I am using in its purest form just like my Farfar’s woodworking and allow that to place itself within the context of the garments. My grandfather showed me the importance of engineering something and of being able to communicate your idea on paper clearly even though I’ve inherited my mother’s messy hand.

go hiking… He also refused to throw them away. He had the same jeans up until the 18th year I knew him and throughout the last good part of his life. At that time, I just considered them as ugly dad jeans but as the years have passed and the more I remember him, I remember those jeans. Not only do I remember the jeans but I also remember his posture in those jeans. He always seemed to have one-foot forward and both hands in his front pockets. He looked cool. This coolness is something that also something I wish to explore; he was a dude in jeans with hands in his pockets. Those moments of jean reminiscing make me see denim garments differently and because of this strong connection I have made with them emotionally and aesthetically, I have taken an interest in exploring them further because they are something that are personally important to me.

In my process for mining ideas, I depended upon my sense of nostalgia for my upbringing as well as more substantial examples from movies, books and other first hand experiences to drive my creative process. I knew I wanted to work with denim but what I wanted to do with it became clear later as I began interviewing older family members and questioning myself to find relevant moments that I could use to structure the design. Starting with my own memories, one that stood out immensely was a moment in time when I was very young and it was a


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sunroom in my parent’s house. Before it was a sunroom, it was a toy room for my sisters and I. But in this one memory, I went over to the old wooden shelf that contained most of our craft supplies and grabbed a piece of black craft paper. On this craft paper were sun bleach marks from the messily stacked pieces of paper that had then told a story of time as the sun gradually faded the corners and sides that were sticking out of the stack. This moment is a prominent part

of my research and process of design as it

has inspired me to take this literally into entire looks. If a jacket is long enough to cover part of a pant, the part that is covered will be darker as if the sun were to literally bleach the person wearing the outfit. This nostalgic relief also translates into the way I have been playing with tan lines through the surface of denim as a memory of what was on top of it. Through sandblasting, a traditional denim technique to give a worn, tonal variation and the accumulation of layers, these memories are embedded in their purest form onto the denim fabric.

My uncle Larry proved to be a huge contributor to the aura of my research. He told me one-of–a-kind stories of the surf and skate culture of LA, the most memorable one being about when my grandparents took him to see Endless Summer at a drive-thru in Pasadena. It was the premiere and all the surfer kids from the south of Venice gang were there, stinking up the entire place in the cologne that that gang would wear. He also supplied me with a digital folder of all of my grandpa’s film from their childhood, a folder containing 1,920 images, all extremely nostalgic and typical of the time. The photo of my mom sunbathing on the side of the road as they enjoyed the California coast on a little break from driving is an image that truly captured the love I have for the Californian light and the warmth one feels in it. The image to the right, of my other uncle in front of his prized, hand made skate decks is yet another photo that explains my background as well as my genetic sense of craft. Through my trips to the thrift stores, I collected denim constructions and details through the various denim pieces I collected. I took the idea of the flat felt seam which is a very prominent part of denim construction because of it’s history of the durable seam and I finished it with a bonding technique, inserting fit pieces of bonding and steaming it down, fusing the denim to itself, creating a relief of the flat felt seam which is normally top-stitched on both sides. Filling in for the top stitch

is a process of sanding the denim, which is done by hand with sand paper to create a minor difference in the shade.

Play is the most important part of my design development. In my process of play, it is about breaking the rules and sometimes taking them back again. It is a process of making your ideas tangible and quick, to satisfy the stream of ideas that come through. Often times, if there is a lack of visual research, I will generate my own research to reference when sample making. As I found it hard to reference good images of tan lines, so I decided to work with a model, dress her in different denim garments and t-shirts and spray her with spray tan, resulting in images of before and after that explain the garment she was wearing and then the mark it made on her naked body which was the starting point to the collection. In the initial starting point of this project, I curated 5 images within small blue boxes with a peephole and sunroof as well as 2 moving images, one being a clip of my sunglasses being projected by light and the other of me trying on denim garments. The point was to try and convey the emotional connection of my concept and experience to the viewer. I

thirst for pure inspiration, rather than forced creativity. It is in the memories of my father, the handmade research of tan lines, the constant sampling of denim seams, and the images my grandfather left behind, that collectively design my denim dreams.

