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ANSWER SHEET Section 8

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ANSWER SHEET

Section 9

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Section 10

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ESSAY 25 minutes Write your Essay in the lined sheets provided. Refer to the Essay Scoring Guide to grade your essay.

The essay offers you the opportunity to demonstrate your ability to present ideas in a clear and logical manner. Be sure to use effective language while developing a clear point of view.

“All compromise is based on give and take, but there can be no give and take on fundamentals. Any compromise on mere fundamentals is a surrender. For it is all give and no take.� -Mohandas Gandhi Assignment: Is it possible for two parties to compromise on fundamentals? Plan and write an essay in which you support an issue with examples from history, literature and personal experiences.

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Section 8

time - 25 minutes 20 questions Mark your answers in the sheet provided. Insert your answers online once test is complete.

1. When 500,000 is written as 5.0 x 10n, what is the value of n ?

4. John used ⅙ of his land to plant apple trees. If he planted 36 acres of apple trees, how many acres of land does he have?

(A) 4

(A) 72

(B) 5

(B) 108

(C) 6

(C) 162

(D) 3

(D) 216

(E) 7

(E) 324

2. If 1⁄4 y + 8 = 0, then y =

5.

8, 12, 20, 36, 68 Describe the pattern.

(A) -32

(A) Add 4 to the preceding number

(B) -8

(B) Multiply the preceding number by 1.5

(C) -4

(C) Double the preceding number then subtract 2

(D) 4

(D) Subtract 2 from the preceding number and

(E) 32

double the result (E) Triple the preceding number and then subtract

3.

8 from the result w

x

y 6.

x = number of months in 7 years y = number of days in 12 weeks

In the figure above, w, x and y lie on the same line. w is the center of the larger circle, and x is the center of the smaller circle. If the radius of the smaller circle is 2, what is the radius of the larger circle?

(A) x > y (B) y > x (C) x = y (D) No relationship, cannot be determined

(A) 2

(E) None of above

(B) 4 (C) 8 (D) 12 (E) 16

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7. If a and b are positive numbers, and a + b = 14,

2

11.

then 14 – b = a (A) 1 (B) 2 (C) -1 (D) a (E) b – 1 8. If x2 = x + 2, which of the following must be true?

(A) 36 inches

(A) x = 12

(B) 36√3 inches

(B) x < 4

(C) 36√3 +24 inches

(C) x > 0

(D) 24√3 +36 inches

(D) x2 < x

(E) 72 inches

(E) x2 > -x 9. Let function f be defined by f (x) = 3x + 4a where a is a constant. If f (5) + f (3) = 56, what is the value of a?

10.

A square is circumscribed by an equilateral triangle. Ifany side ofthe square is 12 inches long, what is the perimeter of the equilateral triangle?

12. John takes 30 minutes to rake a lawn. Todd takes 60 minutes to rake a lawn. If John and Todd decide to rake the lawn together, how long will it take to finish raking?

(A) -4

(A) 16 minutes

(B) 0

(B) 20 minutes

(C) 4

(C) 36 minutes

(D) 8

(D) 45 minutes

(E) 32

(E) 90 minutes

A

B

F

C

This diagram is not drawn to scale.

D

If BD = 8 and AB = 6 and ED = 5 find the length of AE.

13. In a certain year the U.S.A. produced ⅔ and Brazil produced ⅙ of all the iron ore in the world. If all other countries produced 18 million tons that year, how many millions of tons did the USA alone produce? (A) 27 (B) 36 (C) 54 (D) 72

(A) 3

(E) 162

(B) 4 (C) 5 (D) 7 (E) 10 © 2009 Parliament Tutors

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14. If the average of 5 consecutive integers is 12, what is the sum of the least and greatest of the 5 integers? (A) 14 (B) 12 (C) 24 (D) 10

18. What is the ratio of the area of the innermost square to that of the outermost square?

(E) 21 15.

2x 2x 3x = 3x

What values could x take? (A) 1 (B) -1 (C) 1, -1 (D) 1, 0, -1 (E) 0 16. There are eight pipes connected to a large water tank. A valve is connected to each pipe so that an operator can control the flow of water. Each pipe is designed either to let water into the tank or to let water out, but never both. If the tank is empty, any of the filling pipes can fill the tank in exactly eight hours. If full, any of the emptying pipes can drain the tank in exactly six hours. The operator observes that if the tank is full and all eight valves are opened at once, it drains in exactly six hours. How many of the eight pipes let water into the tank? (A) 1 (B) 2 (C) 4 (D) 6

(A) 1 : 12 (B) 1 : 14 (C) 1 : 16 (D) 1 : 18 (E) None of the above 19. Tom, Dick and Harry went to a restaurant for lunch. Tom had $100, Dick had $60, and Harry had $40. The bill was $104 and they decided to tip $16. If the ratio of cash held to cash paid was the same for each man, what was the difference between Tom and Harry’s contribution? (A) $24 (B) $36 (C) $60 (D) $44 (E) $48

20. Triangle RST is isosceles and

RST is 40 degrees

Column A

Column B

Sum of RST’s two equal angles

140 degrees

(E) 5 17. What is the area of the largest triangle that can fit into a rectangle of length ‘d’ and width ‘w’?

(A) Column A is greater (B) Column B is greater

(A) dw/3

(C) Both quantities are equal

(B) (2dw)/ 3

(D) Not sufficient info

(C) (3dw)/ 4

(E) None of above

(D) (dw) /2 (E) None of above © 2009 Parliament Tutors

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Section 4

time - 25 minutes 24 questions Mark your answers in the sheet provided. Insert your answers online once test is complete. The sentences below have one or two blanks. Each blank represents an omitted word. Choose the word or set of words from the choices below each sentence that best fits the meaning of the sentence. Example: As a child, Gary–––––his––––––––upbringing; however, as he grew older he learned to appreciated it. (A) allowed ... stringent (B) loathed ... sheltered (C) embraced ... strict (D) disenfranchised ... satisfactory (E) discovered ... relaxed A

B

C

D

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1. Cindy often feels like a ———-; she insists that people ———- her every day. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

victim … persecute shrew … hassle martyr … help victor … harangue maven … guard

2. Gina is quite the comedian, but since almost everything she says is ———-, it’s sometimes hard to take her seriously. (A) murmured (B) facetious (C) scabrous (D) unemotional (E) brazen 3. Vladimir Nabokov’s prose, though often ———-, is also witty and ———-, thus many find his books a pleasure to read. (A) loquacious … lachrymose (B) dense … bumbling (C) verbose … playful (D) arduous … bland (E) enjoyable … humorous

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4. Behind the one way mirror, the suspect was ———- that the guard was ———- of his actions. (A) unwitting … reticent (B) unaware … cognizant (C) jejune … informed (D) ardent … cogent (E) sentient … scared 5. The company’s profits last quarter were so ———- , bankruptcy is a real possibility. (A) gradual (B) substantial (C) varied (D) marginal (E) copious 6. When leaves begin to turn up into a concave shape to collect water, it is a(n) ———- of a coming rainstorm. (A) prevarication (B) progenitor (C) inspection (D) omission (E) harbinger 7. ———- with the hustle and bustle of Chicago, the poet retreated to a ———- farm in the Midwestern countryside. (A) Dissatisfied … bucolic (B) Contented… bone fide (C) Vexed… tenuous (D) Abhorred… churlish (E) Jaundiced … rarefied 8. Most felt that the———-that pervaded Grandpa’s stories were charming, though some of these phrases everyone agreed were unforgivably trite. (A) platitudes (B) castigations (C) nuances (D) doctrines (E) machinations

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Questions 9-12 are based on Passages 1 & 2 below:

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Passage 1 In the wild, animals exist in a world of which we have little understanding. They may communicate with their kind through “languages” that are indecipherable by humans. A few studies suggest that some species perceive landscapes much differently than people do; for example, they may be keenly attuned to movement on the faces of mountains or across the broad span of grassy plains. Also, their social structures may be complex and integral to their well-being. Some scientists believe they may even develop cultural traditions that are key to the survival of populations. Passage 2 This passage is adapted from a longer article written by a scientist who studies the behavior of ravens.