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society? Society has the potency to form its constituents. Conversely, the courageous individual can also shape society.

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biography I was born and raised in southern California. I attended an arts high school, which let me experiment creatively at an early age. In 2007 I moved to New York to get my BFA in Fashion Design from Parsons the New School for Design. In 2009 I studied in Paris, changing my course of how I wanted to learn. In 2012 I began the MFA program at Parsons. 211


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acknowledge Thank you Cone Denim, PCCA, Denimatrix and Kuroki for letting me use your beautiful denim and BPD Wash House for expanding my knowledge of indigo development.

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thank you I would like to thank Mason Dent, Piotrek Panszcyzk and Isabel Rio for their creative encouragement and a very special thanks to Ann Bridges, this collection couldn’t have happened without you and all of your support.


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Photography /Mason Dent and Jarrod Turner


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jihye BLOCK

Jihye Nam namj0626@gmail.com +1 347 931 7907 www.namjihye.com


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society? Society is like family. Constantly interacting. Affected by it and also affecting it. Learn from the relationship. And I grow up within.

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acknowledge Shelley Fox Jonathan KYLE Farmer


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biography Born in South Korea Moved to U.S.A after graduating from Myungduk Foreign Language High School in Korea Graduated from Rhode Island School of Design BFA Textile Design in 2010 Worked as a print designer before coming to Parsons Graduated from Parsons MFA Fashion Design and Society in 2013

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thank you I would like to thank my family and my cousin Seoyoung Lee and my friend Dawa Chung.

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Photographer: Sonja Georgevich Model: Anastasia at MC2 Make up Artist: Elizabeth Lerman Hair Artist: Dana Boyer


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piotrek stacks be stacked,Wartość Piotrek Panszczyk piotrek@piotrekpanszczyk.com +1 347 990 4895 www.piotrekpanszczyk.com


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society? progression 237


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acknowledge I want to thank the following people for their amazing support and generosity: Claudia Fuentes and Enrique Vera at Incalpaca TPX Luke Mayes and Trish O’Gorman at Dormeuil Nicole Piach at DPS Kristine Trager at Isles Textiles group Dean Stadel and Shatarra Sutherland at MOKUBA 243


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thank you Special thanks to my Mom family and a a very special thank you to Ankie van de Wetering and Clare Byrne for their endless support. 247


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isabel UN-MAKING

isabel.riot@gmail.com +1 347 527 6795 +34 606 633 477 www.isabelrio.com


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biography Born in Ortigueira, a small village in the very North West corner of Spain. Graduated from Universidad San Pablo CEU, Madrid in Advertising and PR in 2005. Gradually changed my path towards Fashion, working for the Spanish designer, Pedro del Hierro, and moving to London in 2006. Attended some courses at Central Saint Martins and two internships with Alexander McQueen and Jasper Garvida. Left London in 2007 to work for Carolina Herrera as a womens-​ wear designer.


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society? HOPE

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acknowledge Limonta, Lyria and Olmetex. Zahira Barneto, Natalia Lopez, Nick Lopez, Paula Gil, Adolfo Macineira, Eryn Rosenthal, Anke Gruendel, Floriana Betti, Fernando Alonso, Ana Giralt. 257


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thank you My amazing family and my inspiring sailor, for their unconditional love and support. Thanks to those real friends who helped me to navigate through this past two years without losing my mind and, especially my MFA friends who made this journey such a fun trip. 258


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Photographer: Benedict Brink Make up artist: Michelle Rosario @NARS Model: Anna Edwards @MAJOR MODEL 260


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anna STILL Anna Stephenson stephenson.m.anna@gmail.com + 1 646 853 3945 www.anna-stephenson.com


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Stills from film


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acknowledge Mokuba Mario Boselli Spoonflower Printer Eastside Copy 268


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society? A unity of differences

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biography Step back | breath | fabric | breathing My work stems from the translation of a moment of unique complexity that no longer exists; a re-presentation of a time passed rather than a representation of a fixed image. The immediate energy of the human form orchestrates a play between the presence and loss of light; a flattened, virgin piece of printed fabric which already has a deeply entrenched narrative. For me, the negative space explores the visual and emotional richness of having nothing.