15

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I once wrote to a trapper in Alaska to ask if he had seen ravens sharing their food. He said not only did they share their food; they were “clever enough” to raid the fish he caught and stored in his cabin. He believed that when a raven discovered unguarded food, it would call out to other birds, which would in turn call out to yet others, and thus they would “get the word out” over long distances. It was no mystery to him why the birds would do this: they were “gossiping.” “It seems obvious,” he said, “that the birds get excited, and they simply cannot hold in their excitement— that lets others know.” And why should they evolve such transparent excitement? That, too, was “obvious”: “Because it is best for the species.” It was disturbing to me to see anyone so facilely blur the distinction between observations and interpretations and then even go so far as to make numerous deductions without the slightest shred of evidence. 9. All of the following occurrences would support the basic claim of passage 1 EXCEPT (A) a cat narrows its eyes to express affection for its kin (B) a soaring hawk easily scans a hillside far below for prey (C) a penguin from Antarctica shows no fear in the presence of humans (D) an elderly doe with no offspring allows itself to be caught by predators to save its fleeing niece (E) elephants move their dead relatives’ remains to a distant area to discourage scavengers from finding the remains

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10. The author of passage 2 places the words “clever enough”, “get the word out”, “gossiping”, and “obvious” in quotes in order to I. Show that the trapper does not really consider the ravens to be engaging in the behavior he describes II. Indicate that she is representing exactly the trap per’s words III. Portray her distrust of the trapper’s assessment of the ravens (A) I only (B) III only (C) I and II (D) II and III (E) I, II, and III 11. The Alaskan trapper/writer would most likely cite the so-called gossiping of the ravens about unguarded food as an example of (A) communication through language that is “indecipherable to humans” (B) raven social structure that is “complex and integral to their well-being” (C) the raven’s keen attunement to its surroundings (D) “cultural traditions” key to the raven population’s survival (E) none of the above 12. The author of passage 1 would most likely respond to the last sentence of passage 2 by (A) emphasizing the possibility that the Alaskan trap per’s deductions may prove accurate (B) agreeing that the trapper’s conclusions were worthless because of lack of evidence (C) pointing out that a successful trapper must have a deep understanding of animal behavior (D) saying that ravens have existed for ages, and must therefore have a highly developed social structure (E) conceding that while the trapper’s conclusions are provocative, we know too little to be sure

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Robinson Crusoe, a novel first published in England in 1719, was written by Daniel Defoe. It relates the story of Crusoe’s successful efforts to make a tolerable existence for himself after being shipwrecked alone on an apparently uninhabited island. The passages below are adapted from two twentieth-century commentaries by Ian Watt and James Sutherland on the novel’s main character. Passage I—Ian Watt (1957) That Robinson Crusoe is an embodiment of economic individualism hardly needs demonstration. All of Defoe’s heroes and heroines pursue money, and they pursue it very methodically. (Line 5) Crusoe’s bookkeeping conscience, indeed, has established an effective priority over all of his other thoughts and emotions. The various forms of traditional group relationship—family, village, a sense of nationality—all are weakened, as are the 10 competing claims of noneconomic individual achievement and enjoyment, ranging from spiritual salvation to the pleasures of recreation. For the most part, the main characters in Defoe’s works either have no family or, like Crusoe, leave 15 it at an early age never to return. Not too much importance can be attached to this fact, since adventure stories demand the absence of conventional social ties. Still, Robinson Crusoe does have a home and family, and he leaves them for the 20 classic reason of economic individualism—that it is necessary to better his condition. “Something fatal in that propension of nature” calls him to the sea and adventure, and against “settling to business” in the station to which he is born—and this 25 despite the elaborate praise that his father heaps upon that condition. Leaving home, improving the lot one was born to, is a vital feature of the individualist pattern of life. Crusoe is not a mere footloose adventurer, and 30 his travels, like his freedom from social ties, are merely somewhat extreme cases of tendencies that are normal in modern society as a whole since, by making the pursuit of gain a primary motive, economic individualism has much increased the 35 mobility of the individual. More specifically, the story of Robinson Crusoe is based on some of the many volumes recounting the exploits of those voyagers who in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries had assisted the development of capital40 ism. Defoe’s story, then, expresses some of the most important tendencies of the life of his time, and it is this that sets his hero apart from most other travelers in literature. Robinson Crusoe is not, like Ulysses, an unwilling voyager trying to © 2009 Parliament Tutors

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get back to his family and his native land: profit is Crusoe’s only vocation, and the whole world is his territory. Passage 2—James Sutherland (1971)

To Ian Watt, Robinson Crusoe is a characteristic embodiment of economic individualism. “Profit,” 50 he assures us, “is Crusoe’s only vocation,” and “only money—fortune in its modern sense—is a proper cause of deep feeling.” Watt therefore claims that Crusoe’s motive for disobeying his father and leaving home was to better his economic 55 condition, and that the argument between Crusoe and his parents in the early pages of the book is really a debate “not about filial duty or religion, but about whether going or staying is likely to be the most advantageous course materially: both 60 sides accept the economic motive as primary.” We certainly cannot afford to ignore those passages in which Crusoe attributes his misfortunes to an evil influence that drove him into “projects and undertakings beyond my reach, such as are indeed often 65 the ruin of the best heads in business.” But surely the emphasis is not on the economic motive as such, but on the willingness to gamble and seek for quick profits beyond what “the nature of the thing permitted.” Crusoe’s father wished 70 him to take up the law as a profession, and if Crusoe had done so, he would likely have become a very wealthy man indeed. Crusoe’s failure to accept his father’s choice for him illustrates not economic individualism so much as Crusoe’s lack 75 of economic prudence, indifference to a calm and normal bourgeois life, and love of travel. Unless we are to say—and we have no right to say it—that Crusoe did not know himself, profit hardly seems to have been his “only vocation.” 80 Instead, we are presented with a man who was driven (like so many contemporary Englishmen whom Defoe either admired or was fascinated by) by a kind of compulsion to wander footloose about the world. As if to leave no doubt about his rest85 less desire to travel, Crusoe contrasts himself with his business partner, the very pattern of the economic motive and of what a merchant ought to be, who would have been quite happy “to have gone 90 like a carrier’s horse, always to the same inn, backward and forward, provided he could, as he called it, find his account in it.” Crusoe, on the other hand, was like a rambling boy who never wanted to see again what he had already seen. 95 “My eye,” he tells us, “was never satisfied with seeing, was still more desirous of wand’ring and seeing.”

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13. Watt most likely says that "adventure stories demand the absence of conventional social ties" (lines 17-18) because he believes that

(A) stories with conventional social ties do not qualify as adventures (B) the protagonist must be free to leave home in order to embark upon an exciting journey (C) conventional social ties restrict the protagonist from reaching full development (D) no protagonist can pursue economic gain while maintaining conventional social ties (E) in order for the reader to bond with the protagonist, the protagonist needs to be presented with out reference to other characters) 14. In line 5, the phrase “bookkeeping conscience” most nearly means (A) strict moral standards (B) dry, unemotional demeanor (C) gain-focused mentality (D) vengeful personality (E) avaricious nature 15. Watt’s personal attitude toward Crusoe’s economic individualism is (A) one of overt support (B) one of total condemnation (C) one of subtle advocacy (D) one of mild criticism (E) meticulously withheld

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17. Lines 65-69 (“But surely...permitted.’”) in Passage 2 marks an important shift in which Sutherland finishes (A) sketching out a general argument and begins offering supporting evidence for it (B) explaining what the economic motive is and begins criticizing those who prioritize it (C) summarizing Watt’s position and begins presenting an objection (D) describing Crusoe’s apparent economic prudence and begins revealing his underlying greed (E) showing how Crusoe appears to agree with his father and begins revealing how they in fact disagree 18. In lines 72-75 (“Crusoe’s failure...travel,”) Sutherland implies that the fundamental nature of Crusoe’s choice was one of (A) travel over familial connection (B) travel over stability (C) economic prudence over familial approval (D) economic success over avoidance of risk (E) economic individualism over a bourgeois life 19. In context, the phrase “did not know himself” (line 78) most nearly means (A) could not make up his mind (B) was unaware of his background (C) was unaware of his desires (D) overestimated his abilities (E) lacked a natural aptitude for economic success 20. The reference to Ulysses in line 44 serves to highlight