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thank you My Family and Friends & A Special Thank You to The Riley’s Shelley Fox, Jonathan KYLE Farmer, Anke Gruendel & Mum In loving Memory of Andrew Hector Stephenson 274


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Stills from film

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“Remembering

that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart. Drown out your own inner voice and most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.” 1

My work currently looks at bedding, specifically the way in which bed linens are a form of clothing created and moulded by the body. The unconscious moments in which our body orchestrates and manipulates white billowing clouds of fabric into stills of beauty. A momentary sculptural arrangement created for no one to see, for no one to judge, and to be continually reformed every single night. This led me onto considering the spiritual influence of fabric and the character and play of falling fabric, when it comes to life. Leaving me to ask, what influence can clothing have over the body/personality of the wearer and vice versa? The direction of my latest work has been influenced by the recent loss of my father and an experience in which his spirit came to visit me. Soon after his passing I returned to New York to continue with my MFA in Fashion Design and Society at Parsons. At this rather difficult hurdle in my life, as an artist, I hit a wall. For the first time ever I felt numb to the art that I had never once doubted to be anything less than a passion. I lost the ability to connect pen with paper and fabric to the body. One night alone in my bed, I dreamt of conversations

with my father, distressed and upset, I woke up abruptly. I turned over in my bed, pulling and wrapping the big duvet over to tuck myself in a little more. As the crunches of the cottons began to quieten and my head had sunk as deep into

my pillow as it could; calmness settled. In a single moment of silence within my otherwise restless sleep I was suddenly awakened by the presence of my father’s spirit sitting next to me, watching me as I slept. A glistening golden outline of him stayed by my bedside; only a few moments passed and then he gradually disintegrated and drifted away.

Was this a Hello? Or a Goodbye? What did this presence translate to? What did each glisten of gold mean? Like a photograph; this moment was a snap shot of complex beauty that could never be replicated and one that will never leave me. As the outline of my father slowly broke away I found myself grabbing the empty space, trying to pull him back. I wanted to capture that moment in time and hold onto it forever. It was this experience that re-engaged my interest in capturing all the moments of beauty in my life through my work, shaking me back into gear. A frozen image is most often portrayed through the lens, however, like watching a film or seeing a play our role as an audience is only of a voyeuristic and pleasurable participation. A position that is devoid of any tactile engagement. I wanted to look at tangible beauty, make a connection between the experiences of expression, the body and touch. I immediately began to think about the pre-Raphaelite sculptures of heroic men draped in billowing falls of fabric, the life of the fabrics and the life of the body captured in a timeless moment of beauty and expression. Steve Jobs makes the point that death is something that we all share, making us “already naked”. His assessment affirmed my understanding of the act of wrapping the body as a ritual akin to a religious ceremony. A moment of simplicity unseen beyond ones own body and functionless in it’s construction. It is within this idea of the naivety of wrapping/ bedding that I have found my challenge; to better understand and master the complexities found in the beguiling delicacy of simplistic clothing and forms. Jobs, Steve. “Stanford Commencement Address.’” Stanford University, CA. 12 June. 2005. Speech.

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Photography / Anna Stephenson Film / Marvic Paulo Model / Olivia Gordon : FORD Models NYC


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alison Coding Non-Stop Alison Tsai alisonyctsai@gmail.com + 1 917 767 6399 www.alisontsai.com


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biography Alison Tsai born and raised in Taiwan, graduated from a medical school and worked in a cancer center for several years. Based on the special background, now is a knitwear designer with a strong personal style that combines organic, innovative but also logical and mathematical. 282


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thank you Thank you everyone who accompanying me in the two years. I am really a lucky one and appreciate sincerely.

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Photography / Paul Jung


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alison

hannah


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hannah

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melitta


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lin

abigail


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anna

piotrek

min


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julian


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anna

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MFA FASHION DESIGN & SOCIETY

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ISSUE 2: MFA FASHION DESIGN AND SOCIETY

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