16. In the first paragraph of Passage 1, Watt implies that a person who pursues economic individualism must give up all of the following EXCEPT (A) maintaining satisfying interpersonal relationships (B) pursuing a connection with the divine (C) enjoying pleasant hobbies (D) climbing the social ladder (E) gaining a sense of identity from where one lives

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(A) the equally improbable details of Crusoe’s and Ulysses’s journeys (B) the equally high stakes that motivated Crusoe and Ulysses (C) the stark difference between the two adventurers’ familial relationships (D) the contrast between the two adventurers’ goals (E) the timeless appeal of adventure stories

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21. Watt and Sutherland differ in their interpretation of Crusoe’s choice to avoid “settling to business” (lines 23-24) in that Watt says Crusoe (A) wants to dissociate from his father, while Sutherland says Crusoe wants more variety in life (B) seeks a more profitable lifestyle, while Sutherland says Crusoe values travel over money (C) is ashamed of his humble station, while Sutherland says Crusoe despises material gain (D) desires to escape civilization, while Sutherland says Crusoe does not wish to become a lawyer (E) thinks it too outdated to enter one’s father’s line of work, while Sutherland says Crusoe wants more risk in his life

24. Watt would most likely respond to Sutherland’s description of Crusoe as “a rambling boy who never wanted to see again what he had already seen” (lines 92-93) by arguing that (A) Crusoe’s desire to see new sights was weaker than his desire to be financially self-sufficient (B) Crusoe wanted less to see new sights than to invent a new way of making a living (C) for Crusoe, traveling away from home was merely instrumental in gaining his ultimate goal (D) Crusoe’s stated love of travel is attributable to his flawed understanding of himself (E) Crusoe traveled to escape the monotony of bourgeois life

22. The central question that both passages address is (A) whether Crusoe achieved his life goals (B) whether Crusoe had a good relationship with his family and business associates (C) why Crusoe sailed away from home (D) whether Defoe celebrates or condemns the pursuit of material gain (E) whether Crusoe understood his own nature 23. Watt uses all of the following arguments to support his claim that Crusoe is “an embodiment of economic individualism” (lines 1-2) EXCEPT (A) all of Defoe’s other main characters pursue money, so Crusoe must also want money (B) if Crusoe had loved money less, he would have given his family more time and attention (C) had Crusoe not desired gain, he would have preferred to stay home and become a lawyer (D) Defoe was a product of an age when economic individualism was popular (E) a quiet, bourgeois life would have satisfied Crusoe had he not wished to become rich

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Section 5

time - 25 minutes 35 questions Mark your answers in the sheet provided. Insert your answers online once test is complete.

The sentences below test grammar, word choice, sentence construction, and punction. Select the option that offers the most effective and precise sentence. Select (A) if you believe the sentence in question is the best option. Example Elisa Greenberg recroded her first album and she was seventeen years old then. (A) and she was seventeen years old then (B) when she was seventeen (C) at age seventeen years old (D) upon the becoming of seventeen years old (E) at the time when she was seventeen years old A

B

C

3. To win the game, a player must find the portal gun, the secret escape hatch, and destroying the evil computer. (A) destroying the evil computer. (B) and the evil computer, which players must destroy. (C) with the evil computer destroyed (D) and to destroy the evil computer. (E) as well as the evil computer, which the player must destroy. 4. Western Mexico’s Baja California, a remarkably wellpreserved tropical peninsula, edges a large bay that has become a favorite destination for marine biologists.

D

E

1. City Hall is smaller than it but still attracts just as many tourists as the bank. (A) is smaller and it but still attracts just as many tourists as the bank (B) is smaller than the bank; it attracts just as many tourists as it. (C) is smaller than the bank but attracts just as many tourists. (D) attracts just as many tourists as the bank and it is smaller than it. (E) is smaller than it looks but still attracts just as many tourists as the bank.

(A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

edges a large bay that has become edging a large bay and it edges a large bay, which has become which edges a large bay, is the edge of a large bay, having become

5. James Ensor, one of Belgium’s most famous painters devoted his life and painted “The Torments of Christ.” (A) devoted his life and painted (B) devoted his life, having painted (C) devoted his life to painting (D) was devoting his life to the painting of (E) had been devoting his life to painting 6. As soon as the pioneers heard how new lots of land were available for claiming, dozens left their old homesteads behind in search of larger properties.

2. When West Side Market, long a landmark of the Upper West Side, was closed down, hundreds of people flocked to its boarded-up entrance to protest that. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

to protest that for its protestation to protest in protestation of that in protesting

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(A) how new lots of land were available (B) how there was availability of new lots of land (C) about new lots of land, which they made available (D) about new lots of land, and they were made available (E) about new lots of land that were available

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7. Medical doctors have broadened one’s understanding of treatment to include attention to a patient’s emotional state as well as to her physical health. (A) have broadened one’s understanding of treatment to include (B) have broadened one’s understanding of treatment, including (C) broaden their understanding of treatment to include (D) broadening the understanding of treatment to include (E) have broadened their understanding of treatment to include

8. In opposition to the brown bears of North America and Russia, which eat primarily plants, polar bears are mostly carnivorous. (A) In opposition to (B) Different than (C) Unlike the eating habits of (D) Unlike the case with (E) Unlike

9. Physicians are testing radical new methods for slowing the loss, in vertebrae, of calcium, because they need it for spinal health. (A) loss, in vertebrae, of calcium, because they need it for spinal health. (B) loss of calcium in vertebrae and it is needed for spinal health. (C) loss, in vertebrae, of calcium because in spinal health it is needed. (D) loss of calcium in vertebrae, which is necessary for spinal health. (E) loss of calcium in vertebrae; calcium is necessary for spinal health.

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10. The play is worth seeing because it provides not only entertaining dialogue and strong characters but also makes you want to turn your life around and make a difference in the world. (A) but also makes you want to turn your life around and make a difference in the world. (B) but also it offers motivation for leading a better life. (C) but also motivation to lead a better life. (D) but also it offers inspiring motivation to lead a better life. (E) and also makes you want to turn your life around and make a difference in the world.

11. The funding and the implementation of such a radical proposition is dependant upon permission from the major shareholders. (A) The funding and the implementation of such a radical proposition is dependant upon permission from the major shareholders. (B) For such a radical proposition, the funding and the implementation are dependant upon the major shareholders permitting them. (C) The funding and implementation of such a radical proposition are dependant upon the permission of the major shareholders. (D) The funding and the implementation of such a radical proposition are dependant upon being permitted by the major shareholders. (E) Dependant upon the permission of the major shareholders are the funding and the implementation of such a radical proposition getting approved.

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The sentences below test grammar and usage skills. Each sentence has either one error or no errors at all. Select the letter with the corresponding error or (E) for No Error.

15. In LDS scholarship Richard Bushman is one of the A only authors who, by refusing to condemn his subject

Example

even when other biographers have done so on the same B historical evidence, has achieved a wide readership C both within and without the LDS community. No Error D E

The CEO realized he was becoming more poorer, A B thanks to a botched ad campaign and dwindling C opportunities for improving his public image. No Error

D

E A

B

C

D

12. While we are still young, the tips of our toes are marked by loops and whorls that are as unique as A B C those found on our fingertips. No Error D E

13. The more experienced senator of South Carolina, A to the delight of all those who ran against him in B years past, have resigned in disgrace as the result of a C journalist’s revealing the story of his extramarital D affair. No Error E

14. Research implies that drinking grape juice, A especially red grape juice, may slow the aging process B and decreasing the chance of developing Alzheimer’s C Disease by blocking oxidation. No Error D E

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E

16. Because of the peeling paint, the grimy windowsills A and the hinges were rusting, the mansion B C looked haunted to children in the neighborhood. D No Error E

17. Professor Quimby successfully fooled his A Psychology undergraduates for months when Benjamin B accidentally discovered that he and all the other C students had been unknowing subjects of an elaborate D study. No Error E

18. This line is reserved for shoppers purchasing A B C ten items or less. No Error D E

19. Only through the exploitation of thousands of A Chinese immigrants were the notorious robber barons B able to build the western portion of what is now known C D as the Transcontinental Railroad. No Error E

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20. By the time Bartholomew Cubbins had removed his A B five-hundreth hat for the duke, his unwittingly comic performance had secured for C himself the nobleman’s marked displeasure. No Error D E 21. Few musicians captured the attention of the world A B as thoroughly as did the Beatles, whose music C is still popular today. No Error D E

22. It is the father’s contribution and not the mother’s A which plays the primary role with determining B the gender of the offspring, a fact that was unknown to C Henry VIII when he executed his wife for failing to produce a male heir. No Error D E

23. The research revealed that many citizens of New York value having easy access to cultural events A B over being able to afford large living spaces of C his or her own. No Error D E

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24. Orbiting the space station, a brilliant designed water A B system will capture water from the environment and C make it accessible to the astronauts. No Error D E

25. Two years ago, when we were entering ninth grade, A Ms. Haskings offered to tutor you and I in French so that B C we would be prepared for her intermediate course in D September. No Error E

26. The rising number of Swine Flu cases in the US A have prompted the Surgeon General to issue a special B health advisory to all citizens, but particularly C to those who are at high risk of contracting the virus. D No Error. E

27. Because Pleasant Company now offers customers the option of designing their own American Girl Dolls, A they must maintain a factory whose structure is vastly B C more complex than it was in the 1980s, when only three D dolls were available. No Error. E

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28. Eighteen years in the making, Stanley Kubrick’s last A movie, released posthumously, was either a celebration with the avant garde form or an B C elaborate prank intended to make overly academic D film critics look ridiculous. No Error. E

29. In spite of its utter failure to publicize professionally, A the band gained thousands of devoted followers since B 1982 and, before the year 2000, was releasing an album C every two years and touring the nation biannually. C No Error. E

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The following is a rough draft of an essay:

31. The purpose of the first paragraph is to (A) present an argument

(1) Before John Kenneth Galbraith passed-away, he helped shape modern economic thought. (2) Galbraith was one of the most decorated and well-read economists of our time. (3) He differentiated from other famous, modern economists on account of his contributions to economic thought, the world of academia, and the American government. (4) Galbraith’s belief that the government should aggressively intervene in economic affairs in order to protect its citizens earned him a controversial reputation. (5) The Canadian-born liberal developed his ideas at a number of institutions, including Harvard, Cambridge and Princeton. (6) Galbraith later entered the political arena by joining the National Defense advisory committee. (7) His success led to his appointment as Department Administrator of the Office of Price Division. (8) Throughout the 1950’s, Galbraith published a number of works outlining his views and ideas. (9) Galbraith used his publications to touch on subjects that people never really looked into or talked about before. (10) Still, many of his ideas and perspectives offered a radical approach that bordered, at times, on Socialism. (11) Many economists value his interpretations and recognize his ability to contrast the influences surrounding consumer demand and the choice of public versus private goods. (12) However, they believe he fails to offer a statistical analysis with substantiated proof, and thus, classrooms today are reluctant to receive Galbraith’s opinions as facts. 30. What must be done to improve Sentence 3 ? (A) Place a colon after “on account of his” (B) Add “himself” after “differentiated” (C) Combine sentences 2 and 3 by placing a semicolon after sentence 2 (D) Divide Sentence 3 into 2 sentences by placing a period after “famous, modern economists”

(B) introduce a new theory (C) present a contradictory situation (D) examine a character (E) introduce a character 32. What must be done to improve Sentence 7 ? (A) Place sentence 7 before sentence 6 (B) Change the word “appointment” to “initiation” (C) Combine sentences 6 and 7 by changing “committee. His” to “committe, where his” (D) Combine sentences 6 and 7 by putting a comma after committee (E) Change “His success” to “His keen economic insight” 33. Paragraph 2 would be improved by adding which of the following sentences? (A) Galbraith went on to become director of the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey. (B) Galbraith continued to develop many of his political ideas. (C) Many economists used their experience in governmental affairs to jump-start other careers. (D) Economists were instrumental during WWII. (E) Many authors begin their careers in government positions.

(E) Place a comma after ‘famous, moder economists”

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34. Which of the following is the best revision to the underlined portion of Sentence 9 reproduced below? Galbraith used his publications to touch on subjects people never really looked into or talked about before. (A) people never considered or argued about. (B) people never cared about before. (C) people never thought about. (D) people had never researched or discussed. (E) people never were somewhat unfamiliar with.

35. Which sentence should be deleted? (A) 8 (B) 9 (C) 10 (D) 11 (E) 12

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Section 6

time - 25 minutes 18 questions Mark your answers in the sheet provided. Insert your answers online once test is complete. 4. Which of the following equations express y in terms of x for each of the four pairs of values shown the table?

1. If a - b = 9 and c (a –b) = 36, what is value of c? (A) 2 (B) 3 (C) 4 (D) 6 (E) 12

2. If 3x – 4 = 5, what is 3x + 9?

(A) y = 3x – 2

(A) 3

(B) y = 3x – 3

(B) 5

(C) y = 2x + 1

(C) 9

(D) y = 2x + 2

(D) 10

(E) y = 2x – 1

(E) 11 5. What is the value of a + d + f + g? 3. Tom usually takes the solid line route from his home to school. If he has more time, he takes a detour route, indicated by the dotted line. How many more miles is his detour route than his usual route?

a

b

c

d

e 2m

f g

HOME

1m

h

3m 4m

1m

1m

1m

1m 3m

1m

1m

SCHOOL

(A) 180

(A) 4

(B) 210

(B) 6

(C) 360

(C) 7

(D) 720

(D) 9

(E) Cannot be determined without specific values

(E) 15

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(A) 12

6. The average of 7 numbers is 15. The average of 2 of the 7 numbers is 40. What is the average of the other 5?

(B) 14

(A) 3

(C) 20

(B) 5

(D) 26

(C) 9

(E) 28

(D) 18 (E) Cannot be determined

10. Which of the following equations express y in terms of x for each of the four pairs of values shown in the table?

7. If x – 34 = 4, y + 27 =14 and z + 24 = 10, what is x + y - z? (A) 26 (B) 28 (C) 30 (D) 32 (E) 39

(A) y = 5x + 8.5 (B) y = 6x + 8.5

8. If x – 8 = 19 and 4y = 12, what is x in terms of y?

(C) y = 6.5x + 8 (D) y = 2x + 2

(A) 2y

(E) y = 2x + 1

(B) 3y (C) 6y (D )9y

11.

(E) 27y

9. If Tom travels the solid line route to school and travels the route BA instead of BCA on the way back, what is the total number of miles traveled?

2x

x - 30

What is the value of the larger angle? (A) 40

A

2m Home

(B) 70 (C) 140

5m

4m

5m

(D) 170 (E) Cannot be determined

C B 1m

4m

1m

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12. The average of 34, 30, 26, 42 and a mystery number is 4 more than the value of the mystery number, what is the median of the list?

15. The following table describes the % change in sales profits in certain retail stores from 1997 to 1999.

(A) 26

% Change

(B) 28 (C) 30 (D) 32 (E) 34 13. A photographer charges x dollars to make a negative, T dollars for 10 prints, and T dollars for each additional print. I it costs $45 to make a negativeand 20 pirints, and if $33of that $45 pays just for the prints, then what is x in terms of T?

In 1999, which store profited the least?

(A) T

(A) P

(B) 2T

(B) Q

(C) 3T

(C) R

(D) 4T

(D) S

(E) 5T

(E) Not enough information

16. A cube with 6 sides is painted red on each of its faces. It is then cut into 216 cubes of equal volume. How many of the 216 cubes have exactly 2 faces painted red?

14.

(A) 34 (B) 84 (C) 48 (D) 128 (E) None of the above If a represents a side of the outermost square, what is the value of a side of the innermost square? (A) a / 4 (B) a / 2√2 (C) a / 8 (D) a / 2 (E) a / 4√2

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17. A cube with 6 sides is painted red on each of its 6 faces. It is then cut into 216 cubes all of equal volume. What is the ratio of (3 faces painted red) : (2 faces painted red) : (1 face painted red) : (no faces painted red) ? (A) 48 : 64 : 24 : 12 (B) 72 : 27 : 81 : 45 (C) 1 : 6 : 12 : 8 (D) 6 : 42 : 90 : 64 (E) None of the above

18.

c(t) = 800(.74)t

The above function is used to model the cheetah popuation in India. If c(t) gives the number of cheetahs living in t centuries after the year 1600, which of the following is true about the population of species between 1600 and 1900?

(A) It increased about 270 (B) It increased about 475 (C) It decreased about 270 (D) It decreased about 475 (E) It decreased about 200

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Section 7

time - 25 minutes 24 questions Mark your answers in the sheet provided. Insert your answers online once test is complete. The sentences below have one or two blanks. Each blank represents an omitted word. Choose the word or set of words from the choices below each sentence that best fits the meaning of the sentence. Example: As a child, Gary–––––his––––––––upbringing; however, as he grew older he learned to appreciated it. (A) allowed ... stringent (B) loathed ... sheltered (C) embraced ... strict (D) disenfranchised ... satisfactory A (E) discovered ... relaxed

3. The ———- chemical ———- the tabletop, sending molten drips to the floor. (A) caustic … corroded (B) toxic … conjoined (C) obnoxious … oxidized (D) opulent … breached (E) noxious … palliated

4. The event was so full of ———- conduct, the newspaper struggled to keep their description of it within the boundaries of good taste. C

D

E

1. As a child, Erwin ———- coconut, but later he gained a(n) ———- for this and other foods he had rejected in his youth. (A) commingled … reticence (B) loathed … tolerance (C) eschewed … revulsion (D) hated … lethargy (E) embraced … appreciation

(A) lachrymose (B) laudatory (C) limber (D) latent (E) licentious 5. She marveled at the ———- movements of the dancers. (A) lithe (B) lugubrious (C) immutable (D) hirsute (E) astute

2. Carlos’s ———- is shown by his ability to ———- against impossible odds. (A) negligence … fight (B) fervidity … yearn (C) tenacity … persevere (D) casualness … rebel (E) pugnacity … surrender

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The passage below is an except from the memoir of a Japanese-American woman whose mother was raised in Japan.

Questions 8-9 are based on the following Passage.

Question 6-7 are based on the following passage.

This is the main complaint against fakes. It is not that they cheat their purchasers of money, reprehensible though that is, but that they loosen our hold on reality, deform and falsify our understanding of the past. What makes them dangerous, however, also makes them valuable. The feelings of anger and shame they arouse among those who have been deceived are understandable, but the consequent tendency to dispose of or destroy fakes, once identified, is misguided. Even if the errors of the past only provided lessons for the future, they would be worthy of retention and study. But forgeries do more than that. As keys to understanding the changing nature of our vision of the past, as motors for the development of scholarly and scientific techniques of analysis, as subverters of aesthetic certainties, they deserve our closer attention. And as the most entertaining of monuments to the wayward talents of generations of gifted rogues, they certainly claim our reluctant admiration.

My mother was raised in a world such as this, in a house of traditions and myths. And although she has traveled across continents, oceans, and time although she considers herself a modern woman – a believer in the sunlight of science – it is a world that surrounds her still. Feudal Japan floats around my mother. Like an unwanted pool of ectoplasm, it quivers with supernatural might. It followed her into our American home and governed my girlhood life.

The excerpt below is from a catalog promoting a museum exhibit displaying fake artworks.

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6. The primary purpose of the final sentence in Passage 1 is to 15

(A) challenge the discussion in the preceding portion of the passage (B) provide support for the narrator’s earlier discussion (C) to demonstrate the narrator’s personal sentiment on the matter (D) summarize the idea of the passage (E) offer a new view on the issue 7. What assumption can the reader infer about the narrator (A) she often faced hardships (B) she was very dependent (C) she felt guilty about rejecting her parents customs (D) she was spiteful (E) she had become a product of American culture

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8. According to the author, forgeries deserve our “reluctant admiration” because they are (A) artistically daring (B) aesthetically pleasing (C) increasingly valuable (D) historically significant (E) able to alter our understanding of reality 9. Which example best exemplifies the “main complaint” in Line 1? (A) Creating a clever disguise to rob a bank (B) Using a counterfeit bill used for the purchase of goods (C) Fabricating a letter from a historical figure (D) Plagiarizing an essay from the internet (E) Designing a hidden compartment to store contraband

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7 Questions 10-15 are based on the following passage.

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This excerpt discusses the relationship between plants and their environments. 45

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Why do some desert plants grow tall and thin like organ pipes? Why do most trees in the tropics keep their leaves year round? Why in the Arctic tundra are there no trees at all? After many years without convincing general answers, we now know much about what sets the fashion in plant design. Using technology more characteristic of a a thermal engineer than of a botanist, we can think of plants as mechanisms that must balance their heat budgets. A plant by day is staked out under the Sun with no way of sheltering itself. All day long it absorbs heat. If it did not lose as much heat as it gained, then eventually it would die. Plants get rid of their heat by warming the air around them, by evaporating water, and by radiating heat to the atmosphere and the cold, black reaches of space. Each plant must balance its heat budget so that its temperature is tolerable for the process of life. Plants in the arctic tundra lie close to the ground in the thin layer of still air that clings there. A foot or two above the ground are the winds of Arctic cold. Tundra plants absorb heat from the Sun and tend to warm up: they probably balance most of their heat budgets by radiating heat to space, but also by warming the still air that is trapped among them. As long as Arctic plants are close to the ground, they can balance their heat budgets. But if they should stretch up as a tree does, they would lift their working parts, their leaves, into the streaming Arctic winds. Then it is likely that the plants could not absorb enough heat from the Sun to avoid being cooled below a critical temperature. Your heat budget does not balance if you stand tall in the Arctic. Such thinking also helps explain other characteristics of plant design. A desert plant faces the opposite problem from that of an Arctic plant â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

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the danger of overheating. It is short of water and so cannot cool itself by evaporation without dehydrating. The familiar sticklike shape of desert plants represents one of the solutions to this problem: the shape exposes the smallest possible surface to incoming solar radiation and provides the largest possible surface from which the plant can radiate heat. In tropical rain forests by way of contrast, the scorching Sun is not a problem for plants because there is sufficient water. This working model allows us to connect the general characteristics of the forms of plants in different habitats with factors such as temperature, availability of water, and presence or absence of seasonal differences. Our Earth is covered with a patchwork quilt of meteorological conditions, and the patterns of this patchwork are faithfully reflected by the plants.

10. The passage identifies a direct causal relationship between (A) how hot an environment is and how much moisture is in the air (B) how much moisture is in the air and how tall the plants grow (C) whether an environment is hot and whether a leafy plant will survive in it (D) the range of an environment's seasonal temperature variation and how much water is stored by the plants growing in that environment (E) the aridity of an environment and whether a plant can safely use

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11. The three questions in lines 1-4 ("Why do...all?") are intended to do all of the following EXCEPT (A) make an emotional appeal to convince the reader to hold a certain viewpoint (B) introduce the reader to the topic of the passage (C) pique the reader's curiosity (D) suggest that a single principle of plant design explains the three seemingly unrelated phenomena (E) point out a mysterious aspect of plant design that may not have occurred to the reader previously 12. According to the passage, a typical desert plant resembles a stick because (A) the protective, bark-like exterior keeps the plant's internal water supply from evaporating into the atmosphere (B) the narrow cross-section of its stick-like shape permits minimal exposure to the hot sun above (C) sticks are rigid and lightweight, allowing the plant to extend itself upward toward cooler air (D) the hardness of the plant's exterior protects it from windblown sand (E) sticks do not look like food to animals, and so the plant is less likely to be eaten by desert wildlife

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14. It can be inferred from the passage that Arctic winds (A) are warmed by heat captured by plants growing at ground level (B) are slowed significantly by low-lying plants (C) never reach the surface of the tundra (D) are destructive to all but the hardiest of plants (E) cool tundra plants, allowing them to balance their heat budgets

15. If the fossilized remains of sticklike plants were found at thebottom of a body of water, we might use the information in the passage to conclude that (A) long ago, sticklike plants grew and flourished in their underwater environment. (B) long ago, a violent storm uprooted the plants and threw them into the water, where they sank to the bottom and became fossils. (C) the water is salty and has dehydrated the plants, resulting in their sticklike shape. (D) what is now a body of water was once a desert. (E) none of the above.

13. In line 55 "patterns" most nearly means (A) decorations (B) templates (C) sequences (D) configurations (E) methods

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This passage on Navajo sandpainting was published in 1989 by a scholar of Navajo traditions who was trying to interpret them for non-Navajo readers. Sandpaintings are made by trickling fine, multi-colored sands onto a base of neutral-colored sand.

Questions 16-24 are based on the following passage.

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We cannot fully appreciate some Native American objects we consider art without also appreciating the contexts in which they are produced. When our understanding of art is heavily focused on objects, we tend to look in the wrong place for art. We find only the leavings or byproducts of a creative process. The concerns I have are deepened as I begin to compare how we, as outsiders, view sandpaintings with how the Navajo view them, even just from a physical perspective. Let me list several points of comparison. We have only representations of sandpaintings drawn or painted on paper or canvas, which we enjoy as objects of art. The Navajo strictly forbid making representations of sandpaintings, and they are never kept as aesthetic objects. Even the use of figures from sandpaintings in the sand-glue craft has not met with the approval of most Navajo traditionalists. Sandpaintings must be destroyed by sundown on the day they are made. They are not aesthetic objects; they are instruments of a ritual process. The sandpainting rite is a rite of re-creation in which a person in need of healing is symbolically remade in a way corresponding to his or her ailment. This person sits at the center of the very large painting and identifies with the images depicted, experiencing the complexity and the diversity, the dynamics and the tension, represented in the surrounding painting. The illness is overcome when the person realizes that these tensions and oppositions can be balanced in a unity that signifies good health and beauty. In terms of visual perspective, we tradtionally view sandpainting from a position as if we were directly above and at such a distance that the whole painting is immediately graspable, with each side equidistant from our eyes. This view is completely impossible for a Navajo. I got a laugh when I asked some Navajo if anyone ever climbed on the roof of a hogan* to look at a sandpainting through the smoke hole. When a painting 6 feet in diameter,

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or even larger, is constructed on the floor of a hogan only 20 feet in diameter, the perspective from the periphery is always at an acute angle to the surface. A sandpainting cannot be easily seen as a whole. The most important point of view is that of the person for whom the painting is made, and this person sees the painting from the inside out because he or she sits at the middle of it. These differences are basic and cannot be dismissed. The traditional Navajo view is inseparable from the significance that sandpainting has for the Navajo. I think we can say that for the Navajo the sandpainting is not the intended product of the creative process in which it is constructed. The product is a healthy human being or the re-creation of a wellordered world. The sandpainting is but an instrument for the creative act, and perhaps it is the wisdom of the Navajo that it be destroyed in its use so that the obvious aesthetic value of the instrument does not supplant the human and cosmic concern. The confinement of our attention to the reproduction of sandpaintings is somewhat analogous to hanging paint-covered artists’ palettes on the wall to admire, not acknowledging that these pigmentcovered boards are not paintings but the means to create them. There is a certain aesthetic value in artists’ palettes, I suppose, but surely most would think of this action as foolishly missing the point. * A traditional Navajo dwelling

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16. According to Navajo tradition, whose perspective on a sandpainting is most important? (A) an art patron’s perspective (B) the sandpainter’s perspective (C) the perspective of the person represented in the sandpainting (D) the tribal chief’s perspective (E) the perspective of the person for whom the sandpainting is made

20. As used in line 61, “supplant” most nearly means (A) overtake (B) replace (C) remove (D) overshadow (E) create 21. The author’s analogy to artist’s palettes (lines 62 – 69) serves to illustrate the

17. As used in line 16, “aesthetic” most nearly means (A) art (B) philosophical (C) permanent (D) private (E) beautiful 18. What would be the result if the traditional Navajo practices regarding sandpaintings (lines 14 – 20) were observed? (A) Only the Navajo could view sandpaintings (B) The sandpaintings could only be viewed during the process of their creation (C) Sand-glue representations would be the only sandpaintings non-Navajos were allowed to view (D) The sandpainting’s creator would select who was allowed to view sandpaintings (E) The person for whom the sandpainting is made would select who was allowed to view their sandpainting 19. Why did the Navajo listeners referred to in line 39 laugh? (A) Climbing onto the roof of a hogan is taboo in Navajo culture. (B) The view from inside the hogan is much more relevant than the view from the center of the paintings. (C) Key details of the sandpainting would be imperceptible from a bird’s-eye view. (D) A bird’s-eye view is irrelevant to the paintings’ intended function. (E) The peripheral perspective of sandpaintings is much funnier than the view from the roof of a hogan. © 2009 Parliament Tutors

(A) various colors present in sandpaintings (B) artistic literacy required to appreciate sandpaintings (C) growing presence of sandpainting reproductions in the art world (D) value of sandpaintings as inspiration for modern painters (E) value of sandpaintings as a process rather than a product 22. This passage suggests that the presence of sandpainting reproductions in an art gallery would (A) render the healing process of sandpaintings ineffective (B) introduce the art world to the traditions of the Navajo (C) devalue sandpaintings as art commodities (D) discourage the Navajo from preserving sandpaintings (E) perpetuate the sandpainting’s aesthetic value rather than its function 23. The author of this passage might use the following analogy to explain most non-Navajo’s appreciation of sandpaintings: (A) Enjoying a meal someone else has cooked (B) Opening a letter addressed to someone else (C) Admiring an ancient building without any knowledge of its historical context (D) Praising a musician without knowing how to play a musical instrument (E) Admiring a building without having participated in its construction

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24. Which statement best summarizes the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s argument? (A) We cannot appreciate ceremonial art because such an appreciation is an example of cultural tyranny. (B) The materials and design of any ceremonial art object are essential to its meaning. (C) Anyone who has not witnessed the healing powers of sandpaintings cannot appreciate their value. (D) We cannot grasp an objectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s significance until we comprehend the purpose it serves and the process by which it was made. (E) Navajo sandpaintings demand a different viewing environment than most other art objects.

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Section 8

time - 20 minutes 19 questions Mark your answers in the sheet provided. Insert your answers online once test is complete. The sentences below have one or two blanks. Each blank represents an omitted word. Choose the word or set of words from the choices below each sentence that best fits the meaning of the sentence.

3. Although the nations seemed ———-, word was —— —-; King James was just waiting for the right moment to avenge his father’s murder. (A) ambivalent … impossible

Example:

(B) indifferent … evident As a child, Gary–––––his––––––––upbringing; however, as he grew older he learned to appreciated it.

(C) hostile … unavoidable

(A) allowed ... stringent (B) loathed ... sheltered (C) embraced ... strict (D) disenfranchised ... satisfactory (E) discovered ... relaxed

(E) cordial … avoidable

(D) amiable … inevitable

4. She tried to ———- the furious bus driver, but her attempts only ———- the situation. A

B

C

D

E

(A) peculate … aggravated (B) detest … irritated

1. After the wedding, Mary’s family ———-; Mary, too, was ———-. (A) celebrated … despondent (B) mourned … happy (C) rejoiced …ecstatic (D) departed … sad (E) cheered … ambivalent

(C) mollify … exacerbated (D) appease … enhanced (E) vivify … razed 5. By the day’s end, the children were ———-; however, their parents were even more exhausted. (A) invigorated (B) myopic

2. Her ———- at being accepted was soon tempered by the fact that her parents weren’t sure they could pay for it. (A) elation (B) emulsion (C) immersion

(C) onerous (D) languid (E) petulant 6. In the book the author juxtaposes good and evil: by the story’s end, good prevails and the ———- king is overthrown.

(D) affliction (E) ambition

(A) noble (B) nefarious (C) sagacious (D) imperial (E) gruesome

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8 Questions 7-19 are based on the following passage.

In this passage from a novel, the narrator has been reading letters of his grandmother, Susan Ward, and is reflecting on the meaning of certain events in her life. In about 1880, Susan Ward was a young woman a writer and a mother - whose husband Oliver was working as a mining engineer in Leadville, in the West. Here, the narrator imagines Susan Ward as she spends the winter with her family in Milton, New York, before rejoining her husband in the spring.

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From the parental burrow, Leadville seemed so far away it was only half real. Unwrapping her apple-cheeked son after a sleigh ride down the lane, she had difficulty in believing that she had ever lived anywhere but here in Milton. She felt how the placid industry of her days matched the placid industry of all the days that had passed over the farm through six generations. Present and past were less continuous than synonymous. She did not have to come at her grandparents through a time machine. Her own life and that of the grandfather she was writing about showed her similar figures in an identical landscape. At the milldam where she had learned to skate she pulled her little boy on his sled, and they watched a weasel snow-white for winter flirt his black-tipped tail in and out of the mill’s timbers. She might have been watching with her grandfather’s eyes. Watching a wintry sky die out beyond black elms, she could not make her mind restore the sight of the western mountains at sunset from her cabin door, or the cabin itself, or Oliver, or their friends. Who were those glittering people intent on raiding the continent for money or for scientific knowledge? What illusion was it that she bridged between this world and that? She paused sometimes, cleaning the room she had always called Grandma’s Room, and thought with astonishment of the memory of Oliver’s great revolver lying on the dresser when he, already a thoroughgoing Westerner, had come to the house to court her. The town of Milton was dim and gentle, molded by gentle lives, the current of change as slow through it as the seep of water through a bog. More than once she thought how wrong those women in San Francisco had been, convinced that their old homes did not welcome them on their return. Last year when Oliver’s professional future was uncertain, she would have agreed. Now, with the future

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assured in the form of Oliver’s appointment as manager of the Adelaide mine in Leadville, the comfortable past asserted itself unchanged. Need for her husband, like worry over him, was tuned low. Absorbed in her child and in the writing of her book, she was sunk in her affection for home. Even the signs of mutability that sometimes jolted her - the whiteness of her mother’s hair, the worn patience of her sister’s face, the morose silences of her brother-in-law, now so long and black that the women worried about him in low voice - could not more than briefly interrupt the deep security and peace. I wonder if ever again Americans can have that experience of returning to a home place so intimately known, so profoundly felt, deeply loved, and absolutely submitted to? It is not quite true that you can’t go home again. But it gets less likely. We have had too many divorces, we have consumed too much transportation, we have lived too shallowly in too many places. I doubt that anyone of my son’s generation could comprehend the home feelings of someone like Susan Ward. Despite her unwillingness to live separately from her husband, she could probably have stayed on indefinitely in Milton, visited only occasionally by an asteroid husband. Or she would have picked up the old home and remade it in a new place. What she resisted was being a woman with no real home. When frontier historians theorize about the uprooted, the lawless, the purseless, and the socially cut-off who emigrated to the West, they are not talking about people like my grandmother. So much that was cherished and loved, women like her had to give up; and the more they gave it up, the more they carried it helplessly with them. It was a process like ionization: what was subtracted from one pole was added to the other. For that sort of pioneer, the West was not a new country being created, but an old one being reproduced; in that sense our pioneer women were always more realistic than our pioneer men. The moderns, carrying little baggage of the cultural kind, not even living in traditional air, but breathing into their space helmets a scientific mixture of synthetic gases (and polluted at that) are the true pioneers. Their circuitry seems to include no domestic sentiment, they have had their empathy removed, their computers hum no ghostly feedback of Home, Sweet Home. How marvelously free they are! How unutterably deprived!

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7. The second paragraph (lines 6 – 18) serves mainly to (A) introduce the setting of Milton. (B) introduce the character of the grandmother. (C) offer the grandmother’s initial impression of Milton. (D) illustrate the timelessness the grandmother found in Milton. (E) illustrate how the grandmother felt about her family. 8. In lines 23-26, the two questions can be characterized by all of the following EXCEPT (A) rhetorical questions (B) hypothetical questions (C) sincere questions (D) the grandmother’s questions (E) unanswerable questions 9. What might “Oliver’s great revolver” (line 29) hint at in this context? (A) Oliver’s masculinity (B) Oliver’s temper (C) Oliver’s career (D) Oliver’s Western ways (E) Oliver’s bad manners 10. What is the best definition for “mutability” in the context of line 46? (A) variety (B) change (C) sorrow (D) age (E) timelessness

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11. The shift between the 4th and 5th paragraphs most accurately represents a shift from (A) a strict account of the grandmother’s visit to Milton to the narrator’s analysis of these events. (B) the narrator’s analysis of his grandmother’s letters to his questioning of her ideas. (C) the narrator’s analysis of his grandmother’s letters to his answers to the questions she raises. (D) the narrator’s assumptions about his grandmother’s visit to Milton to his own musings about the themes he touches on in these scenes. (E) the narrator’s assumptions about his grandmother’s visit to Milton to his analysis of these events. 12. The use of the word “consumed” in line 58 implies (A) that transportation was used greedily. (B) that transportation was non-renewable. (C) that transportation was purchased . (D) that transportation was used recklessly. (E) that transportation was taken for granted. 13. What does the narrator mean by the phrase “asteroid husband” in line 65? (A) a destructive husband (B) a husband she sees rarely (C) a very distant husband (D) a husband that seems alien (E) a steadfast husband 14. The narrator invokes the authority of “frontier historians” mostly in order to (A) assert the historical accuracy of his piece (B) show that the frontier historians are inaccurate in their research (C) introduce a historical presupposition he contradicts (D) show that history cannot compete with his personal experience (E) highlight his own role as a historian

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15. Why might the narrator have invoked the “process of ionization” (lines 75 – 77) as a simile in the last paragraph? (A) Ionization is a process involved in mining, thus the simile relates to Oliver’s character. (B) It gives scientific credence to his theories. (C) It summarizes his argument most succinctly. (D) It ties in with his later statements about modernity and technology. (E) It is intended as a humorous aside.

18. In this passage, what parallel might you find between the narrator and his grandmother? (A) both are shiftless (B) both are wary of change in their lives (C) both are historians in their own right (D) both prefer rural life to city life (E) both are afraid of losing their sense of family 19. What most accurately summarizes the passage’s progression?

16. How might one characterize the difference between male and female pioneers according to the narrator? (A) Female pioneers were realistic about keeping some traditions from home; male pioneers thought they were creating a new home from scratch. (B) Female pioneers sought to bring some parts of home with them; male pioneers abandoned home entirely. (C) Female pioneers sought to abandon painful memories of home; male pioneers took those memories along with them. (D) Female pioneers were unable to leave the idea of home behind; male pioneers were better equipped to do so. 17. Female pioneers were what one traditionally thinks of as a pioneer; male pioneers are more modern. What kind of tone does the narrator use to talk about the “true pioneers” (lines 85 – 89)? (A) an admiring tone (B) a disdainful tone (C) a boastful tone (D) a sarcastic tone (E) a cynical tone

© 2009 Parliament Tutors

(A) an explanation of the grandmother’s feelings to ward home; the narrator’s conclusions about how his grandmother remade her home; the narrator’s warning about the perils of modernity (B) an explanation of the grandmother’s feelings to ward home; the narrator’s conclusions about how his grandmother remade her home; the narrator’s reflection on his grandmother’s legacy of pioneering (C) scenes that portray the grandmother’s feelings to ward home; the narrator’s conclusions about how his grandmother remade her home; the narrator’s warning about the perils that face modern pioneers (D) scenes that portray the grandmother’s feelings to ward home; the narrator’s conclusions about how his grandmother remade her home; the narrator’s unease about how the modern world does not value home (E) scenes that portray the grandmother’s feelings to ward home; the narrator’s conclusions about how his grandmother remade her home; the narrator’s warning about the perils of modernity

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Section 9

time - 20 minutes 16 questions Mark your answers in the sheet provided. Insert your answers online once test is complete.

1. 720 can be written as 7.2 x 10n where n is –––––––––– . (A) 1

4. Sam drove x miles on a car trip. Kara drove “y” miles on a car the same tripe. Darin drove 20 less miles than Kara and 40 more miles than Sam. What is the relationship between x and y?

(B) 0

(A) y + x = 60

(C) 3

(B) x – y = 60

(D) 2

(C) x – y = 20

(E) None of the above

(D) y – x = 60 (E) None of above

2. Profit, or P, is given using the following equation: 5.

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(A) $500 (B) $5003 (C) $166.67 (D) both a and c (E) None of the above 3. There are 100 red, 200 blue, and 300 green balls in a bag. What is the possibility of pulling out a red ball or a blue ball?

Consider the following figure where O is center of the circle. x, y and z are different angles. If z = 40, what expression gives the correct relationship between x, y and z. (A) x < y < z (B) x < z < y

(A) 0.5

(C) y > x = z

(B) 0.33

(D) z < x < y

(C) 0.67

(E) None of the above

(D) 0.7 (E) None of the above

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9. % Change in dollar amount of sales in certain stores from 1977-1999

6. 14x + 10y = 24 What values can x and y take? (A) 1, 1

Store

1997-1998

1998-1999

(B) 6, -6

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-10

(C) both a and b

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(D) 2, -2

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(E) a, b, d

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7. Given below is the schedule of 3 drivers of their road trip from point A to point B. Average speed in this car was computed as the total distance traveled (total time spent traveling minus time taken to rest). Driver’s Name Start Sara

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Stop Avg. Speed 7:20

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Which following expression gives the correct relationship between x, y and z? (A) x < y < z (B) x > y > z (C) x > z > y (D) z < y < x

In 1999, for which of the stores was dollar amount of sale lesser than that of the others shown? (A) P (B) Q (C) R (D) S (E) Not enough information

10. A number is called a “quarterial” if it is a positive number that ends in .25. If x is a quarterial, which of the following must be true? I. 4x is an always an integer II. 5x is always a quaterial III. 3x can never be a quaterial

(E) None of above 8.

y = (x – 1) (x) (x + 1) z=x+x+x

(A) I only (B) II only (C) I, II, and III

(A) y > z

(D) I and II only

(B) y < z

(E) I and III only

(C) y = z (D) Cannot be determined (E) None of above

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11. If P and g are given as P = {2, 4, 6, 8…. 90} g = {3, 6, 9, 12…. 90}

Buses M2 and M3 start at point x M2 travels 160m east and 170m north M3 travels 170m west and 160m south

How far apart are M2 and M3 now? What is the difference between the number of elements in P and the number of elements in g?

(A) 660m (B) 233.45m

(A) 45

(C) 360m

(B) 30

(D) 466.69m

(C) 15

(E) None of above

(D) 60 15. AB is the diameter of a circle whose center is O. If the coordinates of O are (0,0) and the coordinates of B are (2,1), what are the coordinates of A?

(E) None of the above

12.

(A) (4, 2) D

C

(B) (1, .5) (C) (-2, -1)

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B

In the figure above, a circle is nestled in a square which is nestled in another circle. What is the ratio of the shaded to unshaded region? (A) 0.4599 : 2.667 (B) 0.4292 : 2.712

(E) (0, -2)

16. A certain pie recipe states that a the pie should be baked in a pan 8 inches in diameter. If Malcolm wants to apply the recipe to his pan which is the same depth, but 12 inches in diameter, by what factor should he multiply the recipe ingredients.

(C) 0.4782 : 2.996 (D) 0.4022 : 2.366

(A) 2 ½

(E) None of the above

(B) 1 ½ (C) 2 ¼

13. Sherry has 30 coins consisting of quarters and dimes that total $5.70. How many of each does she have?

(D) 1 ⅘ (E) 1 ⅓

(A) 12 quarters, 18 dimes (B) 18 quarters, 12 dimes (C) 13 quarters, 17 dimes (D) 17 quarters, 18 dimes (E) 22 quarters, 10 dimes

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Section 10

time - 10 minutes 14 questions Mark your answers in the sheet provided. Insert your answers online once test is complete. The sentences below test grammar, word choice, sentence construction, and punction. Select the option that offers the most effective and precise sentence. Select (A) if you believe the sentence in question is the best option. Example Elisa Greenberg recroded her first album and she was seventeen years old then. (A) and she was seventeen years old then (B) when she was seventeen (C) at age seventeen years old (D) upon the becoming of seventeen years old (E) at the time when she was seventeen years old A

B

C

(B) (C) (D) (E)

D

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the weight held by any other shelf on the market. the weight other shelves on the market can hold. any other shelf on the market. all other shelves on the market. any of the market’s other shelves.

2. They had forded the river successfully, but now they had the problem what to do about crossing the dense forest. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

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(A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

During Labor Day weekend last year, It was Labor Day weekend last year that The Labor Day weekend that occurred last year was when Labor Day weekend last year, Occurring last year over Labor Day weekend,

4. Because of the volume of applications we received, and so you may not hear from us for up to three weeks.

1. The new shelves can hold more weight than the weight held by any other shelf on the market. (A)

3. During Labor Day Weekend last year, a record number of West Indian immigrants celebrated their heritage in the streets of Brooklyn.

problem what to do about crossing the dense forest. problem whether they could do about crossing the dense forest. problem of crossing the dense forest. problem to cross the dense forest. problem could they cross the dense forest.

(A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

received, and so received may result in received, received; so received;

5. A recently published survey of mothers reveal the shift away from “micro-parenting” toward a more laissez-faire approach. (A) A recently published survey of mothers reveal the shift away from (B) A recently published survey of mothers reveals the shift away from (C) A recently published survey of mothers revealed that mothers shift away from (D) A survey of mothers, recently published, revealing the shift away from (E) A survey of mothers having recently been published, it reveals the shift away from 6. A change in weather helped the driver gain the edge and, around 2 p.m., a southeasterly wind picked up. (A) edge and, around 2 p.m., a southeasterly wind picked up. (B) edge when, around 2 p.m., a southeasterly wind picked up. (C) edge thus, around 2 p.m., a southeasterly wind picked up. (D) edge, that being a southeasterly wind picking up around 2 p.m.. (E) edge, it was, around 2 p.m., a southeasterly wind picked up.

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7. Even though she couldn’t remember his name, she knew they had, since meeting about a year ago, had several conversations together on at least three separate occasions. (A) they had, since meeting about a year ago, had several conversations together on at least three separate occasions. (B) they had been conversing together on at least three separate occasions since meeting about a year ago. (C) they had several conversations together, since meeting about a year ago, on at least three separate occasions. (D) they conversed together several times on at least three separate occasions since meeting about a year ago. (E) they had had several conversations together on at least three separate occasions since meeting about a year ago. 8. Several legal precedents suggest that as a bartender they are responsible for making sure their patrons do not drive home drunk. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

as a bartender they are responsible as a bartender it is their responsibility the bartender is the responsible one bartenders are responsible bartenders are to be the ones responsible

11. Newly opened trade routes and with newly increased demand for the product made it a huge success in the American market. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

(A) (B) (C) (D)

The same critics who panned her last show The same critics which panned her last show Panning her last show, the same critics As for her last show, the same critics that panned it (E) Critics panned her last show but the same critics 10. The Museo Del Prado in Madrid is one of the greatest art museums in the world, a visit to its vast collection is an essential trip for any art connoisseur.

(B) (C) (D) (E) © 2009 Parliament Tutors

The Museo Del Prado in Madrid is one of the greatest art museums in the world, The Museo Del Prado in Madrid, one of the greatest art museums in the world; The Museo Del Prado in Madrid is one of the greatest art museums in the world; The Museo Del Prado in Madrid is one of the greatest art museums in the world; thus The Museo Del Prado in Madrid is one of the greatest art museums in the world and so

with newly increased demand for the product made a newly increased demand for the product made and also demand for the product increased and made as well as increased demand for the product, making and demand for the product increased, making

12. The band, notorious for onstage antics, were banned from several clubs by the end of their tour. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

The band, notorious for onstage antics, were The band, being notorious for onstage antics, were The band, notorious for onstage antics, was The band, notorious as they were for their onstage antics, are The band, notorious for their onstage antics, has been

13. Before embarking on their roadtrip, one should have their car inspected by a qualified mechanic. (A)

9. The same critics who panned her last show were quick to lavish praise on her new work.

(A)

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(B) (C) (D) (E)

on their roadtrip, one should have their car inspected by a qualified mechanic. on one’s roadtrip, one should have your car inspected by a qualified mechanic. on your road trip, you should have your car inspected by a qualified mechanic. on your road trip, one should have one’s car inspected by a qualified mechanic. on their road trip, people should have their car inspected by a qualified mechanic.

14. The forest was razed by fires that burned with great intensity, which did not lessen for several days. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

great intensity, which did not lessen for several days. great intensity that did not lessen for several days. great intensity, not lessening for several days. great intensity, the intensity did not lessen for several days. great intensity; the intensity did not lessen for several days.

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